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FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Recommendation

Responsible Entity

Possible Funding Sources

Estimated Cost

Schedule

Provide for a variety of housing types including single family, duplexes, townhouses, apartment complexes, assisted living facilities, and independent living facilities for households.

COC, SCB, CT

DCED (HRP, CRP), FHLB (AHP)

Depends on the type and scale of development

Ongoing

Promote the public health, safety and general welfare of residents through the provision of quality housing through sound planning and appropriate enforcement of zoning, floodplain management, and building codes.

COC, SCB, CT

DCED (HRP, CRP), FHLB (AHP), Private developers

N/A

Ongoing

Guide future development to designated growth areas in order to preserve valuable agricultural lands, recreation areas, scenic vistas, and rural roads.

COC, SCB, CT

DCED (HRP, CRP), FHLB (AHP)

N/A

Ongoing

Natural Resources Goal: Protect significant natural resources such as floodplains, wetlands, steep slopes, woodlands, biological diversity areas, and watercourses. Allow the location of natural features to guide the type and intensity of future development.

COC, SCB, CT

N/A

N/A

Ongoing

Minimize negative environmental impacts related to growth and development.

COC, SCB, CT

FCPZCD, DEP

N/A

Ongoing

Prioritize the preservation and protection of significant natural resource areas.

COC, SCB, CT

DEP

N/A

Ongoing

Protect surface and groundwater resources from point and nonpoint source pollutants through adequate land development regulations.

COC, SCB, CT, DCNR

DEP, EPA

N/A

Ongoing

Prevent further intrusion of hazardous materials into groundwater or other environmentally sensitive areas.

COC, SCB, CT, DCNR, DEP

DEP, EPA

N/A

Ongoing

Chapter 13 Implementation Plan - 31 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Possible Funding Estimated Cost Schedule Sources Open Space and Agricultural Preservation Goal: Promote open space preservation that contributes to the desirable rural character of the planning area. Recommendation

Responsible Entity

Preserve open space in strategic locations across the planning area through sound planning policies and appropriate land use controls.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP

COC: included in zoning costs

Ongoing

Provide flexibility in land use controls to promote alternative or supplemental agricultural ventures.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, PSU-CE

COC: included in zoning costs

Ongoing

Encourage open space preservation through conservation easement purchase or donation.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP

Determined by size and type of development

Ongoing

Future Land Use and Growth Management Goal: Encourage growth in the Connellsville area while protecting the natural environment, maintaining visual quality and providing services and community facilities. Foster a community with a well-balanced mix of residential, commercial, industrial, open space, agricultural and public land uses that support and complement the area.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, Municipal general revenues

N/A

Ongoing

Explore multi-municipal zoning for the three communities

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, Municipal general revenues

To be determined

Middle-term

Provide for future growth in areas best suited for development that will protect and enhance the planning area’s quality of life.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, Municipal general revenues

To be determined

Middle-term

Maintain the integrity of agricultural and rural areas by limiting development and infrastructures extensions into these areas.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, Municipal general revenues

N/A

Ongoing

Use growth management techniques to preserve open space, protect environmental resources, and minimize development costs.

COC, SCB, CT

LUPTAP, Municipal general revenues, PSUCE

COC: included in zoning costs

Ongoing

Update the City of Connellsville’s Zoning Ordinance.

COC

LUPTAP

$20,000

Short-term

W:\CLIENT\PA\CONNELLSVILLE\COMP PLAN\Document\Ch 13 Implementation Chart.doc

Chapter 13 Implementation Plan - 32 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix A Connellsville City - Project Facilities Inventory and Analysis Local Recreation Facilities

Park Size

Type of Facility

Park Ownership

Facility

No.

Enhancements and Utilities

Condition

Size

ADA

Comments

Deferred maintenance plan needs developed, Playground equipment needs refurbished where justified, some needs replaced and other pieces completely removed. Tennis courts and volleyball court areas need evaluated for present-day usefulness to the community. Graffiti needs curbed. The amount of neighborhood parks needs evaluated to deem their present-day need to the community.

2nd Ward Park

1.30 acres

Neighborhood Park

Connellsville City

Pavilion

1

1 picnic table, wood structure, cement pad

Playground

1

1 modular unit, mulch base, high base retainer

Basketball Court Orientation

1

Asphalt surface, 2 standards, back boards, rims, nets, full fencing around perimeter area

Swing Set Area

1

Parking 12th St. Park

3.06 acres

Neighborhood Park

2 pre-school swings, 2 elementary swings, grass base, high retainer Along streets

Fair

10' x 10'

See Safety Audit

No No

60' x 105'

See Safety Audit

No

A nice small clean park, mild graffiti and some equipment damage; park area is fencedin Graffiti on equipment Bubble blown-out, wood covers bubble hole Side entry fence from play ground to court side is low and a hazard, fence bowed

No

Connellsville City Basketball Court North to South Orientation

1

Asphalt surfacing, 2 standards, back boards, rims, nets, full fencing

Playground

1

1 modular unit, 1 pre-school No Safety swing set, 1-elementary swing Audit set, 2 metal climbers, 1 see-saw Conducted

Baseball Field Northeast Orientation

Street Hockey Court North to South Orientation Parking

1

1

Back stop, player benches, dug outs, bleachers, press box, scoreboard, full safety fencing, diamond-cut infield

Black asphalt surface, goal lines, lights Mostly grass

Fair

50' x 85'

No

No

Needs resurfaced, has wooden backboards Lots of graffiti and damage; old metal play equipment should be pulled out and replaced; modular unit had bubble blown-out and replaced with wood

Fair

RF - 210' LF - 210' Base path - 60'

No

Lots of weeds in infield.; telephone pole in right field used to have fencing strung across it to protect apartment building, but has fallen apart

Fair

60' x 120'

No

Lights are all broken out

No

Appendix A - 1 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Austin Field

4.75 acres

Neighborhood Park

A school teacher lead a fund-raising campaign to renovate the ball field with private local funding. Consider renovating courts or replace with playground equipment

Connellsville City

Tennis Courts East to West Orientation

2

2 courts end-to-end, asphalt, nets, posts, lines, full fencing

Poor

60' x 120' ea.

No

Baseball Field Southwest Orientation

1

Full "new" fencing, infield being renovated

Good

RF - 270' LF - 210' Base path - 60'

No

Along streets

Parking

Cameron Park

1.50 acres

Neighborhood Park

Connellsville City

Basketball Court Orientation

1

Open Space

1

Parking

Connellsville Community Center

1/2 city block

Special Use

Connellsville City

Cracks in asphalt, rusty fencing, fence pole bent, net-pole are bent Constructing a "green monster" type of right field fencing-area

2 standards, backboards, rims, nets, asphalt surface, court lines, full fencing

Fair

Grass, trees, 2 park benches

Fair

60' x 105'

No

The open space are could be made more park-like and functional. Court needs resurfaced, and needs new backboards, rims, and nets No ADA parking signs

Along streets

11/2 city block

Formerly Connellsville High School - built in 1916. Formerly housed the YMCA before they moved to Mt. Pleasant

Appendix A - 2 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Office Space

Pool Changing rooms

Multiple rooms for agencies such as Fayette County Community Action, United Methodist Men, Connellsville Community Ministries, Tae Kwan Do, Twin Trees Agency, and other non-profits

Previous classrooms turned into Multiple agency offices and meeting space.

1 2

Heated water, ADA lift-chair

Fair

18' x 60' or 1,080 sq. ft water surface, 2.5' to 5' depth Day Care was Adolphae, but they moved to the South Side Floor boards warped Redevelopment authority received an (approx.) $150,000 grant to renovate the area for the arts

Day care center

Gymnasium

1

Auditorium

1

Special Use

Connellsville Little League Field

Private Connellsville Little League Association

Little League Field North Orientation Parking

East Park

12. 42 acres

Community Park

Poor

Stage Multiple spaces on side of building

Parking

2.75 acres (approx.)

Basketball court, volley ball court, mezzanine bleachers

Connellsville City

Back stop, player benches, dug outs, press box, scoreboard, full safety fencing, bleachers, grass infield, lights, mound, bathrooms 1

RF - 200' LF - 200' Base path - 60' Good

No

Weeds in infield

Approximately 50 spaces Quality facilities that are susceptible to graffiti and damage due to location and security. Very little parking for size of park

Appendix A - 3 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Pavilion #1

1

9 picnic tables, brick sides, cement floor, 1 grill, electricity

Fair

28' x 70'

Yes

Pavilion 1 & 2 are build over the creek and are build on Ibeams, both need new shingles, and both have graffiti and some damage Pavilion 1 & 2 are build over the creek and are build on Ibeams, both need new shingles, and both have graffiti and some damage

Pavilion #2

1

9 picnic tables, brick sides, cement floor, 1 grill, electricity

Fair

28' x 70'

Yes

Pavilion

1

7 picnic tables, wood structure, cement pad, receives little sunlight due to location and trees overhead, 1 grill

Fair

15' x 60'

No

Pavilion

1

Octagon brick structure

Yes

1

Fair No Safety Audit Conducted

15' x 15'

1 modular unit, 1 swing set area, 1 merry-go-round

1

Red and Green asphalt surface, lines, posts, net, full fencing

Good

60' x 120'

Yes

1

Asphalt surfacing, 2 standards, back boards, rims, nets, full fencing

Good

60' x 105'

Yes

Horseshoe Court

2

Posts, sand pits

Poor

40' post to post

No

Bocce Court

1

Fair

16, x 83'

No

Concession Building

1

Pit area, concrete border Block building built into hill side, one serving bay

Ball Field Southwest Orientation

1

Walking Path Restrooms

1 1

Stone Stage Area

1

Storage Building

1

Playground Tennis Court Northeast to Southwest Orientation Basketball Court Northeast to Southwest Orientation

Tunnel

1

1st and 3rd baseline fencing, backstop 10' fencing Asphalt surface New block building Stage, back stage, electricity, light booth Block building

Tunnel that stream runs through and a walkway

No

Poor

Fair

Needs new roof

Yes RF - 110' LF - No fence Base path -

Good Fair

No Yes Yes

Fair

20' x 60'

No

Poor

20' x 25'

No

Outfield area could serve for soccer practices or game play Graffiti on walls

Full of Graffiti Runs under hillside behind stage area, has a walkway and handrail to the other side A little ominous to look at and go through.

Appendix A - 4 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH Asphalt surface, approx. 6 spaces

Parking

Mountz Park

6.50 acres

Neighborhood Park

Connellsville City

Tennis Courts North to South Orientation

3

3 courts side buy side, green asphalt, nets, posts, lines, full fencing

Fair

60' x 120' ea.

No

Baseball Field Southwest Orientation

1

Backstop, player benches, level surface

Fair

RF - 150' LF - 250' Base path - 60'

No

Playground

1

Parking Pinnacle Park

South Side Park

2.75 acres

1.45 acres

Neighborhood Park

Neighborhood Park

2 -ADA spaces

6 swings side-by-side, 4 elementary and 2 pre-school on each end, 1 metal climber Approx. 40 spaces

See Safety Audit

Needs new playground equipment Surface cracks, fence rusty, needs resurfaced but is stable

No

Connellsville City

Park is clean Basketball Court North to South Orientation

1

Playground

2

Play Area Parking

1

2 standards, backboards, rims, nets, asphalt surface, court lines, full fencing old metal slide and swing set, 2 metal climbers, 2 side-by-side elementary swing sets Volleyball posts left standing Along streets

Poor

60' x 105'

See Safety Audit

No

No No

Connellsville City Basketball Court North Orientation

1

2 standards, backboards, rims, nets, asphalt surface, court lines, full fencing

Playground

1

1 modular unit on grass base, 2 See safety elementary and 2 preschool Audit swings, see-saw on mulch base

Pavilion

1

Volleyball Court Parking

1

Wood structure, cement pad, 1 table Posts only, grass surface Along streets

Most equipment needs pulled or replaced

Fair

Good

60' x 90'

No

No

12' x 12'

Poor

Park is fenced in Small cracks in surface, rusty fence, old wooden back boards Rusty and bent steps, hard ground surface, "S" clasps spread very wide

No No Well kept grass, lots of graffiti

Woodruff Park

6.70 acres

Neighborhood Park

Connellsville City Pavilion

1

Concession Stand

1

3 picnic tables, cement floor, wood structure Brick structure, 1 serving bay, picnic-area overhang

Fair

21' x 30'

Fair

30' x 30'

Graffiti on beams No

Graffiti on walls

Appendix A - 5 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Basketball Court East to West Orientation

2

6.63 acres

Community Park

Fair

90' x 180'

Playground

1

1 modular unit, swing set, metal slide

See Safety Audit

Softball Field Northeast Orientation

1

Back stop, player benches, dug outs, Press box, scoreboard, full fencing, bleachers, lights

Good

RF - 280' LF - 280' Base path - 65'

Public Restrooms

1

Block building, backside of concession

Fair

30' x 30'

Parking

Yough River Park

2 side-by-side courts, 4 standards, backboards, rims, nets, asphalt surface, full fencing

No

Large area that the city tried to flood to make an ice rink

No

Modular unit in poor shade, missing pieces, cement post retainers exposed, steps bent, bubbles blow-out and replaced with wood

No

Approximately 60+ in gravel lot Very nice park, lots to do, great river over view, boardwalk is a nice touch, truck traffic over head can be disturbing

Connellsville City

Pavilion #1

1

Lattice sides, cement floor, 10 picnic tables, 2 grills, electricity

Good

30' x 60'

Yes

Good

30' x 60'

Yes

Fair

15' x 15'

No

Bike Trail Access

1

Boat Ramp Area

1

Lattice sides, cement floor, 10 picnic tables, 1 grill, electricity, water faucet Wood structure, cement base, 1 picnic table Yough River Trail , asphalt through park area Cement ramp

Concession/Restroom Building

1

Crème of Trail Snack Stand

Good

30' x 60'

Yes

Band Stand

1

Good

10' x 27'

No

Horseshoe Courts

4

Fair

40' post to post

Volleyball Court

1

Wood structure Lights, back stop fencing, cement pads No net, 2 posts, grass surface

Pavilion #2

1

Pavilion (octagon)

1

Playground

1

1 modular unit with grass base, 1 metal slide, 2 elementary swings and 2 pre-school swings on ground rubberized base

Good Good

1 grill broken off

Yes

Flush facilities Some pits missing fill

Poor

No

See Safety Audit

No

Appendix A - 6 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Board Walk

1

Connellsville Connection Park

1

Yough River Trail

Yough Water Trail

6.63 acres

70 miles

132 miles

Special Use

Rail Trail

Regional Trail Corporation

Log and mortar 1 room building, interpretative signage, ramp access to entry, fireplace, museum inside

Good

15' x 20'

1

1 room stone building

Good

10' x 20'

Pavilion

1

Metal pole structure with metal roof, gravel base, 6 picnic tables, lights, electricity

Fair

20' x 40'

Open Area Parking

1 1

Grass area Along street

Colonel Crawford Cabin

1

Spring House

The 43-mile North section from McKeesport to Connellsville is owned and operated by the Regional Trail Corporation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. The 27-mile South Section is owned and operated by the Commonwealth of PA, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR), Bureau of State Parks.

A non-motorized, smooth surfaced shared-use, recreational trail for bicycling, walking, fishing and canoe access, hiking, nature study, historic appreciation, cross country skiing, picnicking, and horseback riding.

Good

70 miles

Yes, as per the Regional Trail Corporatio n

The Regional Trail Corporation was created in 1992 by Allegheny, Fayette, and Westmoreland Counties to acquire, develop and maintain Rails-toTrails projects in southwestern PA. Signs erected by the PA

Special Use

Yough Park Boat launch area at Yough River Park Parking at Yough River Park 4.65 acres

Yes

Connellsville Historical Society

Youghiogheny River

Soissons Park

Information in separate section below 61+ by boat launch area, 30+ by Horseshoe Courts

Parking Connellsville Connection Park of the Yough River Park

Hand rails are warping, some boards are splitting and need replaced

Wood structure with ramp and hand rails

Community Park

1

White water rafting, fishing boating

1 1+ by boat launch area,

Good

Yes

Good

Yes

South Connellsville Borough

Appendix A - 7 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH Tennis Court and Basketball Court North to South Orientation

1

Basketball Court North to South Orientation

1

Play ground Area

1

.39 acres

Neighborhood Park

Various playground equipment scattered in a common area

Good

60' x 120'

Good

50' x 75'

Walking Trail

1 1

Backstop, 1 player bench, mound

Poor

Ball Field #2 Southwest Orientation

1

Backstop, 1 player bench, mound

Fair

1 1

Wood structure, gravel base 4 serving bays Various areas and lots

Tennis Court has a small basketball Court at its south end

No Safety Audit Conducted Good

Ball Field #1 Northeast Orientation

Pavilion Concession Parking Hawthorn Street (Proposed Park)

Asphalt surface, lines, posts, net, full fencing, lights, 2 standards, back boards, rims, nets, full fencing Asphalt surfacing, 1 standard, back board, rim, net

Fair Fair

RF - No fence LF - No fence Base path RF - No fence LF - No fence Base path 35' x40' 35' x 40'

No

No No Yes

Connellsville Township

Vacant Lot

1

Potential park/playground/pa vilion site; identified by Township officials. Parcel id# 06-03-0038

Appendix A - 8 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix B Connellsville School District - Project Facilities Inventory and Analysis Local Recreation Facilities Senior High School (Outside facilities)

Park Size

Type of Facility

Park Ownership

School Facility

Connellsville Area School District

Back Stop

Facility

No.

Batting Cages

1

Fair

Football Field North to South Orientation

1

Good

School Facility

School Facility

Comments

Good

Located across town off of Arch St.

1

Good

1

Good

1

Good

Located across town off of Arch St.

2 4

Good Ample around the school property

Connellsville Area School District Gym Remedial Gym Wrestling room Weight/Training Room Pool

1 2 1 2 1

Practice Ball Field Practice Football Field

1 1

Connellsville Area School District Poor Fair

Not maintained

Ample around the school property

Connellsville Area School District Gym Remedial Gym

Jr. High West Trotter Athletic Fields (Outside facilities)

ADA

1

Parking Jr. High East (Inside facilities)

RF - 316' LF - 316' Base path 90'

1

Parking

School Facility

Good

Softball field Southeast Orientation

Practice Soccer Field Tennis Courts East to West Orientation

Jr. High East (Outside facilities)

Size

1

Soccer Field (same as football)

School Facility

Back Stop, dug out, player benches, safety fencing, score board Back Stop, dug out, player benches, safety fencing, score board

Condition

Baseball field East Orientation

Practice Football Field Track North to South Orientation Track Field Event Area

Senior High School (Inside facilities)

Enhancements and Utilities

1 1

Connellsville Area School District Football Field Northeast to Southwest Orientation Track

1 1

Goal posts, scoreboard, lights, small bleachers

Fair

No

Fair

No

Appendix B - 1 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH Track Field Event Area Practice Football Field

1 1

Ball Field #1 Southeast Orientation

1

Fair

RF- 360' LF - 360' Base path - 90'

No

Ball Field #2 Northwest Orientation

1

Fair

RF- 300' LF - 300' Base path - 90'

No

Ball field #3 Southwest Orientation

1

Poor

RF- No fence LF - No fence Base path - 90'

No

Connellsville Township Elementary (Outside facilities)

Connellsville Township Elementary (Inside facilities)

Zachariah Connell Elementary (Outside facilities)

Zachariah Connell Elementary (Inside facilities)

Southside Elementary (Outside facilities)

School Facility

School Facility

School Facility

School Facility

School Facility

School Facility

Fair

No No

Many weeds, fence broken down

Ample around the school property

Parking Jr. High West (Inside facilities)

Limestone millings surface

Connellsville Area School District Gym Remedial Gym Wrestling Room

1 1 1

Playground

1

Parking

1

Gym

1

Playground

1

Ball Field Parking

1 1

Gym

1

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Area School District

Appendix B - 2 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Southside Elementary (Inside facilities)

School Facility

Bullskin Elementary (Outside facilities)

School Facility

Bullskin Elementary (Inside facilities)

School Facility

Springfield Township Elementary (Outside facilities)

Springfield Township Elementary facilities)

(Inside

Clifford Pritts Elementary (Outside facilities)

School Facility

School Facility

School Facility

Playground

1

Play Grass Area Parking

1

Gym

1

Playground

1

Swing Set Area

1

Play Grass Area Ball Field Multi-Use Field Area Parking

1 1

Gym

1

Playground

1

Basketball Court Open Play Grass Area Parking

1 1

Gym

1

Playground

1

Basketball Court Open Play Grass Area Parking

1 1 1

No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted

Appendix B - 3 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH Clifford Pritts Elementary (Inside facilities)

Dunbar Township Elementary (Outside facilities)

School Facility

School Facility

Connellsville Area School District Gym

1

Playground

3

Ball Field Basketball Court

1 1

Soccer Fields

5

Connellsville Area School District No Safety Audit Conducted

1 large, 2 mid-size, 2 small-size

Parking Dunbar Township Elementary (Inside facilities)

Dunbar Borough Elementary (Outside facilities)

Dunbar Borough Elementary (Inside facilities)

Geibel Catholic High School (Outside facilities)

School Facility

Connellsville Area School District

School Facility

Connellsville Area School District

School Facility

School Facility

Gym

1

Playground

1

Play Grass Area Parking

1

Gym

1

Baseball Field Southeast Orientation

1

Back stop, dug outs, player benches, bleachers, press box, foul line fencing only

Fair

RF - No Fence LF - No Fence Base Path - 70'

No

Softball Field Northwest Orientation

1

Back stop, dug outs, player benches, bleachers, foul line fencing only

Fair

RF - No Fence LF - No Fence Base Path - 65'

No

Football/Soccer Field

1

No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Area School District

Connellsville Catholic School System

Parking

Goal Posts, score board, press box Ample around the school property

Fair

No

Appendix B - 4 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH Geibel Catholic High School (Inside facilities)

School Facility

Connellsville Catholic School System Gym

Connellsville Area Catholic Elementary (Outside facilities)

School Facility

No Safety Audit Conducted

Connellsville Catholic School System Play area

Connellsville Area Catholic Elementary (Inside facilities)

School Facility

1

Connellsville Catholic School System

1

Gym

Appendix B - 5 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix C Sample Maintenance Plan Task

Standard

Quantity

Frequency

Duration

Mow grass - riding mower

Establish a specific mowing height that grass should be mowed to. Suggested height 2 ½ inches.

x acres

1 - 2 times per week

May 1 October 1

Mow grass - push mower

Establish a specific mowing height that grass should be mowed to. Suggested height of 2 ½ inches.

x acres

1 time per week

May 1 October 1

x linear feet

Every two weeks

May 1 October 1

2 times per summer and as needed

Mid-May Mid September

2 times per week

May 1 October 1

1 time per week

October 1 April 30

2 times per week

May 1 October 1

1 time per week

October 1 April 30

String trim fence lines, equipment, trees, etc. Hand pull weeds as necessary. Pesticide application for weed control along fence lines, buildings, bleachers, benches, play equipment, sidewalks, trees, etc. Litter Pick up

Equipment inspection

Use checklist Repair hazards Report needed repairs to Parks and Recreation Director

x pieces of equipment

Ballfield Maintenance

Drag fields Fill infield holes Clean dug-outs Perform safety inspection Repair safety hazards.

x ballfields

2 Times per week

May 1 - Aug 31

Seasonal Ballfield preparation.

Specify the tasks to be performed

x ballfields

2 days per field

April and June

Basketball Courts

Litter pick-up Inspect and repair standards, rims, nets Inspect fencing and playing surface

x courts

2 times per week

April October

Appendix C - 1 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Task Tennis Courts

Sweep and Clean Asphalt surfaces.

Snow removal

Standard Litter pick-up Inspect and repair standards, nets, and hardware Inspect fencing and playing surface

Quantity

Frequency

Duration

x courts

2 times per week

April October

x sq. feet

1 time per week

May 1 October 1

1 time per month

October 1 April 30

as needed

October March

1 time per week

Year-round

2 times per week

April 1 October 1

as needed

October 1 March 31

first week of every month

April 1 October 1

x sq. feet

Playground Maintenance Safety Inspections Rake and level safety surfacing

Replenish safety surfacing

Appendix C - 2 November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix D Urban Sustainability Guidelines

Appendix D November 2009


Urban Sustainability Guidelines Prepared for City of Connellsville / Multi-Municipal Master Plan Prepared by Tim Padalino / Trail Town Outreach Corps

Purpose Statement: To identify a conceptual framework for the sustainable design, planning, and redevelopment of Connellsville’s built and natural environments – a framework which incorporates short-term and long-term efforts, all of which will help Connellsville: …to protect, conserve, and enhance the City’s and region’s natural resources; …to establish a strong connection between environment, economy, and social equity; …and to cultivate a ‘green’ community identity of Connellsville.


Environmental Sustainability • Stormwater Management o o o

Reducing impervious surfaces Implementing bio-swales and rain gardens to localize and increase stormwater infiltration Improving stormwater runoff quality and temperature

• Re-Vegetation o o o o o

Increasing tree canopy coverage in urban areas Utilizing complete forest ecology compositions in urban plantings Introducing native plant palette to urban re-vegetation projects Establishing network of ‘green walls’ on occupied, vacant, and new buildings Exploring ‘green roof’ possibilities for occupied and new buildings

Economic Sustainability • Infill Development and Adaptive Re-Use of Buildings o o o

Preserving and enhancing the historic, small-town character of Connellsville Increasing compactness, connectivity, and walkability of downtown core Utilizing the embodied energy of existing buildings

• Diversified 21-st Century Economic Landscape o o o o

Capitalizing on the great economic potential of Connellsville as a ‘destination tourism gateway’ Expanding the City’s and region’s visitor services and hospitality industries to accommodate outdoor recreation and cultural heritage industries Strengthening physical connections to and amenities for the long-distance Great Allegheny Passage rail trail Encouraging and when possible assisting local businesses in sustainable practices

Community Sustainability & Social Equity • Vacant Lot and Vacant Property Strategy o o o o o

Transitional use of vacant lots that focuses on ‘productive landscapes’ – both environmentally and economically Transitional use of vacant lots that create places for community gathering, empowerment, and capacity-building Identifying absentee/disinvested property owners towards potential acquisition of lots for civic use Identifying property owners who are interested in investing in the community and developing strategies to assist and coordinate those owners of vacant lots Developing vacant storefront transition strategy that beautifies windows in ways that celebrate and interpret the City’s and region’s cultural heritage


Environmental Sustainability The City of Connellsville has a rich history of cultural and industrial innovators and entrepreneurs. One major opportunity to extend that legacy of community success into the 21stcentury exists in the integration of environmental conservation techniques into the urban built environment. A new understanding that nature does not exist solely beyond the City’s borders – that in fact the City requires healthy natural systems for the community to function properly – creates new and exciting possibilities. By creating physical capacity throughout Connellsville’s built environment to support ecological functions or ‘environmental economies’, the City can yet again successfully capitalize on community-wide opportunities for advancement. Environmental sustainability ensures that future generations are able to fully enjoy the style and quality of life associated with being a resident of the Connellsville community.

Stormwater Management •

[Overview]: Connellsville’s location has always been primarily about the Youghiogheny River: this river valley has provided the perfect setting for a medium-sized community for over two centuries, sustaining the citizens and various industries. Community-wide stewardship of this irreplaceable natural resource is a top urban sustainability priority.

[What - Reducing impervious surfaces]: Connellsville’s urban core lacks much natural surface, resulting in significant negative impacts on the Yough River watershed. Some impervious areas may serve less-than-critical functions or no function at all. For example, several large parking lots in the downtown core and surrounding neighborhoods are often vacant or underutilized. Determining what the necessary parking capacity is for each lot and removing un-needed parking spaces will quickly help reduce the amount of impervious surface area in Connellsville. These spaces should then be replaced with ecologically functional uses, such as tree pits or “infiltration zones”.

[How - Implementing bio-swales and rain gardens to localize and increase stormwater infiltration]: By replacing impervious surfaces with ecologicallyfunctional spaces, the City can quickly reduce the negative impacts on the Yough River watershed while providing other positive impacts. Bio-swales and rain gardens are ‘infiltration zones’ that consist of specific quick-draining sub-surface materials and are planted with flood-tolerant plant species. They are designed to collect stormwater surface runoff and infiltrate the water close to where the rain falls; this more evenly recharges the underground water table. Including canopy trees can also improve the evapo-transpiration imbalance associated with impervious urban spaces. Bio-swales and rain gardens also reduce the amount of runoff that is collected by pipes – a major positive impact for the local watershed as well as the City’s infrastructure network.

[Why - Improving stormwater runoff quality and temperature]: Bio-swales and rain gardens are excellent low-cost, simple, sustainable technologies that improve overall watershed health. Instead of surface pollutants being swept into stormwater


pipes and introduced into the Yough River, the stormwater contaminants are instead filtered out by the plant roots and soil found in the infiltration zones. Importantly, that infiltration process also cools the stormwater runoff; unnaturally high runoff temperatures can pose a threat to watershed health that is equal to or greater than physical or chemical contaminants. Those unnaturally high runoff temperatures occur when rain falls on unshaded impervious surfaces, most commonly in summer. This problem is effectively addressed through strategic implementation of bio-swales.

Re-Vegetation •

[Overview]: Connellsville has a small-town character defined by compact historical buildings and large urban parks, such as East Park and Yough River Park. But outside of those green spaces, there is a lack of vegetation in the City. An opportunity exists to introduce more vegetation to horizontal and vertical surfaces in the City’s urban core. This would complement the identity of Connellsville’s large urban parks as well as strengthen the connection to the City’s regional landscape context within the Youghiogheny River watershed and Laurel Highlands region.

[Increasing tree canopy coverage in urban areas]: Shade-supplying canopy trees provide environmental and economic benefits. As they grow, they greatly reduce the urban heat island effect; the resulting lower temperatures also further help the urban evapo-transpiration imbalance. Strategically selected and positioned trees can also provide enough shade to considerably reduce operating costs of residential and commercial buildings. Developing and implementing a street tree plan for the urban core would encourage more town visits and contribute to the City’s economic vitality: numerous studies have been conducted proving that pedestrian shoppers are willing to spend more time and money in business districts that contain healthy street trees. Canopy trees can be planted as part of a larger street tree strategy; in underutilized open areas, in areas reclaimed from impervious surfaces, and on public or private lands.

[Utilizing complete forest ecology compositions in urban plantings]: Within re-vegetation areas, it is important to focus on providing a plant composition that is multi-layered wherever it is appropriate. This is composed of canopy trees, understory trees, shrub massings, and ground covers. Such a strategy enhances the environmental benefits described above, in addition to providing cover and food for urban wildlife and supplying more four-season interest and natural beauty to the City’s built environment.

[Introducing native plant palette to urban re-vegetation projects]: During the planning and design of Connellsville’s re-vegetation process, special emphasis should be given to native plant species and varieties. Plants that are native to this climate are best adapted for survival, requiring little or no ongoing irrigation or chemical fertilization. Native plants also supply the best source of food for wildlife. Additionally, a native plant palette will extend the Laurel Highlands’ vernacular ‘sense of place’ from the mountains into the City, creating a great opportunity for environmental education and appreciation.


[Establishing network of ‘green walls’ on occupied, vacant, and new buildings]: Horizontal surfaces are not the only place in which Connellsville has opportunities to use vegetation for multiple benefits. Green walls reduce the urban heat island effect (environmental); reduce the cost of operations to keep buildings cool (economic); and increase the amount of visually-pleasing spaces (social). Whether green walls are designed as a part of new buildings, or implemented onto occupied or vacant existing buildings, green walls are a relatively low-cost and low-effort improvement. A growing medium at the base of the wall is the only requirement to initiate the plants’ creeping growth; the correct species are resilient enough to grow up vertical surfaces with little or no aid. Some species freely attach to the building without damaging the structural integrity of brick or mortar. Other species are better attached to a steel, wire, or mesh grid that runs vertically up the building, providing a safe medium onto which the creeping plant material can attach. All species are low-maintenance or no-maintenance, providing easy multi-dimensional benefits and enjoyment. The two most appropriate species that safely attach directly to the building are the native “Virginia Creeper” - Parthenocissus quinquefolia and the non-native “Boston Ivy” Parthenocissus tricuspidata. Another native species, Clematis virginiana , requires a structure on which it can climb but provides a fragrant bloom of white flowers in the fall.

[Exploring ‘green roof’ possibilities for occupied and new buildings]: Green roofs, like canopy shade trees and green walls, are an excellent technology for improving urban sustainability. They reduce stormwater runoff and can greatly improve the energy efficiency of a building, contributing to financial savings through reduced operating costs. Green roofs also provide habitat and food for birds, and can often be designed to incorporate usable space for the building occupants. Although green roofs provide these considerable benefits, they are often significantly more technical and cost-intensive than other sustainability initiatives. Due to the weight of plant materials, soil, and water absorbed by the growing medium, some historical buildings may not possess the necessary level of structural integrity required to safely implement green roof technology. Every building is unique, and a professional consultant is required to assess the green roof potential of any particular building. A number of buildings in Connellsville’s urban core may be eligible for green roof applications, and new development projects can easily incorporate green roof technology into the project’s conceptual development and construction drawings.


Economic Sustainability The City of Connellsville has a remarkable legacy of prosperity. In recent generations, that legacy has been slowly eroding as a function of the gradual socio-economic transition away from industry and extractive resource development. But with a strong sense of community pride, a strong work ethic, and a wealth of educational and other civic institutions in our region, the City and the region possess numerous valuable building blocks to restore economic momentum and revitalize the community. Connellsville is uniquely equipped to re-position its socio-economic foundation based on a strategy of developing a diverse and sustainable array of jobs and businesses. The opportunity to pioneer ‘green-collar’ workforce development can be realized through partnering with civic and educational agencies to re-train the already-skilled work force for emerging job opportunities. The ‘greening’ of conventional industries creates vast job opportunities: instead of only manufacturing mining equipment and other conventional products, local and regional enterprises can manufacture wind turbines, solar panels, and geo-thermal equipment. Instead of mining and timbering the mountains, growth in the service and hospitality industries can provide world-class options for visitors who come from near and far to appreciate the four seasons of natural heritage and the rich cultural heritage unique to the Laurel Highlands. Whether the City’s best opportunities exist with ‘green-collar’ industrial workforce development; outdoor recreation tourism, cultural heritage tourism, and eco-tourism; or some equitable combination of the two, sustainable economic development can occur in Connellsville and the Laurel Highlands region through the thoughtful merger of economy and environment.

Infill Development and Adaptive Re-Use of Buildings •

[Overview]: Connellsville contains a substantial volume of historic building stock. While these buildings are in a wide array of conditions – from restored and occupied to neglected and vacant – a tangible opportunity exists to rehabilitate and reuse many existing buildings, and to supplement that effort with context-sensitive infill development. In doing so, Connellsville can retain and enhance its charming small-town character through a renewed commitment to revitalizing the City’s historical urban fabric.

[Preserving and enhancing the historic, small-town character of Connellsville]: Connellsville’s urban core retains much of the historic small-town identity that distinguishes it from other communities. While sprawl development and disinvestment by property owners have threatened the downtown’s vitality, many opportunities exist to intentionally preserve and enhance Connellsville’s historic ‘Main Street’ appeal. A healthy downtown is a core component of a prosperous community and region. Connellsville’s “Rebirth of a Community: Building & Design Guidelines” plan helps to illustrate the values and processes of the Main Street program, which aims to strengthen


the connections between an attractive built environment, sustained economic vitality, and a high quality of life. The City should utilize this blueprint for enhancing its identity. •

[Increasing compactness, connectivity, and walkability of downtown core]: A compact, pedestrian-friendly, and bicycle-friendly downtown are key qualities necessary for enhancing Connellsville’s attractive Main Street community identity. The downtown district should retain and enhance those urban qualities that distinguish it from other districts and neighborhoods. Safe and well-signed physical connections are a key component in making Connellsville a welcoming destination for those who travel by means other than automobile. Identifying non-vehicular gateways - such as the Amtrak Station and the Great Allegheny Passage’s northern and southern trail access areas – and providing top-notch signage, directions, and information at these strategic locations will increase the number of visits to downtown Connellsville. A digital kiosk may be the best application for this type of visitor services, regardless of whether the visitors are from Pittsburgh or Paris.

[Utilizing the embodied energy of existing buildings]: While sustainable design, operations, and maintenance of new development projects are all valuable, there is perhaps no better example of a ‘green’ building’ than those that have been restored and are being adaptively reused. The embodied energy contained within the materials and construction of existing buildings can be staggering; to ‘recycle’ these buildings and give them new purpose is to truly ‘go green’ at an impactful scale. Architectural, engineering, and construction consultants can work with property owners to determine which buildings in the urban core are reclaimable, and how much restoration work is necessary to return the buildings to a functional state. This effort is essential if Connellsville is to retain the compact urban fabric and historical ‘Main Street’ appeal of the downtown district.

Diversified 21-st Century Economic Landscape •

[Overview]: Identifying the overlapping linkages between the City’s and region’s economy and natural environments will greatly help Connellsville forge a new path of prosperity. At that intersection of economic development and environmental stewardship lays the next threshold of job growth and business expansion. While ‘green-collar’ jobs and destination tourism will not solely provide the solutions for Connellsville’s socio-economic challenges, they are key components of a larger sustainable economic revitalization process.

[Capitalizing on the great economic potential of Connellsville as a ‘destination tourism gateway’]: Connellsville is located at the gateway between the Pittsburgh metro area and the rural Laurel Highlands. This pivotal location creates a broad set of opportunities for entrepreneurs who are inspired to provide services and/or hospitality to the growing number of people who are interested in visiting Pittsburgh and the Laurel Highlands – including those who are using the railroad to reach Connellsville.


Within a day’s drive are a nearly unmatched variety and wealth of destinations. Cultural attractions - such as the Frank Lloyd Wright architectural commissions, Youghiogheny Glass Factory, and French and Indian War sites – pair perfectly with natural attractions such as Ohiopyle State Park, the Youghiogheny River, Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail, and Laurel Caverns. Connellsville can redefine itself as a ‘home-base’ destination for visitors of all demographic types who wish to spend one night, one weekend, or one week exploring Connellsville and the surrounding Laurel Highlands region. Connellsville’s proximity to Pittsburgh and relative proximity to other metropolitan areas such as Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and Cleveland help advance those sustainable economic development opportunities. The strong combination of an authentic historic identity, a variety and wealth of attractions, and a location among several metropolitan areas makes Connellsville poised to strategically capitalize on its soaring potential as a ‘destination tourism gateway’. •

[Expanding the City’s and region’s visitor services and hospitality industries to accommodate outdoor recreation and cultural heritage tourism]: With Connellsville’s central location among a wealth of attractions, many opportunities exist to increase the number of jobs and businesses in the service and hospitality industries. Currently there is a major service gap resulting in the need to develop a variety of overnight accommodations: boutique hotel, hostel, and bed and breakfast options all represent feasible examples of entrepreneurial investments that will pay dividends. The number of visitors to the Laurel Highland region is staggering: The Great Allegheny Passage sees 750,000 visits annually; Ohiopyle State Park sees over 1.5 million visits per year; and Fallingwater hosts over 120,000 visits annually. Connellsville is positioned to capture some of those visitors by introducing a variety of accommodations options. Additionally, the opportunities associated with outdoor recreation tourism are also very compelling. With both the Youghiogheny River and the Great Allegheny Passage passing right through town, there is potential for expanding services in terms of gear rental and sale, gear service and repair, and shuttling assistance. The amount and proximity of public lands, including State Game Lands, State Forests, State Parks, and National Park Service lands, create enormous potential to grow the outdoor recreation service sector. These economic development opportunities are compounded by the four distinct seasons that occur in the Laurel Highlands region.

[Strengthening physical connections to and amenities for the long-distance Great Allegheny Passage rail trail]: Connellsville is the only City on the Passage between McKeesport, PA and Frostburg, MD. Additionally, Connellsville is perfectly located to become the first overnight destination for Passage riders who are travelling east from the trailhead in McKeesport (43 miles away) or the trail access area in Boston, PA (39 miles away). With the amount of Passage users growing rapidly since the rail-trail was connected to the C&O Canal Towpath in Cumberland, MD, the timing has never been better for entrepreneurial investment in - and municipal support for - the Passage. As part of the Trail Town Program, Connellsville can continue to “reap the economic benefits of trial-based tourism and recreation as part of a larger, coordinated approach to regional economic development”. The 2008 Phase 2 Economic Impact Study revealed that Passage users supplied the regional Trail Town community with $12 million in


direct spending, and also directly contributed to over $3 million in wages for the regional Trail Town community. Strengthening the physical connections between the rail trail and the downtown businesses is a guaranteed catalyst for economic development! A coordinated approach towards improving signage and way-finding amenities for bicyclists and pedestrians is critical to increasing the amount of visits to Connellsville’s downtown businesses. Along with clear and compelling signage, bicycle lanes that are safe and well-marked are another example of a physical connection that is currently lacking. In addition, urban design elements including landmarks and arrival thresholds will further help create a clear and welcoming transition from trail to town. •

[Encouraging and when possible assisting local businesses in sustainable practices]: From improving energy efficiency to reducing landfill-bound waste, all businesses in Connellsville and other Trail Towns should transition to sustainable practices whenever applicable and feasible. Non-reusable and non-recyclable materials (such as styrofoam) should be rapidly phased out; recycled materials should be introduced. A growing share of the conventional market is aware of the need to operate our homes and businesses more sustainably. This emerging, wide-spread attitude is beginning to impact the ways in which consumers spend their dollars; people are becoming more thoughtful about which businesses they do (or don’t) support, preferring to support business ventures that are thoughtful about the way they are using energy and material resources. The businesses that best respond to this emerging consumer trend will be best positioned to capture the most amounts of destination tourism dollars. A regional survey is currently underway which will help determine the consumer interest in ‘green businesses’. The goal of the survey is to understand what steps consumers are willing to take to support businesses that are committed to sustainable practices: if they are willing to pay more (and if so, how much); and if consumers will alter their travel plans or travel further to support a ‘green business’; and other factors.


Community Sustainability & Social Equity Vacant Lot and Vacant Property Strategy •

[Overview]: Connellsville contains numerous underutilized, vacant, or derelict properties in and around the urban core. The City has an opportunity to develop a strategic plan for these properties that currently detract from Connellsville’s historic small-town charm and restrict the City from realizing its potential for community revitalization. Many of the vacant properties in Connellsville can be managed and utilized in a coordinated way that creates multiple benefits. Instead of blighted properties that provide no service to the community, these spaces can once again be utilized – potentially in ways that support productive and sustainable initiatives. In addition to environmental and social benefits of reclaiming and restoring vacant properties, there are also strong economic incentives. A 2006 citywide study conducted in Philadelphia showed that derelict land decreased the value of neighboring property by 20%, while green and well-maintained formerly vacant land not only captured the initial decrease in property value but added an additional 17% in value - resulting in a total property value increase of 37%. (Wachter, S., Gillen, K.C., 2006) When possible, the City should work with property owners to either explore conventional strategies, or perhaps explore less conventional vacant property strategies that may provide transitional, semi-permanent, or long-term solutions.

[Transitional use of vacant lots that focuses on ‘productive landscapes’ – both environmentally and economically]: The majority of vacant lots in Connellsville result from a lack of investment or outright disinvestment; reaching out to land owners to collaborate on strategies for those vacant lots may not necessarily produce results. In those instances, a strategy of temporary or transitional uses could be explored to determine what short-term uses can be applied to vacant lots in the City. Of particular relevance are strategies that create productive uses on currently vacant lots. These vacant lots create great opportunities to explore the overlap between environmental and economic benefits: uses that re-introduce environmental systems to the urban area while simultaneously generating ‘economies of the environment’. Primary examples of ecological services that create value include community gardens comprised of productive crops (such as bio-fuels, flowers for sale, or fruit and vegetable produce for donation to community food banks) and nurseries that grow canopy trees to later be re-sold or utilized in a street tree program.

[Transitional use of vacant lots that create places for community gathering, empowerment, and capacity-building interactions]: In addition to transitional uses of vacant lots that generate ecological services of value, strategies that create places of usable community space should also be explored. The opportunity exists to transform spaces that have been dormant and neglected into spaces that foster community interaction and empower community members through


the sharing of space, time, and ideas. Although this approach is unconventional, the possibility to develop productive, welcoming, and attractive spaces remains a compelling alternative regarding the numerous vacant lots in Connellsville. Building on the strong legacy of the City’s urban parks (such as East Park and Yough River Park), a network of gathering spaces or ‘urban parklets’ throughout the urban core would help to redefine and refresh Connellsville’s image. •

[Identifying absentee/disinvested property owners towards the potential acquisition of lots/properties for civic use]: Regardless of the strength and appropriateness of any conceptual strategy to address Connellsville’s network of vacant properties, the overall feasibility is perhaps the most relevant factor. The City of Connellsville needs to identify which property owners are non-interested or non-cooperative in terms of restoring Connellsville’s built environment to its full potential. In doing so, the City can develop a realistic strategy to acquire properties which can be reclaimed towards ultimately increasing the quality of life for Connellsville community members, visitors, and potential entrepreneurs. If the City is unable or uninterested in formally acquiring property, a ‘community re-development’ group could be formed based on cooperative interests and investments. Community development groups have been catalysts for neighborhood and city revitalization in many different areas of Southwest PA; Connellsville could be the next example of a community organizing itself to take productive action when the governing authority is unable or unwilling to do so.

[Identifying property owners who are interested in re-investing in the community and developing strategies to assist and coordinate those owners of vacant lots]: Similar to the process of inventorying which currently-vacant properties are held by non-interested or non-cooperative owners, the City should also strategically determine which currently-vacant properties are owned by individuals who want to achieve sustainable goals with their properties but are perhaps limited from taking action due to tangible or intangible reasons. If or when such a group of property owners is identified, the City should collaborate with those property owners towards developing a strategy for their currently-vacant properties that pursues environmental, economic, or social sustainability goals. Professional or financial assistance, as well as strategic coordination among property owners, may be necessary to catalyze action and create positive results that benefit the entire Connellsville community.

[Developing vacant storefront transition strategies that beautify windows in ways that celebrate and interpret the City’s and region’s heritage]: Transforming vacant storefronts from neglected and unsightly spaces into attractive public displays is one initiative that requires relatively small amounts of time and energy, but can potentially create a considerable positive impact. Thoughtfully placing donated exhibits in vacant storefronts would create a welcoming, positive atmosphere for people who are visiting the downtown and would also attract greater numbers of people who are currently not visiting downtown Connellsville.


Importantly, such a storefront campaign would create an excellent opportunity to engage local and regional youth who may be inspired or required to contribute to community revitalization efforts. Historical maps, photographs, collages of local and regional attractions, and other interpretive displays of the area’s cultural and natural heritage are all great examples of storefront display options. Art exhibits could also be incorporated to further create interest and a sense of discovery while supporting regional artists and gaining them valuable exposure.

Economic Sustainability

Community Sustainability

Environmental Sustainability

Conclusion: By necessity, all of the initiatives outlined and described in this document have been classified into one of the three above categories. But virtually all of those initiatives share something in common with the other two categories: the overlap between the environment, our economy, and the social equity of our communities is where most of these initiatives truly exist. Finding the appropriate balance and relationship between each of these three elements of sustainability is critical for each community – and every sustainability plan will look different. Some initiatives will have a higher priority as determined by feasibility, time constraints, funding limitations or opportunities, volunteer support, public opinion, resistance or support from elected officials, and many other factors. Understanding the context within which these sustainability goals exists is the first step to implementing these urban sustainability guidelines.


Environmental Sustainability:

Reducing Impervious Surfaces Connellsville’s vast amount of impervious surfaces - most notably the surface parking lots - are problematic for the community’s environmental systems. Many of these lots can be partially reduced in size to allow implementation of strategically placed rain gardens, bio-swales, and other types of re-vegetated infiltration zones. This introduction of ecologically functional materials and processes into sterile urban spaces is a high-priority sustainability initiative. Below: Location of downtown impervious parking lots. Several of these large lots are owned by the City ( ), creating a critical mass of land ownership - and a good opportunity for large-scale design improvements and best management practice upgrades for Connellsville’s urban built environment. Over time, structured parking can replace surface parking. This would help to recreate a dense urban fabric and provide groundlevel retail and office space - all while providing adequate parking opportunities for the City’s citizens, workers, and visitors.


Environmental Sustainability:

Bio-Swale and Rain Garden Infiltration Zones Infilitration zones provide cost-effective improvements towards multiple environmental issues while simultaneously reducing the burden on the City’s dated infrastructure systems. By replacing the lowest or downhill areas of a parking lot (or other impervious surface) with a linear strip of permeable ground materials and native plants, stormwater runoff can be cleaned, cooled, and locally returned to the underground aquifer.

Below: Potential locations for bio-swale implementation. By identifying the amount and location of underused or unneeded parking space, property owners can strategically reduce impervious surface areas and introduce infilitration zones. Stormwater runoff naturally follows gravity; as such, a relatively small rain garden can mitigate much larger impervious areas if the infilitration zone is properly sited, designed, and constructed. Together, these small investments can create major improvement.


Environmental Sustainability:

Re-Vegetation of Urban Spaces Connellsville’s urban built environment is ripe for a major increase of green matter in the form of canopy trees, understory trees, shrubs, and ground covers. By transforming portions of underused parking lots into venues for native plant spacies, the community can benefit from four seasons of beauty in previously unattractive spaces. Urban plantings also provide tangible benefits: they reduce the urban heat island effect, which can lower the cost to operate a building; and they provide aesthetic and calming qualities that cause visitors to spend more of their time and money downtown. Below: Potential areas for urban re-vegetation strategy. Along with potential infilitration zones (blue), this diagram illustrates key areas for an urban re-vegetation strategy (green). Emphasis was placed on introducing plants to large impervious areas to reduce the heat island effect and on locating plants along street corridors and at focal points to help create a more attractive urban streetscape.


Environmental Sustainability:

Green Roofs and Green Walls These newer technologies can represent a larger investment, but also provide substantial sustainability paybacks. Green roofs can greatly reduce operating costs for a building while also functioning to capture stormwater for re-use and reducing stormwater runoff impacts on the community’s watershed and infrastructure systems. Green walls represent a relatively smaller investment, but also provide value through reducing the urban heat island effect and providing habitat, forage, and beauty to the urban environment. Below: Possible opportunities for green roof installation. Along with stormwater infilitration (blue) and re-vegetation (green) opportunities, this diagram depicts possible opportunities to install green roofs (bright green) in the City’s urban core. The highlighted opportunities are purely conceptual. Selected buildings include newer construction and larger owners, such as a municipality or banking institution. All potential green roof installation projects require professional consultation.


Environmental Sustainability:

Conceptual Rendering

Green Alleys and Streetscapes

A D B

C E

A

Green Wall

B

Rain Barrels

C

Native Understory Plants

D

Native Canopy Trees

E

Permeable Paver Parking


Environmental Sustainability:

Conceptual Rendering

Green Parking Lot

A

A B

C D

A

Native Canopy Trees

B

Bio-Swale Infiltration Zones

C

Native Understory Trees

D

Native Ground Cover


Environmental Sustainability:

Conceptual Rendering

Urban Re-Vegetation with Native Plants

A B

A C B D

A

Native Canopy Trees

B

Native Shrubs

C

Native Ground Cover

D

Bio-Swale Infiltration Zone


Acknowledgements

Student Conservation Association The Student Conservation Association (SCA) is building the next generation of conservation leaders and inspiring lifelong stewardship of our environment and communities by engaging young people in hands-on and minds-on service to the land and our communities.

Trail Town Program The Trail Town Program is a special project of The Progress Fund, a non-profit lender to businesses in the travel and tourism industry. The Trail Town concept was developed by the Allegheny Trail Alliance in conjunction with The Progress Fund and other key partners to realize the economic potential of the Great Allegheny Passage.

Trail Town Outreach Corps The Trail Town Outreach Corps is a hands-on and minds-on service internship focused on opportunities for local communities to strategically pursue the relatively undeveloped niche of "rural sustainability" within the larger regional pursuit of sustainable economic development and community revitalization.

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources This project was financed in part by a grant from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program, Environmental Stewardship Fund, under the administration of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation.

Connellsville Redevelopment Authority Located in the historic downtown of Connellsville, the Redevelopment Authority works towards the revitalization and beautification of the City of Connellsville. The CRA has provided valuable logistical support towards the completion of this project.


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix E Large shade Trees ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Acer rubrum ‘Franksred’ - Red Sunset Red Maple Acer x freemanii ‘Armstrong’ - Armstrong Freeman Maple Aesculus hippocastanum - Horse Chestnut Cercidiphyllum japonecum Tree FormKatsura Tree Corylus colunra (tree form) - Turkish Hazel or Turkish Filbert Eucommia ulmoides - Hardy Rubber Tree Ginkgo biloba (any male variety) - Ginkgo Gleditsia triacanthos (any thornless, seedless, variety) - Honeylocust Gymnocladus dioicus (male variety only) Kentucky Coffeetree Koelreuteria paniculata - Goldenrain Tree

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Liriodendron tulipifera - Tulip Tree Nyssa sylvatica - Blackgum Platanus x acerifolia ‘Bloodgood’ Bloodgood London Planetree Quercus phellos - Willow Oak Quercus rubra - Northern Red Oak Quercus palustris - Pin Oak Sophora japonica - Scholartree Tilia tomentosa - Silver Linden Ulmus parvifolia – Lacebark Elm/Chinese Elm Ulmus Hybrids – disease resistant trees like ‘Homestead’, ‘Pioneer’, ‘Regal’, and ‘Urban’ (limited quantities) Zelkova serrata - Zelkova

Smaller trees for under utility lines ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Acer ginnala – Amur Maple 15’-20’ Acer tataricum – Tatarian maple 15’-25’ Crataegus crus-galli var.‘Inermis’ – Thornless cockspur hawthorn (15’-20’) Crataegus laevigata ‘Superba’ – Crimson Cloud hawthorn (15’-20’) Magnolia stellata – Star Magnolia (10’-20’) Acer buergeranum – Trident Maple (20-30’) Acer campestre – Hedge maple (25’-40’) Acer campestre ‘Evelyn’ – Queen Elizabeth hedge maple (30’-40’) Acer griseum – Paperbark Maple (25’-35’) Amelanchier laevis ‘Cumulus’ or “Majestic’ – Apple Serviceberry (20’-30’) Amelanchier x grandiflora – Serviceberry (20’-30’) Carpinus caroliniana – American Hornbeam (20’-35’) Cercis canadensis – Eastern Redbud (25’30’)

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

ƒ

Cornus kousa – Kousa Dogwood (20’-30’) Crataegus phaenopyrum – Washington hawthorn (20’-30’) Crataegus viridis ‘Winter King’ – Green hawthorn (25’-30’) Magnolia ‘Galaxy’ – Galaxy Magnolia (20’30’) Malus ‘Spring Snow’ tree form – Spring Snow Crabapple (25’-30’) Prunus sargentii – ‘Columnar’ – Sargent cherry (30’) Prunus serrulata ‘Amanogawa’, ‘Kwanzan’ – Japanese cherry (25’-35’) Prunus virginiana ‘Shubert’ – Shubert Chokecherry (20’-30’) Sorbus species – Mountain Ash (15’-35’) Syringa reticulata ‘Summer Snow’, ‘Ivory Silk’ – Japanese Tree lilac (20’-25’)

Appendix E November 2009


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix F Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza

Appendix F November 2009


SCHEMATIC DESIGN PROPOSAL

OVERVIEW The overall strategy of our proposal is connecting two key assets that pass through Connellsville: the Great Allegheny Passage bicycle trail and the Amtrak rail service. In order to connect these assets, we propose creating a civic plaza which enhances the pedestrian corridor from the Amtrak station to City Hall while also creating pedestrian and cyclist connections across the Youghiogheny River. Harnessing these two assets

INFILL MIXED USE FESTIVAL PLAZA

could create an eco-tourist driven economic engine that spurs development for the rest of downtown Connellsville. This strategy came from a previous community design charrette that examined the larger Laurel Highlands context. The main conclusion from this charrette was that Connellsville is uniquely located to be the hub of Laurel Highlands’ activity. Having a train station capable of unloading the baggage car (including bicycles) is instrumental to this strategy. This will immediately connect Connellsville to the growing market of outdoor recreation opportunities in Western Pennsylvannia.

AMTRAK STATION

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE OVERLOOK PLAZA

A

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ac

m

for

A

sp

at

pl

55

0’

g(

55

in

rk

pa

Connellsville Proximity Map enue

Witter Av

AMTRAK STATION with 550’ platform

B

PUBLIC AMENITIES

C

PLAZA / PARKING GARAGE

Church

B

ley

W N Al

including public restrooms, information kiosks, & phones

sub-surface parking with above-grade festival plaza Arch Str

eet one way

C

PEDESTRIAN CROSSWALKS stained concrete with metal medallion depicting seal of Connellsville

eet

Water Str

D

E

MIXED USE INFILL BUILDINGS

>

commercial storefronts with offices and/or residential top floors

eet

Peach Str

D

F

E

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE cantilevered bridge for cyclists & pedestrians

G

Hotel

RIVER OVERLOOK plaza space with overlook structure

g You

E ey

hio

Grape All

ny

ghe

E .

er

Riv

Fire Dept

eet

Apple Str

Orchard

Alley

Street two

reet

< Water

1st St

City Hall

way

>

G F Crawford Avenue

N

Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza 125 East Charles Street Suite 116

Muncie

Indiana 47305 765-760-1050

www.thestudiothree.com


A + B. THE NEW CONNELLSVILLE

AMTRAK STATION + AMENITIES A. AMTRAK STATION The proposed Amtrak station by will have a 550’ platform to unload the baggage car. This will increase the ease of traveling by train to Connellsville and consequently, the number of travelers as well. Access to the baggage car is critical for those tourists coming to access the Great Allegheny Passage with their bicycles.

B. PUBLIC AMENITIES

AMTRAK STATION

This is where the tourist’s experience of the City begins. It is imperative that the City make arrival welcoming and coherent with the rest of Connellsville. One way of making this arrival welcoming is to provide public amenities. These amenities should include restrooms and an informational system that helps visitors navigate Connellsville - especially to the Great Allegheny Passage. This could be the place to advertise specific cultural features or other “don’t miss” opportunities in Connellsville including vital services such as dining, lodging, medical, and other amenities.

rk

pa es)

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for

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55

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55

in

AMTRAK STATION PARKING

venue Witter A AMTRAK STATION

CITY FUNDED AMENITY BUILDING

Church lley

WNA

TRAIN PLATFORM

Arch S treet

tr Water S eet one wa

FESTIVAL PLAZA PARKING

y

N

>

h Street

Peac

PRECEDENTS OF TRANSIT STATIONS IN SIMILAR CONTEXTS

This transit facility in Charlottesville, Virginia combines the city’s visitor’s center, public restrooms, bicycle parking, city bus terminal, and Amtrak services all under one roof. This facility

Adjacent to one of two regional rail stations in Wittenburg, Germany is a covered bicycle parking area. This acknowledgement of multi-modal transit is critical to promoting sustainable and

anchors the city’s pedestrian mall and is adjacent to a sheltered amphitheater that creates a regional draw for visitors.

healthy communities.

This covered shelter allows for the interface between bicycle, pedestrian, and tram service in Almere, Netherlands.

This modern tram stop welcomes passengers to and from the financial district of Milan, Italy.

Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza 125 East Charles Street Suite 116

Muncie

Indiana 47305 765-760-1050

www.thestudiothree.com


C. THE NEW CONNELLSVILLE

FESTIVAL PLAZA The proposed Festival Plaza serves several important functions. One function is a visual terminus from the train station. It will act to draw the recently disembarked tourists towards the heart of the city. Its prime function, however, is a mutli-use space that lies adjacent to a church, apartments, and proposed mixed-use buildings. The proposed Plaza will feature a statuary commemorating “Braddock’s Road” and encampment - a campaign

FESTIVAL PLAZA

that brought George Washington and David Boone through the area. There will also be covered seating areas and a landmark element of a spire. This could be a flexible landmark that utilized for a host of seasonal functions: a Christmas tree, a Maypole, flagpole on Independance Day, etc.

AFTER: proposed festival plaza looking south along Arch Street

Ch ley

W N Al Arch St reet

y

et one wa

re Water St

N d site

>

propose

Peach S BEFORE: looking south along Arch Street

OPTION #2 : PARKING GARAGE As new commercial development along the waterfront is being proposed, providing adequate parking is necessary. Removing some surface parking to fill the gaps of the urban SPIRE

fabric means concentrating parking in easy-to-find areas. One solution could be a parking garage in the current surface parking area. The parking garage would serve the adjacent church as well as near-by businesses and the general public.

STATUARY COVERED SEATING

OPTION #2 with parking garage

Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza 125 East Charles Street Suite 116

Muncie

Indiana 47305 765-760-1050

www.thestudiothree.com


D + E. STRENGTHENING URBAN FABRIC + CREATING COHERENT

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION A key component to physically connecting the Amtrak station with City Hall is creating a continuous fabric between the two. This involves several things - infilling the “missing teeth” (or vacant blocks), a pedestrian-friendly streetscape and consistent paving patterns.

MIXED USE INFILL DEVELOPMENT

We propose the infill development to be mixed-use : retail uses on the ground floor with either residential or office uses on the upper floors. By having several different uses in the same area, it prolongs the time period over which people are occupying the space. This helps contribute to the sense of vibrancy that makes urban areas attractive. A pedestrian-friendly streetscape includes such things as appropriate lighting, signage, landscape features, and crosswalks.

eet Arch Str

eet Water Str

FESTIVAL PLAZA

one way

>

eet

Peach Str

NEW STREET PAVING MIXED-USE INFILL Hotel

MIXED-USE INFILL ey

Grape All

MIXED-USE INFILL

LANDSCAPE BUFFER

Fire Dept.

N < Water

BEFORE : typical streetscape

City Hall

Stre

AFTER : looking south along Water Street

AFTER : looking north along Water Street

PRECEDENTS OF PEDESTRIAN-FRIENDLY STREETSCAPES IN SIMILAR CONTEXTS

Clean, minimal lines define this combination of street lighting, street signage, banners, and traffic signals in Greenville, South Carolina.

Wayfinding to parking can be difficult for many users. In this city owned lot in Mount Pleasant, Michigan, however, the number of spaces available as well as the variety of ten and two hour enforced spaces is clearly marked and has an attractively defined edge.

Defining a cross-walk midblock involves a number of safety issues. In this example, the paving pattern and color, trees, and lighting stanchions mark the crossing for both pedestrians and motorists.

Most European cities and towns choose modular units for their city sidewalks as they drain quickly, and can be easily removed and replaced in the interests of maintenance and access to utilities. This elegant pattern of granite pavers is found in Nuremburg, Germany.

Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza 125 East Charles Street Suite 116

Muncie

Indiana 47305 765-760-1050

www.thestudiothree.com


F + G. CONNECTING ACROSS THE RIVER

BRIDGE + OVERLOOK The proposed pedestrian bridge will be cantilevered from the existing Crawford Avenue bridge. The intention is to provide a safe and aesthetically pleasing connection across the river. To further push Connellsville into becoming a “bike town”, it is necessary to make navigating the city by bicycle easer, safer,and more desireable. PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

The overlook is set-up to do a variety of tasks : to allow convenient access to the Youghiogheny River, to act as a visual lure from the Amtrak Station, and to offer another venue for civic activities. Creating a variety of public plazas in both scale and design allows a wide range of events to be hosted in proximity to one another. It also creates the opportunity to hold multiple civic events simultaneously and within sight of one another.

OVERLOOK PLAZA

BEFORE : looking west along crawford avenue

1st S treet

REHAB EXISTING BUILDING (RETAIL OR FOOD)

HONEY LOCUST STAINED CONCRETE AUTUMN BLAZE MAPLE PERENNIAL BED

BICYCLE RACKS

N AFTER : looking west towards overlook plaza along crawford avenue & pedestrian bridge

OPTION #1: overlook plaza

AFTER : looking east from overlook toward Amtrak Station & mixed use development

OPTION #2: overlook plaza

HONEY LOCUST LILLY BED

STAINED CONCRETE PERENNIAL BED GRASS BICYCLE RACKS

AUTUMN BLAZE MAPLE

BEFORE : looking east toward Amtrak Station

PRECEDENTS OF PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES IN SIMILAR CONTEXTS

This cantilevered pedestrian bridge in Muncie, Indiana connects downtown with a local cultural center.

This pedestrian oriented bridge in Greenville, South Carolina combines a minimalistmodern design aesthetic with advanced suspension engineering, contacting the riverbed below with a small number of pylons.

This cantilevered pedestrian lane attached to a roadway bridge successfully connects

This riverfront park in Cologne, Germany features a climbable bronze abstraction of the Rhine river valley.

the Naperville, Illinois riverwalk to a portion of the downtown business district.

Schematic Design for Connellsville Civic Plaza 125 East Charles Street Suite 116

Muncie

Indiana 47305 765-760-1050

www.thestudiothree.com


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix G Quick-test Calculations

Appendix G November 2009


Connellsville Five-Mile Capture Area Gapture Rate Analysis

Rents Type 1 Bedroom 1 Bedroom 1 Bedroom

Rent

lncome Limits

40yo

,138

50o/o

547 657

6Oo/"

Total

1 Person 2 Person 40%$ 17,520 $ 20,000 so%$ 21,900 $ 25,ooo 60%$ 26.280 $ 30.000

Maximum lncome per Tax Credit Program for Fayefte County 1 Bedroom @ $18,760 1 Bedroom @ $23"150 1 Bedroom @ $28,140

40"/": 5oo/": 61o/o:

Minimum lncome per Tax Credit Program assuming Tenant pays ,15% of income for rent.

1 Bedroom @ 1 Bedroom @ 1 Bedroom @

4O"/o: 50"/": 6Q"/o:

$1 1,680

$14,587 $17,520

Age & lncome Statistics lor proposed Primary Market to 64 years 10,000 to $14,999 (40%) 10,000 to $19,999 (50%) 1s,000 to $24,999 (60%)

# of Households

to 74 years $10,000 to $14,999 (40%) $10,000 to $19,999 (50"/d $15,000 to $24,999 (60%)

# of Households

75 and older $10,000 to $14,999 (40%) $10,000 to $19,999 (50%) 15,000 to $24,999 (60%)

# of Households

173 243 127

185 4't1

423

254 453 315

btal between $10,000 to $14,999 (40%) btal between $10,000 to $19,999 (50%) between $15.000 to

612 x 35% eligible 1107 x 35% eligible 865 x35%

Total Age & lncome Eligible

Population

904

# Subsidized Units in Market

Area

224

Rate

214 387 303

29.76oh Overall Capture Age category of 55 to 75 and over was based on all units being 1 bedroom units for elderly. lncome eligibility assumes equal distribution across range. Data HAS NOT been trended and is based on 2000 Census lnformation.


FINAL DRAFT MULTI-MUNICIPAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF CONNELLSVILLE, CONNELLSVILLE TOWNSHIP, AND SOUTH CONNELLSVILLE BOROUGH

Appendix H Connellsville Main Street Building and Design Guidelines

Appendix H November 2009


Connellsville Main Street

Rebirth of a Community Building & Design Guidelines

DRAFT February, 2009


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Contents: Design Guidelines

The guidelines are based on the U. S. Department of the Interior Standards and applied to the local context of Connellsville.

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties

with Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating Restoring &Reconstructing Historic Buildings

An interactive version of the Standards & Guidelines can be found at: http://www.nps.gov/ history/hps/TPS/tax/rhb/

2

Contents......................................................................................................................... 2 Introduction.................................................................................................................... 3 Boundaries..................................................................................................................... 4 Purpose of Design Guidelines........................................................................................ 5 General Building Guidelines.......................................................................................... 6 Development and Site Plan Review............................................................................... 7 Architectural Character Building Improvements......................................................... 13 Architectural Character Assessing Buildings............................................................... 14 Architectural Character . ............................................................................................. 18 Artist’s Renderings of Building Rehabilitation in Downtown Connellsville.............. 26 Architectural Character . ............................................................................................. 27 Residential Development Guidelines Existing Housing, Infill and Rehabilitation...... 43 Neighborhood and Housing Guidelines....................................................................... 44 Examples of Distinction ............................................................................................. 46 Housing Rehabilitation Examples .............................................................................. 52 Housing Infill Prototypes ............................................................................................ 71 Residential Street Options .......................................................................................... 72 Housing Infill Prototype ............................................................................................. 74 Housing Infill Prototype - Elevation ........................................................................... 79 Residential General Considerations . .......................................................................... 82 Definitions/Glossary.................................................................................................... 83 The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee...................................................... 87 Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grant Application Guidelines............. 88 Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grant................................................... 89 Façade Grant Application Parameters, Process and Procedures.................................. 90 Model Scoring Criteria for Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grants..... 92 Façade Grant Application............................................................................................ 93 Release and Hold Harmless Agreement....................................................................... 95


Design Guidelines

Vision Statement Connellsville is a community of rich natural and historic resources where all embrace: local history, the benefits of tourism centered on the Great Allegheny Passage and the Youghiogheny River, the beauty of the environment, the advantages of local services, businesses, artists and crafters; so that both the quality of life and vitality of businesses are improved through increased visitors and active members of the community.

Introduction: Vision Statement Mission Statement

Mission Statement With the current business community, natural and historic resources and our cultural diversity as a solid foundation, the Connellsville Main Street Program will provide opportunities for existing and future businesses to expand and flourish by encouraging economic development and revitalization through the promotion of our heritage, the arts and tourism.

Committees

Connellsville Main Street shall develop and enhance its existing resources and assets to: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

CMS Steering Committee:

Gerry Browell, Jim Clarke, Linda Cordaro, Michael Edwards, Bryan Kisiel, Dave Marchewka, Becky McLuckey, Leo Rudnick, Pat Stefano

CMS Design Committee:

Michael Edwards, Leo Rudnick, Tom Rusnack, Glenn Wolfe, Melissa Tzan, Dan Cocks

These guidelines have been created to serve as a reference to assist the community throughout the revitalization process.

The images and references are for the purpose of illustration and guidance.

Thank you to the Design committee for their help in putting this document together. We would also like to thank the Connellsville Historical Society for their help with compiling historic photos.

3


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Boundaries

Geographic Boundaries for the Façade Grant Program The designated target area is defined as: • East Crawford Avenue beginning at Prospect Street continuing south to Route 119. • North Pittsburgh Street, beginning at North Alley continuing south to Gallatin Avenue on South Pittsburgh Street. • North Third Street from Yough Park continuing south to St. Rita’s. • North Arch Street at Apple Street continuing to South Arch Street at South Street. • East Apple Street at Prospect Street continuing to East Apple at North Arch. The Connellsville Main Street Design Guidelines are applicable to any commercial property within the designated target area of Connellsville’s Central Business District. See designated area within the outlined boundary. At this time, Connellsville’s downtown does not encompass a historic district. Most of the buildings along downtown Main Street were built around the turn of the twentieth century. Six structures within downtown Connellsville are listed individually on the National Register of Historic Places. Those five structures are: U.S. Post Office, Colonial National Bank, Dr. McClenethan’s Office, Carnegie Library and Union Passenger Station (P&LE)

4


Design Guidelines

Purpose of Design Guidelines The purpose of these Design Guidelines is to encourage facade restoration projects. By improving the building’s overall appearance we hope to reduce and eventually eliminate vacancies in the downtown area and be able to promote reuse of commercial properties.

Purpose of Design Guidelines

These guidelines are also to help in bringing substandard buildings into compliance with basic health, safety and building codes. In order to create an attractive downtown, these guidelines will assist with the preservation of original and historic buildings and assure that such buildings are rehabilitated in an appropriate manner. Any restoration, preservation, rehabilitation or maintenance should follow these Design Guidelines and the United States Department of Interior’s “Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings.” A copy of this document can be dowloaded for free from the website: http://www.nps.gov/history/ hps/TPS/tax/rhb/. These Design Guidelines are not meant to stifle creativity or individuality. Connellsville Main Street does not want every building in downtown to be painted the same color or be adorned with the exact same signage. Individual business and property owners are encouraged to be creative in thinking about the image that their renovated and improved buildings will portray as part of the entire downtown community. When in doubt, please call the Connellsville Main Street Office at_________. We have a variety of photos, reference materials, sample paint palettes and sample awning materials and colors that all downtown business and property owners are welcome to consult.

5


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

General Building Guidelines

The Building and Design Guidelines section includes guidelines for the following areas: • awnings • energy conservation • masonry maintenance • painting/ color • signage • upper story windows • window displays • general beautification • consistency

• doors • decorative elements • infill • rear/side entrances • storefront designs • storefront windows • lighting • miscellaneous items • parking

These recommendations are not intended to point fingers or to accuse people of not having attractive buildings. The specific recommendations are intended to help building owners identify ways to improve their building and prioritize their improvement projects. Long-term planning will be a key element in the downtown improvements. Connellsville will benefit visually from a consistency of architectural character. While much of a community's character comes from the often eclectic variety of buildings there should be compatibility (but not uniformity) of architectural styles. While being sensitive to the basic style and character of the community, the buildings should also reflect the continuing redevelopment and development of the community. Some of the key points to consider in examining the architectural compatibility of buildings within the Connellsville Main Street District include: • A consistency of roof style and height; • All buildings should follow the same orientation (narrow, wide, square, etc.); • The proportion (height and width) and scale (relative size) of buildings should be the same across the entire district. This not only helps define the visual character of the district, but also helps define the district itself; • There should be a distinct and characteristic rhythm (spacing) of building openings (windows and doors); • The general massing and details of the buildings in the district should be consistent; • Each building should have a clear and characteristic entrance; • In order to establish a clear edge, all buildings should have a similar setback from the curb; and • They should utilize similar materials, colors and textures. New buildings should be of compatible materials and textures. New and renovated buildings should preserve basic architectural details. The small town character of Connellsville is one of its greatest assets. While growth and development of the city is essential for its viality and success, this growth and development must maintain and enhance the character of the place. The tree lined streets of the older neighborhoods, the historic downtown, the parks, the mixture of housing styles all add to The quality of life for the City. The guidelines presented in this section will help encourage development appropriate to the local community. These are intended to serve as recommendations in evaluating projects and proposals and for developers and property owners in applying for a Facade Restoration Grant, or for the general enhancement of the community.

6


Design Guidelines Purpose Development and Site Plan Review helps regulate the development of structures and sites in a manner which considers the following concerns and, where necessary, requires modification of development proposals to eliminate or minimize potential problems and nuisances. The principal areas of concern are: a. the balancing of landowners' rights to the use of their land, with the corresponding rights of abutting and neighboring landowners to live without undue disturbances (e.g., noise, smoke, fumes, dust, odor, glare, stormwater runoff, etc.); b. the convenience and safety of vehicular, bicycle and pedestrian movement within the City of Connellsville, and in relation to adjacent areas or roads; c. the adequacy of waste disposal methods and protection from pollution of surface or groundwater; and d. the protection of the unique local character and natural environmental features on, and around, the site under review, and in adjacent areas.

Projects Requiring Development and Site Plan Review No permit for the construction, exterior alteration, relocation, occupancy, or change in use of any building shall be given and no existing use shall be established or expanded in floor area except in conformity with a site plan approved by The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee. Development and Site Plan Review shall also be required for the resumption of any use discontinued for more than two (2) years, or for the expansion of any existing use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expansionâ&#x20AC;? shall include a floorspace increase of twenty-five percent (25%) or more within any 10- year period, or the introduction of new materials or processes not previously associated with the existing use. Required approval includes proposals for commercial, industrial, office, multiple dwelling residential developments, municipal, institutional, utility, fraternal or recreational purposes.

Development and Site Plan Review Purpose Projects Requiring Development & Site Plan Review Exemptions from Development & Site Plan Review

Exemptions from Development and Site Plan Review Development and Site Plan Review shall not be required for: a. the construction or enlargement of any single family or two family dwelling, or building accessory to such dwelling; b. the construction or alteration of any building used exclusively for agriculture, horticulture, or floriculture; c. construction or alteration providing for not more than two hundred (200) sq. ft. total floor area after construction d. customary home occupations or those home-based occupations that do not generate significant additional traffic, noise, or other public nuisances.

7


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Development and Site Plan Review Standards for Review

Standards for Review The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee shall review the site plan and supporting documents, taking into consideration the reasonable fulfillment of the objectives listed below. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee shall adopt detailed design guidelines and performance standards to guide decisions with respect to these objectives, and to help ensure consistency in the review of all applications, including the following standards: 1. Legal Conformance with the provisions of the ordinances of the City and the County, and all applicable rules and regulations of state and federal agencies. 2. Traffic Convenience and safety of both vehicular and pedestrian movement to and from and within the site and in relationship to adjoining ways and properties. 3. Parking Provisions for the off-street loading and unloading of vehicles incidental to the normal operation of the establishment, adequate parking, adequate lighting, and internal traffic control. 4. City Services Reasonable demands placed on City services and infrastructure. 5. Pollution Control Adequacy of methods for sewage and refuse disposal, and the protection from pollution of both surface waters and groundwater. This includes minimizing soil erosion both during and after construction. 6. Nuisances Protection of abutting properties and City amenities from any undue disturbance caused by excessive or unreasonable noise, smoke, vapors, fumes, dust, odors, glare, stormwater runoff, etc. 7. Existing Vegetation Minimizing the area over which existing vegetation is to be removed. Where tree removal is required, special attention shall be given to planting of replacement trees. 8. Amenities The applicant's efforts to integrate the proposed development into the existing landscape through out design features such as vegetative buffers, roadside plantings, and the retention of open space and agricultural land. 9. City Character The building setbacks, area and location of parking, architectural compatibility, signage, and landscaping of the development, and how these features harmonize with the surrounding Cityscape and the natural landscape.

8


Design Guidelines Enforcement

1. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may require the posting of a bond or other similar performance guarantee to ensure compliance with the plan and stated conditions of approval. It may suspend any permit or license when work is not performed as required. 2. Any Special Permit issued under this section shall lapse within one (1) year if a substantial use thereof has not commenced, except for good cause. 3. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may periodically amend or add rules and regulations relating to the procedures and administration of this by-law, by majority vote of the Board, after conducting a public hearing to receive comments on any proposed revisions. Such hearing shall be advertised once in a newspaper of general local circulation, at least seven (7) days prior to the hearing date.

Development and Site Plan Review Enforcement Submission Requirements

Submission Requirements

The site plan shall include the following data, details, and supporting plans. The number of pages submitted will depend on the proposal's size and complexity. All of the requirements must be met in each plan, with notations explaining the reasons for any omissions. Site plans shall be prepared by a registered professional engineer, architect, or landscape architect. Items required for submission include: 1. Name of the project, boundaries, and maps showing site's location in the city, date, north arrow and scale of the plan. 2. Name and address of the owner of record, developer, and seal of the engineer, architect or landscape architect. 3. Names and addresses of all owners of record of abutting parcels and those within three hundred (300) feet of the property line. 4. All existing lot lines, easements, and rights-of-way. Include area in acres or square feet, abutting land uses, and the location and use of structures within three hundred (300) feet of the site. 5. The location and use of all existing and proposed buildings and structures within the development. Include all dimensions of height and floor area, and show all exterior entrances, and an anticipated future additions and alterations. 6. The location of all present and proposed public and private ways, parking areas, driveways, sidewalks, ramps, curbs, fences, paths, landscaping, walls, and fences. Location, type, and screening details for all waste disposal containers shall also be shown. 7. The location, height, intensity, and bulb type (e.g., fluorescent, sodium incandescent) of all external lighting fixtures. The direction of illumination and methods to eliminate glare onto adjoining properties must also be shown. 8. The location, height, size, materials, and design of all proposed signage. 9. The location of all present and proposed utility systems including: • sewage or septic system; • water supply system; • telephone, cable and electrical systems; and • storm drainage system including existing and proposed drain lines, culverts, catch basins, headwalls, endwalls, hydrants, manholes, and drainage swales.

9


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Development and Site Plan Review Submission Requirements

10

10. Plans to prevent the pollution of surface or groundwater, erosion of soil both during and after construction, excessive run-off, excessive raising or lowering of the water table, and flooding of other properties, as applicable. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may also request soil logs, percolation tests and storm runoff calculations for large or environmentallysensitive developments. 11. Existing and proposed topography at a two (2) foot contour interval. All elevations shall refer to the nearest United States Coastal and Geodetic Bench Mark. If any portion of the parcel is within the 100 year floodplain, the area will be shown, and base flood elevations given. Indicate areas within the proposed site and within fifty (50) feet of the proposed site, where ground removal or filling is required, and give its approximate volume in cubic yards. 12. A landscape plan showing all existing natural land features, trees, forest cover and water sources, and all proposed changes to these features including size and type of plant material. Water sources will include ponds, lakes, brooks, streams, wetlands, floodplains, and drainage retention areas. 13. Zoning district boundaries within five hundred (500) feet of the site's perimeter shall be drawn and identified on the plan. 14. Traffic flow patterns within the site, entrances and exits, loading and unloading areas, curb cuts on the site and within one hundred feet of the site. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may require a detailed traffic study for large developments or for those in heavy traffic areas to include: a. the projected number of motor vehicle trips to enter or leave the site, estimated for daily and peak hour traffic levels; b. the projected traffic flow pattern including vehicular movements at all major intersections likely to be affected by the proposed use of the site; c. the impact of this traffic upon existing abutting public and private ways in relation to existing road capacities. Existing and proposed daily and peak hour traffic levels as well as road capaCity levels shall also be given. 15. For new construction or alterations to any existing building, a table containing the following information must be included: a. area of building to be used for a particular use such as retail operation, office, storage, etc.; b. maximum number of employees; c. maximum seating capacity, where applicable; and d. number of parking spaces existing and required for the intended use. 16. Elevation plans for all exterior facades of the proposed structure(s) and/or existing facades, plus addition(s) showing design features and indicating the type and color of materials to be used. 17. Plans of all site features including landscaping, parking (vehicular and nonvehicular), access points and pedestrian access.


Design Guidelines Conforming Lots Where existing buildings express a traditionally modest (pre-zoning) front setback, creating a characteristically close relationship with the street, it is highly desirable to continue this pattern in order to retain the area's character. Therefore, the maximum setback of new construction should harmonize with the average setbacks of existing adjacent buildings. Outside of the areas of generally uniform building setback (where existing structures are located at various distances from the roadway), front setbacks may vary to a greater degree, and principal buildings shall generally be located within 40 feet of the front lot line unless there are substantial counter-balancing considerations (such as irregular topography, wetlands, or the preservation of natural rural features, including pastures, cropland, meadows, or timber stands). In all instances, parking shall be excluded from such areas, between the principal building and the roadway(s).

Development and Site Plan Review Conforming Lots Non-Conforming Lots

Where commercial development is proposed adjacent to a residential use, a side yard setback of 30 feet shall be observed for buildings, parking, or storage. This area is to be used as a buffer zone and must be landscaped.

Non-Conforming Lots Where the proposed expansion or reconstruction on a nonconforming lot fails to meet the above setback requirements, increased screening shall be provided to lessen the effect on adjoining lots. In no case shall the expansion of the existing use be allowed to extend closer than 10 feet to any lot line. Where the non-conforming lot borders a residential or institutional use, setbacks of between 10 and 20 feet will require a solid wooden fence, no less than five feet in height, to form an effective visual screen. Landscaping in the form of deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs will be required on both sides of the fence. For side and rear yard setbacks of between 20 and 30 feet, an increased number of both deciduous and evergreen shrubs, growing to a mature height of at least five feet, will be required, in a planting bed of at least 10 feet wide. Parking lots shall be provided at the side or to the rear buildings when practical to maximize the positive visual character. Full consideration should be made to accommodate storm water run off through natural (ground water recharge/retention/ detention) or mechanical means. The visual impact of parking areas upon the character of the area can be easily reduced through landscaped buffers, whose width at the roadside edge shall be based upon the length of the parking area exposed to the street (but which shall in no case be less than six (6) feet in width). Locating buildings near the front edge of parking lots reduces the amount of required landscaping, as it minimizes the exposed area of parking. Parking lots containing ten or more spaces shall be planted with at least one tree per eight spaces, no smaller than 2â&#x20AC;? caliper (trunk diameter at chest height), each tree being surrounded by no less than 40 sq. ft. of permeable, unpaved area. Parking areas must also be screened along lot lines bordering institutional or residential uses.

11


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Development and Site Plan Review Screening

Screening shall consist of a landscaped area at least six (6) feet wide, densely planted with a mixture of deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs, and shall create an effective visual barrier. All trees shall be a minimum of 2â&#x20AC;? caliper (trunk diameter) when planted. Native trees and shrubs shall be planted wherever possible, in order to capture the look through indigenous species (such as lilac, viburnum, day lillies, ferns, red-twig dogwood, oak, maple, sycamore, linden, hawthorne, birch, shadbush, etc.).

Placement of Buildings

In instances where healthy plant material exists on a site prior to its development, in part or in whole, for purposes of off-street parking or other vehicular use areas, the Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may adjust the application of the above mentioned standards to allow credit for such plant material if, in its opinion, such an adjustment is in keeping with and will preserve the intent of these standards.

Facades

Screening Open storage areas, exposed machinery, and outdoor areas used for the storage and collection of rubbish, must be visually screened from roads and surrounding land uses. Suitable types of screening include opaque wood fences and dense evergreen hedges of five (5) feet or more in height. Where evergreen hedges are proposed, a temporary fence should be built to provide screening until the evergreens are of sufficient height. In locations where potential health or safety hazards may arise (such as rubbish storage/collection areas), a solid wooden fence, six (6) feet in height is required (to deter children and animals from entering. Decorative, lower level, pedestrian-scale lighting should be employed.

Placement of Buildings Buildings should be sited so that obstruction of views from the public ways will be minimized. This can be achieved by taking advantage of topographic changes or existing vegetation.

Facades It is particularly important that new construction meet minimum design criteria in order that it may blend with the surroundings. New construction throughout the city should be compatible with surrounding properties, in terms of formal characteristics such as height, massing, roof shapes and window proportions. Where new construction is surrounded by existing historic buildings, building height and exterior materials shall be harmonious with those of adjacent properties. In the interests of maintaining a sense of history, vertical siding shall be discouraged, and synthetic siding should imitate the character and dimensions of traditional clapboards. Masonry block should generally not be used as a building facade material.

12


Design Guidelines Making Improvements Can...

There are numerous great reasons to make improvements to your building. Making improvements to your building can... 1. Extend the life of the structure; 2. Enhance the appearance, thus improving the market image of the business or businesses which operate in it. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;tiredâ&#x20AC;? looking building is far less likely to attract new clients or customers to the businesses; 3. Reduce the energy consumption, thus reducing the operation/overhead costs to the businesses; 4. Increase the income generation from a building via increasing rent/lease rates. In some downtowns, building owners have been able to renovate the upper stories into elderly or studio apartments; 5. Result in receiving tax credits on the amount of money invested in the structure. Buildings which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places are eligible for income tax credit. Most buildings in downtown are eligible for listing on the National Register; 6. Improve the overall character of the downtown and the community. Upon improving the overall character of a downtown, improved vitality is sure to follow.

Architectural Character: Building Improvements

What Improvements Should I Make?

There is not a standard answer for each building, but in general, the following rules should apply... 1. Focus first on structural damage or deterioration. Deteriorated stone or brick, collapsing roof structure, and leaky roofs are examples of structural damage; 2. Second, maintenance items should be attended to. Items such as tuckpointing, painting, re-glazing windows and weatherproofing are considered maintenance items; 3. Finally, if the building is structurally sound and in good repair, consider cosmetic improvements. Some enhancements may include: replacing single pane windows with thermal insulated windows; cleaning exterior brick and stone; replacing or repairing architectural details which have been removed, are damaged, or are deteriorated; or adding or replacing an awning.

13


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Assessing Buildings Historic/ Traditional Facades Assessing the appropriate character and enhancement/ rehabilitation needs of Main Street Buildings is a realatively simple process. A technique easily applied involves taking a photograph of a building or block of buildings, identifying those things that are appropriate to the design guidelines and those things which need to be changed. The marked-up photograph can be used as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;work planâ&#x20AC;? for rehabilitation/renovation and to identify those projects appropriate for the Facade Enhancement Program. Illustrations on the following pages show a similar process for more contemporary facades, the rear sides of buildings and infill development.

Existing Conditions

With Assessments/Comments/Mark-Ups

With Enhancements/Rehabilitation

14


Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Assessing Buildings Contemporary Facades

Existing Conditions

With Assessments/Comments/Mark-Ups

With Enhancements/Rehabilitation

15


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Assessing Buildings Building Rear Treatments & Passages

Existing Conditions

With Assessments/Comments/Mark-Ups

With Enhancements/Rehabilitation

16


Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Assessing Buildings Infill

Existing Conditions

With Assessments/Comments/Mark-Ups

With Enhancements/Rehabilitation

17


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: General Building Improvements

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Many buildings are altered over time. The drawings below illustrate how this can happen. Sometimes alterations made to buildings are very beneficial; other times they are damaging to both the structure and character of the building as well as the integrity of the downtown. Buildings can be described on a scale between the “original design” and “significantly altered.” The drawings below illustrate buildings on both ends of the continuum. The position on the continuum will determine what redevelopment or improvement options are available for a building.

Original Design

Minor Alterations

Storefront Is Lost

Significant Alterations


Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: General Building Improvements

Three Typical Buildings - Existing Conditions

Three Typical Buildings - Minor Restoration

Three Typical Buildings - Major Restoration

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: General Building Improvements

Minimally Altered Buildings Do:

• Maintain the historic fabric of the building (i.e. maintain the original stone or brick); • Spruce up a “tired” look. Add color selectively by painting the building's details, window trim, or cornice; • Add a cloth awning which complements the storefront or upper story windows, where appropriate; • Maintain the original facade design and signage. Don't:

• Cover up or alter architectural details such as the cornice, decorative hoods above upper story windows, or clerestory windows; • Paint or stucco-coat the original brick and mortar. Once a historic structure is painted or covered with stucco it usually can never be reversed without substantially damaging the integrity of the brick; • Substitute modern metal and tinted windows or doors for the original ones; • Use large signage or excessive neon lighting.

Examples of buildings that have remained in their original state or seen only minimal alteration.

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Design Guidelines Substantially Altered Buildings

Buildings which have been significantly altered have a variety of options for improvements. Those options range from reconstructing the original facade to disguising it to reduce the impact to the overall character in the downtown. Some examples of how this can be accomplished are illustrated here. Do:

Architectural Character: General Building Improvements

• Investigate the potential for removing the materials covering the original facade; • Restore original facade, if possible; • Add or enhance elements which may reflect the scale, patterns, and lines of neighboring buildings; • Add an awning to add color and help disguise the substantial alterations; • Add color selectively to complement colors used by neighboring structures. Don't:

• Use large, protruding signage; • Continue altering the architectural style. • Use bold, eye catching color or materials.

Examples of buildings that have been substantially altered.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: New Construction, Infill & Additions

New construction/ infill in the downtown can have a good or bad result. Buildings which are constructed to match or reflect the context are positive additions to a historic downtown. New buildings which ignore height, width, scale, building lines, rhythm and the indigenous materials used by surrounding buildings generally are not good neighbors in the downtown. Do:

• Use materials which match or complement surrounding building's patterns, color and appearance; • Match the sizes, scale and rhythm of the windows and store fronts of neighboring buildings; • Use signage which is not overpowering. Don't:

• Introduce materials which are not already found in buildings in the downtown; • Use exotic shapes or patterns which will disrupt visual continuity; • Try to imitate historic styles without professional assistance and thorough investigation of the scale, materials, proportions, and characteristics of that style. Some historic styles such as Colonial, Federal, and Beaux Arts are not appropriate in a dowtown.

Street View: Encourage similar proportions to existing buildings

This Not this

In-character infill

Plan View: All buildings should be on the same general plan or “buildto line. Some variation can add character, but too many irregularities in this pattern detracts from the downtown’s overall cohesiveness. Out-of-character infill

Street View: Roof patterns should be consistent with existing facades and roof patterns.

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Design Guidelines New construction and additions within the historic district of downtown Connellsville should follow the Secretary of Interior Standards and any building code and historic ordinance established by the city. The designs of new construction and additions should be compatible in detail, style and scale to the historic character of Connellsville. The following guidelines are for sustainable new construction and additions as recommended by the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

Architectural Character: New Construction, Infill & Additions

Building Design: 1. Provide a well-insulated building that minimizes heat gain and loss. 2. Building cool roofs which provide low heat absorption and high reflectivity roof assembly or green roofs (vegetated). 3. Orient building for passive heat gain and cooling/natural ventilation 4. Incorporate universal design principles and child-friendly and senior friendly design. 5. Meet or exceed local requirements for accessible and special needs housing.

Water Conservation and Management: 1. Make sure water meters are installed and that there is owner/tenant accountability in water use. 2. Use water-saving strategies such as dual-flush toilets and a looped domestic water system with recirculating pump for immediate hot water at the tap 3. Minimize storm water discharge using permeable paving and retention systems 4. Provide mitigation during construction to avoid siltation of surrounding streams or drainage systems during heavy rains.

Energy Efficiency: 1. Assure that electric and gas meters are installed and that there is accountability by owner or tenant. 2. Use properly sized and designed sealed combustion boilers or furnaces and distribution systems or other low-energy use heating. 3. Use tankless water heaters, indirect water heaters, sealed combustion water heaters, or solar hot water heaters. 4. Specify compact fluorescent fixtures and educated tenant about their energy savings. 5. Specify Energy Star appliances throughout 6. Avoid or minimize air-conditioning with natural ventilation or other passive cooling strategies. 7. Consider renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics using research grants and rebates.

Examples of Appropriate Infill Development

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: New Construction and Additions - Maximum Grant: $5,000

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: New Construction, Infill & Additions

Reduced and Sustainable Material Use: 1. Use fewer building material through advanced framing techniques or other systems approach to building construction 2. Use recycled content and building materials where possible 3. Use locally available (within 500 miles) building materials such as locally produced masonry or other earthen system, recycled lumber or locally mined timber or other recycled materials, or recycled aggregate from demolition of existing site work or structure nearby.

Recycling During and Post Occupancy: 1. Reduction and management of construction waster: reuse form-boards, mulch waste wood on-site, sort construction waste and recycle applicable materials, salvage reusable materials 2. Recycling of user waste, mulch yard waste on site or provide recycling bins for pickup by local recycling authority, provide recycling bins along with trash bins for residents.

Indoor Environment Quality-Healthy Buildings: 1. Detail building envelope to shed water with adequate flashing and a continuous drainage plane, design walls to be able to dry on the interior, exterior, or both as appropriate to the local climate 2. Provide operable window with screens and take advantage of natural crossventilation when possible 3. Provide mechanical ventilation to remove excess moisture and indoor pollutants from living spaces and to provide an adequate amount of outside air 4. Specify sealed combustion boilers, furnaces and water heaters 5. Minimize the use of carpeting, which can hold dirt, mold and other allergens. When used, specify carpeting with low VOC’s and recyclable fiber and backing content. If available, install carpeting that can be recycled.

Orientation of New Buildings: 1. Building heights shall comply with the provisions of the Connellsville Zoning Code 2. New buildings should face a street, or other public space. Buildings should not front directly onto parking lots. 3. New buildings situated on street corners should have two facades. Both walls do not need to provide their own entrance, but the façade without a door should not be a blank canvas. Rather, it should be an extension of the façade with its design integrated with the “main” wall of the building. 4. Off-street parking areas should be sensitively located to the side or rear of the buildings. This layout will reduce the visual impact to and disruption of the streetscape’s continuity.

Roofs and Walls of Additions: 1. The new roof form (its shape) should be appropriate to and imitate the existing building’s roof 2. Flat roofs should be avoided on one and two story buildings. 3. The façade of a building should be emphasized through window patterns and proportions and the enhanced treatment of entrances through details, materials and architectural motifs 4. The use of blank, windowless walls is discouraged. If however they are absolutely necessary, they should utilize surface articulation and architectural elements found in other wall facings to give interest to the wall.

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Design Guidelines Scale and Mass of Additions: 1. Building scale and mass shall comply with the Connellsville Zoning Code. 2. The overall scale, massing and proportions of new additions should relate to and be compatible with those of adjacent and surrounding buildings. 3. Changes in scale and mass, such as offsetting a wall, or deviating from the existing roof line should be made in graduated increments 4. Buildings should not have long, uninterrupted flat walls. Designing wall offsets, adding changes in floor levels, including windows and ornamentation to exterior walls should be used to add interest and variety. Flat, unadorned walls are boring and often invite vandalism 5. Roof line offsets, cross gables and dormers should be utilized to vary the massing of the roofs of buildings. 6. Visibly exposed sides of new additions should be defined with a base and cap or cornice

Architectural Character: New Construction, Infill & Additions

Materials and Detail of Additions: 1. All materials, details and colors used with new additions should be compatible with the overall design of the original building, as well as with the surrounding buildings. New additions should be well integrated with existing structures 2. Architectural features and motifs of original building should be retained and repeated in the design of new additions whenever possible. 3. When designing additions, the patterns, colors, details and prominence of materials used tin adjacent buildings should be taken into account 4. Artificial siding and trim materials should not be used.

Service Areas and Mechanical Equipment: 1. Loading areas, waste facilities, air condition units, exhaust and vent stacks, elevator penthouse and antennae should be located to the rear of buildings or screened from view. 2. The use of interior refuse rooms in lieu of outdoor dumpsters or other methods of waste removal is encouraged. Visible trash receptacles are uninviting and discourage foot traffic. 3. Fire escapes should not be visible when viewed from the main faรงade.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Renderings of Building Rehabilitation in Downtown Connellsville (from the Connellsville Community Charrette December, 2008) drawings by: L.R. Deeg, ASAI Studioâ&#x20AC;˘Three

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Design Guidelines A storefront is often the heart of a business' identity. It acts as an invitation, but it is often the most frequently changed component of a building's facade. Though change is positive and necessary for maintaining an image, there are some traditions that should be considered when altering a building's storefront. The storefront, historically, was built into the facade, whereas many of today's storefronts appear to be applied as additions to the front of the building. This interrupts the historic pattern established by the openings. The following guidelines apply to storefronts: 1. Storefronts of adjacent buildings should be of similar proportions, scale and height; 2. The pattern of storefronts creates a very strong relationship between the buildings on a street and the pedestrian. Traditionally, it is appropriate to slightly recess the storefront at the sidewalk edge. A storefront that is pushed back into the building more than a few inches, however, isolates the first floor from the street; 3. Storefronts of the era when downtown was built were composed largely of windows with a recessed entry. This was a functional solution to allow natural light to penetrate into the building. As well, the design allowed for visual access from the sidewalk deep into the building giving the pedestrian a chance to view merchandise without entering the store; 4. Storefront windows usually consist of an upper band of transoms, the large display windows, and a lower base of wood, masonry or some other material; 5. Usually the door had a vision panel. Recessing the door emphasizes the entry and is a way to provide shelter for customers when going in or out. It also lessens the hazards of opening a door directly onto the sidewalk and must be done to meet codes; 6. Display windows and transoms are appropriate places for subtle painted signs. Decoration of the storefront should be carefully considered, as the design may detract the customer's attention from merchandise. Loud patterns, colors or signs will not make it easy for the customer to look through the storefront. 7. When choosing materials for your storefront, consider first those that are indigenous to the buildings along the street. They should be simple and inconspicuous so that the emphasis is on the entry and the relationship of the sidewalk to the interior is strong; and 8. Avoid using materials in nontraditional applications; variations in the overall pattern may negatively isolate the building.

Window displays and signage can serve as effective marketing and character enhancement.

Architectural Character: Storefront Design Much of what gives the traditional buildings of downtown its personality and identity are the rich archtitectural details found in the building facades. These details add tremendous visual character to the building and make the general streetscape of the community inviting and interesting.

Storefront Basics: 1. The design of entrance ways and street-level portion of facades should be compatible with the design of the upper floors to retain the overall character of a building. 2. Retail stores, service oriented businesses and restaurants should have large pane display windows on the ground level. 3. Buildings with multiple storefronts should be visually unified through the use of building materials, colors, architectural details, awnings, signage and lighting. 4. The original proportions of display windows and any special features such as transoms or leaded glass should be retained. 5. Entrances should be well defined by architectural elements such as lintels, pediments, pilasters, columns, porticos, porches, railings and balustrades. 6. Avoid replacing an entire store front when repairing existing materials and surfaces or replacing parts and sections may be all that is necessary.

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Maximum Matching Grant for Facade Enhancement & Architectural Elements: $5,000

27


City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Facades/ Architectural Elements

Architectural Elements Basics: An inviting and engaging downtown has a certain “feel” created by its design and architecture. The downtown character is created by consistency, coordination and complimentary forms. Originally, the hidden assets built into each property brought the whole city together visually and made it pleasing for customers—window shopping and walking the streets became a stimulating sensory experience. Scale, mass, rhythm, patterns, materials, shapes and colors are some of the ingredients used to define streetscapes and public spaces. This section outlines the uses and appropriateness of architectural designs and features that give commercial districts and outdoor spaces their personality. Fortunately, downtown Connellsville still has much of these architectural features. Some of the original architectural features and unique details are still underneath more modern applications or coverings. Simple removal of these coverings would reveal original features and details, revealing the original design and character.

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Maximum Matching Grant for Facade Enhancement & Architectural Elements: $5,000

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Architectural Character: Facades

Passive Amenity Island • pedestrian seating/rest area • shade/comfort • vegetation • mail/trash containers

Facade: In-character new development • similar proportions • modern materials

Shop Outdoor Spaces • special displays • event displays • awnings

Facade: Restoration • Clean surfaces • Historic kickplates • All items from left

Alley Improvement • lighting • pedestrian walkway • link to neighborhood/parking • alley activities

Facade: Paint-up/fix-up • Paint trim • Add awning • Reglaze windows


Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Facades/ Architectural Elements

Business Entry • display area • customer parking • lighting • awnings

Facade: Original

Active Amenity Island • outdoor eating space • vegetation • street furniture

Facade: Analysis

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines Doors are a very important design feature of a storefront. Doors are not only for a person to walk through, they also add character and identity to the storefront. Doors serve also as an insulator from weather and can provide light. When choosing a door consider the following: 1. Use a door which imitates the original. If the original door has been removed find a historic photo to base your decision (if possible); 2. Avoid â&#x20AC;&#x153;slabâ&#x20AC;? doors. These doors not only do not fit the character of Door Basics: downtown buildings, they are uninviting to the customer as well; 3. Doors with windows are generally more inviting. People naturally tend to 1. Maintenance, repairs, refinishing avoid entering spaces they cannot see into; and restoration of existing historic doors is encouraged 4. The door should be made of materials which look compatible to the rest of in lieu of replacement, where the facade; possible. Avoid replacing 5. Doors for external stairway entrances (secondary doors) should have less doors that do not match the detail to avoid drawing attention to them; and size of the opening, or that use 6. If you choose an aluminum and glass door, select one which has a dark finish inappropriate materials. rather than a reflective one. 2. It is not recommended to close

Architectural Character: Doors

up existing door openings. Best Practice: re-establish original door openings where they have been covered up or filled in

Maintenance Note:

All original doors in good repair should be kept. New hinges and hardware can be added to make them more operable and secure. Wood doors should be kept well sealed with a varnish or paint.

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Maximum Matching Grant for Facade Enhancement & Doors: $5,000

When possible, maintain/restore original doors and proportions.

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A poorly altered entryway: door relocation, modern door with no windows.


Design Guidelines A building's color can have the single most significant effect on its appearance. Buildings which are painted using complimentary colors are inviting. On the other hand, buildings which have been painted with single, bland colors will have the opposite effect. Additionally, paint which is peeling or in bad condition makes a building unattractive. Below are some things you should consider when painting a building. 1. Look at your neighbor's properties to select a color which will not clash with its surroundings or duplicate the scheme of another building. Being a good neighbor is important in building a clear identity for downtown; 2. The weather and sun will fade and damage paints. To ensure longevity of your paint, buy top quality paint, properly prepare the surfaces, and select colors which are less likely to fade; 3. If you are not good at selecting colors that match or work well together, consider consulting with someone who can. Consulting with someone may make a considerable difference between a bland building and an exciting one; 4. Consider using colors which were used at the time the building was built. Most major brand paint companies have specific pallets for historic buildings. White paint was not used in the periods which most buildings in were built; 5. Do not paint details or trim in dark colors; 6. Once a brick building has been painted, it generally should always be repainted verses restoration back to the original brick (sandblasting and many chemical paint removing techniques damage the brick patina); 7. Repoint brick before painting (if necessary); 8. Reglaze (reputty) windows before painting; 9. Remove all peeling and loose paint; and 10. Consult a paint specialist to determine the best paint for the surface you are painting.

When painting windows or architectural details, use medium to light shades versus dark colors as seen here. LIghter colors highlight building details.

Examples of inappropriate building colors

Tripartite Color Scheme 1. Base Color a. Wall Surfaces b. Storefront Walls c. Cornice (when same material as walls) 2. Major Trim a. Cornice b. Window Hoods c. Window Frames

d. Storefront Supports e. Storefront Cornice f. Storefront Kickplates 3. Minor Trim a. Window Sash b. Door Frames c. Small Details on Cornices, Hoods, and Kickplates

Architectural Character: Painting & Color Painting Basics: The original materials used for wall facings and ornamentation such as brick, woodwork, stone, cast iron and the colors themselves, give buildings their special character and identity. The materials actually provide visual harmony to the entire streetscape and downtown atmosphere. The best solution to the problem of a deteriorating façade is to properly repair it and provide regular maintenance to the original exterior surface and its decorative features. When painting: 1. Use only non-toxic, low volatile organic compound (VOC) paints, sealants and finishes. 2. Best Practices: all wood structures and trim should be prepared for painting by manually scraping old paint to reveal the original architectural details. Wood should not be cleaned by sand blasting or by using pressurized water or steam. 3. Paint colors should be chosen from those colors which are appropriate to the period of the buildingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; construction date. 4. Single color, monochromatic and contemporary color schemes should be avoided for early buildings. The placement and quantity of accent colors and the relationship of lights to darks should reflect the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character. 5. Use historically accurate color palettes. Connellsville Main Street Design Committee will have sample color palettes that are historically accurate. Most of the buildings in the Connellsville Main Street District are of the late Victorian period, from 18901910.

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Maximum Matching Grant for Painting and Exterior Restoration: $5,000

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Decorative Elements

Decorative elements, or details, add visual interest and character to the streetscape. These can be in the form of carved ornaments, mouldings, stained glass or painted graphic elements. Care should be taken not to introduce too much detail into a building facade as this may result in visual clutter. The typical details found in downtown are brick, stone or metal: Brick: Many building facades have incorporated decorative brickwork. If brick must be replaced at any time, it is important that the craftsmanship and pattern of the existing masonry be respected. This includes coursing, brick shape or design, and pointing. Stone: Stone details can be very elaborate or simple accents to other elements. Metal: Metal is used frequently in cornices and bracket details. In restoring the details of downtown buildings, you should: 1. Uncover any original elements that are hidden by inappropriate additions or alterations. For example, cast iron columns are decorative structural elements that often are covered by storefront modernizations and are likely to still be in place; and 2. Many times, pieces of decorative elements are removed for alterations, such as modern signage; or pieces simply deteriorate. It is important to protect and preserve existing decorative elements, as reproduction of details can be costly. However, it is recommended that missing elements be replaced to match existing if possible. It is the collection of details that creates a building's character and enhances the overall streetscape.

An example of a very unique building detail.

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Design Guidelines Awnings serve numerous purposes and should be considered by building owners as a wise addition to their structure. On this page these benefits are described. 1. Protect merchandise, interiors, and furnishings from sun damage; 2. Provide shade and shelter from elements for customers and pedestrians; 3. Reduce heat loss and heat gain; 4. Help establish a pedestrian scale - encourage street activities; 5. Can be operable or fixed and are available in a variety of styles; 6. Variety of materials - canvas, plastic and vinyl. Canvas is traditional material, but requires maintenance. Vinyl is durable; 7. Provide opportunity to add color to building; • To decide on a color - consider colors that will contribute to variety and diversity of street; • If building is rich in detail, use a subtle color for awning; • If building has fewer architectural details, use a bright color to enliven the facade; 8. Provide an effective space for signage. Advertising on awnings is encouraged. Signage on awnings should be used primarily for identification and be limited to simple designs. 9. Awnings should be weather resistant and vandal resistant; • Consider durability against wind damage, color fastness (resistance to sunbleaching), retardant to deterioration caused by rain and snow; • Certain colors are more likely to fade than others. Dark colors tend to fade faster.

Awnings can communicate

Awnings establish pedestrian scale and comfort

Architectural Character: Awnings Awning Basics: 1. Awnings are both functional and decorative. Similar to signage, awnings can add to or detract from the overall aesthetics of the town. Either fixed position or retractable awnings are acceptable. 2. Awnings should be attached to buildings by using the gentlest means possible. 3. Select weather-treated canvas or natural looking material for awnings. Plastic awnings are not appropriate. 4. Awnings should fit within the storefront area and not cover architectural elements 5. Awnings may display the name and nature of the business on the front face and/or side facings. Use simple letter designs and keep the message brief. 6. Awnings may be used at street level and in upper stores as long as they are appropriately scaled and designed to maintain the architectural style of the façade

Awnings can communicate

Awnings establish a pattern and rhythm

Awnings can add significantly to the character of the building and the streetscape

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Maximum Matching Grant for Awnings: $2,500

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Rear and/or Side Entrances

Many businesses have benefited greatly by introducing a side or rear entrance. The advantage of a side or rear entrance is that customers, clients, owners, and employees can park behind the building, utilizing typically wasted space. Rear entrances, whether they are used frequently or not, improve the overall character of the building. Nice rear entrances also make alleys feel safer for pedestrians who usually are frightened to walk in an alley. More often now, parking areas are being developed behind buildings. Adding a rear or side entrance will cater to the people parking in these spaces and can also increase fire safety. The following are some guidelines on how to improve or add a side or rear entrance. 1. Remove all garbage and debris away from the entrance; 2. Place a small sign by the door along with an open/ closed sign; 3. Consider placing a small awning over the doorway to communicate that the door is operable and in use; 4. Windows or loading docks near the entrances should not be boarded up. This condition will indicate that the rear or side door of the building is not operable; 5. Creating a window display in windows along side the entrance will help indicate its purpose as an entrance; and 6. For reasons of security, cash registers, etc. should be located so both doors can be monitored.

An example of an enhanced quality side entrance: before & after

An example of a rear facade and parking court: before & after

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Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Rear and/or Side Entrances

A typical cluttered rear facade showing minor & major enhancements

Examples of building rear facades showing balconies/exterior access, shared elevators and parking â&#x20AC;&#x153;courts.â&#x20AC;?

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Signage Sign Types: 1. Projecting Signs—are meant to attract pedestrian attention. Best used when there is a sidewalk. 2. Freestanding Signs—are appropriate when a building is set back 10 or more feet from the sidewalk. 3. Flush Signs—are meant to be viewed from a distance. These are used on signboard panels above doors and storefront windows. Many downtown buildings have a recess or horizontal molded band designed to accommodate the sign. Best Practice: use this area for your sign. 4. Window Signs—are applied on the inside of display windows or doors. These signs are pedestrian oriented. 5. Icon or Graphic Signs—are the oldest type of commercial sign. They illustrate by their shape the nature of the business within. They are the easiest signs to read and are well suited for both vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

Signs are used to draw attention to a business and to help develop the identity and image of that business. In a historic downtown like 's, signs should be selected wisely to complement the buildings and to avoid a clustered appearance. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee recommends and encourages that signs and awnings be simple, suitably sized, attractively designed, constructed using appropriate materials and be located properly to enhance the image of your business and the overall aesthetics of historic downtown Connellsville. In general, signs in 's downtown should follow these guidelines: 1. Use the smallest sign necessary to convey your message; 2. The sign should not dominate the facade. The shape and scale of the sign should complement the building. 3. Determine who you want to see your sign. If you want to attract pedestrians consider window signs, signs hanging from the entry, and signs above the doorway. Use awning signs and wall mounted signs to attract vehicular traffic. 4. Use materials which reflect and compliment the building materials; 5. If you use neon, it should be used carefully so as not to be overpowering. 6. Backlit plastic signs are not encouraged in the downtown; 7. Keep your message simple. Signs are generally a part of a complex, visual environment. 8. Avoid flashy colors. These colors should be used on a highway, not in the downtown.

Examples of symbol or blade signs

Awning and window signs can attract the attention of pedestrians

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Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Signage Lighting Signs: 1. Use external lighting fixtures rather than internally lit plastic fixtures. Best Practice: Use “gooseneck” style lighting fixture 2. Avoid using flashing lights of any kind Best Practice: Use compact fluorescent or LED energy efficient lights 3. Sign lighting should be directed to the sign itself 4. Lighting fixture designs, if visible, should be consistent across the façade and compliment the architectural period of the building.

Construction and Design:

Examples of symbol or good advertising and wayfinding signs

Sign Basics: 1. Obtain a sign permit from the city office. Size of signs must conform to the city’s building code. See appendix. 2. Signage should be installed in locations that do not cover up or destroy architectural features or historically significant details. 3. Signage should be mounted so that holes can be easily patched. Ideally, holes should be made in mortar joints, not into masonry units (bricks). Best Practice: reuse holes that exist. 4. Signage color should coordinate with the color and character of the building on which it is being placed.

5. Signs should be illuminated externally. Internally lit plastic signs, fluorescent or flashing lights are not recommended as they don’t reflect the historic nature of downtown. 6. Signs should be simple without too much detail. Best Practice: less is more. 7. Use display windows for creative signage, lettering and business logos. 8. Do not put too many signs on storefront display windows and doors. Signs should be sized and scaled to balance the structure. Do not hide or overwhelm the building.

1. Consider a return to or re-create period signage. Use lettering fashionable to the time period of the building. 2. Use artisan-crafted signs and quality sign materials made specifically by the sign industry 3. Use graphic elements and details of the building and architectural motifs as part of the sign design when feasible. 4. Lettering should be kept to a minimum and the message kept brief. A logo or illustration can be included to communicate the nature of the business. Lettering and logo designs should be graphically coordinated together. 5. Well designed signs that reflect the historic character of Connellsville are preferred.

Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Matching Grant for Signs: $500

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Masonry Brickwork and Masonry Basics: 1. When cleaning or removing paint from buildings that are either brick or masonry, it is recommended to use steam or low pressure water (no more than 300 psi) and soft bristle brushes. NEVER sandblast or use high pressure wash, or use abrasives on brick or masonry. 2. To preserve the original beauty and prolong the life of a building, only periodic cleaning and repointing are required. Repointing should be done by a professional with experience in historic materials. 3. Repoint brick and masonry facades when needed. Repointing is the process of removing deteriorated mortar from the joints of a wall and replacing it with new mortar. 4. When repointing, match new mortar to the original compressive strength, color, composition, depth and finished of the original joins. 5. Painted brick is not recommended unless the brick facade has already been painted. Paint will obscure defining features, such as join profiles and bonding patterns, and will also create an instant and continuing maintenance expense for the future. 6. Repair decorative brickwork and masonry whenever possible. Only replace decorative masonry features when they are completely missing, or too deteriorated to repair. Use existing physical evidence to guide the new work and to match the original features as closely as possible, replacement brick units should match the original in dimension and should be â&#x20AC;&#x153;toothed inâ&#x20AC;? to the original surface.

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It is very important to maintain a building's masonry skin, as neglect can lead to accelerated deterioration of the structure resulting in very costly damage. Locating problems with masonry does not require a trained eye, the most serious problems include mortar deterioration and brick decay. However, the origin of the problem and its proper remedies may require the opinion of a professional. Often damage to mortar or to masonry units is caused by water infiltration. It is imperative that masonry be properly drained, including adequate flashing and weeps. Building owners should inspect bricks and mortar for signs of water infiltration. If the mortar has become soft it will allow water to seep into the brick. After this occurs, the protective outer covering of the brick will deteriorate, requiring that the brick be replaced, at risk of compromising the structural integrity of the wall. When making repairs to deteriorated masonry: 1. Care should be taken to avoid obvious patching. The color, configuration, size of mortar joints and coursing of the existing masonry should be matched as closely as possible. Repointing (tuck-pointing) brick is often all that is required, but the same attention should be given to duplicating the old mortar strength, composition, color and texture. After patching or repointing it is recommended that surface treatments to repel water infiltration be applied. 2. If a masonry facade has historically been painted, the paint should not be removed from the masonry, nor should the type or color of the paint be radically changed. The paint acts as a protectant for the masonry and removing it may cause damage to the brick. 3. Cleaning masonry is only recommended when necessary to halt deterioration to the brick or to remove heavy soiling. If masonry is painted, and is still in good condition, cleaning is acceptable. If masonry is dirty, microorganisms can multiply on the masonry, damaging it over time. The decision to clean masonry is not easy, so seeking advise is recommended.

Examples of dirty. deteriorated or damaged brick

Brick tuck-pointing to reestablish surface integrity


Design Guidelines Windows provide a link and a barrier between what is happening on the inside and the world outside. This is especially true for commercial buildings. Storefront display windows bring visual interest to the streetscape and provide a means to show off what the business has to offer. They also provide natural light and ventilation to the interior spaces of the buildings.

Architectural Character: Windows Window Basics:

A poor choice of windows or improper maintenance can create significant energy loss 1. Maintenance, repairs, refinishing and can quicken the deterioration of a building. Windows also help give a building and restoration should be first character. Decorative trim, awnings, and even varying sizes and shapes of the glass attempted in lieu of replacement panes are commonly used to further distinguish and individualize the building. of existing historic windows if

possible. Windows are an integral part of the design of a structure. They are specifically sized and spaced depending on the size of the building, to serve a particular need, and work 2. It is not recommended to close up existing window openings. It in coordination with the doors to provide a linking between the inside and outside is recommended to reestablish activities. original window openings where

First floor windows are the main "communicators" and set the rhythm for other floors. Upper floor windows are for lighting interior spaces and providing ventilation and climate protection. Buildings that are considered ‘historic,’ must respect the size, placement, materials, and detailing of the window openings that "came with the building." New buildings must use windows to "fit in" with their neighbors so not to completely loose the original intent of the architect and builder, and diminish the value of the building.

they have been covered up or filled in 3. Energy efficient window are highly recommended. 4. Provide or re-establish day lighting with original windows and skylights where possible. Minimize glazing on east and especially west exposures to reduce heat gain. 5. Provide shading devices, operable window, shutters and thermal mass to fine tune these strategies.

New Window Basics:

Window needing reglazing to maintain weather proction

Avoid “quick fix” window replacements

Inappropriate window replacements

Traditional gridded windows are relatively easy to repair

1. Whenever possible, windows on upper floors should align vertically with windows and entrances on the first floor. 2. The rhythm of windows and façade openings and decorative window trim should be consistent with that of the original building 3. New windows should be compatible with the style, size, material, color and detail of windows on the existing building.

Maximum Matching Connellsville Facade Restoration Program: Grant for Facade Enhancement & Windows: $5,000

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Architectural Character: Streetscape

Streetscapes assist with attracting new residents, businesses, and visitors to the heart of the community. With careful implementation, a quality streetscape Design Guidelines will help to create more safe public spaces and generate a greater sense of community pride. The streetscape recommendations noted are also a conscious effort to distill historic character and provide a generally functional and common-sense approach to this most visible of public spaces. It’s important to avoid developing a standardized, theme park-like set of improvements. A good streetscape will balance old and new, embracing consistency with diversity as a general approach rather than a simple ‘beautification’ and homogenization. The term ‘streetscape’ typically refers to exterior public spaces located between street curbs and building facades. Inclusion of pedestrian crosswalks and traffic calming measures located within vehicular spaces are exceptions to this definition.

A diverse streetscape celebrates the uniqueness of the community

Simple streetscape elements such as flower boxes can add color and visual interest. Clocks and textured paving adds character.

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Design Guidelines An informal parking study of the downtown area indicated parking need based on the use of the building and on an estimate of the number of square feet the building contains. According to one model, a clothing store required an average of two parking spots per 1,000 square feet of space. This data suggests that a 2,000 square foot building would require four parking spaces. However, a government office requires only one tenth of a parking space per 1000 square feet. A 20,000 square foot government building would require only two parking spaces.

Architectural Character: Parking

The informal parking study done during the charrette suggests that there are adequate parking spaces for current uses, but the designated parking areas are not utilized efficiently and are not what many retail customers would consider convenient (direct line of sight to the front door of the destination). There are also concerns of lot maintenance and general aesthetic character. A more detailed parking study is recommended, but short-term recommendations would include a general clean up and resurfacing of the existing parking areas and simple landscape treatments. If current parking lots are developed into other uses, parking in the downtown will quickly become an issue of concern.

Some examples of attractive parking design

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

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Design Guidelines

Residential Development Guidelines: Existing Housing, Infill and Rehabilitation

The examples presented here are representative. They are from several different communtiies, but represent styles found in, and appropriate to, the City of Connellsville.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Neighborhood and Housing Guidelines

The neighborhoods generally maintain an historic pattern and character. Elements such as narrow, tree lined streets, serviceable alleys, narrow lots, and solid, roomy houses represent a time of great pride of place, as grew from a settlement on the Youghiogheny River to a center of the coal and coke industry. While recent years have seen a decline in some of the housing values, the neighborhoods near, and around downtown boast a wide array of housing types and architectural styles, incorporating late nineteenth and early twentieth century styles such as Greek Revival, Italianate, Georgian Revival, Arts and Crafts, and Queen Anne. The neighborhoods also display a diversity of housing quality, from well-kept and stately homes to simple duplex residences; from luxurious to affordable. Walkable proximity to Downtown’s business and cultural offerings, as well as reasonable access to the growing trail system are also distinct assets, making these neighborhoods a desirable place to own and rent. The goal of these guidelines is to enhance, celebrate, and preserve the unique architectural character of the Downtown Neighborhoods and to provide guidance for neighborhood infill and new development. These guidelines are divided into four sections: • First, a summary of properties that characterize the neighborhoods’ diversity of architectural styles and the properties that are well maintained, preserved, and/ or designed. This section stands as a gallery of “best examples” and sets the standard for preservation and infill development. • The second section of the study incorporates a series of examples of residential and commercial properties. In a “before and after” comparison; the properties are depicted as if repaired, preserved, and/or enhanced with architectural and landscaping elements in an variety of budget and commitment levels. The case studies are intended to serve as examples of how individual properties could be enhanced. They display a range of properties according to style and quality and should be viewed as illustrations of their potential, not as a condemnation of the condition or maintenance of any particular property. • The third section of the study shows proposed residential infill development for the neighborhood, which respects the traditional lot sizes and setbacks of the neighborhood. A range of facade options are shown, emphasizing the “curb appeal” of the new houses while maintaining a consistency with the architectural styles of the neighborhood. Various densities of use, ranging from singlefamily occupancy to conversions to multi-family apartments are explored within the same size footprint, illustrating a wide range of possibilities consistent with the character of the neighborhood. • The fourth section offers some very general guidelines for enhancement of the neighborhoods. While the revitalization effort must be done on a case-by-case basis, there are some general principles that can help focus the efforts.

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Design Guidelines The vision that these guidelines promotes is one that requires considerable investment of time and effort from residents and homeowners, but is one that provides a solid basis for the continued vitality and development of the neighborhood as a quality place to live. Creative strategies will be found to help in the cause. In the words of Ron Powers:

Neighborhood and Housing Guidelines

“If you always do what you always did, you’ll always get what you always got.” Issues such as absentee ownership, gentrification, affordable housing and inflated assessments, as well the costs of implementing theses proposals must come into focus as neighborhood revitalization progresses. In all cases, barriers to the improvement and preservation of the neighborhood’s character and viability must be discussed, analyzed, worked at and overcome, as this unique neighborhood comes to realize its true potential as home for a diverse and thriving community.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Examples of Distinction: Summary

photo from: citydata.com

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Historic neighborhoods often have a variety of house styles, sometimes on the same block. In Connellsville, one can see commercial and residential buildings dating from the mid-1800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in styles ranging from Italianate, Tudor, Foursquare, to Queen Anne. Each style has a particular architectural vocabulary, or elements, that distinguish it from other styles. To preserve that integrity of an historic neighborhood, such as those near downtown, it is important to preserve and rehabilitate those elements. The following pages describe the most commonly found house types in historic downtown , and offer some rehabilitation strategies for each.


Design Guidelines Style Italianate houses were generally built between 1840 and 1885 and are a revival style of the traditional Italian homes of the middle ages. They are one of the most common house styles found in Connellsville. Common features of Italianate houses include: typically built of brick or wood with carved or cast details; eaves that overhang widely, with decorative brackets; tall, double-hung windows, often topped with brackets or crowns; engaged ornamentation (pilasters, window head and sill ornaments, etc.); and often has a symmetrical facade.

Examples of Distinction: Italianate

Walls Siding should be restored to its original condition and material. Painted brick should be re-painted, as it is difficult to remove paint from brick without damaging its structural integrity. Paint colors should be historically accurate. Tall, narrow windows are a hallmark of the style. If restored or replaced, they should be left at the same dimensions.

Roof Italianate houses are susceptible to failure of the eaves and fascias from water and freeze-thaw cycling. Maintenance of gutters and downspouts is essential for the longevity of the roof. Roof ventilation is another area where this style of building is susceptible to failure; seek professional advice on how to provide adequate ventilation without destroying the historical character of the facade,

Landscape This style of home generally benefits from low evenly spaced foundation plantings, with specimen plantings to provide accents for stairs, doors and corners.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Examples of Distinction: Georgian/ Colonial

Style Georgian and Colonial Revival houses were popular between the 1880â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and 1950â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Among the most enduring house styles, these styles are very popular today for new construction. Common themes include symmetry, references to classical architecture, columns, and porches, often with a subtle twist, such as an implied porch, that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually constructed, or a broken pediment. Bay windows and Palladian windows are also common. Houses may be elaborate or simple, and may be folk, or vernacular architecture with a few Colonial Revival elements to set it apart.

Walls Siding for Georgian and Colonial Revival houses range from wood clapboards to brick. Often times these original materials are covered over with applied vinyl or aluminum siding, but where economically feasible, the original materials should be restored. Where original materials are covered, care must be taken not to destroy the integrity of elements, and to facilitate later removal of the coverings. Brickwork should be evaluated for integrity and repointed and reflashed as necessary.

Roof Georgian and Colonial Revival are most often gables, which are susceptible to failure at the valleys where roof pitches meet. Inspect these areas and determine whether the valley flashing needs repaired or replaced. Gutter maintenance will also help protect these areas.

Landscape These styles of home are very adaptable for formal arrangements or free form organic landscape designs. Deep or spreading rooted plants should be avoided near the buildings foundations or near underground drain tiles.

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Design Guidelines Style The Eclectic tradition includes many if not all stylistic examples that escape majority classification, but do address some distinctive stylistic categories, and may include exotic or a mixture of styles as part of the composition, or address a specific time, or culture romanticized in the period’s literature. Middle Eastern and Asian influences followed the Romantic period and were also referenced as part of the Lodge Organizations that were popular in the midwest’s development and settlement. Today, The word ‘Eclectic’ has been popularized to mean ‘things that don’t go together.’

Examples of Distinction: Eclectic

Walls May include any range of materials traditional to residential construction.

Roof Asian influenced or other exotic influenced designs may have parapets or other ornamentation in addition to gabled, hip, or flat roofs.

Landscape Some exotics may be included in typical examples but may also feature colorful flowering trees, exotic flowers and perennials.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Examples of Distinction: Queen Anne

Style The Queen Anne is what comes to most peoples’ minds when they think “Victorian house.” They are usually large, ornate, and painted in several colors. Built between the 1880’s and 1910’s, they were a very popular style and are still common. Common features of Queen Anne’s include: Varied rooflines, often with dormers and turrets; and trim under eaves and along roofline, often painted one or more colors different from the rest of the house. There may also be shingles or half-timbering under the eaves.

Walls When repainting, choose a base color for the siding, and a different color for each type of trim. Paint stores can suggest historically accurate color schemes. Preserve trim. Trim was generally made of wood, and as it is small, is often one of the first things to deteriorate. It is one of the key elements of a Queen Anne. Porches are another common element, and should be left open rather than enclosed

Roof Queen Anne’s are generally gabled, but often feature turrets with hipped roofs. The roofs of this style home are most susceptible to failure at the valleys where roof pitches meet. Inspect these areas and determine whether the valley flashing needs repaired or replaced. Gutter maintenance will also help protect these areas. An element often destroyed or removed from this style of home is ornate metalwork from the roof, along ridges, peaks and hips, especially. Every effort should be taken to preserve and restore these elements, which are often times discarded during reroofing projects.

Landscape These styles of home often feature formal arrangements or geometric landscape designs.

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Design Guidelines Style The Arts and Crafts style is group of folk and aesthetic styles, including the Bungalow, Shingle Style and others. They were built from the late 1800’s through the 1940’s and were one of the most popular house styles.

Walls

Examples of Distinction: Arts and Crafts

Siding types typically include from rough sawn wood clapboards, split shingles, to stucco with exposed timbers. The style was also the first to feature exposed brick in its residential origins in England.

Roof A variety of intersecting gables, hips, and angles are featured in the full range from small scale homes to large mansions. Intersections and drip edges are critical and demand maintenance over the life-span of the roof.

Landscape No distinguishing landscape features stand out in examples studied, however the origins of the style do acknowledge a rustic nature that rejected the intricate nature of the Queen Anne. Many early examples were constructed in and around the ‘rough’ countryside, so perennials and native plants may make a generous and sensitive compliment to the home in question.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Examples: Summary

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The case studies featured in this section were selected as examples that showed much potential for becoming â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;good neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; with some key improvements that fit a reasonable scope and budget. While not all the properties in the study area were considered the cases do represent the range of architectural styles and qualities of the neighborhood. Proposed improvements, as noted, are not necessarily limited to the property represented, and may be considered as ideas for other properties like the cases examined.


Design Guidelines Remove non-traditional cladding at commercial storefront and replace with appropriate materials and details. Restore original parapet and bracket, or provide a reasonable approximation. Do not remove, wrap in sheet metal or otherwise destroy these elements.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Provide awnings to enhance streetscape, improve energy efficiency and create a visual separation between uses by using siding, signs even light fixtures. Utilize painted signage as an attractive, effective and inexpensive element; utilize embossed or applied letter signage elsewhere. Avoid typical internally illuminated fluorescent signs. Provide flower boxes for visual interest and streetscape enhancement. Restore windows to more appropriate style and character

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Restore windows to more appropriate style and character Simple applied elements of appropriate materials and design can enhance an otherwise unexciting and historically unfriendly facade. Provide design elements that improve accessibility to people of all levels of mobility, as illustrated by this ADA compliant ramp. Decorative elements can also enhance the function of the building, like this larger porch roof, which sheds water and snow better than the existing low slope design. Provide elements like flags and plantings for visual interest.

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Design Guidelines Repoint, reflash and otherwise maintain exterior brickwork to ensure a longer building life. Replace windows and doors with units of a similar style, material and size to the original

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Where elements are missing, replace with duplicates or similar designs and materials to match the original, such as this handrail Provide historically appropriate appurtenances such as awnings and details such as beaded wainscotting.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Traditional details can be applied to enhance a plain facade and give the neighborhood a more traditional architectural feel During festive times of the year, promote expressions of the individual residents, such as the flags and garlands depicted here celebrating Independence Day Functional details like lightning rods and weather vanes are easy to install and maintain and add character Maintenance of planting beds and attention to plant selection can have a big effect on the curb appeal of a building for relatively little investment

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Design Guidelines Strip, fill, prime and paint exterior surfaces and maintain them to improve the value and longevity of your building. When replacing front doors in particular, utilize traditional designs and materials

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Replace missing elements, like the porch, shown here. Refer to old photographs and other means for determining the original details and replicate those where possible. Provide low maintenance pavers for safety and ease of use. New porch can be constructed of Concrete Masonry and treated wood for longevity and low maintenance.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Small changes such as replacing the lattice screening with traditional notched board railings can have a huge impact on the look of a building. Replace inconsistent or poor quality facade elements with historically correct durable components for long life and easy maintenance. Where pieces of original trim or ornamental details still exist, such as the shutters shown here, use originals as templates in fabricating missing components. Removing inappropriate fencing and landscaping allows for better curb appeal. The addition of simple elements such as flower boxes and light fixtures can add to the visual appeal of the structure.

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Design Guidelines Planting deciduous trees along the south and west of a building can provide shade in the yard for summer recreation and can drastically reduce energy consumption in some cases.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Terrace steep lawns for additional opportunities to provide plantings. Maintenance of site elements, like the damaged concrete of this stair not only makes the building look more attractive, but periodic maintenance will enhance the value of the property and make it last longer. Replace elements, such as this handrail, which are unsightly and unsafe and replace them with traditionally styled elements. Provide perennial planting beds for color and visual impact at relatively low cost

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

When altering the floorplan in a remodeling project, be aware of the effects those changes will have on the exterior of the building. A new, smaller window would allow light into this stairwell, improving aesthetics and safety. Handrails and guardrails are not just an important visual element, but an important safety element as well. When replacing windows and doors, use new units that have the same patterns, details and materials as the original; substitution with a smaller unit, then blocking in the left-over opening is unattractive, wastes energy and reduces the potential resale value of the building. Re-pointing masonry with the appropriate mortar type, color and joint is essential to both the appearance and the weathertightness of a wall. Adding landscaping greatly enhances the visual appeal of the structure.

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Design Guidelines Prune and maintain existing trees Where possible restore original window and door openings to provide light and air to the building, while maintaining the original character of the design.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Repair or replace damaged elements like this sill, especially where the element is intended to protect the building from moisture. When replacing windows and doors, use full sized replacements; the cost savings is minimal to use smaller units, but result in more air and water penetration, and are visually objectionable.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Replace cornice that has been removed. A cornice is not simply an aesthetic element, but helps shade the wall to keep the building cooler in the summer, and helps protect the upper windows from rain. Maintain and replace roofing systems as required to protect the building from moisture. When re-siding, use the same orientation and exposure as the original to maintain the original character.

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Design Guidelines Replace architectural elements with similar pieces. This column for example, may be replaced with a tapered column and trimmed out to match the remaining columns instead of leaving a plain replacement column that stands out as different from the rest of the facade.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Bedrooms require adequate sized windows for light and ventilation as well as to meet life safety codes. Provide adequately sized and positioned window units as shown. Provide a wider stair with adequate railings for safety and ease of use. Re-point the masonry supporting this porch and repair the concrete flatwork to ensure a long service life.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Maintenance of gutters, downspouts and splash blocks are perhaps the single most important component of periodic maintenance of owning a house. This building exhibits the significant water damage often associated with the failure that comes from putting off this maintenance. Repair/replace gutters and downspouts. Re-point masonry to repair and prevent further moisture damage. Scrape, patch and paint exposed woodwork to prolong its service life and improve its appearance. Replace non-contextual elements with appropriate period reproduction, such as the porch shown here. This patio and porch is more functional than the version currently in place, and provides a friendlier more â&#x20AC;&#x153;finishedâ&#x20AC;? appearance to this facade.

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Design Guidelines Repair/replace gutters and downspouts as required. Re-point existing masonry. Strip paint using appropriate methods, or if the condition and type of masonry involved suggests, scrape and repaint.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Repair/restore/replace appropriate doors and architraves to complete the architectural â&#x20AC;&#x153;lookâ&#x20AC;? of the building. The elements working together will improve the look of a building more than any one element alone can accomplish. Refer to standards section for specialty window restoration guidelines and examples. New desirable elements, such as porches, furniture, garages, etc., should be in a historically friendly or sympathetic style.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

During repair, be sure to carefully match new colors to the existing; either thoroughly clean the existing adjacent surfaces or paint the entire structure. Historically appropriate elements, such as these shutters rather than awnings help improve the look of the building by restoring the correct proportions to the facade. Replace spalling and cracked paving with new concrete or porous paving systems, like brick, shown here, for safety and improved appearance. Plantings are an important part in improving the appearance of the neighborhood with minimal cost.

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Design Guidelines Maintain steps and stairs; weed, patch any spalls or cracks; and repair/ replace handrails, as shown here, with historically appropriate elements. Scrape, fill, prime and paint all areas of failing paint to insure a good, longlasting protective covering for your building.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Use care when locating attachments to the home, like this satellite dish. The device would have worked equally well installed elsewhere on the building, rather than prominently on the front of the house.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Paint, ventilation and flashing are critical at all eaves, even those without gutters, shown here. As time and budget allow, restore/ replace damaged or missing architectural elements, such as the shutters, cornice and railings shown here. Maintenance of stucco and parging is especially important. Although these are very durable systems, once water penetrates their outer layers, they can quickly fail and begin to fall apart. Proper paint application and maintenance of flashings is necessary.

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Design Guidelines Maintenance of plantings is essential to keep the home looking its best. When a maintenance regimen is kept, it takes less effort to maintain landscape elements than those only maintained after long periods of untamed growth.

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Some remodeling projects, no matter how well intentioned, only result in lowering the value of the property and those around it. This saltbox-styled remodeling results in no gained floor area, but looks completely out of place. Work within the traditional lines of the style of the building whenever possible. Hanging baskets are low maintenance and very attractive. Maintain steps and railings for safety and appearance.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Rehabilitation Example: General

Enhanced landscaping, such as the deciduous trees shown here help keep the home cooler in summer and warmer in the winter. By replacing elements which have been lost over time, the building becomes more attractive, efficient and serviceable, without adding too much to the tax burden of a home. Examples of this type of improvement would be appropriate new windows, doors, and shutters. Larger elements can be added which drastically effect the resale value of a home, again without adding too much to the tax burden; examples of this type of change include replacing the missing porch, or replacing/repainting the damaged siding.

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Design Guidelines Infill opportunities exist throughout the study area. These vacant building sites are opportunities for new construction in styles, scales and materials that are sympathetic to the neighborhood, or better yet, enhance the neighborhood as a whole. Arranged around public transit stops, with sidewalks, bike paths, etc. can greatly improve the neighborhood.

Housing Infill Prototypes: Summary

Housing stock that has decayed to the point where it needs to be demolished provides another opportunity for this type of project. A variety of funding sources, such as Hope VI, will grant funds for this type of work.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Residential Street Options: Existing Conditions

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A typical residential grid street pattern was common in early 20th century development. Double parallel parking and two way traffic on all streets are featured. Sidewalks with greenways (of varied sizes) with street side trees provide shade and shelter. Residential unitsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; entrances address the street and feature porches for outdoor living and socialization in warmer months.


Design Guidelines A variation of a residential grid street pattern retains much of the original. Double parallel parking and two way traffic on all streets are featured. Sidewalks with greenways and trees provide shade and shelter. Pedestrian friendly “bulb outs” reduce crossing distances and extend the green space of corner lots. Period lighting is featured at each corner. Residential units’ entrances address the street and feature porches for outdoor living and socialization in warmer months.

Residential Street Options: Street Enhancements

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype: Alley Access to Garage

These infill prototypes illustrate the advantages of the alley loaded arrangement. The sideyard space is maximized, providing more greenspace, less construction cost and less maintenance for the narrow lot.

Note the placement of deciduous trees for solar protection in the summer and for enhanced solar gain in the winter. Also, note the alley loaded garage. By reducing the number of curbcuts along the main street, a more pleasant and even pedestrian environment is created and the expense of construction and maintenance of a driveway is eliminated. This also increases â&#x20AC;&#x153;sidewalk safety.â&#x20AC;?

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Design Guidelines The prototypes shown features a side approach driveway with rear detached garage, when alley thoroughfares are not available. Shifting the garage to one side slightly increases the net usable area of rear yard, varying with lot width. Avoid placing garages toward the street side of the property, as doing so creates a very unpleasant pedestrian environment, and minimizes social interaction between neighbors.

Housing Infill Prototype: (2) One Bed Units Stacked

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype: Over/Under Duplex

Dinette

Dinette

Kitchen

Kitchen

Living

Living Bath

Bath Utility

Bath

Utility

Bath

Bath Bedroom 1

Bedroom 1

This floor plan arrangement provides a single bedroom detached unit in keeping with appropriate lot sizes and housing character of the neighborhood. The lower floor â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access addresses the street side of the property, and features a covered porch. A second entrance/ exit at the rear provides easy access from the alley or side driveway from the garage.

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Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype: 2 Story, Row House/ Dbl. Entry 3 Bedroom

Dinette Bedroom 1 Kitchen Bath

Bath

Bath Utility

Bedroom 3 Living Bedroom 2

This floor plan arrangement provides a three bedroom single family detached unit in keeping with appropriate lot sizes and housing character of the neighborhood. The lower floor â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access addresses the street side of the property, and features a covered porch. A second entrance/ exit at the rear provides easy access from the alley or side driveway from the garage. The unit features three bathrooms, and locates all sleeping quarters on the second floor.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype: (2) Three Bed Units Stacked

Deck

Dinette

Bedroom 3

Bedroom 2

Kitchen

Bath

Bedroom 1

Bedroom 1

Bath

Kitchen

Living

Utility

Bath

Bath

Utility Bedroom 2

Bedroom 3

Living Dinette

Porch

This floor plan arrangement provides two three bedroom stacked units in keeping with appropriate lot sizes and housing character of the neighborhood. The lower floor â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s access addresses the street side of the property, and features a covered porch. A second entrance/exit at the rear provides easy access from the alley or side driveway from the garage. The upper floor unit enjoys access from a full width deck at the rear of the unit. Each unit features three bathrooms and two bathrooms. Homeowners may benefit from renting the upper unit to defray mortgage costs, house elderly, college age or other family members, or rent to the market.

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Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype Elevation: Italianate

Utilizing a standard sized lot, this building style is of a sympathetic style and scale to many of the surrounding homes, and could be constructed for an average budget for new residential construction in the area. Aesthetics and detailing recall and are sympathetic to the Italianate style and features roof dormers for additional natural light and character in the upper floor.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype Elevation: Eclectic

Utilizing a standard sized lot, This elevation is of a sympathetic style and scale to many of the surrounding homes, and could be constructed for an average budget for new residential construction in the area. Aesthetics and detailing recall and are sympathetic to the range of Eclectic styles surrounding the farmhouse tradition. A gambrel roof and rustic shutters are shown.

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This design, while appearing more modern in scale and geometry, contains historical references that allow it to be sympathetic to the other buildings in the neighborhood. Wood or vinyl siding or masonry materials can compliment the design well. Distinctive features such as the eye window in the upper floor add to the architectural character of the unit and the neighborhood.


Design Guidelines

Housing Infill Prototype Elevation: Arts & Crafts

Utilizing a standard sized lot, This elevation is of a sympathetic style and scale to many of the surrounding homes, and could be constructed for an average budget for new residential construction in the area. Aesthetics and detailing recall and are sympathetic to the range of Arts and Crafts styles surrounding the Victorian period. Ornamentation such as corbels, trim, shutters, and column capitals can be obtained off the shelf or manufactured from patterns.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Residential: General Considerations: Setbacks & Site Placement

common setback (or build-to) lines

The front of the house should align with the fronts of other houses

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Note: Homes built before the 1950s were not subject to zoning ordinances as we know them today, that require a standard setback distance. Developers of early neighborhoods understood the relationships of families to each other and the street and the importance of order in developing the neighborhood patterns. These kinds of building relationships are important to the integrity and character of the neighborhood.


Design Guidelines

Definitions/Glossary Adjacent or Abutting: To physically touch or border upon, or to share a common property line or border. “Adjacent” or “abutting” shall include properties or uses that are separated by a drive, street, or other public-dedicated right-ofway. Anchor: A metal clamp that helps prevent walls from bulging; often ornamented in appearance; the flat metal stars or other shapes placed into brick walls used to secure the structure. Arcade: A series of arches supported on piers or columns. The architectural surface treatments of a façade—elements connected by “joints”. The various parts of a façade put together in a joined way—the connectedness and visual connections of those elements. Awning: A roof-like structure often made of canvas or plastic, usually attached to the side of an exterior wall, which serves as shelter, over a storefront, window, door or deck. Baluster: One of a series of short pillars or uprights that support a handrail Balustrade: A series of balusters connected on top by a handrail and often on the bottom by rail; used on staircases, balconies, porches, etc. Berm: An earthen mound designed to provide visual interest, screen undesirable views, decrease noise, and/or control or manage surface drainage. Block Face: The properties abutting one side of a street and lying between the two nearest intersecting or intercepting streets, or nearest intersecting or intercepting street and railroad right-of-way, unsubdivided land, watercourse or city boundary. Buffer: Open spaces, landscaped areas, fences, walls, berms, or any combination thereof, used to physically separate or screen one use or property from another so as to visually shield or block noise, lights, or other nuisances. Building Form: The shape and structure of a building as distinguished from its substance or material. Building Mass: The three-dimensional bulk of a building height, width, and depth. Building Scale: The size and proportion of a building relative to surrounding buildings and environs, adjacent streets, and pedestrians. Bulkhead: the panel at the base of the display windows of a storefront; on the interior, it can be used to describe a boxed-in space suspended from the ceiling, enclosing mechanical or electrical equipment or lowering the ceiling height. Casement Window: A window that opens on hinges fixed to its vertical edge. Character Defining Features: any distinguishable architectural elements or characteristics that distinguish a building or other resources, assists in classifying the building a particular type, style, form, etc. and sets it apart from others. Column: A pillar, usually circular in plan. Usually it has a base, shaft and capital. Commercial Center, Large: A “large commercial center” contains one or more commercial buildings or establishments with 50,000 square feet or more (gross floor area).

Definitions/ Glossary

Anchor

Articulation

Awning

Baluster

Balustrade

Column

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Definitions/ Glossary

Column

Crenelation

Dentils

Engaged Column

Fanlight

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Commercial Center, Small: A “small commercial center” contains one or more commercial buildings or establishments and all the buildings in the center contain less than 50,000 square feet (gross floor area). Commercial Development: All retail, restaurant, service, hotels, motels, and similar businesses, but shall not include office or industrial uses. However, any office or industrial development or building that includes more than a twenty percent (20%) retail component by square footage shall be subject to these Commercial Design Guidelines and Standards. Cornice: A projection at the top of a wall; top course or molding of a wall when it serves as a crown. Two basic cornices are the box cornice (closed space) and the open cornice; the portion of the roof that overhangs a wall. Crenelation: Any decorative element that simulates the alternating squares (merlons) and spaces of a defensive parapet. Dentils: Small square blocks found in series on cornices and moldings. Eaves: The portion of a roof which projects beyond the wall. Engaged Column: A column or pillar that is in direct contact with a wall, usually half of a circular column. Façade: Front or principal face of a building, and any side of a building that faces a street or other open space. Fanlight: A semicircular or fan-shaped window with a radiating glazing bar system; usually found over entrance doors. Fence: An artificially constructed barrier of any material or combination of materials erected to enclose, screen, or separate areas. Fenestration Pattern: The arrangement of windows and other exterior openings on a building. Flashing: Pieces of non-corrosive metal used around wall and roof junctions and angles as a means of preventing leaks. Floor Area Ratio: The relationship of the total gross floor area of a building to the land area of its site, as defined in a ratio in which the numerator is the gross floor area, and the denominator is the site area. Guidelines: Shall mean advisory regulations. Guidelines are indicated by use of the terms “may” and “should.” Leaded Glass: Small panes of clear or stained glass that are held in position by means of lead strips. Lintel: A horizontal structural member that supports a load over an opening; usually made of wood, stone or steel; may be exposed or obscured by a wall opening. Major Tenant: Within a commercial center that does not fit the definition of “Large Commercial Center,” any user or tenant containing 15,000 square feet or more of gross floor area. Where more than one user or tenant in such a center contains more than 15,000 square feet, the user or tenant with the largest amount of gross floor area shall be considered the center’s “major tenant.” Masonry: Work constructed by a mason using stones, bricks, concrete blocks, tiles or similar materials; most often, the building blocks are joined by mortar. Maximum Extent Feasible: No feasible and prudent alternative exists, and all possible efforts to comply with the regulation or minimize potential harm or adverse impacts have been undertaken. Economic considerations may be taken into account but shall not be the overriding factor in determining “maximum extent feasible.”


Design Guidelines Maximum Extent Practicable: Under the circumstances, reasonable efforts have been undertaken to comply with the regulation or requirement, that the costs of compliance clearly outweigh the potential benefits to the public or would unreasonably burden the proposed project, and reasonable steps have been undertaken to minimize any potential harm or adverse impacts resulting from the noncompliance. Mixed-Use Development: A single building containing more than one principal permitted land use or a single development of more than one building containing more than one principal permitted land use. Such land uses may include office, retail, residential, or service uses such as hotels and motels. In a mixed-used development, the different types of land uses are in close proximity, planned as a unified complementary whole, and functionally integrated to the use of vehicular and pedestrian access and parking areas. Moldings: A continuous decorative band; serves as an ornamental device on both interior and exterior surfaces; often serves to obscure the joint formed when two surfaces meet. Mortar: A mixture of plaster, cement or lime with a fine aggregate and water, used for pointing and bonding bricks, stones or cement blocks. A typical lime mortar is made from one part slaked lime and six parts of sand. Natural Features: ”Natural features” include but are not limited to flood plains and surface drainage channels, stream corridors and other bodies of water, steep slopes, prominent ridges, bluffs, or valleys, and existing trees and vegetation. Orient/Orientation: To bring in relation to, or adjust to, the surroundings, situation, or environment; to place with the most important parts facing in certain directions; to set or arrange in a determinate position: as in ‘to orient a building.’ Ornament: Details added to a structure solely for decoration; to add shape, texture, depth, color and visual interest to an architectural composition. Pad Site: Typically used in the context of retail shopping center development, a building or building site that is physically separate from the principal or primary building and reserved for freestanding commercial uses, each such use containing no more than 15,000 square feet of gross floor area. Typical pad site uses include, by way of illustration only, free-standing restaurants, banks, and auto services. Parapet: A low wall or protective railing; often used around a balcony or balconet, or along the edge of a roof. Pilaster: A squared or rectangular column or shallow pier attached to a wall; frequently decorated to represent a classical column with base, shaft and capital. Pointing: The treatment of masonry joints by filling them with a high quality mortar; used to protect against weather or simply to improve the appearance of a masonry wall. Primary Abutting or Access Street: The street abutting a commercial development that carries the most traffic volume. If a commercial development abuts two streets that have traffic volumes within twenty percent (20%) of each other, the applicant shall designate which street is the “primary abutting or access street.”

Definitions/ Glossary

Ornament

Parapet

Pilaster

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Definitions/ Glossary

Quoins

SIgnage Band

String Course

Transom

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Primary or Principal Building: The building or structure on a commercial development site used to accommodate the majority of the principal permitted use(s). When there are multiple buildings on a commercial development site, such as in a shopping center, the primary or principal building shall be the one containing the greatest amount of gross floor area. Buildings sited on pad sites or free-standing kiosk/ATM machines cannot be “primary” or “principal” buildings. Quoins: Large stones or bricks used to decorate and accentuate the corners of masonry buildings. Laid in a vertical series, the blocks usually alternate between the two sizes. Some quoins actually serve to reinforce the structural integrity of the corners of buildings as well as being decorative in nature. Rehabilitation (historic): the process of returning an historic building and/or property to a state of utility through repair or alteration. Restoration: The process of returning a building and or property (as nearly as possible) to its appearance at a specific period of time in history based on historical research, suing the same construction materials and methods as the original. Rising Damp: The condition that exists when suction pulls groundwater into the masonry wall from the bottom up. This condition can be clearly identified. Setback Line: A line, parallel to the respective lot line and internal to the lot, that defines the required building setback. Signage Band: A continuous, flat, horizontal area above the first floor designed to provide advertising on commercial buildings; this area is usually incorporated into the storefront cornice’s entablature. Standards: Shall mean mandatory regulations. Standards are indicated by use of the terms “shall” and “must.” Steep Slopes: Any portion of a development site where the natural grade of the land has a slope of thirty percent (30%) or greater. String course: A continuous horizontal band of brick, stone or wood on exterior walls. Used for decorative purposes or as a means of breaking up a large expanse of wall surface. A string course can also function to shed rainwater. Also called a belt course or dripstone. Thoroughfare Street: ”Thoroughfare street” shall mean streets designated by the Master Plan as thoroughfares (arterials). Transom: A horizontal lintel or beam across a window, dividing it into stages or heights. It also can refer to a fixed window over a door or another window. Transitions: Generally, an array of tools and techniques designed to ensure compatibility between adjoining land uses that may differ by type and in intensity., including the following techniques: 1. Architectural Transitions: Designing and adapting the form of a building to take into consideration neighboring buildings and land uses. 2. Landscape Buffer and Screening Transitions: The use of landscaping, berms, fences, walls, or any combination of these, to buffer and screen a more intense land use from an adjacent, less intense land use.


Design Guidelines The following outline recommends the basic structure for The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee who could also serve as the review committee for an enhancement and beautification grant program. 1. Develop a five member The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee comprised of: • One member appointed by the Plan Commission; • One member appointed by the Chamber of Commerce or similar organization; • One elected official from the Town Council ; and • Two at-large members. * The elected officials and at-large members should be appointed by the City Council. The following rules are to apply to The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee: • Any member of The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee should recuse themselves from any discussion involving any property in which they have a direct interest, nor shall he or she pursue a grant award while serving on the committee; • All members shall score the grant applications independently and objectively; and • No member shall directly assist the applicants in applying for the grants. 2. Upon developing The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee a Building Owner Meeting shall be held to: • Make property owners aware of the guidelines and opportunities for building enhancement. • Make proper notification of the grant program and Building Owner Meeting; • Distribute the guidelines and applications (these should also be made available on-line); • Discuss and review the Building and Design Guidelines; • Announce the deadline for grant applications; • Make clear the scoring criteria for the grants; and • Answer questions.

The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee General Provisions

»»» Many communities that have initiated design review processes and building enhancement programs have offered regular workshops, often in association with local contractors, historic preservationist, architects, landscape architects and building supply retailers, to help property owners participate effectively and proactively in the program. Some communities have focused or targeted their efforts to a particular area such as downTown, an historic distric or a corridor. 3. All interested building owners must deliver their application to the City Council's office by the close of business by a certain date. No extensions or exceptions will be awarded. 4. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee will score grant applications according to the published Scoring Criteria. 5. Announcements of grant awards will be made by a specified date. 6. A press release announcing the grant recipients should be prepared for publishing in the next edition of the newspaper. 7. Work/Construction can begin immediately upon award. 8. All work must be completed by a determined Construction Deadline. 9. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee shall meet by a determined date to assess project progress. All grant projects will be reviewed for their adherence to the grant rules, expediency of the process and for meeting the project goals. 10. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee shall meet by a determined date to prepare a Program Report to the City Council. This report shall address the strengths and weaknesses of the grant program and make a recommendation for continuing, altering, or eliminating the program.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grant Application Guidelines

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The following are the Grant Application Guidelines which determine the eligibility and parameters for each applicant. 1. The maximum grant award is determined by category of improvement; 2. The grant will match a dollar for every dollar invested by the owner up to the maximum allowable grant award in the specified category. All additional costs associated with the improvements are the responsibility of the owner; 3. Only buildings in the defined district are eligible for the grant program; 4. All privately-owned buildings in the specified district are eligible for a grant. Owners of two or more buildings in the district are eligible for a grant for each building; 5. Decisions by The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee are final; 6. All improvements, as described in the grant application, must be completed within twelve (12) months from the award date, or be subject to deobligation by The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee. Project extensions and/or modifications may be awarded with the approval of a majority of The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee; 7. If work has not begun by the determined date, a report must be submitted to The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee describing the reasons for the delay, and offering a revised time schedule for completion. The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee may approve an extension or revoke the grant at that time; 8. A change to the scope of the project outlined in the grant application must be presented to The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee for approval. If the change is substantial, a decision will be made by The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee to deobligate the grant or allowed to continue; 9. Any deobligated grant project is eligible to reapply for another grant, if or when, additional funds are available; 10. Grant funds awarded to a building owner will be paid to the owner upon substantial completion of the project, at the discretion of The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee. The grants will be used to reimburse expenses incurred to complete the project. Material, consultant fees, and labor costs qualify for reimbursement; 11. Proof of all costs, fees and labor must be submitted to The Connellsville Main Street Design Committee prior to grant award disbursement; and 12. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweat Equityâ&#x20AC;? or in-kind donations will not count as matching funds.


Design Guidelines The Connellsville Main Street is offering Façade Restoration Grants from funding received from Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development’s Main Street Program. Project funding creates an incentive for private investment in the Central Business District restoration projects and property reinvestment. The awarding of grants is dependent upon funding from DCED and is based on the allocation of funds for the Façade Restoration Grant from the DCED. An attractive and energetic Central Business District is key to the success of Connellsville’s Downtown. Implementation of the Façade Restoration Grant Program will result in a more competitive and economically viable Central Business District. This Program is to encourage restoration projects of building facades and to enhance the building’s overall exterior appearance, thus creating a uniform and consistent Central Business District.

Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grant General Provisions

Eligible Applicants (see map) The Façade Restoration Grant Program is a 50/50 matching grant program that provides money to commercial property owners or business owners (with property owner approval) located within the designated Main Street area. Façade: shall be defined as that part of the building facing the street(s), including the entirety of the building from the ground up. Storefront: shall be defined as having its own unique entrance, interior space and display window. Process and Procedures: After an application is submitted and approved, the project can begin. Grants offered cannot be used to pay for work that is currently in progress or already completed. Applicants are required to meet with the Design Committee to discuss their project prior to completing the application process. Design assistance is available as needed. Call the Connellsville Main Street office to arrange these meetings. All potential structural issues should be reviewed by a licensed professional. Applications will be accepted for review at any time throughout the year. Priority will be given to the projects that meet the criteria and have the greatest overall impact on the downtown. An individual doing their own work will only be reimbursed for materials. The Façade Restoration Grant application is provided in the back of this guidebook. Submit the completed grant application form with the following: a. Applicant Identification and Property Owner Identification b. Location of Property c. Five (5) complete copies of the following: i. Written project description, ii. Design plans, drawings, schematic and photographs d. Contractor and material cost estimates and a projected schedule for completion of each eligible project. Two bids are required, however three are recommended. e. Matching fund verification, proof of financial responsibility f. Signatures of the Applicant and Property Owner g. Signed Hold Harmless Agreement h. Any required permits from city

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Faรงade Grant Application Parameters, Process and Procedures

The total grant amount will not exceed 50% of the total project cost up to a maximum of $ 5,000 or as otherwise noted. The grant cannot be used to pay for work that is currently in progress or has been completed. No more than one application per project will be funded. Funding for phased projects will be considered on a case by case basis. Eligible projects and their dollar amounts are as follows: [Note: these are maximum grant amounts]

Signs and Awnings

Maximum for awnings........................ $2,500.00 Maximum for signs................................ $500.00 This category is for the maintenance and repair of, or removal and replacement of existing signage and awnings, as well as the installation of new signage and awnings.

Exterior Restoration and Painting

Maximum ........................................... $5,000.00 This category refers to the repair, cleaning, refinishing, painting, restoration or replacement of exterior woodwork, decorative architectural elements, architectural sheet metal and cast iron elements. This category includes exterior masonry repairs, restoration, repointing, repainting (only if originally painted) or low-pressure water or steam cleaning.

Architectural elements and additions

Maximum ........................................... $5,000.00 This category refers to the construction of new additions. With respect to existing structures, the repair, replacement, installation, painting or restoration of windows (including display, ornamental and upper-story windows), shutters and exterior doors as part of storefront entrance ways is included. This category includes repair, replacement, installation, painting or restoration of cornices or parapets when part of faรงade.

Paving and Sidewalk Restoration

Maximum ........................................... $2,000.00 This category is for the maintenance and repair of, or addition of sidewalks, walkways, plazas and courtyards

Exterior Lighting

Maximum ........................................... $1,500.00 This category is for the maintenance and repair of, or addition of exterior lighting to building sites. Exterior lighting may include building mounted fixtures.

Lighting Signage

Maximum ........................................... $1,500.00 Exterior lighting may be used for illuminating signs, entrance ways, pathways, sidewalks and to light the building faรงade itself. NOTE: Change orders must be reviewed and approved by the Design Committee and will be done in a timely manner so as not to delay the project schedule.

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Design Guidelines Selection Process:

ƒƒ Grants will be awarded based upon the level of improvement(s), the accuracy of historic preservation and the vitality and significant impact the project will make to the downtown environment. Only complete applications will be accepted for processing. ƒƒ The grant application will be reviewed by the Connellsville Main Street Manager and Steering Committee President for completeness of information and supporting documents and compliances with the Façade Restoration Grant Program requirements. This review process will be completed within five working days. ƒƒ After the grant application is reviewed, it will be submitted to the Design Committee for review at their next scheduled meeting within 30 days. ƒƒ Only work approved by the Design Committee will be eligible for the Façade Restoration Grant. Project work may not commence until the applicant/ property owner receives a notice to proceed from the Main Street Manager. ƒƒ Applicant’s projects are required to meet all applicable codes and ordinances of the city of Connellsville. Applicants are also required to secure any necessary permit(s) from the City of Connellsville before work can commence. ƒƒ Once the project has been completed, the applicant must send a letter of project completion, an “after” photograph, copies of all receipts and proof of payment for materials and labor to the Main Street Manager. ƒƒ It is the responsibility of the grantee to fulfill financial obligations to all contractors and sub-contractors for the material and labor expenses. ƒƒ Once the work is completed and reviewed by the Connellsville Main Street Design Committee the Connellsville Main Street Steering Committee will submit grant check to the property owner/building owner in accordance with the terms of the grant. Work not completed in accordance with the approved project description may be denied payment.

Façade Grant Application Parameters, Process and Procedures

The following items should have been satisfactorily addressed: 1. The project has been completed in conformance with the design plan and/or project as submitted, reviewed and approved by the Connellsville Main Street Design Committee. 2. .Pre-approval of all changes in the project scope of work, contract change orders or materials has been obtained from the Design Committee 3. .The completion of final inspections, if required by the City of Connellsville. There will be no reimbursement if violations of ADA codes or city codes exist. In addition, the Design Committee must ensure that all aspects of the project have been satisfactorily completed.

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Model Scoring Criteria for Connellsville Main Street Facade Restoration Grants

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The following criteria will be used to score all grant applications. The maximum score is 100 points. 1. Amount of matching funds (20 point maximum): The minimum amount for matching funds is one dollar per every grant dollar. If the matching amount exceeds the minimum amount, additional points will be awarded. The below chart describes the scoring for matching fund amounts. Minimum match ($1 match per $1 grant):......10 points Exceeds $2 match per $1 grant:......................15 points Exceeds $3 match per $1 grant:......................20 points 2. Readiness to proceed (15 point maximum): Projects that demonstrate that they can be started immediately will be awarded more points than projects that cannot start for several months. Projects that are not ready to proceed have a higher likelihood of not being completed within the twelve (12) month deadline. Furthermore, a goal of this program is to make an impact on the existing conditions as soon as possible. If the improvements can be started and completed within a short time frame, a higher point scoring will be awarded. Projects that are ready to proceed immediately will be awarded the maximum points. Projects that have considerable steps to accomplish prior to being ready to proceed will be awarded less than the maximum. 3. Demonstration of need (15 point maximum): Additional points will be awarded to building owners who demonstrate a need for the grant due to financial constraints, hardship, or due to emergency. Projects that can be afforded by the owner and that are not in an emergency situation will not score as high. 4. Degree to which the project follows the Building and Design Guidelines (20 point maximum): Building and design guidelines have been developed to steer building improvement decisions, to ensure consistency throughout the downtown, and to ensure quality improvements. These guidelines should be followed where applicable. The degree to which the Building and Design Guidelines are followed will determine the scoring in this category. Projects which disregard the Building and Design Guidelines shall receive few or no points in this category. 5. Discretionary scoring (30 point maximum): The discretionary score will be determined using the following criteria: a. existing condition of building - buildings which are in deteriorated condition, or are in disrepair will score higher; b. impact to the overall structure; c. impact to the overall community or target area; d. impact to the current business or operation in the building; e. occupancy of building - buildings which are vacant will take priority; and f. amount of grant request.


Design Guidelines Applicant’s Name

Façade Grant Application

Business Name Project Site Address Mailing Address (if different from project site address) Business Phone Business Fax Business Email Are you the owner(s) of record of the subject property__Yes __No (please complete below. Property Owner’s Name Project Owner’s Address Project Owner’s Phone Brief Project Description: Please provide a description of the project, goals, project timeline. Attach any additional description/documentation.

For Connellsville Main Street Use Only Date Application Received: By: Target Area Location? oYes oNo Code Compliance? oYes oNo Financial Responsibility oYes oNo Signed: Main Street Manager, Connellsville Main Street Date President, Connellsville Main Street Date Design Committee Approved? oYes oNo Connellsville Main Street Design Committee Chairperson Date

Estimated project cost: Indicate the appropriate category associated with the project. o

Signs/Awnings

o

Exterior Painting and restoration

o

Additions and Architectural Elements

o

Site and Building Enhancements

o

Paving and Sitescaping

o

Walls and Fences

o

Exterior Lighting

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

Façade Grant Application If you have questions regarding the completion of this application or the eligibility of your project, please call the Connellsville Main Street office at 724-

Anticipated Project Start Date: Additional funding source(s)—check all that apply to your project o

Cash

o

Bank Loan

o

Other (please specify and describe below)

he applicant acknowledges the terms and conditions associated with the Façade Restoration Grant Program and agrees to comply with all of its requirements.

Signature of Applicant Date Signature of Property Owner of Record (if different than above) Date

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Submit grant applications to:

Connellsville Main Street

Connellsville, PA 15425


Design Guidelines Release executed on the________day of _______________, 20__, by ___________________and____________________of________________________, Property Owner (Tenant if applicable)

Release and Hold Harmless Agreement For Connellsville Façade Grant Program

Street Address City of Connellsville, Fayette County, State of Pennsylvania, referred to as Releasor(s). In consideration of being granted monies for restoration, modifications, signage or other physical changes to the property located at the above address, the Releasor(s), understands that they are solely responsible for providing their own contractors and to assure that those contractors are fully insured and licensed and have obtained all necessary permits in accordance with Borough and State regulations. The Releasor(s) waives, releases, discharges and covenants not to sue the Connellsville Main Street program for loss or damage, and claims or damages therefore, on account of any work that has been performed in accordance with City or State guidelines. Releasor(s) agrees that this release, waiver, and indemnity agreement is intended to be as broad and inclusive as permitted by the laws of the State of Pennsylvania and that if any portion of the agreement is held invalid, it is agreed that the balance shall, notwithstanding, continue in full legal force and effect. Releasor(s) further states that it has carefully read the above release and knows the contents of the release and signs this release as its own free act. Releasorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s obligations and duties hereunder shall in no manner be limited to or restricted by the maintaining of any insurance coverage related to the above referenced event. This release contains the entire agreement between parties to this agreement and the terms of this release are contractual and not a mere recital. Date this ______________day of _____________, 20__. Property Owner Signature Witness

Tenant Signature (if applicable) Witness

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City of Connellsville Design Guidelines

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Multi-Municipal Comprehensive Plan Appendix