{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

FEBRUARY 2020 WWW.ARTTIMES.CO.ZA


X

William Kentridge b.1955 South Africa Whilst Reaching Down (Slowly), 2013 | Estimate: R3 000 000 – 5 000 000

PUBLIC PREVIEW Wednesday 12 February 12pm – 5pm Thursday 13 February 10am – 5pm Friday 14 February 10am – 3pm AUCTION Friday 14 February at 3pm VENUE OroAfrica House, 170 Buitengracht Street, Cape Town e-catalogue available online


Modern & Contemporary African Art 14 February 2020

Abdoulaye Diarrassouba (Aboudia) b.1983 Cote d'Ivoire Untitled, 2013 | Estimate: R130 000 – 160 000

SALE ENQUIRIES CAPE TOWN

+27 21 418 0765 | +27 83 391 7235 | ct@aspireart.net

JOHANNESBURG

+27 11 243 5243 | +27 84 444 8004 | enquiries@aspireart.net

PARIS

+33 6 22 31 3787 | c.person@piasa.fr | m.denis-lutard@piasa.fr

www.aspireart.net | www.piasa.fr


Modern + Contemporary Art 193 Gallery (Paris) | 31 Project (Paris) | 313 Art Project (Paris

– Paris (Paris) | A. Galerie (Paris) | A&R Fleury (Paris) | A2Z Art Gallery (Paris/Hong Kong) | AD G

Aedaen Gallery (Strasbourg) | Galería Albarrán Bourdais (Madrid) | Alzueta Gallery (Barcelona) | Gale

(Zürich) | Ana Mas Projects (Barcelona) | Galerie Ariane C-Y (Paris) | Artco Gallery (Aachen/Cape Town

im Breisgau) | Art Sablon (Brussels) | Galerie Arts d’Australie – Stéphane Jacob (Paris) | Art to Be Galler

Royale – Galerie Valérie Bach (Brussels) | Galerie Cédric Bacqueville (Lille) | Galerie Ange Basso (Pa

Albert Benamou, Barbara Lagié, Véronique Maxé (Paris) | Galerie Renate Bender (Munich) | Galerie B

Claude Bernard (Paris) | Galerie Thomas Bernard – Cortex Athletico (Paris) | Galerie Bert (Paris) | Galeri

Galerie Binome (Paris) | Bogéna Galerie (Saint-Paul-de-Vence) | Brisa Galeria (Lisbon) | Ségolène Bros

Pierre-Yves Caër Gallery (Paris) | Galerie Capazza (Nançay) | Galerie Chauvy (Paris) | Galerie Chevalier

Cutts Gallery (Toronto) | Creative Growth (Oakland) | David Pluskwa Art Contemporain (Marseille) | Ga (Lyon/Paris) | Dilecta (Paris) | Galería Marc Domènech (Barcelona) | Galerie Dominique Fiat (Pari

(Marseille) | Galerie Dutko (Paris) | Galerie Jacques Elbaz (Paris) | Galerie Eric Mouchet (Paris) | Espace

Galerie ETC (Paris) | Galerie Valérie Eymeric (Lyon) | Lukas Feichtner Galerie (Vienna) | Flatland (A

Foco (Lisbon) | Francesca Antonini Arte Contemporanea (Rome) | Freijo Gallery (Madrid) | Galerie P

Galerie Claire Gastaud (Clermont-Ferrand/Paris) | Galerie Louis Gendre (Paris/Chamalières) | Gim

Galerie Michel Giraud (Paris/Luxembourg) | Gowen Contemporary (Geneva) | Galerie Philippe Gravier

Arthies) | H Gallery (Paris) | H.A.N. Gallery (Seoul) | Galerie Ernst Hilger (Vienna) | Galerie Eva Hobe

Breyne Gallery (Brussels/Paris) | Galerie Hurtebize (Cannes) | Galerie Jeanne Bucher Jaeger (Paris) (Paris) | Espace L (Geneva) | Galerie La Forest Divonne (Paris/Brussels) | Galerie Lahumière (Par

(Zurich) | Lancz Gallery (Brussels) | Alexis Lartigue Fine Art (Paris) | Anna Laudel (Istanbul/Düsseldor

Lelouch (Paris) | Galerie Françoise Livinec (Paris/Huelgoat) | Galerie Loft (Paris) | Victor Lope A

(Barcelona) | Galerie Daniel Maghen (Paris) | Kálmán Makláry Fine Arts (Budapest) | Galerie Mark Hac

Anna Marra (Rome) | Maurice Verbaet Gallery (Knokke Heist/Berchem) | Galerie Minsky (Paris) | Galerie Mo

Metz) | Galerie Frédéric Moisan (Paris) | Mo J Gallery (Seoul/Busan) | Galerie Lélia Mordoch (Paris/

(Madrid) | Galerie Najuma Fabrice Miliani (Marseille) | Galerie Nec Nilsson et Chiglien (Paris) | Niki Cr

Galerie Nathalie Obadia (Paris/Brussels) | Galerie Oniris – Florent Paumelle (Rennes) | Opera Gallery

(Paris) | P gallery sculpture (Athens) | Galerie Paris-Beijing (Paris) | Galerie Perahia (Paris) | Pigment

Galerie Polaris (Paris) | Galerie Provost–Hacker (Lille) | Galerie Rabouan Moussion (Paris) | Raibaudi W

Rebecca Hossack Art Gallery (London) | Red Zone Arts (Francfurt am Main) | Galerie Richard (Paris

Véronique Rieffel (Paris/Abidjan) | J.-P. Ritsch-Fisch Galerie (Strasbourg) | Galeria São Mamede (Li

(Paris) | Galerie Brigitte Schenk (Cologne) | School Gallery/Olivier Castaing (Paris) | Septieme Gallery (

(Seoul) | SIRIN Copenhagen Gallery (Frederiksberg) | Galerie Slotine (Paris) | Galerie Véronique Smag

Smulders & Galerie Karsten Greve (Paris) | Michel Soskine Inc. (Madrid/New York) | Gallery SoSo

(Brooklyn) | SPARC* Spazio Arte Contemporanea (Venice) | Structura Gallery (Sofia) | Galerie Tam

Osaka) | Templon (Paris/Brussels) | Luca Tommasi Arte Contemporanea (Milan) | Galerie Traits Noirs (P

Trigano (Paris) | Galerie Univer/Colette Colla (Paris) | Un-Spaced (Paris) | Galerie Vallois (Paris) | Ga

Viltin Gallery (Budapest) | Galerie Wagner (Le Touquet-Paris-Plage/Paris) | Galerie Olivier Waltman (P

Esther Woerdehoff (Paris) | Wunderkammern (Rome/Milan) | Galerie XII (Paris/Los Angeles/Shangha (Lima/Paris) | Galerie Géraldine Zberro (Paris) | Galerie Zink Waldkirchen (Waldkirchen).


s/Seoul) | Galerie 8+4

Galerie (Montpellier) |

erie Andres Thalmann

n) | Artkelch (Freiburg

ry (Lille) | La Patinoire

aris) | Galerie Belem/

Berès (Paris) | Galerie

ie Bessières (Chatou) |

ssette Galerie (Paris) |

r (Paris) | Christopher

alerie Michel Descours s) | Double V Gallery

e Meyer Zafra (Paris) |

Amsterdam) | Galeria

Pascal Gabert (Paris) |

mpel & Müller (Paris) |

r (Paris/Saint-Cyr-en-

2th Grand Palais 5th April www.artparis.com 2020

er (Paris) | Huberty &

) | Galerie Koralewski is) | Galerie La Ligne

rf) | Galerie Jean-Marc

Arte Contemporáneo

chem (Paris) | Galleria

Modulab (Hagondange/

An Overview of the French Art Scene:

/Miami) | Galeria MPA

Common and Uncommon Stories

ryan Gallery (Lagos) |

y (Paris) | Orbis pictus

Southern Stars:

t Gallery (Barcelona) |

An Exploration of the Iberian Peninsula

Wang Gallery (Paris) |

s/New York) | Galerie

gghe (Paris) | Caroline

o (Heyri) | Space 776

ménaga (Paris/Tokyo/

Paris) | Galerie Patrice

alerie Vazieux (Paris) |

Paris/Miami) | Galerie

ai) | Galerie Younique

List of exhibitors of 7/01/2020

isbon) | Galerie Sator

(Paris) | Gallery Simon


@ict_artfair

@ICTArtFair

@ICTArtFair


ART TIMES FEBRUARY EDITION 2020

CONTENTS Cover: Conrad Botes, SOUTH AFRICAN (1969-) The Temptation to Exist I, 2011, Acrylic on Canvas, 200 x 130cm Struass & Co. Contemporary Art Auction, Sat 15 Feb 2020

12 M.O.L.5 ON NATURE,RALPH WALDO EMERSON, AND PARIS. Ashraf Jamal

20 ICTAF 2020

Ten reasons to experience art from Africa and the world

36 AD-REFLEX

Hindsights and Foresights

48 OFENTSE SESHABELA Democrazy

54 THK Gallery

The grass is always greener on the other side: the photography of Johno Mellish

60 DR ESTHER MAHLANGU PRESENTS Cape Town Art Week 2020

64 RITES OF PASSAGE

Birth, death and every damn thing in-between

72 ART BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE Unsung South African artists

80 UPROOT

Emma Willemse’s quest to make notions visible

84 SUE MARTIN

Disrupting surfaces and breaking boundaries

92 DECADES IN WAITING The art of NWU Alumni Unibo

102 BUSINESS ART NEWS

A bumper offering of upcoming SA Fine Art Auctions

120 ARTGO

Art exhibition highlights nationally Kirsten Sims. Sink or Swim, 2019, Mixed media on board, 810 x 1115mm, Salon91


From the editor

SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION

CONTACT ART TIMES Tel: +27 21 300 5888 109 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock, Cape Town EDITOR Gabriel Clark-Brown editor@arttimes.co.za

Johno Mellish, The Day That David Goldblatt Died, Dias Beach, Mossel Bay, 2018, Chromogenic print. Courtesy THK Gallery, be sure to read Sven Christian article on Johno Mellish.

A

fter a long summer break, the art world wakes up with renewed vigour by bringing out its best for the Investec Cape Town Art Fair. The ICTAF marks the first firm heartbeat of the 2020 art financial year and this year. Judging from the strong work flowing across my desktop this last two months, we are in for a kick ass year - artists are working harder, determined to make incredible work to get through a tough financial climate. In addition to the ICTAF opening days we also have important contemporary art auction sales by Strauss, Aspire and Welz who contribute to the tsunami of energy and present even more opportunity of owning a special work. Lastly, I would like to thank all of our readers and advertisers for your support. We might not be the oldest art magazine but we have produced by far the most amount of quality contemporary editions over the past 14 years. In addition we have made it our mandate to reach and inspire the largest network of SA artists and art lovers (just under a million on a daily basis). We would like to say that your love for art inspires us and makes our enjoyment of this special time in the art world valued and magical.

Gabriel Clark-Brown

ADVERTISING & MARKETING Eugene Fisher sales@arttimes.co.za ART DIRECTION & DESIGN Brendan Body DIGITAL MEDIA & EXHIBITION LISTINGS Jan Croft subs@arttimes.co.za ARTGO CONTENT info@artgo.co.za RIGHTS: THE ART TIMES MAGAZINE RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY MATERIAL THAT COULD BE FOUND OFFENSIVE BY ITS READERS. OPINIONS AND VIEWS EXPRESSED IN THE SA ART TIMES DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT THE OFFICIAL VIEWPOINT OF THE EDITOR, STAFF OR PUBLISHER, WHILE INCLUSION OF ADVERTISING FEATURES DOES NOT IMPLY THE NEWSPAPER’S ENDORSEMENT OF ANY BUSINESS, PRODUCT OR SERVICE. COPYRIGHT OF THE ENCLOSED MATERIAL IN THIS PUBLICATION IS RESERVED.

@ARTTIMES.CO.ZA

10


M.O.L.5

ON NATURE, RALPH WALDO EMERSON, AND PARIS. Story and photos, Ashraf Jamal

E

xiting the plane at Charles de Gaulle I left I vital document in the pouch in front of my aisle seat, Robert Pogue Harrison’s book, Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition. The loss would prove increasingly vexing while in Paris, a city whose exquisite gardens and tree-lined boulevards reminds one forcibly of the value of cultivation and ‘the gardener’s vocation of care’. For Pogue Harrison the matter was deeper still, for gardens – mythic or real – define the best in us, despite our unerring capacity for destruction. And so, to compensate for this loss, two days later I entered a bookshop that overlooks The Tuileries and purchased a copy of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s best loved work, Nature, despite the fact that another languished in my bookshelf in Cape Town. At night, after long days walking the streets of Paris, paying homage to its great museums – the D’Orsay, Louvre, L’Orangarie, Jeux de Paume, Pompidou – I’d reread Emerson, pausing as I recalled the force of the following words … ‘that nothing can befall me in life – no disgrace, no calamity (leaving me my eyes), which nature cannot repair. Standing on the bare ground – my head bathed by the blithe air and uplifted into infinite space – all mean egotism vanishes. I become a transparent eyeball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or parcel of God’.

For the sceptic these are heady words. Not for me. In rereading Emerson, I understood what makes Paris unique. It is nature, human and otherwise. No city, to my mind, has better consecrated life as art, the natural world as a portal to the divine. It is Monet of course who stands at this portal, though he is not alone. Monet dedicated his monumental paintings of water lilies to ‘those with nerves exhausted’, who could find calm by looking at his paintings and follow ‘the restful example of those still waters’. And there is no doubt, when seated before these paintings in L’Orangerie, that it is this calm which infuses one. There is a caveat however, because we are caught between a ‘vocation of care’ and destruction. In short, we fail to recognise what is best in us and for us. Our eyes are not ‘transparent’ but afflicted by a perceptual glaucoma. We look, but we don’t see. Worse, our eyes are foreclosed by a very particular cataract – the camera lens. Everything we see is seen second hand, or not seen at all. The desire to place oneself before a painting and record one’s presence therein has become a plague. One doesn’t see Monet’s lilies one sees one’s grinning mug in front of it. I witnessed this hijack on thousands of occasions, most horrifically so at the Louvre in which people lined in droves to take a selfie in front of a heavily secured stage with the Mona Lisa at its epicentre. There were four other portraits of women which to my mind were equally compelling, yet no one stopped to linger there.

“No city, to my mind, has better consecrated life as art, the natural world as a portal to the divine.” 12

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


I was recently and intriguingly told that the first selfie occurs in Ridley Scott’s film, Thelma and Louise, a factoid I will revisit. Another, however, intrigues me more. That the selfie first came into being when a drunken Australian lout recorded his puke-strewn mug while lying smug and snug beside a toilet bowl. Whatever the truth – and these day’s truth has become dangerously relative – what is glaringly in evidence is our desire to find ourselves at the centre of things. We must be seen to be, to exist, as players on histories ephemeral stage. Our mugs have become post its, as jaundiced and facile as a smiley face. Emerson’s ‘transparent eyeball’ is the antidote to this disease. How else are we able to allow the ‘currents of the Universal Being’ to pass through us? ‘Retrograde’ was the word directed at me by a chiding friend when I recounted the pleasures which a potentially pure apprehension of art allowed. A backwards move, the slur also carries a degenerate and inferior quality. I’m not sure I agree. Yes, Impressionism today is mistakenly perceived as kitsch. But to what end? Why is it that the great early modernists can be revered and yet, in the case of Monet, be simultaneously negated? Surely there is something wrongheaded in the long-standing valorisation of the New York centric Pop Art and Abstract Expressionist movements at the expense of a Paris centric art dedicated to understanding the mysteries of nature, form, and light? Surely Emerson has a point in declaring that ‘When a man lives with God, his voice shall be as sweet as the murmur of the brook and the rustle of corn’? I am not a naturalist at the expense of the postindustrial tech centred world which consumes us today. These states are not mutually exclusive. It is just that, in Paris, I profoundly recognised the urgent need to restore the Rights of the Human and natural world. In a very different yet equivalent way, the fifth floor of the Pompidou also demonstrated the power of human insight untainted and unmediated by a technology that seeks to intercept and antedate that experience. I am not saying that tech does this per se. As the South African sound artist, Jenna Burchell, reminds us, tech can help us to understand the soul. She, however, is an exception to the rule. What we love today and choose to align ourselves with is our aridity. We are Nietzsche’s ‘Last Man’, complacent, smug, content to wallow in easy gratification and unfought for pleasures.

14

On the fifth floor of the Pompidou, however, another more genuinely experimental battle was waged. Here it was Matisse who stood at the portal. Matisse who understood Emerson’s recognition that ‘Nothing is so fleeting as form; yet never does it quite deny itself’. At the D’Orsay I overheard a debate concerning the relative merit of Monet and Matisse. The artists are markedly distinct, but the question reinforced the centrality of these two early modern artists in the Western imagination. They are our Scylla and Charybdis, exemplary is their exploration of ‘fleeting form’. Both however stand on a ‘bare earth’, both, after Emerson, understand ‘A man is a bundle of relations, a knot of roots whose flower

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


and fruitage is the world’. It is this profound connectedness which sticks and inspires us. It is their joy and wonder which remains. At the Museum of Contemporary Art, which stands alongside Palais de Tokyo, I stumbled upon a shrine dedicated to Matisse. His dancing figures, painted in his 60s, possess a magical hovering momentary beauty which reminds us of what the eye can see and the body feel when given the chance to do so. Not all of life is about speed and instantaneity. The quick-fix is forgettable. What lingers longer is our ability to find a sacrament in the everyday. For while Matisse’s paintings or dancers, or Monets’ of water lilies, are vast in scale, they are also instances of the sublime caught in miniature. As Emerson subtly phrases it, ‘Nature is a

mutable cloud which is always and never the same’. The eternal exists in the instant. It is this realisation which Paris, with its watery thread, its gardens, arcades, market places, cobbled streets, and churches dedicated to art, so soulfully expressed. A city is a living organism after all, and the Jesuit priest, Michel de Certeau, understood this all too well. It was heartening and reassuring to see someone reading his book as I raced through the city’s underground metro towards my pod, a bunkbed in a room which accommodated six strangers at the Peoples Hostel in Paris’s 12th precinct. Because, after long days of walking, and standing, and looking, one needs solace and quiet, and, in my case, a wedge of brie, bread, pulped juice, and vodka.


16

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


‘Nature is a mutable cloud which is always and never the same’.


The encounters with artworks are too numerous to record. Besides, each of us has a very different take. What we single out is ours. There were the requisite nineteenth century greats, Manet’s ‘Olympia’, Courbet’s ‘Origin of the World’, Gericault, Ingres, Delacroix. However, Edouard Vuillard particularly drew me, if only because I was unaware of the extent of his gift. His ‘Portrait de Madame Frantz Jourdain’, painted in 1914, proved to be one of my most stirring encounters. I was wholly drawn in, captured by the light and the lady ruefully basking in it. Then again, I was also enraptured by Henri Martin’s ‘Portrait de mon Fils’, of a dapper man, coolly insouciant, in a glittering light-flooded path and garden. I mention these glorious paintings to remind myself and the reader of the depth and breadth of the works on view, and the time it takes to truly see the little we can. I never made it to the Rodin Museum and Sculpture Park, never saw his famous figure of ‘The Poet’, otherwise known as ‘The Thinker’. Nevertheless, contemplation was everywhere to be found. At 8am on a Sunday

18

I found myself in the Tuileries before another adamantine figure, bent and caught in some excruciating agony. The affliction – psychic, emotional – was inescapable. Paris, after all, is a place of the ravaged mind and contested soul, the very heart of the battle in the Western world on behalf of the Rights of the Human. Sculpted in marble by Henri Vidal, the figure stood starkly cut out against a clear blue sky. And, in that moment, I recognised myself, my pain, my fears and regrets, but, most of all, my will, in the midst of darkness, to thrive, move on, engage, love. For as Emerson has sagely reminded us, ‘The reason why the world lacks unity, and lies broken and in heaps, is because man is disunited with himself. He cannot be a naturalist until he satisfies all the demands of the spirit. Love is as much its demand as perception. Indeed, neither can be perfect without the other. In the uttermost meaning of the words, thought is devout, and devotion is thought. Deep calls unto deep’.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


MODERN & CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART Auction in Cape Town : Friday 14 February 2020 at 15:00 (GMT+2)

Marc Padeu (1990, Cameroon) Untitled - 2019 (detail) Acrylic and glitter on canvas - 189 × 209 cm

Marlene Dumas (1953, South Africa) Oktober 1973 - 1973 (detail) oil and water-based paint on canvas - 1835 × 122.5 cm

Zemba Luzamba (1973, Democratic Republic of Congo) New Generation 3 - 2019 (detail) Oil on canvas - 134 × 169 cm

William Kentridge (1955, South Africa) Drawing from Other Faces (Healing To All in Global) - 2011 (detail) Charcoal, conté and collage on paper - 57 × 84 cm

VIEWING AND AUCTION LOCATION Oro Africa House 170 Buitengracht Street Cape Town - South Africa PUBLIC PREVIEW Wednesday 12 February 2020 from 12:00 to 17:00 (GMT+2) Thursday 13 February 2020 from 12:00 to 17:00 (GMT+2) Friday 14 February 2020 from 12:00 to 15:00 (GMT+2)

ABSENTEE AND TELEPHONE BIDS bids@aspireart.net | Tel. : +27 71 675 2991 (South Africa) GENERAL ENQUIRIES JHB | enquiries@aspireart.net | Tel. : +27 11 243 5243 CT | ct@aspireart.net | Tel. : +27 21 418 0765 (Paris) INFORMATIONS PIASA c.person@piasa.fr | m.denis-lutard@piasa.fr Tel. : +33 62 231 3787

INFORMATION, UPCOMING AUCTIONS & RESULTS WWW.PIASA.FR | WWW.ASPIREART.NET PIASA SA - agrément n° 2001-020 - Commissaire priseur habilité : Frédéric Chambre Aspire Company Reg No : 2016 / 074025 / 07 | VAT number : 4100 275 280


THE INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR 14-16 FEB 2020 TEN REASONS TO EXPERIENCE ART FROM AFRICA AND THE WORLD Summer in Cape Town is set to become a centre of the art world, as multitudes of artists, gallerists, curators and collectors will encamp for events of lasting cultural significance. For the art-loving public, the combined experience will blast open stupendous new views on the visual arts.   The pivotal, anchor event will be the Investec Cape Town Art Fair, coinciding with the Art Week Cape Town, the Stellenbosch Triennale as well as major retrospectives of the career of William Kentridge and exhibitions throughout the city.   From the 14th to the 16th of February 2020, the 8th edition of Investec Cape Town Art Fair will return to the Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC). Positioned as the leading art fair in Africa, the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020 will welcome the foremost galleries from South Africa, the African continent and abroad.   A third of the exhibitors due to showcase at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020 will be new to the event, and close to 40% from the rest of the world. After almost a decade of groundwork, the fair’s consistent drive to bring together galleries and artists from SubSaharan Africa, North Africa, United Kingdom, Europe, Middle East and the USA is yielding remarkable results.    What can the public expect? 10  must-see experiences centred on the artists, galleries and exhibitions taking place at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair. Detail - Everard Read, Teresa Kutala Firmino, Ponderous Grace, Mixed Media On Canvas, 90 X 110 Cm (Image Courtesy Of Michael Hall) 20


22

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


1. TODAY HERE, TOMORROW THE WORLD New visions of the continent and the arrival of artists from Africa and its diaspora as important participants on the international art scene can be witnessed on the main exhibitions of the Investec Cape Town Art Fair.   TOMORROWS/TODAY will be a curated section about the sociopolitical dynamics of the present day. The guest co-curators for 2020 - Nkule Mabaso (Curator at Michaelis Galleries, Cape Town) and Luigi Fassi (Artistic Director of MAN Contemporary Art Museum in Nuoro, Italy) - have curated a cross-section of the most exciting, emerging and artists from Africa and the Diaspora.    From its inception, the aim of TOMORROWS/ TODAY has been to shine a light on emerging and under-represented artists; set to be tomorrow’s leading names. It is open to those working on and beyond the African continent and, as the title implies, the ongoing theme is one of transformation, and experimentation showcasing unorthodox art forms addressing current social and political issues.   Artists that will be showcased in the section are Danica Lundy (USA) of Gallery C+N Canepaneri in Italy, Amanda Mushate (Zimbabwe) of First Floor Gallery in Zimbabwe, François-Xavier Gbré (France) of Gallery Cécile Fakhoury in Ivory Coast, Senegal and Paris, Andy Robert (USA) of Hannah Hoffman in Los Angeles, Fathi Hassan (Egypt) of Gallery Lawrie Shabibi in Dubai, Ernesto Shikhani (Mozambique) of Perve Galeria in Portugal, Nnenna Okore (Australia) of Gallery Sakhile&Me in Germany, Gregory Olympio (Togo) of Septieme Gallery in Paris, Bonolo Kavula (South Africa) of Suburbia Contemporary in Spain and Isabelle Grobler (South Africa) of Sulger-Buel Gallery in London.

“A third of the exhibitors will be new to the event, and close to 40% from the rest of the world.” Eclectica Contemporary, Nina Holmes, Thicket 2018, Acrylic on canvas, 61 x 86 cm (Detail)


Christopher Moller Gallery, Nigatu Tsehay, Unnamed 2

2. GOING SOLO The third iteration of the SOLO section will examine the issue of space: its politicisation through issues of geopolitics, migration, spatial practice and theory, diasporic studies and borders, national and abstract.    In anticipation of the exhibition, art fair director Laura Vincenti says that the theme has been selected to communicate how artists speak and relate to Space in their works and beyond.   “So there is a double theme in one theme -- the space inside the artwork, and how the work is placed to interact with space.” The theme of Space also gestures towards broader cultural sensitivities in the sociopolitical moment, in which there is a heated national debate about historical entitlements to Space. The following artists have been selected for the SOLO section of the 2020 Investec Cape Art Fair: Kirsten Beets (South Africa) of Salon Ninety-One in South Africa; Teresa Kutala Firmino (South Africa) of Everard Read Gallery in South Africa; Nina Holmes (South Africa) of Eclectica Contemporary in South Africa; Alexandra Karakashian (South Africa) of SMAC Gallery in South Africa; Mawande Ka Zenzile (South Africa) of Stevenson in South Africa; Riley Holloway (USA) of Lars Kristian Bode in Germany and Sungi Mlengeya (Tanzania) of Afriart Gallery in Uganda.  (Detail) Everard Read, Blessing Ngobeni, A Study Of Corruption, Acrylic And Collage On Canvas, 157 X 108.5 Cm (Image Courtesy Of Michael Hall) 24


3. WELCOME TO THE WORLD STAGE   The list of great artists due to land in Cape Town is staggering, reflecting on the significance of the moment. With the proliferation of art fairs in the world, the Investec Cape Town Art Fair is the only international fair on the continent. The Investec Cape Town Art Fair stands as a medium for creating a dialogue between the northern and southern hemisphere - it is fair to say that the 2020 edition of the Investec Cape Town Art Fair presents itself as a unique and special opportunity to experience an international platform for artists from all over the world. The Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020 will happen on what can be described as a veritable world stage, showcasing talent, dialogue and curated display. Expect to find the works of veteran Egyptian Fathi Hassan care of Lawrie Shabibi Gallery in Dubai; Shirin Neshat care of Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg, Ghanaian painter Gideon Appiah care of Afikaris Gallery of Paris, Onyis Martin care of Circle Art Gallery in Nairobi, Luc Ming Yan care of Apalazzo Gallery in Brescia, Brazilian Beto Shwafaty care of Prometeo Gallery in Milan and local performer and sculptor Athi-Patra Ruga care of WHATIFTHEWORLD in Cape Town.

EbonyCurated. Leonard Matsoso, Warrior, Charcoal and Pastel on Paper, 180cm x 83.5cm, 1980, PastModern

4. WELCOME TO THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF ARTE POVERA Local visitors to the Investec Cape Town Art Fair will be introduced to the wonderful art movement Arte Povera when one of its major founders is exhibited this year. Giorgio Persano of Torino, in Italy, opened in the 70s and was a home for Conceptual Art, Arte Povera and Minimal Art in Europe. Giorgio Persano is one of the galleries representing the masters of the Arte Povera movement: the gallery will be showcasing two representatives of the movement; Mario Merz and Michelangelo Pistoletto. Another gallery set to be showcasing this Italian art movement is Galleria Massimo Minini – Francesca Minini, representing artist Giulio Paolini. Arte Povera is the radical Italian art movement from the late 1960s to 1970s whose artists explores the relationship between artist and object, and between the cultural access of the wealthy and that of people born into poverty.    Experience the complex world of outsider art when it takes this bold step, at the art fair, towards making itself known to the broader art audience.  Left: Galerie AGorgi. Rym Karoui. Opposite page: Joshua Miles, Mountain Fynbos, SA Print Gallery

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

27


Galleria Patricia Armorcida. NUNCA, Branding 1, 2019, acrylic on canvas, cm 150x120


5. AMERICA ON POINT   Due to be featured at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020, is Haitian artist Andy Robert, represented by Los Angeles-based gallery Hannah Hoffman. Robert is based in Brooklyn, New York, and his large-scale, experimental paintings pick apart our visual reality so that we may examine the minutiae of life. The Investec Cape Town Art Fair will again host the American gallery Hannah Hoffman, forging a path for intersectional dialogue down South.  New York-born artist Amelia Etlinger, represented by Osart Gallery in Milan, was an artist associated with the Fluxus movement, visual poetry and the Italian Poesie Vivisa community. Etlinger moved with her family to Clifton Park, New York in the late 1960s. Etlinger regarded herself as a poet; after reading ee cummings, she started to create visual poetry that evolved into elaborate and collaborative works of natural material collected in the woods behind her house as well as fabric, thread, beads, costume jewelry, Japanese papers, and other found material. At the same time, Los Angeles-born artist Riley Holloway will appear on the SOLO platform of the Investec Art Fair 2020. Represented by German gallery Lars Kristen Bode, Holloway is a prestigious Hunting Prize finalist. A figurative painter, he works out of Dallas but was born in Los Angeles. In his paintings he examines Black masculinity and asks us to imagine a world where dignity is not a privilege but a right.  

Amelia Etlinger, Untitled (Tapestry theatre), 70’s, mixed media on velvet fabric, cm. 102 x 85 Ph. Max Pescio

29


30

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


6. WASTE NOT WANT NOT Taking cognisance of our overburdened planet a host of artists exhibiting at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020, are using the detritus of human life as inspiration or raw material for their work.   Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos, represented at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair by gallery Mimmo Scognamiglio in Milan, Italy. In her work she re-contextualises and decontextualises existing objects; and is known for making a chandelier out of tampons. She rose to prominence after exhibiting at the 51stVenice Biennale in 2005, was the first woman and the youngest artist to exhibit at the Palace of Versailles, and has had a solo show at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao.   Congolese artist Patrick Bongoy (represented by EBONY/CURATED of Cape Town) who will exhibit his creatures created from rubber and hessian. The Cape Town based artist’s work is a response to the global reality of literal and figurative environmental pollution. This encompasses the entire spectrum from the erosion of economic viability, the impact on a community and individual behaviour and sociocultural decay of the rural and urban landscape.   Nigerian artist Nnenna Okore, represented by German gallery, Sakihle&Me, has received international acclaim for her richly textured abstract sculptures and installations. Her highly tactile sculptures respond to the rhythms and contours of everyday life, combining reductive methods of shredding, fraying, twisting and teasing with constructive processes of tying, weaving, stitching and dyeing. Inspired by forms, topographies, and phenomena related to place, memory, time, and language, she invites her viewers to consider and encounter earthly structures more delicately. She is deeply concerned with earth’s vulnerability amidst the wave of climate disaster in its path. In her works, she romanticizes nature’s sublimity and the essence of life.

“A host of artists are using the detritus of human life as inspiration or raw material for their work.” (Detail) Kresiah Mukwazhi, Send Me Your Nudes, 2018, Mixed Media, 189 x 314 cm


7. IT’S ALL TALK It’s time again for the art-going public to hear and be heard. It is customary in the art world to give artists, curators, gallerists and specialist collectors a platform upon which they can interact. Tumelo Mosaka will return to Investec Cape Town Art Fair in the capacity of guest curator for Cultural Platforms and the Talks Programme.    Commenting on the contribution of a strong Talks Programme to Investec Cape Town Art Fair, Mosaka says, “The Talks Programme is a perfect platform to explore various topics engaged by artists. It is the vehicle for generating discussion, and debate about current issues and the marketplace. It provides an opportunity to share and learn from international professionals alongside local specialists.”  Hot topics in 2020 include Philanthropy in Africa, an artists’ discussion titled Constructing Landscapes of Possibilities with Thenjiwe Niki Nkosi and Malebona Maphutse, moderated by Sharlene Khan; discussion between artists Kemang we Lehulere and François-Xavier Gbré of France; Museums in the 21st Century with Adriana Rispoli, an Independent Curator from Italy with Koyo Kouoh, Director of Zeitz MOCAA, and Sonia Lawson, Director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo. Other topics include Investing in Culture and the Quest for Sustainable Art Platforms. 8. NIGHT VIBES   Once again, the hugely successful Gallery Night will take visitors to explore the culture of Cape Town evenings. The Friday night event allows visitors to hop on a bus and tour the city galleries. Visitors from beyond the Cape, who’ve identified artists and galleries from the city, at the fair, will gain a greater understanding of Cape Town and its diverse offerings.     Film fans are also in for a treat as art meets cinema at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020. Don’t miss out on a curated art documentaries sundowns at the Labia Theatre, Cape Town’s renowned oldest cinema. The programme ART.DOC is the most recent edition to the fair’s programme; and is part of an initiative to educate those who are interested in art locally and internationally.    This event is sponsored by The Consulate of Italy in Cape Town, free of charge to all visitors and is on a first-come first-serve basis.  WORLDART, Norman O’Flynn, Elephant in the room, 85x100cm acrylic and spray on acrylic glass, 2019 32

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


SMITH Gallery. Dale Lawrence, Hercules Wrestling with Death for the Large Bathers, 2019, Oil on linen, 175 x 350 cm

9. MODERN MASTERS Expect a foundation course in South African art pioneers at the Past/Modern section of this year’s Fair, which will showcase work by photographers David Goldblatt, Peter Magubane and Paul Weinberg, a solo presentation by Dr. Esther Mahlangu, as well as a selection of works by the increasingly sought after Amadlozi group, Cecil Skotnes, Edoardo Villa, Sydney Kumalo and Ezrom Legae.    Curated by Cape Town veteran gallerist Joāo Ferreira, visitors can expect a panorama of works from coveted areas of historical South African art movements.   Ferreira’s curatorial statement reminds us that “Artistic expression has always been an accurate social barometer. Past / Modern will draw from South Africa’s history of late colonial, apartheid and post-apartheid years – including artists originating from formal education, community centres, self-taught or cultural tradition, who have reached consensus as to their vital contribution to the evolution of South African art history.”   10. CHAMPIONING CRUCIAL CULTURAL CAUSES   The ongoing Cultural Platform section presents the work of cultural institutions and non-profit organisations who nurture and support artistic production in the region, through exhibitions and artist residencies.

34

Fair visitors will be struck by the appearance of artwork by the late, great Gerard Sekoto presented by The Gerard Sekoto Foundation, under the aegis of The Norval Foundation. The NJE Collective of Namibia, an artist-run collective initiated for artists from Southern Africa in general, will present three artists: Rudolf Seibeb (Namibia), Chuma Somdaka (South Africa) and Jo Rogge (South Africa / Namibia). The organisation Eh!Woza will screen youthmade films examining the local HIV and TB co-epidemic. And, from KwaZulu-Natal, the KZNSA, the force behind Durban’s leading contemporary gallery, will exhibit the renowned Derrick Nxumalo and Andile Maphumulo, in a celebration of township and urban life through the expressionistic use of colour and wild geometric lines.   The Investec Cape Town Art Fair will run from 14-16 February 2020 at the CTICC. For more information, visit www. investeccapetownartfair.co.za The fair is produced by Fiera Milano Exhibitions Africa (FMEA) of Fiera Milano S.p.A, a global leader in exhibition management and the organisers of miart art fair. Follow Investec Cape Town Art Fair on Twitter @ ictartfair, Instagram @investeccapetownartfair and Facebook @ICTArtFair #ICTAF

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


www.thkgallery.com

Image Š Kimberly Hale

52 Waterkant Street, Cape Town

This month, catch us at: Investec Cape Town Art Fair: 14-16 February 2020, Booth C-7 Different Angles: opening 06 February, 6-8 pm at THK Gallery Iziko South African National Gallery: featuring works by Jake Michael Singer


AD-REFLEX

Hindsights and Foresights Deepest Darkest Gallery CT 09 Jan – 20 Feb Q&A with AD-Reflex 1. Where does your name, AD-Reflex originate? The “AD” within AD-Reflex, refers to notions of ‘ascent’ and ‘descent’. Seemingly opposites collide and coexist in the work of the artist duo. These so-called ‘collision boundaries’ where opposites meet, spark the creative energy, that is AD-Reflex. 2. Ad-Reflex is a collaborative duo. How does this dynamic work and how does it translate to your practice? Collaboration implies the rejection of the idea of the individual artist as genius. Instead, our collective voice spontaneously becomes a singular voice. From the start, we had very similar overlapping interests and visual observations. The impetus of new work might be sparked by anything from travels to mundane daily life experiences. We compile various design / collage ideas that are vigorously scrutinized to achieve the desired identity and vision of a new artwork. Fine-tuning the initial concept to achieve the most desired final result follows this. It entails elements like size, scale, technical and production process. Although we both have distinctly different skill sets, we share a unified vision, and that includes equal involvement throughout the process. 3. There are recurring themes of the classical present in much of your work, but also the subversive. Tell us more about this process’ evolution and the AD-Reflex language. Our initial partnership was sparked by an intense shared interest and love for the baroque and the classical. Both artists have embraced ever present ‘duality’ in the baroque. In spite of the love of the baroque and the classical,   we retain a firm grounding in the contemporary.

Ablaze

37


We undermine the idea of flawless progress in the contemporary moment, that the right direction is always known. Instead, everything can mix with everything; everything is possible and in perpetual transformation. Triviality mingles with glamour, banality with sophistication, and despair with beauty. 4. In several works from ‘Hindsights and Foresights’, subjects from the specifically local urban everyday are a pivotal departure. Can you elaborate on that? We don’t see it as a pivotal departure. The similarity between a Rembrandt etching of the poor and destitute in the 17th century, and a 21st century man scrambling through garbage in contemporary Africa seems distinctly similar to us. The garbage collectors have become an everyday reality within the South African contemporary landscape. In conversation with several of these guys, we become aware of the pivotal role they play, and their collective sense of community.  5. Beauty and despair appear constants of the AD-Reflex oeuvre. The tactility and movement of paint as a sculptural medium could also be seen as an impassioned, near violent response. Can you elaborate on how these reconcile in your work and why?  Duality is ever present in our work. We see it as our task to subvert the expected and the known. We want to subvert what is traditionally seen as the ‘rift’ between the painterly and the digital. Instead, we celebrate the co-existence or dance between the two art forms. The liminal space where these two meet forms the core of the AD-Reflex expression. For more information please see www.deepestdarkestart.com. Top: Ruptured Left: The Gravity of Me,180x180cm

39


Serpents Nest 40

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Hero

Kevin Mackintosh 22 Feb – 10 Apr 2020

DEEP

EST DARK EST

20 Dixon Street, De Waterkant Tues – Fri: 12pm – 6pm Sat: 12pm – 4pm deepestdarkestart.com @deepestdarkest_art


REFLECT

Presented by Graham Modern & Contemporary grahamsgallery.co.za

“The Artist is no other than he who unlearns what he has learned, in order to know himself,” (E.E. Cummings 1958)

R

eflect is presented by Graham Modern & Contemporary and brings together the artists George Pemba, Peter Clarke, Gerard Sekoto and Dorothy Kay in an exhibition designed to captivate its audience through connecting histories. Graham Modern & Contemporary will be exhibiting at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 14th – 16th February 2020 focusing on pioneering artists whose work unveils the intersectionality of lived experience during South Africa’s tumultuous years of segregation. The convergences that the exhibition highlights are reflected in representations of social spaces, human connections, perseverance and hope. Exhibited alongside each other, Pemba, Clarke, Sekoto and Kay offer rich interpretations of historical struggles and what these may mean today. How do we learn to unlearn? How do we see ourselves reflected in this past? And how do we shape a different tomorrow?

Gerard Sekoto, Le Café Parisien, Oil on canvas, 1959

42

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Gerard Sekoto, Tableaux de Seine, Paris, Oil on canvas, 1960


George Pemba, Xhosa Woman Carrying a Calabash, Oil on canvas board, 1958

These questions become central in locating the significance of Modern African art today, and in relating it to contemporary lived experience. Committed to developing and promoting a strong international programme of African art, Graham Modern & Contemporary establishes the discursive links between artists of different periods and the importance of intergenerational exchange. Reflect, presented at the 2020 Cape Town Art Fair, is an example of this long-term vision. George Pemba, born in 1912, admiring Renoir, Monet, Toulouse Lautrec, Degas and Gauguin, found himself applying classic techniques but adding a cultural context. Pemba’s depictions of life scenes expose his interest in local life and people. The genre is more than a simple ‘record’ of township life but allows for the complicated constructions of historical context. Pemba’s work has a universal quality. The deliberation of composition and use of colour in his works creates a  richness and intensity. Pemba is considered one of SA’s most prominent artists.   George Pemba, Waiting in the Queue, Oil on board, 1985

44

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


“Reflect brings together the artists George Pemba, Peter Clarke, Gerard Sekoto and Dorothy Kay in an exhibition designed to captivate its audience through connecting histories.”

Peter Clarke, Ruined Houses at Simon’s Town, C.P, Oil on board 1971

Peter Clarke was born in 1929 and establishing artistic motivation was fundamental in his outlook. His earliest influences were Mexican artists, German Expressionists and Japanese prints. Hardship is inextricable from his work. His reactions can be interpreted as observational yet inevitably subjective in opting rather for everyday life than being overtly political. His views regarding the transition from apartheid have been unremittingly positive within the art. Gerard Sekoto is considered a pioneer of modernism  in Africa.  He developed an interest in depicting people and simple local life, holding his first solo exhibition in 1939. He had the first picture by a black artist displayed in the museum in South Africa.   In 1947 Sekoto left South Africa. Sekoto held his first solo show in Paris in 1949. In  1989  the Johannesburg Art Gallery honoured him with a retrospective exhibition and Wits awarded Sekoto with an honorary doctorate. In 1990 the French Government awarded Sekoto the award of Chevalier of the Order of Arts and Letters. In 2003, Sekoto was posthumously bestowed the Order of Ikhamanga.

46

Dorothy Kay, Three Mirrors, Oil on board

Dorothy Kay was born in 1886. She began studying figure painting at the Dublin Metropolitan School of Art and the Royal Hibernian Academy School. In 1910 she moved to South Africa. She was represented in the British Empire Exhibition in London in 1924 and in the same year exhibited internationally. She was elected a member of the Royal British and Colonial Society of Artists, exhibiting at the Dominion Artists’ Exhibition where Queen Mary purchased one of her etchings; “Romance”.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


OFENTSE SESHABELA

Democrazy: a demonstration of craziness, a solo exhibition at Eclectica Contemporary www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za

I

n 2018, Ofentse Seshabela first exhibited with Eclectica Contemporary. First on a group exhibition at the gallery and then at the FNB Joburg Art Fair. His installations of collage, smudging and juxtapositions have grasped young children, experienced collectors and old mavericks alike. Most notable was his questioning work ‘Land?’ installed at the FNB Joburg Art Fair, which was composed of bullet casings dotting across a wall of the booth to form the letters and question mark. A metaphor, an oxymoron, found objects and the construction of an artwork that articulated the elephant in the room of the country at the time. From the question of land, to the complexities of violence in the country which have formed a thematic focus in his largescale collage pieces, Seshabela has established an artistic practice that is concerned, considered and unflinching.

As 2020 begins a new decade, the focus of Seshabela’s work is now to both reflect and project forward, presenting images that are puzzles and mirrors of the state of the world as he sees it. Democrazy: a demonstration of craziness is his solo exhibition, exhibited at Eclectica Contemporary from February to coincide with Cape Town Art Week and will be a key aspect of the Eclectica Contemporary presentations during the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020. Democrazy: A Demonstration of Craziness is the result of work that Seshabela spent most of 2019 busy with. Seshabela feels that it is important to reflect on the progress of South Africa’s post-apartheid democratic system, and how it has impacted people and spaces.

Billboard Icons, 2019, Mixed media 52 x 48 cm

49


The title of the exhibition is inspired by the late Nigerian musician, Fela Kuti in his song Teacher Don’t Teach Me Nonsense. The ideals of politics and society presented by Fela Kuti impacted Seshabela’s thinking and informed the process of putting his artworks together. “I remembered his song titled Teacher Don’t Teach Me Nonsense”, said Seshabela, “I find the play on words very interesting, particularly in the term ‘Democrazy’. It is a classic juxtaposition that I think best describes the socio-political system that we are living in as South Africans. It is crazy that we are still dealing and fighting against issues that were constructed to make black people suffer in society”. The work Seshabela has produced for Democrazy: a demonstration of craziness is filled with juxtapositions of form, ideas, narrative and symbolism. Dimension and perspective is distorted and upended through the collage-like positioning of his depictions. Seshabela evokes motifs of Apartheid imagery, such as police dogs and army tanks alongside portraits of politicians, and in this way, he calls into question the familiarity of certain representations and the lingering ghosts of their meanings. He presents these questions from a place of deep concern and frustration, disillusioned by the systems of power that remain, designed to leave poor people poor. Seshabela’s work reflects on the fighting nature of black subjects against constructed systems and spaces that continue to undermine the value of black people. Positioning his work from his own lived experience and personal perspective, the work focuses on black people and distinct spaces. In this exhibition, he imagines people as soldiers in spiritual warfare. The armour depicted is thus metaphoric for protection needed to survive as well as signalling the context and thematic understanding in which Seshabela places his work. Looking to inter-war and post-war art movements, Seshabela considered the work of Surrealist artists and was inspired by the treatment of figures and forms as modes of emotive and psychological descriptors.

Shop to Live, 2019, Mixed media 64 x 64 cm

50


We look the same, 2019, Mixed media 64 x 64 cm

He has, in turn, depicted some of the figures with elongated limbs. The extended limbs stand as symbolic of hegemony in systems of power. It can be understood that, through the works, Seshabela is communicating to the viewer that those with longer limbs are those that possess greater power, perhaps through social status, class dynamics, or political affiliation. In considering the continuing tension in South Africa around issues of racial inequality, financial barriers and standards of living Seshabela reminds us that “due to our unforgiving history, black people are often found at a disadvantaged end of society. It is difficult to get a job. It is difficult to start and maintain one’s own business. It is difficult to raise a family. It is difficult to survive as a black person in this world. I say this, because I have had my fair share of struggles in my

52

upbringing. I know that struggles vary from family to community to society. It has not been a smooth ride for me to be where I am today. I had to fight. In fact, I am still fighting and I have accepted my role as a fighter in this society”. Democrazy: a demonstration of craziness is an exhibition that reflects and zooms in on the economic and structural construction of the lives of people living in the townships, informal settlements and rural areas of the country. Seshebala’s work is a visual representation of a co-existence of parallel worlds of society and power. The work is loaded with questions and speaks to the concerns that many continue to wonder, as repercussions and legacies continue to impact the lived realities of everyone in South Africa.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


‘in chorus’ - hugh byrne 29th january - 2nd march 2020

ebony/curated caPe toWn | 67 LooP street, caPe toWn inFo@ebonycurated.com | WWW.ebonycurated.com

investec caPe toWn art Fair 14th - 16th February 2020 main section booth a12

Past/modern booth P4


THK GALLERY

The grass is always greener on the other side: the photography of Johno Mellish By Sven Christian

A

ccording to the numerous media outlets that ushered in the news, David Goldblatt passed away peacefully at his home in Johannesburg in the early hours of the morning. It was a Monday—the 25 June 2018, to be exact. I know this because I’ve spent most of my day trying to figure out why Johno Mellish decided to title a photograph of three teenagers in a beachside parkinglot, The Day that David Goldblatt Died, Dias Beach, Mossel Bay (2018). To my surprise, the answer is quite literal. But the photograph is much more than that. For one, there’s been an accident. One of the teenagers has fallen off his skateboard and is lying on his back, spread eagle. Another supports his head, while the third stands by, idle. They seem unsure of their next move. Whatever charge this moment might have, the image is eerily calm, still, and quiet. Indeed, peaceful. The light is soft; the shadows long. Everything is soaked in a gentle, pastel wash—like the quiet reflection of a lake before sunrise, untouched by the morning’s first wind. Thinking back, I don’t remember much from that day except for the flood of acknowledgements and tributes on social media, which came and went before any of it might’ve had time to sink in. I return to it now, imagining the early morning rush of journalists slopping coffee over their keyboards to pen the first word; the background drone of office telephones; the tired, drawn-out faces of gallery staff as they hurry to compile a statement. Mellish’s photograph seems like another world—a parallel moment. Not the media storm, but the passing itself—as if Goldblatt’s soul might have arrived to register this juncture on his way out. 

Johno Mellish, The Day That David Goldblatt Died, Dias Beach, Mossel Bay, 2018, Chromogenic print mounted under Diasec, 100 x 125 cm.

54


Johno Mellish, Butterfly, Collectors, 2018, Chromogenic print mounted under Diasec, 100 x 125 cm. Opposite Page Top: Johno Mellish, Locked Out, 2018, Chromogenic print mounted under Diasec, 64 x 80 cm. Opposite Page Bottom: Johno Mellish, Goods lift, 2019, 64x80cm

This is not so much a form of documentation as it is speculative fiction—what I imagine is a byproduct of Mellish’s background in cinematography. As described by Ashraf Jamal, “Mellish does not ‘take’ photographs … he re-takes them, shifts their original context, and overlays discrete and random threads into ‘new and unexpected’ composites.” One such thread is the Disney-like construction which dominates the left half of the image—a children’s waterpark—which resembles the manufactured worlds of Wes Anderson, Dr. Seuss, or, more recently, Michael Schur’s hit series, The Good Place. Goldblatt of course had a similar penchant for residue—sites, structures, and monuments that not only harbour memory but allude to something much larger than the frame permits. “Our structures declare who we are in a remarkably

56

naked and claritory way,” he remarked in 2015. Speaking to Mellish about the photograph, I learn that it was taken at midday, following the news of Goldblatt’s passing. “Those kids were just skateboarding past,” he explained. “I was thinking about my relation to David Goldblatt and my relation to South Africa, as he might have thought about his … It was especially pertinent for me to think about that on that day. Especially being where I was on Dias Beach.” This was, for me, something of a penny drop— that the ‘otherworldly’ quality of the image might belong to an arc which stretches back to the aspirations of European settlers through to the benumbed world of Netflix. Here we see what Jamal refers to as the image’s “coded innocence,” something “deceptively

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


“Mellish does not ‘take’ photographs … he re-takes them, shifts their original context, and overlays discrete and random threads into ‘new and unexpected’ composites.”

Johno Mellish, A Family of Strangers, 2019, Chromogenic print mounted under Diasec, 80 x 64 cm

saccharine” about Mellish’s photography as a whole—from the ‘Stranger Things’ quality of Winters Night Walking (2018) and the smothered forest of Butterfly Collectors (2018); to the more overt and intimate forms of domestic alienation depicted in A Family of Strangers (2018), in which everyone seems to be looking past everyone else for a way out. To some extent, all are images of futility, yet they are also images of longing. In this strange and saturated light, the grass is always greener on the other side, and I am left with the lyrics from Arcade Fire’s Wasted Hours, playing out like a soundtrack on repeat:

58

First they built the road, then they built the town That’s why we’re still driving around and around And all we see, are kids in buses longing to be free. Johno Mellish’s photography will be on show at THK Gallery, Cape Town, from 06 February – 28 March 2020 as part of the exhibition Different Angles, which also includes the work of Nyasha Marovatsanga. Nyasha is a promising young artist based in Harare, Zimbabwe. THK is proud to show his works for the first time in South Africa. Mellish will also be exhibiting his work as part of THK Gallery’s booth at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Investec Cape Town Art Fair 2020 Cape Town International Convention Centre 14 - 16 Feb www.christophermollerart.co.za; @christophermoller_gallery


DR ESTHER MAHLANGU PRESENTS

Cape Town Art Week 2020

T

he Melrose Gallery will be presenting a solo exhibition by Dr Esther Mahlangu on the Past/ Modern Section at the Investec Cape Town Art Fair. The exhibition will present a timeline of Dr Mahlangu’s impressive achievements in the 74 years in which she has been practising her art. Guests to the fair will be able to view one of the few large scale panel paintings that she has created that measures 3,6m x 2,4m, similar to the one that was recently commissioned by Swizz Beatz and Alicia Keys for the Dean Collection. A unique installation of smaller works presenting different symbols used by her over the years to create the paintings for which she has won global acclaim will also be on display. Unveiling of the ‘Mahlangu’ Rolls-Royce in Cape Town: Dr Mahlangu is the first artist to have been invited to create an artwork for the ‘gallery’ of a new Rolls-Royce Phantom named the ‘Mahlangu’ in her honour which will be unveiled at One&Only Cape Town during Art Week. The Phantom models have been designed with a glass case built into their dash which allows the owner to personalise their vehicle. Dr Mahlangu Solo ‘Disrupting Patterns’: ‘Dr Esther Mahlangu - Disrupting Patterns’ opens to the public on 13 February and runs until 1 March 2020 at The Melrose Gallery Cape Town. This solo exhibition will run as an extension of the dialogue around ‘Disrupting Patterns’, the well-received Pan African Contemporary group exhibition.

60


W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

47


“Her artworks are geometric, modern and abstract in nature speaking to the natural order and balance inherent in sacred geometry and all things.” The exhibition will showcase several of Dr Mahlangu’s latest works for which she has become so globally acclaimed. Her artworks are geometric, modern and abstract in nature speaking to the natural order and balance inherent in sacred geometry and all things. Known as a ‘disruptor’ from an early age, Mam Esther as she is affectionately known, was the first person to reimagine traditional Ndebele house painting onto contemporary platforms. Born in 1935, Mam Esther has been painting for over 74 years, collaborating consistently with the world’s leading museums, curators, art fairs, celebrities and global brands. Collector’s Focus V at Norval Foundation: “Army Helmet” a unique artwork by Dr Esther Mahlangu will form part of the exhibition “Courage is as Contagious as Fear: Selected

62

works from the Hoosein Mahomed Collection” that will run at Norval Foundation, Cape Town from 8th February to 21st April 2020. For more information see www.norvalfoundation.org RONALD MUCHATUTA AT THE STELLENBOSCH TRIENNALE Ronald Muchatuta will be participating in the inaugural Stellenbosch Triennale which takes place from 11 Feb to 30 April 2020. Ronald will be presenting a body of powerful new works in the ‘curated section’ of the Triennale. Contact craig@themelrosegallery.com or see www.themelrosegallery.com for more information on the artists and exhibition calendar.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Onyis Martin

BEFORE TOMORROW COMES 06 February 2020 +27214224145 | 69 Burg Street,Cape Town info@eclecticacontemporary.co.za | www.eclecticacontemporary.co.za


The Serpent’s Kiss, Verna du Toit


RITES OF PASSAGE

Birth, death and every damn thing in-between

Curated by Lloyd Pollak

GalleryOne11


A

bout three months ago I was introduced to the gallerist Marita Schneider, the director of GalleryOne11, at a dinner party. Usually I detest dinner parties as no matter how lethal the boredom, politeness dictates that you cannot leave before 11.00 pm so that, unlike gaol, you don’t even get time off for good behaviour. However, when your host is the eccentric John Bauer, the dreaded dinner turns into a glorious occasion for bibulous uproar, impassioned argument, and an insanely good time.

courtship (if such still exists), engagement, marriage, old age and finally death are the most significant rites of passage.

Marita and I clicked instantaneously. Both of us are outrées Bohemian rebels who couldn’t give a toss what anyone thinks. To hell with political correctness, identity politics and all forms of joyless and sanctimonious hypocrisy we say. This iconoclastic attitude informs GalleryOne11’s curatorial approach so I was only too delighted when Marita invited me to collaborate. She admired my judgement and “believed I was one of the country’s most perceptive and audacious critics” her words, not mine.

The roll call of participating artists includes Andrew Verster, Pierre Fouché, Anton Karstel, Daniel Halter, Iaan Waldeck-Pyrmont, Henk Serfontein, Malcolm Dare, Conner Cullinan, Gabriel Clarke-Brown, Clare Menck, Verna du Toit, Nadja Dhaenke, Cathy Layzell, Arlene Armaler-Raviv and the freshly shorn and tonsured Max Wolpe. Catherine Ochalla, Khomo Ramalla and Annemieke Engelbrecht are among the exciting additions to the local scene.

That’s how the fun started! The two of us daintily hitched up our skirts and started kicking ideas around. Finally we chose the theme: Rites of Passage: the title, “Birth, death and every damn thing in-between”, a quote citing the hardboiled Dorothy Parker’s witheringly cynical observation “The facts of life are birth, death and every damn thing in-between.” The invited participants would be my favourite artists. They include some of the most ground-breaking, earth-shattering talents at work in our country today. Rites of passage mark any event of major consequence in our life cycle, particularly any change in our social or sexual status. Usually they take place in societally approved ways that involve the community and some ceremony, but they may also take place behind closed doors like sexual initiation, or prove entirely secular like kitchen teas. Birth, baptism, confirmation, puberty, coming-of-age, loss of virginity,

Are such events empty, outmoded formalities? Or do they still possess social, cultural, psychological and spiritual relevance? The brief is inclusive raising all the perennial and most fundamental questions about the nature of human life. The exhibition will give prominence to work that has never seen before and which will make the heart race and accelerate the adrenalin flow.

Further inspiration for an astonishing intervention was provided by James Webb and Jo O’Connor. Their strategy of subversion was eagerly applauded by no less than Maurizio Cattelan but hush! We must leave you in suspense and reveal no more. Our directive to the artists was to strive for emotional authenticity and be true to whatever they felt. As such key events are recorded in the family album, we urged all participants to avoid the bland factuality of the “happy snap”, shun the literal, unleash the imagination, push the boundaries and invent the new. Prepare yourself for two sensational shows Rites of Passage and My African Wild Dogs by Jean Theron Louw. Both open on the 5th of February at 18h30, 111 Loop St. The keynote speaker is Marilyn Martin. Cancel all engagements, be there and witness history in the making.

“The invited participants would be a selection of my favourite artists which include some of the most ground-breaking, earth-shattering talents at work in our country today.” 66

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Cain, soon after the fall; Pierre Fouché


JEAN THERON LOUW My African Wild Dogs GalleryOne11

G

alleryOne11 believe that contemporary art spaces should accept social responsibility, promote dialogue and create a “safe space” where members of the community can engage and exchange ideas about the discourse of the day . That is why we chose to display Jean’s mixed media sculptural ensemble My African Wild Dogs which addresses ecology, overpopulation, sexual abuse, xenophobia and many other issues of pressing universal import. The show pulls such a devastatingly emotional punch that it leaves the viewer reeling. Deservedly My African Wild Dogs is one of 4 nominations in the category for Visual Arts for the 2020 kykNET Fiëstas the winners are announced at the award ceremony on the 9th February. Additionally she was the official festival artist at the Montagu Book Festival in 2019. While My African Wild Dogs pivots around the canines, it also transforms them into a metaphor for the artist’s exploration of her own inner disarray in the face of the lethal devastation of the planet and the threat of the industrialized world’s collapse. What galvanized her into creating this suite was a burning sense of urgency, of crisis, paralysis and deadlock. Impelled by an overwhelming need to speak out, she used her sculpture as a kind of alarm system, warning humanity that we have reached the eleventh hour, that the clock relentlessly ticks on, and that, unless we drastically revise our ideas and take action immediately, we cannot avert the imminent global catastrophe that looms ahead. This detail of a drawing from X illustrates how the wild dog and the artist merge and become one. Jean recognizes the parallel between herself and the animal which embodies both the ego and the id, both the tender nurturing instincts and the anti-social, destructive and murderous drives within the human psyche. 

68

My African Wild Dogs, 1st Floor - GalleryOne11

The title of the artwork 21+1+1 refers to the number of ex-president Zuma’s children and the work concerns overpopulation and asks whether, in our world of dwindling resources, anyone possesses the right to procreate on such a massive scale. Jean’s attitude towards her subject is one of deep ambivalence. While the dog’s carnivorous ferocity ignites deep-seated subconscious dreads, the creature also arouses empathy, as the species is on the verge of extinction. There are currently less than 400 wild dogs left in South Africa, and the number diminishes with every passing day. Jean also experiences feelings of kinship with the dogs as they possess human qualities. Romulus and Remus were suckled by a mothering wolf and the

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


dogs are protective of each other, nurture their offspring in a collective effort and demonstrate an ability to subsume their individuality within the pack’s greater identity in order to ensure survival. Gallery One11’s reiteration of Jean’s original exhibition will take place on the 1st floor at 111 Loop St. Prepare yourself for two sensational shows My African Wild Dogs by Jean Theron Louw and the Rites of Passage curated by Lloyd Pollak. Both open on the 5th of February at 18h30, 111 Loop St. The keynote speaker is Marilyn Martin. Cancel all engagements, be there and witness history in the making.

Lloyd Pollak in studio Jean Theron Louw


JOHN BAUER

John Bauer, The Monumental Installation on the façade of 111 Loop St.

The Monumental Installation GalleryOne11

J

ohn Bauer pushes the limits of what is technically possible in ceramics. A sentimentalist, he salvages antique crochet cloth, linens and lace and makes these materials immortal by recreating them, stitch by stitch, in porcelain. John exhibited at the Outliers Unplugged show at GalleryOne11 during July 2019. Whilst in conversation with the gallerist Marita Schneider the plan to make history was hatched.

The Monumental Installation is a massive undertaking whereby the entire façade will be clad in individually crafted matchbox- size porcelain tiles. The building is situated at 111 Loop St. Cape Town; the installation will become a historical monument, a dazzling tour de force testifying to John’s audacity, daring and boundless skill. There is always a surprise factor in John Bauer’s work; he uses the inspiration of netsuke, old coins, flowers, heirloom jewellery,

70

found objects and dolls. These he reproduces to perfection in porcelain, capturing bygone eras where skill and craftsmanship were of primary concern. By appropriating rare coins, carvings, lace and organic substances he not only references the technologies of the past, he manages to preserve them for future reference. Members of the public can engage in the making of history by visiting the site at 111 Loop St. and for mere R100.00 they can select a tile as keep sake and choose another to form part of the installation. “John’s designs are neither prettification nor embellishment; they are art, art as redemption and transcendence; art as revolt against the mainstream; art as the toppling of conventional notions of beauty. Every canon of taste is systematically violated, for there is a flagrancy to John’s imagery, a rawness and immediacy that makes it brazenly other.” Lloyd Pollak

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ART BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE Art@Africa

Written by Briony Haynes Curated by Nadine Foreman

David Griesel Shy Angel, Ink and gouache on paper, 59 x 42 cm


A

rt Fairs unite both local and international galleries and collectors, creating an economic platform for contemporary art. This then results in growth of sales in the South African Market. The increasing talent exhibited from overseas is causing art fairs to become an international affair not just in terms of clients but also artists. Although this has its own merits and privileges, it is causing many incredible South African artists to be excluded from their own environment and this increased internationalism seems to be losing the local, inclusivity that other galleries still prioritise. In this environment, art appears unreachable and exclusive to the select elite. Art Fairs are perhaps becoming a location to showcase the extreme, with artists working in a way to shock and encourage controversy rather than universal enthusiasm. In Carrie Brummer’s ‘Art of Alienation’ she states, “Art is becoming ever more self-absorbed, elite and uninviting. Since when has art had an impact on people and made a difference? [...] We should be more focused as an artist culture on promoting and celebrating changes for the better”

Above: Lauren Redman, Watershed 1, 2019, Oil on Canvas, 120 X91 X5cm. Left: (Detail) Caelyn Robertson, Breached, 2016, Oil on Canvas. 195 X 160cm

75


Andries Visser, In Our Hands, 2019, Birch Wood and Indian Laurel, 160 X 70cm

Kara Schoeman, Coral Bleach. Opposite Page: Barney Banardo, Pow Wow, 2017, Acrylic on Canvas, 78 X 60cm

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

77


“We challenge ourselves to communicate and to create meaningful and memorable art experiences to touch the souls of our audience.” - Nadine Froneman, Curator.

Gregg Price, That Part of Me, 2013, Limited Edition Digital Print on Fine Art Paper, 35 X 44cm

At Art@Africa we want to share our passion for our wonderful country and our divers art with the world and that only works by removing all barriers of intimidation. We encourage entirely local art and aim to support local communities in order to unlock talent in our country. In doing so, we are able to present more attainable artwork with astonishing heart and soul. We believe that art belongs to everyone and we look to present artists who create honest, unpretentious works.“This does not mean we only exhibit affordable, aesthetically pleasing or popular art. We challenge ourselves to communicate and to create meaningful and memorable art experiences to touch the souls of our audience.” Says Nadine Froneman, Curator. “The rapidly evolving South African Art world is more vibrant than ever before and we are a very active part of it,’’ says Akissi Beukman, artist liaison. Many of our works display an aspect of

78

cultural, traditional identity and some combine this with the importance of technology in the modern day. South Africa is a country that is ever questioning its stereotypical identification and Art@Africa looks to present works that express this evolving idea as well as display the positivity associated with the cultural infusion of South Africa. At Art@Africa we invest in our artists through marketing, financial and legal expertise, 31 years international experience in creating displays, artworks for museums and edutainment centres, as well as our time and enthusiasm. This is all invested into young artists, displaying them amongst the crème de la crème to create an atmosphere of intertwined new and established talent. There is so much talent in our country and we must celebrate it.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


TM

Maurice Mbikayi | WEB JACKET 1 | R 10 000 - R 15 000

Cape Town | Fine Art, Books, Collectable Cars, Decorative Arts, Furniture, Silverware, Fine Jewellery & Watch Auction | 25 & 26 February 2020

14 Dreyer Street | Claremont | Cape Town | 7708

Preview | 20, 21, 22 & 23 February 2020 | 10am - 4pm Walkabout conducted by Anton Welz and our specialists’, Saturday 22 February, 11am For more information, condition reports and for consignment queries, contact us on 021 794 6461 or email us on ct@swelco.co.za www.swelco.co.za

Downlo ad the f ree Stephan Welz & Co. app


Emma Willemse in her studio. Photo: Rudolph Willemse. Opposite Page: Broken boat (2019). Digital print on Hahnemuhle 300gsm. 65.5cm x 36cm

UPROOT

Exhibition by Emma Willemse RK Contemporary, Riebeek Kasteel 9 February to 1 March 2020

www.rkcontemporary.com

T

he conceptual artist Emma Willemse is known for her three-dimensional installations and artist’s books in which she uses found objects collected from sites that are infused with a history of loss. Willemse’s interest in displacement as a theme is informed by her own experience of the loss of several homes in the 1990’s. She conducted an academic study into ways that the loss of a home affects the psyche of the displaced and came to the conclusion that this traumatic experience causes consequential losses of memory and identity. The quest to make these notions visible runs like a golden vein through her oeuvre as artist, initiated from a very personal manifestation and developing into more universal issues of loss.

80

In her new exhibition called Uproot, which takes place in her hometown Riebeek Kasteel, Willemse expands her investigation into the natural environment. She explains: “In much the same way that a floor of a house could be considered the footprint of a home, and its demolishment could therefore be deemed as an uprootment of all the meanings we assigned to that home, I interrogate questions around the physical uprootment of trees, probing the aftermath of the losses occurring when trees are destroyed.” In a world inundated with the one environmental crisis after the next, the focus of the exhibition Uproot is particularly relevant. Trees are known to create ecological environments in which a myriad of life forms flourish and through their

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Root fragment VII (2020). Collagraph print and collage, 24 x 24cm

green canopies, trees provide much of the earth’s oxygen. It is known that deforestation world-wide has extreme negative effects on the environment, such as loss of biodiversity, displacement of people and the increase of arid land. As the first step in her creative process for Uproot, Willemse has embarked on a pursuit to find and document the huge uprooted trees from the Riebeek Valley and surrounding areas. Her intention is to honour these fallen giants through her art making. True to her practice, the exhibition comprises works in a wide range of media, including an installation from found materials as well as mixed media works on paper, digital prints, drawings and handmade collagraphs and monotypes. Emma Willemse has exhibited extensively in

82

South Africa, Africa and abroad. Her works have been included in the Nando’s Collection, the Arcadia Collection, and the South African Embassy in Beijing. Her award-winning artist’s books installation, called 101 ways to long for a home, has been exhibited in diverse configurations in Florence, Dakar, Senegal Johannesburg, Stellenbosch, Paris and London. Emma holds a Master’s degree in Visual Arts from the University of South Africa and qualifications in psychology and librarianship. All enquiries: Astrid Mcleod Tel +27 (0)83 653 3697 www.rkcontemporary.com

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Daor Contemporary Coode Crescent Port of Cape Town 8001

(Enter from South Arm Road, through the security booms) Gallery Hours: Tues-Fri: 9am - 5pm Sat: 10am - 2pm

www.daor.co.za info@daor.co.za +27 71 624 6985 | +27 71 624 7130

CONTEMPORARY


SUE MARTIN

Disrupting surfaces and breaking boundaries by Laura de Harde www.suemartinfineart.co.za

84

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


I

n 2010, Emeritus Professor of History of Art (UCT) and curator of the exhibition Lie of the Land (2010), Michael Godby, commented that historically the genre of landscape painting and mapping ‘represents a means of taking control over space’ (2010: 61). These visual techniques were employed by early explorers as a means of making sense of the unfamiliar territories they encountered on their travels. Godby noticed that an unusually high number of contemporary South African artists continued to perpetuate the practice of landscape painting by subverting it through a critical lens (2010: 61). Godby attributed the trend to ‘land and its history [continuing] to be such a fraught issue in [South Africa]’ (2010: 63). Today, many contemporary South African artists continue to probe the subject of land, confirming that Godby’s assessment holds true, a decade later.

South African painter and printmaker Sue Martin is one such artist who employs the dusty vistas, scorched by the African Sun, as some of the backdrops against which she grapples with her own positionality as a third generation South African (Image 1). Drawing from historical sources, her lived experiences, her travels and a selection of her own photographs, Martin builds up and disrupts the surfaces of her artworks creating a palimpsest of ideas, images, media and marks. Martin’s exploration of her identity is sensitive and purposeful. The textures Martin creates through the layering of paint and wax are prompts for the viewer to look closer and to scratch beneath the visually pleasing surface in order to unearth the layers of complex engagement. 3326 Grahamstown, mixed media and oil on map, 115 x 63 cm


2228 Alldays, mixed media and oil on map, 114 x 78 cm

Martin skilfully manipulates both paint and surface to enable her conceptual framework to transcend an exclusively personal engagement with her subject. In her most recent body of work, The Cartographer’s Notes (2019 2020), Martin paints directly onto topographical maps thereby disrupting the surface and breaking through the constructed boundaries both symbolically and conceptually. For Martin, maps symbolise the taming of the natural world, by employing what can often be the arbitrary demarcation of land (Image 2). Moreover, maps represent a momentary intervention in an otherwise extensive and complex history. Martin employs ‘veils of colour [that] metaphorically echo the many layers of meaning present in the work, as well as evoking layers of time’ (suemartinfineart.co.za 2019). Martin’s earthy colour pallet and her exploration of historical images provide a sense of continuity between each distinct body of work, spanning the length of her noteworthy career. Since her first solo exhibition in 1999 Martin

86

has exhibited extensively across South Africa with various galleries such as Knysna Fine Art, In Toto Gallery, Artist Proof Studio and The White River Gallery. Her series Urban Cowboys (2009) was acquired by the IEC (Independent Electoral Commission) and forms part of its permanent collection. Martin’s ability to weave ‘invisible threads’ (Kiefer 2011) between theory and practice, enables her work to retain an intimate sensibility while simultaneously connecting it to what the German artist Anselm Kiefer calls the ‘manifest cosmos’ (Kiefer 2011). To experience Martin’s most recent body of work, The Cartographer’s Notes (2019 - 2020), visit Knysna Fine Art and The Gallery at Grande Provence. In addition, The White River Gallery will be representing Martin at the Turbine Art Fair (2020) later this year. www.suemartinfineart.co.za sue_martin_fineart.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


JHB: 011 206 1500 | fineartjnb@stuttafordvanlines.com CPT: 021 514 8700 | fineartct@stuttafordvanlines.com www.stuttafordvanlines.com


JOSHUA MILES Three Artist Proof Retrospectives By Angela Miles www.joshuamiles.co.za

J

oshua Miles has been working full time as an artist and printmaker through out his artists career. His main focus is limited edition reduction block prints, first in woodcuts and more recently in linocuts. Because of his passion for working in this technique he has worked prolifically and as a result has built up a large collection of his own artist proofs.

An artist proof is, at least in theory, a print taken in the printmaking process to see the current printing state while the block of wood or lino is being worked on by the artist. In modern practice a proof is usually used to describe an impression of the finished work that is identical to the numbered edition. Artist proofs normally belong to the artist and by convention the artist is not supposed to sell these with the edition. Art curators, collectors and historians view proofs as especially desirable because of their rarity and that is often reflected in the price.

Deer Park stream, 565 x 420mm 88

Riveirsonderend sheep, 565 x 420mm W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Tamboershoek windpomp, 565 x 420mm.

Now Joshua has decided it is time to release a selection of some of his collection of proofs which are all works where the edition has sold out by way of a retrospective of his working career so far. The collection is so extensive that he has decided to split it into 3 parts. These 3 parts were easy enough to separate as Joshua is a landscape artist and so these 3 parts are the 3 areas of his country where he focuses his work. The Overberg, where he has lived for many years, The Karoo, where he currently resides and Cape Town, his beloved mother city. The first of the above collection to be released will be ’The Overberg’ which will be exhibited in Hermanus at the FynArts Gallery and the opening will be on Thursday the 27th of February at 17.30 and the show will be on until the 6th of April running over 2 First Fridays in Hermanus.

90

Part 2 of the collection will be ’The Karoo’ with images of the area going on exhibition in his home town at the Prince Albert gallery. This exhibition will open on Saturday the 13th of June and also run for a month. The 3rd part of the collection will be ‘Cape Town’ with images of th city being exhibited at The SA Print Gallery over December and into the following January. All of these proofs being released are a rare opportunity for collectors and buyers to have the chance to purchase that “one that got away” so if you remember that image of Joshua’s that you were too late to purchase as the limited edition had sold out, then here is one last chance….

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Image © Nyashadzashe Marovatsanga

DIFFERENT ANGLES Nyasha Marovatsanga Johno Mellish 06 February - 28 March 2020 OPENING: 06 February at 18h00 52 Waterkant Street, Cape Town www.thkgallery.com


DECADES IN WAITINGTHE ART OF OUR ALUMNI UNIBO 13th February- 20 March 2020 Text by Amohelang Mohajane (Mafikeng archives) NWU Gallery

T

he exhibition is inspired by a rediscovered Archive in NWU Mafikeng. Too keen to pass on the opportunity, I accepted the invitation. Little did I know I’d be taking a journey back into 31 years of the Universities history.

The archive staff had known the history of how the artworks came into their possession with the help of Kristana Travis who saved the archive when the Fine Art Department closed down many years ago. We scheduled a meeting with Tonic Dichaba, who was one of the students to meet at the NWU Archives. She was immediately transported back to the 80’s. Nostalgic moments. While walking through the archives with contemporaries they identified the fellow painters techniques. The archive consists of original linocut and Oil on Masonite renderings of different subject matter. These include figure drawing studies, cubism and perspective, still life’s, selfportraits and everyday scenes from the hood and some protest art.

Above: Unknown, self portrait. Right: Filicitous T Dichaba

92

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


LESEGO MONCHO

Decade of Expression & Creativity NWU Main Gallery Text by Boitumelo Makousu 13 Feb - 20 March

P

ablo Picasso the most prolific artist in history crosses one’s mind when looking at Mr Moncho’s works. Bringing it back home, South African artists like, Irma Stern, Alexis Preller, Walter Battis, Gerhard Sekoto, Cecil Skotnes, are Moncho’s sources of inspiration including George Pemba and many other abstract artists in and around the country. Moncho takes us on his decade of expressive and creative works. Reflections of memories of his beautiful village, the murals on the village homes, his interest in earthy colours which made him feel closer to mother nature, and his interest in drawing animals His love for experimentation grew. A curious venturing mind and a phase in his life where anxiety, loneliness, depression ultimately caused the flatness in one’s life. The flatness expressions on his work is as the result of the many times that one lived without being pleasant, interestingly that awakened the artist in him. The figures and the backgrounds are integrated to lift the spirit and bring harmony into the works, he uses Impasto to add energy and lift the mood in the flatness of his works. Lesego’s work is a protest against all social illnesses that includes, human rights abuses, obesity and literary. “My canvas is a space in which to act, what is on the canvas is not a picture but an event” says Moncho. Exhibition runs from 13 February – 20 March Lesego Moncho, The fisherman village, 120 x 80, 2019

94

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


96

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


HERMANUS FYNARTS 2020 A word from the Festival Director Mary Faure

I

t gives me great pleasure to introduce the 8th annual Hermanus FynArts Festival which will run this year from 5-16 June. Our annual celebration of South African Arts this year promises to be our most exciting and comprehensive festival to date.

Basically Beethoven is the title of the Opening Concert. FynArts audiences will join music lovers around the world to celebrate the 250th Anniversary of the composer’s birth. The FynArts Festival Orchestra with soloist, Jordan Brooks (violin), under the baton of Richard Cock will perform a programme of Beethoven’s much loved music. Characteristically there is plenty to choose from and much consideration has gone into planning this year’s programme selection of exhibition, concerts, Strauss & Co Series of Presentations and Interviews, workshops, demonstrations, food and wine, films and a programme for children. I believe the arts have always been powerful tools for change. As artists weave their rich threads of creativity and passion into re-imagined ways of expression to communicate with their audiences, they connect us with one another and our environment. Three of the major FynArts exhibitions this year share a commonality in their reference to the increasing fragility of our planet. Beezy Bailey is our Festival Artist for 2020 and the title of his exhibition is Falling Stars. In his artist’s statement Beezy says: “This exhibition comprises a body of recent work in which I  am exploring two avenues of interest that affect our lives at present.  The first being ‘Anthropocene’ and the demise of Festival Artist, Beezy Bailey, Mother and Flower (Detail)


Above: Jaco Sieberhagen. Opposite Page: David Griesel

our environment ….This links with the second avenue of my work, which has to do with the spiritual.  I believe that a loss of  spirituality is  responsible  for the strife and dis-harmony currently observed throughout the world.  For me the process of both making art and viewing art is a healing one.” I am also excited about our Sculpture on the Cliffs exhibition, curated this year by Gavin Younge. He says of the exhibition: “This year’s theme,  Vertical Animal, encompasses the defence of the rights of all life forms – human and non-human. These 12 sculptural installations inspire us to think visually and to reconsider our relationship with our environment.”

98

The ever-popular Tollman Bouchard Finlayson Art Award takes as its theme, Biomimicry - the imitation of elements of nature for the purpose of solving complex human problems. It is therefore also the design and production of art that takes inspiration from the natural world. I am sure this unique exhibition of tondi on the heads of wine barrels in the cellar of the Bouchard Finlayson wine farm will again be a festival fabourite. Angelo Gobbato, a name that is synonymous with opera, will be the recipient of the 2020 FynArts Legacy Award in recognition of his longstanding and unique contribution to the arts in South Africa and beyond. His distinguished career has included being an opera director and Artistic Director of CAPAB.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Performances - Dance for All

“As artists weave their rich threads of creativity and passion into re-imagined ways of expression to communicate with their audiences, they connect us with one another and our environment.” He spent many years as Head of the UCT Opera School where his most famous pupil was Pretty Yende. Last year Angelo released his memoirs, A Passion for Opera, to coincide with his 75th birthday. This year, specially for FynArts, and to coincide with the 50th anniversary of his professional collaboration with soprano, Aviva Pelham, he will join forces with her in presenting 50 Shades of Gold - the many shades that have marked their artistic collaboration which began fifty golden years ago. In addition to the programme components that festival goers have come to enjoy over the past seven years, we have added a few new ones, two of which are: a stronger presence for theatre, and ‘design’ as a topic for two presentations and an exhibition.

100

To accommodate festival goers attending evening concerts, pre-show dinners will be available at participating restaurants offering ‘specials’ on presentation of a performance ticket for that same night. Evening concerts will therefore start at 19:30. I look forward very much to welcoming you to a bumper FynArts 2020 that will leave you uplifted, stimulated and inspired. The programme booklet will be launched by the second half of February and will be available also at all distribution points of SA Art Times.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


A retrospective of artist proofs

The Overberg by

Joshua Miles Opening on 27 February 2020 at 5:30 The exhibition will run until 6 April 2020 2 Harbour Road, The Courtyard, Hermanus For more information Chantel Louskitt: admin@hermanusfynarts.co.za or cell: 060 957 5371


Business Art News

STRAUSS & CO CONTEMPORARY ART SALE A bumper offering of Pan-African talent 15 February 2020

A

new wave of internationally celebrated South African artists, among them Nicholas Hlobo, Athi-Patra Ruga and Simphiwe Ndzube, lead Strauss & Co’s much-anticipated Contemporary Art auction, due to be held in Cape Town on 15 February. Now in its third year, this benchmark annual sale coincides with the Investec Cape Town Art Fair and will feature 102 carefully vetted lots, among them a consignment of pan-African works from a South African collector. Highlights from the forthcoming sale include Nicholas Hlobo’s embroidered ribbon assemblage piece Umphokoqo (estimate R400 000 – 600 000). This is the first time a work by this highly rated artist will appear on the secondary market in South Africa. Athi-Patra Ruga’s wool and thread on tapestry canvas, Touched by an Angel (estimate R700 000 – 900 000), is a pop-political allegory depicting a Rihanna-esque bad girl clad in a bikini bearing a flag. The estimate reflects sustained interest in Ruga’s textile work over the last five years. In 2019 Strauss & Co sold Ruga’s photograph, The Night of the Long Knives I, for R1.7-million, a world record. The youngest artist in the trio, Simphiwe Ndzube, winner of the 2015 Michaelis Prize, is represented on the sale by an early-career photo triptych, In Search Of (estimate R120 000 – 160 000). The pageantry enacted in his tableaux vivants heralded the subjects and themes of his current painting practice. All three artists have enjoyed significant international attention in the last year. Now based in Los Angeles, Ndzube appeared on the 2019 Lyon Biennale, an important earlycareer milestone for artists, and was recently the subject of a video profile by Vanity Fair. Hlobo and Ruga have both been involved in high-profile collaborations with French luxury goods brands.

102

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


William Kentridge, Small Koppie 2, Mixed media on found paper, 47 by 66,5cm, R1 500 000 - 2 000 000 Property of a collector


Karel Nel, The Place of the Manao Tupapau, Gaugui’s Grave, Hiva Oa, pastel and pigment on bonded fibre fabric, 165 by 214cm, R500 000 - R700 000. Opposite Page: Omar Victor Diop, Trayvon Martin, 2012, from Liberty, inkjet print on Hahnamuhle 109,5 by 80cm, R150 000 - R200 000. From the property of a Collector.

Commissioned by Louis Vuitton, Hlobo’s limited edition ArtyCapucines PM handbag features a bright blue hand-embroidered decoration and a flower blooming from the interior of the bag. Ruga’s Lady Dior bag, for fashion house Dior, depicts a face embroidered with pearls, fabric and metal flowers and crystals. Strauss & Co is proud to be offering 22 lots from the Property of a Collector. Encompassing drawing, painting and sculpture, the consignment includes a number of works by contemporary African artists with international presence, among them painters Cyril Omamogho (Nigeria) and George Lilanga (Tanzania), and photographers Omar Victor Diop (Senegal) and Hassan Hajjaj (Morocco). Based in Marrakech, Hajjaj’s vibrant portraits of Moroccan youths last year featured in his career survey at the photography museum Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris. An edition of Diop’s performance portrait Trayvon Martin, 2012 (estimate R150 000 – 200 000) is currently being exhibited on a survey of new African art at the Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo, Norway.

104

“I am proud of the range and depth of the works on offer in this sale,” says Matthew Partridge, contemporary art specialist at Strauss & Co who heads up the sale. “The sale highlights a broad range of artistic strategies, from painting to photography, defining this current moment. The 22 lots from a South African collector provide insight into how these practices can be combined into a coherent pan-African collection.” Paintings feature strongly in the upcoming sale, with noteworthy works by Jake Aikman, Lisa Brice and Georgina Gratrix on offer. The catalogue also includes an untitled floral study from 2015 by in-demand portraitist Cinga Samson (estimate R70 000 – 90 000). There is also a special focus on photography. The photography session opens at lot 32 with an important 2001 work by Berni Searle, Still (estimate R200 000 – 300 000), from the Property of Kangra Group (Pty) Ltd, assembled by the late Graham and Rhona Beck. The lot comprises eight semi-transparent photographs of the artist kneeling, covered in flour, in the process of kneading dough, and is based on a video installation shown at the 2001 Venice Biennale.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Owusu-Ankomah, Thinking the Microcran No 6, acrylic on canvas, 85 by 135cm, R180 000 - R240 000.

“Searle’s influence is deeply felt in South African visual art, where a whole generation of artists, including Athi-Patra Ruga, Mohau Modisakeng, Zanele Muholi and Nandipha Mntambo, share a common lineage in Searle’s staged photography and video work,” says Partridge. Modisakeng and Muholi, who each have a work in the photography session, are also alumni of the Venice Biennale. Modisakeng’s Passage 7 (estimate R180 000 – 240 000) is a self-portrait of the artist stranded in a rowing boat and is based on a three-channel video projection presented in the South African Pavilion at the 2017 Venice Biennale. Strauss & Co was a co-sponsor of the pavilion. The contemporary sale features a number of past winners of the prestigious Standard Bank Young Artist Award. Aside from Modisakeng, they include Jane Alexander, Pieter Hugo, William Kentridge, Mary Sibande, Mikhael Subotzky and Nontsikelelo Veleko. The sale also includes an untitled canvas (estimate R150 000 – 200 000) by Blessing Ngobeni, the 2020 recipient of this career-defining accolade. Executed in 1993-94, Alexander’s tableaux sculpture, something’s going down (estimate R800 000 – 1 million), presents four diminutive figures moving in a procession along a ramp painted in military camouflage. “Alexander’s

106

sculptures are seldom offered at auction and this is a rare opportunity to acquire a work in this medium by this preeminent South African artist,” says Partidge. Kentridge’s important charcoal drawing Small Koppie 2 (estimate R1.5 – 2 million) forms part of the consignment from the South African collector and depicts the low hill in the Marikana area where police killed 34 striking miners in August 2012. Kentridge visited the site as part of his drawing process. Commenting on the overall scope of the sale, Strauss & Co joint managing director Bina Genovese says: “Strauss & Co’s 2020 contemporary art sale represents our biggest offering to date. It is also our most representative sale, both in terms of gender and nationality. Collectors wanting to learn more about this exciting, future-orientated category are urged to participate in our vibrant educational and social programme in the lead up to the sale.” Genovese will reprise her role as lead auctioneer at the sale. Strauss & Co’s third contemporary art sale will take place on Saturday, 15 February 2020 at 6pm at Quay 7 Warehouse, 11 East Pier Rd, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town. (GPS: 33°54’05.4”S 18

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Next Fine Art Auction

Sunday, 16th February 2020 ~ 404 Jan Smuts Ave, Craighall Park, JHB

IrmA Stern, GouAche Sold for r 440 000

Anton vAn WouW, Bronze

Sold for r 320 000

J.h. PIerneef, oIl Sold for r 800 000

Let us do the same for you - Now accepting entries for this auction

Enquiries: stuart@5aa.co.za ~ 011 781 2040 ~ www.5thAveAuctions.co.za

5th Avenue Fine Art Auctioneers 2020 Kick-Off Auction

art & antiques auction on 15 February 2020 9:30am

Penny Siopis, acrylic, dye-based ink, glass paint and enamel with collaged hair extensions SOLD R220,000 View previous auction results at www.rkauctioneers.co.za

011 789 7422 • 011 326 3515 • 083 675 8468 • 12 Allan Road, Bordeaux, Johannesburg


Business Art News

ASPIRE X PIASA AUCTION Modern & Contemporary African Art 14 February 2020

aspireart.net

Kudzanai Chiurai, Revelations X, 2011, R 160 000 – 240 000


E

ver-increasing global interest in art from Africa is changing the art market To meet this growing demand, Aspire Art Auctions has partnered with Paris-based auction house Piasa, to introduce an Africa focussed auction that presents some of the best examples of modern and contemporary art produced on the continent. This collaboration is unprecedented and represents the first time an African and European auction house have partnered to present a sale of African art, in Africa, for a global audience.

The Modern and Contemporary African Art auction takes place on Friday, 14 February at OroAfrica House in Cape Town. The curated collection comprises 198 lots, featuring 139 artists from Africa and the diaspora, and whilst it presents a broader pan-African offering, it spotlights various key collecting segments within 20th century modernism, contemporary production and photography.

Above: Marlene Dumas, Oktober 1973, 1973, R 3 000 000 – 5 000 000. Left: Salah Elmur, The Green Forest, 2016, R 195 000 – 255 000

111


Mary Sibande, A Terrible Beauty is Born, 2013, R 300 000 – 400 000

The auction introduces a remarkable painting by Chéri Samba (Congo), internationally regarded as the most in-demand African artist on the auction circuit. Retour au Bercail, 1995, (R225 000 – 300 000) is the first work by the artist to be offered at auction in South Africa. Other prominent artists debuting locally on auction include Aboudia Abdoulaye Diarrassouba (Ivory Coast), with two expressive mixed media works from the mid1990s, Marc Padeu (Cameroon), Salah Elmur (Sudan) with an enchanting work The Green Forest, 2016 (R195 000 – 255 000) as well as Gareth Nyandoro (Zimbabwe) with his 2016 paper-based work titled Tauya Nadzo Tsoka Dzenyu (Brand New Second Hand Nikes), estimated at R180 000 – 240 000. Collectors of contemporary art will be particularly interested in works by Kudzanai Chiurai (Zimbabwe), Zemba Luzamba (Congo) and Kay Hassan, alongside alongside Mustafa Maluka, Moshekwa Langa, Wim Botha and Zander Blom. Adding to the strength of the overall offering is a striking city-scape Full Moon, 2017 (R100,000–150,000) by the late, much celebrated David Koloane. An impressive range of drawings and sculpture by William Kentridge leads this contemporary selection. The mixed media work Whilst Reaching Down (Slowly), 2013, (R3 – 5 million) presents a series of drawings on dictionary paper highlighting the artist’s interest in drawing text and animation. Adorning the catalogue cover is a superb, early painting by internationally acclaimed Marlene

112

Dumas, never before seen on the market. Expressive and powerful, Oktober 1973 is only the third Dumas painting ever offered at auction in South Africa. Estimated at R3–5m, the work is set to attract significant interest. A strong lead of women artists which showcases an exceptional still life painting by Irma Stern’ from 1954. African and Chinese ceramics with oranges and open book  reflects Stern’s sophistication, love of travel, her delight in the discovery of diverse cultures and their artefacts, and her mastery of oil painting. Helen Sebidi’s colourful Figures and birds, 1991 (R80 000 – 120 000) will appeal to the dedicated collector. Contemporary highlights include work by Lisa Brice, Deborah Poynton and Frances Goodman, as well as Georgina Gratrix’s compelling portrait Girl with Purple Hair, 2013 (R250 000 – 350 000) and  Mary Sibande’s striking photograph, A Terrible Beauty is Born (from the Long Live the Dead Queen series), 2013 (R300 000 – 400 000). Aspire has made meaningful advances in developing the market for photography at auction, and the exciting range of photographic works and lens-based media will thrill collectors. Rarely exhibited in South Africa and also making its inaugural local auction appearance, is an early 1980s photograph by the late Nigerian/British photographer Rotimi Fani-Keyode. Legendary photographer David Goldblatt is represented with well-known images from the seminal photobooks Some Afrikaners Photographed and TJ/Johannesburg Photographs.

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Georgina Gratrix, Girl with Purple Hair, 2013, R 250 000 – 350 000


“Aspire Art Auctions has partnered with Paris-based auction house Piasa, to introduce an Africa-focussed auction that presents some of the best examples of modern and contemporary art produced on the continent.”

Chéri Samba, Retour au Bercail, 1995, R 225 000 – 300 000

Three striking examples from Benin photographer Leonce Raphael  Agbodjélou draw upon his hallmark portrait vernacular. Two remarkable sets of pen and ink drawings; Oja Suite, 1962 and Nok Suite, 1958/59 (each R300 000 – 500 000) by Uche Okeke, a an important figure in Nigerian art history, together with a powefull, early drawing by Dumile Feni Mother and Child, 1966 (R200 000 – 300 000) introduces the outstanding collection by 20th century and modern artists from the continent. Impressive works from established, canonical artists like John Koenakeefe Mohl, Ablade Glover (Ghana), Ernesto Shikhani (Mozambique), Alexis Preller, Cecil Skotnes and Walter Battiss are sure to attract attention. Of note is the beautiful Namaqualand flowers and quiver tree, a strikingly large landscape painting by Hugo Naudé (R750 000 – 1 million). Headlining the collection is J.H. Pierneef’s, Baobabs with Soutpansberg in the distance, painted in 1920

114

and estimated at R 6 – 9 million. Pierneef’s baobab paintings, are extremely rare, and this impressive painting produced 100 years ago, with impeccable provenance, is a must have for any serious collection of his work. ASPIRE X PIASA AUCTION DATE: Friday 14 February at 3 pm NEW VENUE: OroAfrica House, 170 Buitengracht Street, Cape Town PREVIEW DAYS: Wednesday 12 February
 12 to 5 pm Thursday 13 February
 10 am to 5 pm Friday 14 February
 10 am to 3 pm ENQUIRIES: Cape Town | +27 21 418 0765 | ct@aspireart.net

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Donovan Ward, The Return, 2016, linocut on paper, Sanlam Art Collection.

Tina Smith, Pieces of Home, 2016, linocut on paper, Sanlam Art Collection.

Manfred Zylla, D6, 2016, 4 colour woodblock on paper, Sanlam Art Collection.

Lionel Davis, The Sentinel, 2016, linocut on paper, Sanlam Art Collection.

“Remembering 60 000 Forced Goodbyes” An exhibition of a portfolio of 50 prints by 50 artists commemorating 50 years since the declaration of District 6 as a “Whites Only” area in 1966 and the forced removal of 60 000 inhabitants.

Sanlam Art Gallery 2 Strand Road, Bellville

23 January – 28 February 2020 Monday – Friday 09:00 – 16:30 or by appointment Tel: 021 947 3359 www.sanlamart@sanlam.co.za


Business Art News

STEPHAN WELZ & CO.

First Cape Town Auction – February 2020 www.swelco.co.za

W

e have a number of exciting highlights for our upcoming live auction on the 25th and 26th of February. Our selection of old South African masters includes a landscape by the highly acclaimed artist, Pierneef. Our offering of contemporary South African artists includes a striking bronze torso by Sydney Kumalo and a significant watercolour by George Pemba. Johannes Phokela’s satirical take on Rubens’ Saturn Devouring his Son and Maurice Mbikayi’s Afrofuturistic photographic prints, along with Ed Suter’s large scale photographic portraits comprise some of our young contemporary South African artists. For those seeking more historical artists, Gustav Klimt’s collotype of a woman wearing a boa is an example of the artist’s ability to convey women in a delicate and ethereal manner.

Join us in our showroom on 14 Dreyer Street, Claremont, Cape Town to view all our exquisite pieces. We have a walkabout with Anton Welz on Saturday the 22nd of February, with our auction preview on the 21st, 22nd and 23rd of February.

Gustav Klimt (Austrian 1862 - 1918), Portratskizze: Dame Mit Boa, signed in the plate, collotype, 49 by 32cm, R15,000 - R22,000

For more information, please contact our CT branch on 021 794 6461 or ct@swelco.co.za

Mr Brainwash (British French 1966 - ), Pup Art, signed in pencil in the margin; artist’s fingerprint in ink in the margin, screenprint, 56 by 56cm, R 20 000 – R 30 000

116

Ed Suter (British - ), The Bathers, giclée print, 111 by 157cm, Karoo Art Hotel, Acquired directly from the artist, R15,000 - R20,000

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


Johannes Phokela (South African 1966 - ), Saturn Devouring His Own Children, oil on paper, 58 by 41cm, R15,000 - R20,000


Sydney Alex Kumalo (South African 1935 - 1988) TORSO, signedm bronze on wooden base, height: 37cm excluding base, R100,000 - R150,000

118

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A


ONGOING SHOWS OPENING EXHIBITIONS FEBRUARY 2020 Momo Gallery, Salah Elmur, Sunflower Vase, 2019, Acrylic on canvas, 200cm x 250cm


ONGOING SHOWS: FEBRUARY 2020

RUST-EN-VREDE SUMMER SALE UNTIL 12/02/2020

EVERARD READ JHB CIRCA THE SONG OF THE CHICOTTE BLESSING NGOBENI UNTIL 15/02/2020

WWW.RUSTENVREDE.COM

WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA

SMITH I’M DONE MICHAEL LINDERS SOLO EXHIBITION UNTIL 15/02/2020 WWW.SMITHSTUDIO.CO.ZA

UNTIL 12/02/2020

UNTIL 15/02/2020

UNTIL 15/02/2020

IS ART STONES OF GREECE EXHIBITION BY MARLENE VON DÜRCKHEIM 11 HUGUENOT STREET 021 876 2071

WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA UNTIL 17/02/2020

UNTIL 15/02/2020

DEEPEST DARKEST GALLERY AD-REFLEX HINDSIGHTS AND FORESIGHTS UNTIL 20/02/2020 WWW.DEEPESTDARKESTART.COM

UNTIL 20/02/2020

EVERARD READ FRANSCHHOEK A WALKING SHADOW HENK SERFONTEIN UNTIL 17/02/2020

Daor Contemporary Coode Crescent Port of Cape Town, 8001 (Enter from South Arm Road, through the security booms)

www.daor.co.za | info@daor.co.za

+27 71 624 6985 +27 71 624 7130

UNTIL 21/02/2020 Art Times_Display Listing.indd 1

122

CONTEMPORARY

2020/01/17 12:14:17

W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

UNTIL 17/02/2020

EVERARD READ CAPE TOWN PROTEACEAE NIC BLADEN UNTIL 22/02/2020 WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA UNTIL 22/02/2020


H E R M A N U S

A Celebration of South African Arts

5 - 16 June 2020

Exhibitions performances talks, presentations demonstrations, workshops food and wine, films and children’s events

A Fusion of Arts Festival and Winter School More information at hermanusfynarts.co.za or admin@hermanusfynarts.co.za

Imiso Ceramics

Sign up for our newsletter and social media platforms to keep updated on who, what and where in the run up to the FynArts Festival


ONGOING SHOWS: FEBRUARY 2020

SALON NINETY ONE IF IT WASN’T FOR US | A SOLO EXHIBITION BY SARAH PRATT UNTIL 22/02/2020

WALL ART DOMESTIC SCENES GROUP EXHIBITION UNTIL 22/02/2020

WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA

WWW.WALLSART.CO.ZA

UNTIL 22/02/2020

UNTIL 22/02/2020

UNTIL 27/02/2020

CANDICE BERMAN GALLERY SARAH GRACE | STOLEN FROM A DREAM UNTIL 28/02/2020

SANLAM ART GALLERY REMEMBERING 60 000 FORCED GOODBYES UNTIL 28/02/2020

DYLAN LEWIS SCULPTURE GARDEN ALL VISITS BY APPOINTMENT UNTIL 29/02/2020

WWW.CANDICEBERMAN.CO.ZA

WWW.SANLAMART@SANLAM.CO.ZA

INFO@DYLANART.CO.ZA.

UNTIL 28/02/2020

UNTIL 28/02/2020

UNTIL 29/02/2020

ECLECTICA PRINT GALLERY NHLANHLA XABA 69 BURG STREET, CAPE TOWN, 8001 0214224185 WWW.ECLECTICAPRINTARTGALLERY.CO.ZA

UNTIL 30/11/2019

124

UNTIL 29/02/2020

W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

UNTIL 29/02/2020


Sue Martin

F I N E A RT I S T www.suemartinfineart.co.za

Launching her latest body of work: The Cartographer’s Notes (2020) On exhibition during February at Knysna Fine Art & The Gallery at Grande Provence

will be at

Date:13 - 16 February 2020 Venue: Cape Town International Convention Centre BOOTH E3

ArtistProofJHB

Artist Proof Studio

gallery@artistproofstudio.co.za www.artistproofstudio.co.za +27 11 492 1278 William Kentridge - Skeletal She-wolf - 2020 (detail)


Kirsten Sims. Willy Nilly, 2019, Mixed media on board, 1115 x 810mm, Salon91


BOOTH B11

14 - 16 FEBRUARY 2020 CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA


ONGOING SHOWS: FEBRUARY - MARCH 2020 IS Sculpture

Tokara Delicatessen

GOODMAN GALLERY JHB CLOSET BRETT CHARLES SEILER UNTIL 29/02/2020

RUHAN JANSE VAN VUUREN ‘Hiraeth' Tokara Wine Estate, Helshoogte Pass. 021 8762071 or 021 8839717

WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM UNTIL 29/02/2020

UNTIL 29/02/2020

SA PRINT GALLERY JOSHUA MILES FYNBOS CITY 2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020

KNYSNA FINE ART AND THE GALLERY AT GRANDE PROVENCE SUE MARTIN THE CARTOGRAPHER’S NOTES UNTIL 29/02/2020

WWW.PRINTGALLERY.CO.ZA UNTIL 29/02/2020

UNTIL 29/02/2020

UNTIL 29/02/2020

UNTIL 29/02/2020

STEVENSON CAPE TOWN BARTHÉLÉMY TOGUO BILONGUE UNTIL 07/03/2020 WWW.STEVENSON.INFO UNTIL 29/02/2020

128

UNTIL 02/03/2020

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

UNTIL 07/03/2020


BOOTH B12 A SOLO EXHIBITION BY KIRSTEN BEETS

14 - 16 FEBRUARY 2020 CAPE TOWN INTERNATIONAL CONVENTION CENTRE WWW.SALON91.CO.ZA


ONGOING SHOWS: MARCH - APRIL 2020

GOODMAN GALLERY JHB BÔNA THABISO SEKGALA UNTIL 14/03/2020

NORVAL FOUNDATION WHY SHOULD I HESITATE: SCULPTURE WILLIAM KENTRIDGE UNTIL 23/03/2020

WWW.GOODMAN-GALLERY.COM

WWW.NORVALFOUNDATION.ORG

UNTIL 13/03/2020

UNTIL 14/03/2020

UNTIL 23/03/2020

ZEITZ MOCAA WHY SHOULD I HESITATE: DRAWINGS WILLIAM KENTRIDGE UNTIL 23/03/2020 WWW.ZEITZMOCAA.MUSEUM

GENDER-POLITICS-IDENTITY COLLECTION TO CONTEMPLATE AND CONVERSE ON THEMES ASSOCIATED WITH GENDER, IDENTITY, MYSTICISM AND LAND DISCOURSES. UNTIL 29/03/2020

WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA

WWW.ZEITZMOCAA.MUSEUM

UNTIL 23/03/2020

UNTIL 29/03/2020

UNTIL 30/03/2020

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM

ZEITZ MOCAA

MICHAELIS SCHOOL OF FINE ART AND SO THE STORIES RAN AWAY UNTIL 30/03/2020

RUPERT MUSEUM THEN & NOW GROUP EXHIBITION UNTIL 10/05/2020

UNTIL 30/04/2020

130

UNTIL 30/04/2020

W W W. A R T T I M E S . C O . Z A

UNTIL 10/05/2020


Recent Acquisitions Exhibition

This exhibition will run until Wednesday 26 February 2020


OPENING EXHIBITIONS

FEBRUARY 2020 WEEKS 1-4 THK Gallery, Johno Mellish, Winter Nights Walking 1, 2018, 100x125cm


OPENING EXHIBTIONS: FEBRUARY 2020 WEEK 1

STEVENSON JHB DADA KHANYISA GOOD FEELINGS 01/02/2020 UNTIL 13/03/2020 WWW.STEVENSON.INFO 01/02/2020 UNTIL 13/03/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

UNISA PERMANENT ART EXHIBITION RECENT ACQUISITIONS TEL: 012 444 8644 01/02/2020 UNTIL 26/02/2020 01/02/2020 UNTIL 26/02/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

THE CAPE GALLERY JOHN KRAMER 03/02/2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020 WWW.CAPEGALLERY.CO.ZA 03/02/2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

ECLECTICA COLLECTIONS ONYIS MARTIN – BEFORE TOMORROW COMES OPENS 06/02/2020 WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA

02/11/2019 UNTIL 16/11/2019 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

05/02/2020 UNTIL 22/03/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

OPENS 06/02/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

ECLECTICA CONTEMPORARY DEMOCRAZY: A DEMONSTRATION OF CRAZINESS - OFENTSE SESHABELA OPENS 06/02/2020

EVERARD READ CAPE TOWN UN-EARTH DYLAN LEWIS 06/02/2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020

GROUND ART CAFFE MICHAELA RINALDI 06/02/2020 UNTIL 04/03/2020

WWW.ECLECTICACONTEMPORARY.CO.ZA

WWW.EVERARD-READ.CO.ZA

WWW.GROUNDARTCAFFE.CO.ZA

OPENS 06/02/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

06/02/2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

06/02/2020 UNTIL 04/03/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

134

W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A


Heather Auer, Saving the Rhino (Detail)

The Heather Auer Art Studio Visit us at Glencairn, Simonstown (By Appointment Only)

South +27 779 PRINT.pdf 2695 / Email:3 info@heatherauer.com IS Art Art Time HalfAfrica: page ad - (0)82 Jan 2020 2020/01/23 09:36

021 876 2071 is@isart.co.za

Photo: Hendrik Theron

FRANSCHHOEK

Marlene von Dürckheim STONES OF GREECE

TOKARA

Ruhan Janse van Vuuren HIRAETH

STELLENBOSCH Various Artists NOW OPEN


Ebony Curated, Lwando Dlamini, Untitled Portrait IV, Oil on Canvas, 2020, 82,4cm x 59,3cm


WA L K A B O U T S AT U R DAY 2 2 & 2 9 F E B R UA RY @ 1 1 H 3 0


OPENING EXHIBTIONS: FEBRUARY 2020 WEEK 1-2

THK GALLERY DIFFERENT ANGLES 06/02/2020 UNTIL 28/03/2020

RK CONTEMPORARY UPROOT EMMA WILLEMSE SOLO EXHIBTION 09/02/2020 UNTIL 01/03/2020 WWW.RKCONTEMPORARY.COM

WWW.THKGALLERY.COM 06/02/2020 UNTIL 28/03/2020 WEEK 1 FEBRUARY

08/02/2020 UNTIL 29/02/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

09/02/2020 UNTIL 01/03/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

STELLENBOSCH ART TRIENNALE TOMORROW THERE WILL BE MORE OF US 11/02/2020 UNTIL 30/04/2020

ART.B GALLERY DOUBLE VISION 2020 GROUP EXHIBITION 12/02/2020 UNTIL 07/03/2020

WWW.STELLENBOSCHTRIENNALE.COM

WWW.ARTB.CO.ZA

INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC ART FESTIVAL (IPAF) DIGITALISATION SALT RIVER, CAPE TOWN 12/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WWW.BAZ-ART.CO.ZA

11/02/2020 UNTIL 30/04/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

12/02/2020 UNTIL 07/03/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

12/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

ART@AFRICA SO MUCH TALENT IN OUR COUNTRY 13/02/2020 UNTIL 13/04/2020

ARTIST PROOF STUDIO INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR BOOTH E3 13/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART

WWW.ARTISTPROOFSTUDIO.CO.ZA

13/02/2020 UNTIL 13/04/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY 138

13/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

13/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY


OPENING EXHIBTIONS: FEBRUARY 2020 WEEK 2-4

THE MELROSE GALLERY CAPE TOWN (ONE&ONLY) DR ESTHER MAHLANGU DISRUPTING PATTERNS 13/02/2020 UNTIL 01/03/2020 WWW.THEMELROSEGALLERY.COM

NWU GALLERY DECADE OF EXPRESSION AND CREATIVITY LESEGO MONCHO 13/02/2020 UNTIL 20/03/2020 WWW.SERVICES.NWU.AC.ZA

OLIEWENHUIS ART MUSEUM

BECOMING: WHAT IS & WHAT IS NOT. NEW ACQUISITIONS OF THE ART BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA 13/02/2020 UNTIL 22/03/2020

WWW.NASMUS.CO.ZA

13/02/2020 UNTIL 01/03/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

13/02/2020 UNTIL 20/03/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

13/02/2020 UNTIL 22/03/2020 WEEK 2 FEBRUARY

GRAHAMS MODERN & CONTEMPORARY INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR BOOTH P2 14/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020

SMITH INVESTEC CAPE TOWN ART FAIR BOOTH C12 14/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WWW.SMITHSTUDIO.CO.ZA

ART AT AFRICA MAUREEN QUIN LIVE WORKSHOP 15/02/2020

14/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WEEK 3 FEBRUARY

14/02/2020 UNTIL 16/02/2020 WEEK 3 FEBRUARY

ART IN THE YARD CROSS & CROWN BY SOLOMON OMOGBOYE 22/02/2020 UNTIL 16/03/2020

DEEPEST DARKEST GALLERY HERO KEVIN MACKINTOSH 22/02/2020 UNTIL 10/04/2020

WWW.ARTINTHEYARD.CO.ZA

WWW.DEEPESTDARKESTART.COM

22/02/2020 UNTIL 16/03/2020 WEEK 4 FEBRUARY

22/02/2020 UNTIL 10/04/2020 WEEK 4 FEBRUARY

140

W W W. A R T G O . C O . Z A

WWW.ARTATAFRICA.ART 15/02/2020 WEEK 3 FEBRUARY

22/02/2020 UNTIL 23/03/2020 WEEK 4 FEBRUARY


SUBSCRIBE!!

Get your Art Times delivered monthly for only R380 The Art Times is a monthly 132 page gloss perfect bound South African Art Publication available in print, online and on mobile. If you would like to subscribe to The Art Times please email proof of payment with your full name as reference to subs@arttimes.co.za or 021 300 5888 to confirm your subscription. Pay: ARTLIFE (PTY) LTD Bank: FNB Acc Number: 62752894058 Branch Code: 260209


S bend, Table Mountain, Reduction Woodblock 2020


The SA Print Gallery is proud to present:

JOSHUA MILES FYNBOS CITY 2020 A study of light, colour and life Ends 29 February 2020

SA Print Gallery 109 Sir Lowry Road, Woodstock, Cape Town Tel 021 300 0461 gabriel@printgallery.co.za www.printgallery.co.za


GET YOUR COPY OF THE ART TIMES ON ROVOS RAIL

Ontrack with the most adventurous Rovos Rail readers who love a world of art and beauty.


SOUTH AFRICA’S LEADING VISUAL ARTS PUBLICATION


CONTEMPORARY ART AUCTION Saturday 15 February 2020 at 6pm Quay 7 Warehouse, 11 East Pier Rd, V&A Waterfront, Cape Town

Zanele Muholi, Lerato Dumse, Syracuse, New York, 2015 (detail) R30 000 – 50 000

www.straussart.co.za

Profile for SA ART TIMES

Art Times February 2020  

Art Times February 2020  

Profile for arttimes