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Vol 4.10

JANUARY 28, 2018

|

JARMEL

REECE HIP HOP ARTIST pg #54

Carolyn RENEE

ENTREPRENEUR | CEO pg #112

View this and past issues from our website.

REMEMBERING...

TRUMP'S ATTACK...

SHEROES

pg. #8

pg. #18

pg.#34

BERNIE HAYES

VERONICA NEWTON

DR. MALAIKA HORNE


Available -

FEBRUARY 2018

on lulu.com and Amazon.com pg.

2


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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


IN THIS

ISSUE:

6

8

IN THE NEWS We Grow...

THE WRITINGS OF... SHEILA BOSSOPPO-MOYO

50

46 THE LAST OF THE...... PIERRE BLAINE

45TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT... METRO THEATER CO.

116

92

FEATURED MODEL MANOHISOA A.

FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER DOMINIC COX

pg.

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No major discipline problems

our mentorship program with Infinite Scholars, the Moline Acres Police Department wishes to the hopes and dreams of families in our community wishing to send their children to college. te Scholars program uses it extensive nationwide network of 500+ colleges and universities to ege scholarship for students who achieve the criteria above. The Moline Acres Police ent is committed to helping our students accomplish these criteria. The motto for this program dges Create Scholars.�

cres is located in North St. Louis County, Missouri. To learn more, contact the Moline Acres partment at 314-868-2433 or Infinite Scholars at 314-499-6997.

LIVE / WORK / PLAY NATE JOHNSON

14

22

OP/ED SECTION INFINITE SCHOLARS

64

Pictured are Moline Acres Chief of Police Colonel Ware, Police Officer Donaldson, and students Charmaine and Charles.

74

RECOLLECTING HOLY GROUND... MARSHA CANN

FEATURED ARTIST THOMAS kARSTeN ...Listen people... Life is a giant, invisible scale with two sides; Good and bad You and your beliefs Are the weights The things you do each day Determine the balance Your conscience is a flawless Judge and jury; It only questions you when you're wrong...

The Temptations,

"You Make Your Own Heaven and Hell Right Here on Earth" (Regarding the last line of this quote from "You Make Your Own Heaven and Hell Right Here on Earth": "It only questions you when you're wrong" Sang by The Temptations on the recording. "The only question is what you want" Written by: BARRETT STRONG, NORMAN WHITFIELD, NORMAN J. WHITFIELD)

Established 2014 Volume 4.10 St. Louis, MO www.the-arts-today.com/ Layout/Design www.bdesignme.com

NOTE:

As the publishers of The Arts Today Ezine we take care in the production of each issue. We are however, not liable for any editorial error, omission, mistake or typographical error. The views expressed are those of the contributors and not necessarily those of their respective companies or the publisher.

Copyright Š 2017 - All rights reserved.

COPYRIGHT:

This Ezine and the content published within are subject to copyright held by the publisher, with individual articles remaining property of the named contributor. Express written permission of the publisher and contributors must be acquired for reproduction.

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IN THE NEWS

Export Opportunities in the Americas: Brazil, Canada & Mexico

TIME | DATE | PLACE 8:00 am registration 8:30-10:00 am program Thursday, December 7, 2017 Please note NEW ADDRESS: World Trade Center St. Louis 120 South Central Ave. Suite 1200 St. Louis, MO 63105 REGISTRATION $20 REGISTRATION

One-on-one appointments available following the program.

Learn about export opportunities in three major markets in the Americas region. Brazil is recovering from recent political and economic upheaval and reforms have seen growth in the energy and agricultural sectors in particular. Canada's economy has enjoyed greater than expected growth, outpacing all other members of the G7. Mexico continues to offer a wide range of opportunities for US exporters from industrial equipment and inputs to agricultural products. Speakers: Mr. Fabio Yukio Yamada Director, Missouri International Trade & Investment Office - Brazil Mr. Ludovic Ortuno Director, Missouri International Trade & Investment Office - Canada Ms. Gloria Garcia Director, Missouri International Trade & Investment Office - Mexico Click here to view speaker bios and learn more.

Contact John Hensley to schedule.

pg.

6


Your Source for Art Appreciation

Volume 2.1 March 4, 2015

St. Louis

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE ART OF FOOD | LENA O.A. JACKSON ......................................... pg. 126 TENDING THE MIND | JERRY WARD ............................................ pg. 136

Please support our sponsors, many of-

fer events or programs with an emphasis on the arts and creativity.

BUD, NOT BUDDY | METRO THEATER ......................................... pg. 144 OPPORTUNITIES | A.T.E.Z. ............................................................... pg. 152 CAREERS | A.T.EZ ................................................................................ pg. 154

#ArtsTodayEZ

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Volume 4.10 Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018 January 28, 2017


The Writings of

Ta-Nehisi Coates and Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois: Some Interesting Similarities?

Recently I read several articles responding to the Ta-Nehisi Coates vs. Dr. Cornel West “public debate” about the writings of TaNehisi Coates on the struggle to survive as a Black American under structural racism, particularly as a black male. After reading Coates’ book, Between the World and Me (2015), I noticed several interesting similarities and differences between his work and the writings of W.E.B. Du Bois, two black writers from two different generations.

journal, investigated and wrote about the countless

lynchings throughout the South.

I found other similarities. Coates writes to prepare

his son for the realities of living in America. He warns his son about the police killings of young black men, in particular. “… the police departments of your country have been endowed with the authority to destroy your body” (Coates, p.9). Describing his son’s tearful disbelief in learning that Michael Brown’s killers were found not guilty and allowed to go free, Coates tells his son what he was told by his grandparents and that is: “…this is your country, that this is your world, that this is your body, and you must

Coates takes his title for Between the World and

find some way to live within the all of it” (Coates, p. 12).

Me from a poem by Richard Wright, who describes the

Coates expresses the frustration all black men and women

horrific experience of finding the narrator at the site where

have in trying to teach our young about surviving and

a lynching had taken place and seeing the “design of white

navigating hostility towards our black skins perpetrated by

bones slumbering forgottenly upon a cushion of ashes” and

the agents of white supremacy.

torn tree limbs. As the narrator stands before the bones,

he fears the same fate will befall him. A major theme in

he and his wife could not find a hospital to treat his two-

Coates’ book is his fear of the black body and trying to

year son who died of diphtheria. Du Bois tries to overcome

advise his son on how to protect himself.

In Du Bois’ essay, “The Passing of the First-Born,”

his grief by believing that his son in death has escaped his

Regarding Coates’ title, the first essay in Du Bois’

future bonds and is now free. “Well sped, my boy, before

The Souls of Black Folks (1903) begins, “Between me

the world had dubbed your ambition insolence, had held

and the other world there is ever an unasked question:

your ideals unattainable, and taught you to cringe and bow.

… How does it feel to be a problem?” Du Bois is writing

Better far this nameless void that stops my life than a sea

about being an African American held in contempt by one’s

of sorrow for you (Du Bois, p. 151). After his son’s death,

country at a time where a few years earlier in 1896, the

Du Bois throws himself into his work and handles his grief

U. S. Supreme Court had just ruled in favor of “separate

as best he can.

but equal” segregation laws in Plessey v. Ferguson. Du

Bois, who was the editor of The Crisis, the NAACP monthly

pg.

Coates writes about the social construction of race.

He mentions that the elevation of whiteness was caused

8


by “the pillaging of life, liberty, labor, and land…to deny you

into his manhood, and he looks for ways to make him

[his son] and me the right to secure and govern our own

well-grounded in his black body. He believes in the value

bodies” (Coates, p. 8).

of education and seeking his own truth. He describes

Du Bois, who was the first black sociologist and

first black Ph.D. to graduate from Harvard, made the study of race a major part of his life’s work. He writes about whiteness in an essay entitled, “The Souls of White Folks” and describes how whites threatened the black body in both the North and the South. “We have seen, you and I, city after city drunk and furious with ungovernable lust of blood; mad with murder, destroying, killing, and cursing; torturing human victims because somebody accused of crime happened to be of the same color as the mob’s

valuable experience at his alma mata, Howard University, and how it helped to shape his views. He describes Howard University, its alumni, living in Washington, D.C., as “The Mecca.” In his autobiography, Du Bois describes his times at Fisk University and that experience was the first time he was surrounded by his own people. in his essay, “Of the Training of Black Men,” writes of the important functions of the Negro College. He felt it was key to maintaining the standards of popular education by training black teachers and finding solutions to racism.

innocent victims and because that color was not white!”

(Du Bois, 1920, in Sunquist, 1996).

generations. Both express similar ideas in their writings. I

Both writers highlight major overarching themes in

their works. Coates writes of “The Dream” and not having access to “perfect houses with nice lawns” or access to the

Both Coates and Du Bois come from different

found it interesting how much I was reminded of Du Bois’ writings when reading Coates’ book, Between the World and Me.

official powers of the state while blacks face sanctions and the inequities of the criminal justice system. Du Bois writes of being shut out of mainstream America by a vast “veil”

By: Sheila Bassoppo-Moyo

and having the ability to see into the white world. He also writes of “double-consciousness,” that is viewing oneself as both an African-American and also as an American of the dominant culture and how at times this two-ness “an American, a Negro; two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder” (Du Bois, p.9).

Coates knows one day his son will venture out

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"Quiet Time" by: Lonnie Powell

"Cuban Dancer" by: Ed Johnetta Miller pg.

12


June 26, 2017 PRESS RELEASE For Immediate Release Contact: Robert A. Powell 314-265-0432 Portfoliogallery@att.net,

Portfolio Gallery today issues its call for art, and invites visual artist of all disciplines to enter at:www.portfoliogallerystl.org The “All Colors” Fine Art Show will feature 100 artist and 200 pieces of art, both local and nationally known artists, collectors and educators to the St. Louis Region.

The “All Colors” exhibition will feature the art of invited artist Dean Mitchell, Charles Bibbs, Manuelita Brown, Ed Johnetta Miller, Lonnie Powell, Robert Hale, Sandra Smith, Cbabi Bayoc, Thomas Sleet, Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi, Ronald Johnson and others. Our goal is to create an exciting art event that attracts a national audience. Sells income will support general operations of Portfolio, Inc. a not-for-profit 501C3 arts organization and further be used to provide grants to St. Louis artists, small notfor-profits and community based organizations. Please join the award winning Portfolio Gallery as it presents its 1st Annual “All Colors” Visual Arts Invitational & Juried Exhibition to be held January 13th through February 28, 2018, at the St. Louis Artist Guild, 12 Jackson Avenue, Clayton, Missouri 63105.

Portfolio Gallery is a member of The Alliance of Black Galleries

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OP / ED SECTION

Moline Acres Police Department College Scholarship Program in partnership with Infinite Scholars Program

The Moline Acres Police Department College Scholarship Program wishes to acknowledge some of the students in our city that have accepted the promise of a college scholarship for accomplishing the following criteria: 1. 2. 3. 4.

95 percent school attendance 3.3 or better cumulative grade average 22 or better composite ACT score No major discipline problems

Through our mentorship program with Infinite Scholars, the Moline Acres Police Department wishes to help fulfill the hopes and dreams of families in our community wishing to send their children to college. The Infinite Scholars program uses it extensive nationwide network of 500+ colleges and universities to find a college scholarship for students who achieve the criteria above. The Moline Acres Police Department is committed to helping our students accomplish these criteria. The motto for this program is “Our Badges Create Scholars.� Moline Acres is located in North St. Louis County, Missouri. To learn more, contact the Moline Acres Police Department at 314-868-2433 or Infinite Scholars at 314-499-6997.

Pictured are Moline Acres Chief of Police Colonel Ware, Police Officer Donaldson, and students Charmaine and Charles.

pg.

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Editorial Rebeccah Bennett TRUTH: This is not the first time that this country has been run by a bigot. It is not the first time that we have experienced political isolation and social rejection. Founder and principal of Emerging Wisdom LLC.

A

nd it is not the first time that we have had to figure out how to metabolize our grief and fear in ways that did not immobilize us, but caused us to actualize our power to change the world.

PERSPECTIVE:

Right

and forefathers lived through horrors that were generational in scope and scale. They persisted through times when there was little chance of a better tomorrow, much less a better life – not even for their kids. Yet they responded to their lot in life by creating resistance movements, aid societies, educational and religious institutions, banks and co-ops, art forms, innovations and spiritual practices that continue to make our lives

now it might do us some good to call upon our ancestors for wisdom, strength and guidance. Our foremothers Copyright Š 2017 - All rights reserved.

better today. Remember that their blood is our blood. Their strength is our strength. They are the ROOTS and we are their FRUITS.

PRAYER:

We call upon our ancestors, those upon whom the sky fell. We call upon our ancestors who experienced all manner of degradation, humiliation, violation and death. We call upon our ancestors, people who swung from trees and were forced to live on their knees. We call upon our ancestors, many of whom persisted, survived and endured without destroying themselves or others. May whatever it is that nourished and sustained them come more fully alive in us. Ashe.

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pg.

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Why Trump's ATTACK on | Global Blacks | is an Attack on African Americans

1

Why Trump’s Attack on Global Blacks is an Attack on African Americans Think Piece By. Veronica Newton It is the beginning of 2018. The government was shut down, there was a women’s march, and the Muslim Ban is still in place. Trump has also launched his verbal attack on Hattians and has started his global anti-Black agenda. We know it would come sooner rather than later. Some of us could have been unsure as to what is his global anti-Blackness would look like. Now we have our answer, and Trump calling Haiti and other Black nations ‘shithole' countries is a clear indication that this is not the last attack on global Black folk. This statement was made in a meeting with lawmakers who were modifying the immigration policies and visas for peoples living in the US from Haiti and other African nations. He used words such as ‘take them out’ and questioned why America needs more people from those ‘shithole’ countries. Furthermore, the Trump administration will stop Haitians from receiving temporary agricultural and seasonal visas for work and employment. The administration claims that Haitians have overused their visas in the past and have stayed in the United States longer than the allotted time. Many Haitians have been living and working in the United States since the 2010 earthquake that devastated their island. However, Trump plans to end the immigration from Haiti and African nations, while welcoming immigrants from Norway and other white nations. This again, is all a part of ‘making America great again’—in other words ethnic cleansing and anti-Blackness. To African Americans, anti-Blackness is as American as apple pie. It is clear when we look at government policies that continuously disenfranchise African Americans. It should be no surprise that Trump is now singling out specific Black nations and attacking them, their people and limiting their opportunities here in the US. This is global racism and global anti-Blackness and African Americans should be specifically alarmed. We are not safe or can avoid Trump’s institutionalized anti-Blackness. African Americans should be aware of the policy changes and language that are used surrounding other global Blacks. Whether we are West African, Haitian or African American, we are all a part of the African Diaspora that connects us not just culturally but globally, and systemically through our linkage through colonization. We must speak up and use our voices and resources to support our Haitian brothers and sisters and make connections among Freedom Struggles so that we resist global anti-Blackness. Ase’.

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MARCH 8 • 7pm Lee Auditorium • FREE Thursday

Registration required: mohistory.org/elizabeth-hinton

2018 PROGRAMS

PRESENTATION BOOK SIGNING

&

PRESENTED IN COLLABORATION WITH

Washington University Center for the Humanities Elizabeth Hinton, assistant professor in the department of history and the department of African and African American Studies at Harvard University, will deliver this presentation on her award-winning book. Named one of the New York Times’s 100 notable books of 2016, From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime examines the implementation of federal law enforcement programs in the mid-1960s that laid the groundwork for the mass incarceration of American citizens. The book will be available for purchase in the Missouri History Museum Shop.

Closes April 15 | Free admission

PRESENTED BY

SPONSORED BY

JSM Charitable Trust

#1 in Civil Rights: The African American Freedom Struggle in St. Louis examines the local civil rights movement and the city’s leading role in advancing the cause of racial justice. From ground-level activism to groundbreaking court rulings, St. Louis has been front and center in contesting racial inequities. #1 in Civil Rights uncovers a history that’s compelling and complex, but that all too often has been overlooked in the telling and retelling of the larger national narrative.

COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND PROGRAM SPONSOR William T. Kemper Foundation—Commerce Bank, Trustee

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY

Forest Park • St. Louis • 314.746.4599 • mohistory.org

pg.

20

Maxine Clark and Bob Fox


TAX PREPARATION CLINICS Thanks to a new partnership with the Davis Tax Foundation, we’re offering three FREE tax preparation clinics for artists this year. Space is limited. To avoid disappointment, make your appointment soon. Tuesday, February 20, and Wednesday, February 21 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. by appointment only at the St. Louis Artists' Guild, 12 Jackson Avenue in collaboration with the Davis Tax Foundation Space is limited. Please book no later than February 13. To make an appointment, send an email with your name, cell phone number and date preference. Note: Sorry, the Davis Tax Foundation team cannot assist you if you had depreciation, cost of goods sold, paid employees, income over $65,000 or foreign income. You’ll need to bring all W-2s and 1099s, your 2016 tax return and other documents (a full list will be sent with your appointment confirmation). Thursday, March 15 4:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. by appointment only Metropolitan Artist Lofts, 500 N. Grand in collaboration with Gateway EITC Community Coalition This clinic is just for artists who live in the Arcade Apartments, Metropolitan Artist Lofts and Leather Trades Artist Lofts. Space is limited. Please book no later than March 8. To make an appointment, send an email with your name, loft building and cell phone number. Note: The income guideline limit for this clinic is $54,000. The volunteers can prepare Form 1040/1040EZ with Schedule A, Schedule B and C (up to $25,000 of self-employment income), and the forms for earned income tax credit and the child tax credit. Sorry, the team cannot assist you if you had depreciation, cost of goods sold, paid employees, a home office or rental income. You’ll need to bring all W-2s and 1099s, your 2016 tax return and other documents (a full list will be sent with your appointment confirmation). Need arts-related legal or accounting assistance? Apply here

DIY

Do you feel comfortable doing your own taxes? Hate having to buy new tax software every year? If your income was less than $62,000, click here.

WWW.VLAA.ORG 314-863-6930 vlaa@stlrac.org 6128 Delmar, St. Louis, MO 63112

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IVE WORK PLAY

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018 St. Louis

I

must admit that heading into the middle of the month, it was very tempting to not send you this letter. However, I didn't want miss out on letting you know about some of the cool things that the rest of the month has to offer. As you know, I love this town, and a few other folks had some nice things to say about St. Louis this month as well. The USA Today has named Vicia, which is the new vegetable forward restaurant in Cortex, the number 2 restaurant in the country! Also, the Huffington Post gave St. Louis some props in their recent column, 7 Cities with Hidden Cultural Gems. They said "St. Louis is slowly building a reputation as a mecca for the visual arts, but the performing arts scene is already hot along the banks of the Mississippi River." They also shout out my favorite festival of the year, the Festival of Nations!, which will be upon us in August. But have no fear, there are plenty of things to do between now and then. I hope that you will join me in enjoying our great

city and continue to work with me to make it better!

JANUARY

15 thru

JANUARY

21

Martin Luther King, Jr said that "Life's most persistent and urgent question is: What are you doing for others?" Tomorrow morning, join me for the Memorial March of Celebration through the streets of downtown St. Louis where we can talk about how we can work together to increase peace and justice. On Tuesday, perhaps you can swing by the St. Louis Artists Guild to check out All Colors, presented by the Portfolio Gallery. It features an impressive group of fine artwork from artists that mainstream publications have overlooked in St. Louis and across the country. On Wednesday, you can head down to Grand Center for the #Wednesday Night Jazz Crawl, or perhaps you'd rather make your way to Lafayette Square to enjoy the live music of Amanda Raye at Sqwires for Wine Down Wednesday at Sqwires. Did I mention there will be a free wine tasting? Also on Wednesday, author Daniel Pink will be at the Ethical Society discussing his new book When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing. Thursday will be one of the last days to enjoy PEACE at the Atrium Gallery, which features a series of acrylic paintings by Willem de Looper. Also on Thursday, the Art of Live Festival kicks off at Off Broadway (see what I did there:) with Rayland Baxter. One wristband, three venues, and a plenty of live music all weekend at The Ready Room, Old Rock House and Off Broadway, featuring local, national, and international musical artists!

pg.

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Local Events JANUARY

Thursday, is also your chance to start those salsa lessons that you have been meaning to get to. Yes, the Majestic Dance Studio is launching a course that will have you dancing with the stars in 6 weeks!

The Black Rep's final performance of August Wilson's play Fences.

Friday, you might want to check out the amazing jazz piano styling of Ptah Williams at The Dark Room in Grand Center, or head over to The Bootleg at the Atomic Cowboy for the St. Louis Americana Festival which features 10 musicians blessing the stage all night long! On Saturday, take the kids to see Paw Patrol Live at the Peabody Opera House. You could also check out the Family Winter Carnival Soulard Market Park. The Von Trapp Family will be on the big screen as The Sound of Music will be screened at the Powell Symphony Hall on Saturday afternoon. The Hett Center for the Arts will host The Moscow Festival Ballet: Don Quixote on Sunday. You might want to head to the Edison Center at Washington University for

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


IVE WORK PLAY

Starting on Monday, it's Clayton Restaurant Week, where you can enjoy you can enjoy 2 or 3 course meals for On Thursday the 25th, The Grandel Theatre will be the place to be for Dance for Food, which will feature performances by The Big Muddy Dance Company and others! The cost of admission is non-perishable food items! On Friday, you'll find me at 2720 Cherokee Street hangin' out with some cool folks enjoying some cool music at Nappi Hour. The 16th Annual Food and Wine Experience will be taking place at the Chase Park Plaza on Saturday and Sunday. If you are looking to show off your knowledge or lack of knowledge of useless info (btw it's only useless if you don't know it), the Arch Rivals Roller Derby are hosting their 10th Annual Trivia Night at German Cultural Society.

JANUARY

22

What could go wrong with Motorcycles on Ice? Find out at the Family Arena on Saturday night as the Xtreme International Ice Racing tour show off their skills. On Sunday, you can join me at COCA for a mix of cutting-edge hip-hop and contemporary dance. Momentum is sure to be a dynamic, can't miss performance.

thru

Also on Sunday afternoon, Rapped and Remixed is The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, along with The 442s and Compositions for L.I.F.E. presentation of a surprise musical experience for the entire family. Enjoy classic melodies from Prokofiev's Romeo & Juliet complete with a modern-day twist and contemporary narration.

JANUARY

Yes, another great month to enjoy in St. Louis! I'm looking forward to seeing you soon.

28 ed

continu

All the best. -Nate P.S. Here is the latest Housing Report for your review. Median sales prices are up 7% from last year. Inventory continues to be low, which is good for our clients who are selling homes, but a bit more of a task for our clients who are buying homes. However, we are up for the challenge! Let me know if you have any questions. Nate K. Johnson ABR,CIPS,CRS,GRI,SRES Broker/Owner Real Estate Solutions 314-575-7352 Direct 314-514-9600 Office nate@livingstl.com www.livingstl.com

pg.

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Follow 13

Read Article Elaine Young ­ Artist

pg.

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January 16­ March 17:    STL Symphony: 50 Years at January 16­ March 17:  Powell Hall   STL Symphony: 50 Years at   Powell Hall Celebrate the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra by  visiting St. Louis Public Library's upcoming Celebrate theSymphony: St. Louis Symphony Orchestra exhibit "STL 50 Years at Powell by visiting St. Louis Public Library's upcoming Hall" on display January 16 through March 17 exhibit "STL Symphony: 50 Years at Powell at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street. Hall" on display January 16 through March 17 at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street.

Throughout January:  M LK 2018 Programs @Your Throughout January: Library  MLK 2018 Programs @Your

Library MLK 2018 Programs @Your Library celebrates

the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. MLK 2018 Programs Library celebrates and includes displays,@Your programs, book clubs, the life of Dr. performances Martin Lutherand King, Jr. more. spoken word much January 16­ March 17:  and includes displays, programs, book clubs,   more. spoken word performances and much STL Symphony: 50 Years at

January 16­ March 17:    Powell Hall STL Symphony: 50 Years at    T hroughout January: Powell Hall Celebrate the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra by

visiting St. Louis Public Library's upcoming   Tech For Tots:   T hroughout January: exhibit "STL Symphony: at Powell   50 Years   Tech For Tots:  Hall" on display January 16 through March 17 Orchestra by Celebrate the St.tooLouis Symphony Children are never young to code. By   Olive playing with code, children will develop at Central Library, 1301 Street. visiting St. Louis Public Library's upcoming Children are never too young to code. By important skills such as critical thinking, playing with code, children will develop exhibit "STL Symphony: 50 Years at Powell problem solving and persistence. important skills such as critical thinking, Hall" on display January 16 through March 17 problem solving and persistence. at Central Library, 1301 Olive Street. Throughout January:

LK 2018 Programs @Your M January 11 & 18: Library So You Think You Want to January 11 & 18: Start a Nonprofit? (Part 1 & 2)     MLK 2018 Programs @Your Library celebrates So You Think You Want to the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Start a Nonprofit? (Part 1 & 2)   and includes displays, programs, book clubs,  

Join us for helpful hints, practical checklists, Throughout January: spoken performances andtales. much more. success word stories and cautionary us for helpful hints, practical checklists,  MJoin LK 2018 Programs @Your success stories and cautionary tales. Library

T hroughout January: January 25:    Tech For Tots:  MLK 2018 Programs @Your Library celebrates   Teen Writer's Group  January 25:    theChildren life ofare Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. never young to code. By Teen Writer's Group  Explore the craft of too writing through journaling playing with code, children will develop and includes displays, programs, book clubs, and work sharing. important skills such as critical thinking, Explore the craft of writing through journaling spoken word performances and much more. problem and persistence. and worksolving sharing.

January 29:   I Have a Dream" Blood Drive  January 11 & 18: January 29: So You Think You Want to   I Have a Dream" Blood Drive  In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., make a  Throughout January: Start a Nonprofit? (Part 1 & 2)   big difference in the lives of others. Sign up by 

a In honor of Dr. Martin calling 314-771-5450 orLuther King, Jr., make Tech For Tots:  big difference in the lives of others. Sign up by atwww.redcrossblood.org Join us for helpful hints, practical   tales.checklists, calling or success314-771-5450 stories and cautionary

atwww.redcrossblood.org Children are never too young to code. By playing with code, children will develop important skills such as critical thinking, problem solving and persistence. January 25:  Check out SLPL News on our homepage at slpl.org for more information

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www.the-arts-today.com Teen Writer's Group 

Teen Writer's Group  about this month’s events. Visit our events calendar for a complete list of Check out SLPL News on our homepage at slpl.org for more information

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Remembering the city’s colorful past!

S

everal books and articles have been written about St. Louis, and a few displays have featured our glorious past. Hardly anything is ever written or disclosed about AfricanAmerican broadcasters and announcers. You

’ Some of the nation’s finest communicators have graced know how the story goes, ‘out of sight-out of mind.

the airways in our community and the area. I would like to review my contribution to test and jog your memory. From my book ‘The Death of Black Radio,’ see how many facts you can recall and the personalities you remember.

Do you recollect E. Rodney Jones and Yvonne Daniels, along with Leo Cheers on WTMV in East St. Louis? ‘Little Ole Young Roscoe’ McCrary was there also, and Robert ‘B.Q.’ Burris was also a personality there before he became program director at KATZ.

Robert ‘BQ’ actually followed Dave Dixon as

pg.

program director at KATZ. Dave had a brother at KATZ, Jerome. In the 60’s, KATZ had a line up consisting of Leonard Morris, BQ, Doug Eason, Bernie Hayes, Buster Jones, Jerome (Night beat down rhythm street) Dixon, Gabriel (The Buzzard Lope) and Jesse ‘Spider’ Burks.

Donnie ‘Soul Finger’ Brooks had already departed for Detroit, and ‘Shelly the Playboy’ had returned to Alabama. Wyvetter Lindsay and Devan Strong

also did weekend gospel. ‘Gentleman’ Jim Gates, Al Waples and Chuck Cunningham later joined the staff. Some of the newscasters at the station included Leon Perry, Ken Brantley, John O’Day, Kevin Woodson and Robin Boyce. Over at KXLW, George ‘The G’ Logan, Lou ‘Fatha’ Thimes, Gracie and Columbus Gregory were the key personalities, all of whom had worked at KATZ. Jimmy Bishop and ‘The Magnificent Montague’ spent time at the facility, along with Albert ‘Scoop Sanders’ Gay, Steve Byrd, Shelly Pope and Hank Spann. Some of the earlier pioneers whom you very rarely hear about are Wiley Price and Amos Dotson. These two gentlemen were a couple of

pioneers who opened the doors for some of those persons I have already named, but you don’t hear of any scholarships or other memorials to them.

28


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REMEMBERING... cont.

Actually Wiley Price was the first African American announcer. One of the first Blacks to break the color barrier at the general market station was Bill Bailey. Bill was an announcer at KMOX radio, before joining us at KWK in 1969. At KWK the lineup was made up of Scoop Sanders, Donn Johnson, Bernie Hayes, Al Waples, Jim Gates, Tom Joyner, Jake Jordan, Tony Stittum, Decater Agnew, Ronnie St. Peter, Bobby Knight, Bobby Bass, Donn St. John, Sonny Jo White and Bill Moore.

was the all night personality at KKSS. Remember Gary Starr, Curtis “Soul” Brown, Edie B, Cheryl Winston, Rod ‘Jockenstein’ King, Gene ‘Mr. Twist’ Norman, Chico Brown? There are so many more and not enough space. Many of the above have passed on but their memories will linger. All are in the National Back Radio Hall of Fame at Harris-Stowe state University. How much did you remember?

Bernie Hayes

Some of the television pioneers were Diane White who was the pacesetter and trailblazer for AfricanAmerican men and women. Later, Fred Porterfield, Julius Hunter and Robin Smith were hired at the network affiliates. Ron Nichols had one of the hottest TV talk and variety shows in the area, also on KMOX-TV. Jim Gates and I hosted ‘The Black Circle Hour’ at Channel 30. When we left, Doug Eason hosted the weekly dance show while Jim and I hosted ‘Jim and Bernie’s Soul Brotherhood.’ In the early 70’s, Gentry Trotter was the movie and theater critic for KMOX-TV while Scoop and I went to Channel 2 as announcers and weathermen. I also hosted ‘Dialing for Dollars’ at Channel 2. John Gardner was the African-American anchor there. John later pg.

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CAPCR Meeting Thursday, January 11 How do we implement a shared vision of public safety? How does that translate into re-investment? What systemic changes will the SLMPD need to make? Come to our monthly general meeting this Thursday, 6 pm to 8 pm. We'll be at the Rowan Center, 1401 Rowan (at Ridge). We want your help solidifying our plans for the new year! #ReInvestingInPublicSafety  

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IPHF Bijou Night  Want to change how you receive these emails? You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list. "Coming to Light: The Edward Curtis Story" Edward Curtis, IPHF 2017 Hall of Fame Inductee  Thursday, January 4th  at the International Photography Hall of Fame Doors open at 6:30pm  Movie begins at 7:00pm  Run time: 1 hour, 23 minutes  Join us at IPHF to experience the dramatic story of eminent photographer Edward S. Curtis and the creation of his monumental portfolio of Native American images. Descendants of his photographic subjects tell stories about the photos and reveal their meaning to Indian people today. 

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Hello, I would love it if you took a moment to check out my GoFundMe campaign: CLICK GOFUNDME LINK BELOW TO DONATE https://www.gofundme.com/black-archaeologist-season-4

Your support would mean a lot to me. Thank you so much!

- Michael Lambert

Black Archaeologist. pg.

32


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SHEroes Black Women’s Extraordinary Political Unity … tonight is a night for rejoicing because … as Dr. King liked to quote, "The moral arc of the universe is long but it bends toward justice.” Tonight, tonight, ladies and gentlemen, tonight, tonight in this time, in this place, you helped bend that moral arc a little closer to that justice and you did it, not only was it bent more, not only was its aim truer but you sent it right through the heart of the great state of Alabama in doing so, said newly elected Alabama’s U.S. Senator Doug Jones in his victory speech December 12, 2017.

Basking in the afterglow of Doug Jones’ stunning defeat of Roy Moore stands a group of stalwart voters heretofore overlooked, unheralded and unappreciated. They’re political sheroes on the left -- African American women who voted 98 percent in favor of Jones to help tip him over the triumphant edge, toppling an ultra-conservative zealot. Attorney Jones presided over poetic justice with the 2002 successful prosecution of Klansmen for the 1963 bombing of Birmingham’s 16 Street th

Baptist Church that killed four little Black girls. Many Alabama Black girls grew up with the horror of this evil bedeviling their state, but they dealt another decisive blow against the karmic debt of vicious racism when they flocked to the polls to right an egregious wrong. Jones is the first Democrat to be elected statewide in Alabama since 2006 and first to win a Senate seat since 1992. Considered the reddest state in the union, Alabama Republicans had bamboozled so many Democrats that for years a moderate-to-liberal candidate was viewed as having a snowball’s chance in hell of winning. Prior to the Alabama upset, Black women came out in droves in red state Virginia to support Democrat Ralph Northam who defeated Republican Ed Gillespie (a Trump surrogate) in the

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gubernatorial race. It seems that turning red states blue is becoming their tour de force. Vanessa Williams, The Washington Post, reported: Black women have been the most loyal supporters of the Democratic Party, through thick and thin,” Avis Jones-DeWeever (said), an adviser to the Black Women’s Roundtable … (yet) the party has focused more on wooing back “white male voters who have not supported the Democratic Party for 50 years” rather than “watering the garden in your own back yard.

But this is not the first time African American women have voted in strong numbers for Democratic candidates. It has been happening for quite some time, yet largely ignored, as DeWeever so aptly put it. In 2016, they voted 94 percent for Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton against the Republican Donald Trump.

In 2012, they voted in the greatest

percentages for Barack Obama.

In many of these decisive political

contests, their turn out has been stronger than White women, White men and more than Black men. In fact, one of the most baffling is why 53 percent of White women voted for the “predator-in-chief” Donald Trump and 63 percent voted for the accused pedophile Roy Moore. Working fist in glove for the betterment of the Black community, Black women have been punching back for many decades. Case in point is Annie Malone, Madame C.J. Walker and Maggie Lena Walker as well as others who came from a long and rich tradition of African commercialism and empowerment. Annie Malone is considered the first self-made woman millionaire, not the first self-made Black woman millionaire. Madame C.J. Walker, under the tutelage of Malone, also became a millionaire, in continuing the development of the Black hair care business. Maggie Lena Walker was the first female bank president (of any race) to charter a bank in the United States. All did this in the early 20 Century, a little more than th

a generation out of slavery.

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SHEROES... cont.

Despite a real kinship for the cause and a fervent resolve to uplift their communities, Black women are frequently besieged by a take-no-prisoner brand of conservatism such as firebrands and fire-breathing Roy Moore and Ed Gillespie, yet they’ve persevered, possessing no illusions about the metaphorical “storming of the Bastille.” In other words, enduring centuries of fanatical, hard lined racism and sexism seemingly hasn’t fazed them; instead it’s energized them to push back even harder. Because Black women inherited leadership traditions from the motherland, Gwen Moore, curator, urban identity and landscapes, Missouri History Museum, said African women worked outside the home, controlling the agriculture thus giving them a larger degree of financial freedom, empowerment and self-efficacy. Upon landing in the western hemisphere, that take-charge sense persisted. Here, they were more in the public sphere than White women (particularly the middle- and upper-class) who many times were relegated to the home or private sphere. Although privileged, White women eventually realized this was more of a gilded cage. Moore continued: When Black women were enslaved and brought to North America, they quickly gained a reputation as expert farmers and contributed to agriculture on a broad scale, which helped to make the South prosperous. They were also artists, artisans, shopkeepers, and craftsmen, trading and selling on the open market. Slaves were allowed to do this as they were often loaned out to work for others and could keep a small portion of their earnings.

In politics, education, the arts and even science Black women have excelled -- think Hidden Figures, the film that chronicles the exceptional math abilities of African American women that helped to build the space industry.

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While racist media and other racist institutions have historically mischaracterized

and

demonized

African

American

women,

with

amazement, most haven’t internalized these stereotypes. Stereotypes are essentially lies and grossly unethical. They are stark negative images repeated over and over again to portray in this case Black women as promiscuous, shrill, aimless and indolent. After a while, it can take on a life of its own. This ability not falling prey to blistering psychological warfare and attacks, not becoming supine, submissive and subservient are exceptional. Bucking up against socially and racially sanctioned practices and ideas have been their saving grace. Suffice it to say, they should be the marker or the exemplar for other marginalized groups to follow. Black women joined other women for the Women’s March, January 21, 2017, the day after President Trump’s inauguration.

They marched for

women’s rights that galvanized women throughout the nation and the globe.

Three Black women, Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors and Opal

Tometi, started the Black Lives Matter movement protesting police brutality in the Black community. Tarana Burke started #MeToo to expose sexual harassment and assault.

And let’s not forget “Auntie Maxine”

(Congresswoman Maxine Waters, D-CA) who distinguished herself early on in calling out “45’s” incompetence. Still, too many Black women struggle, victimized by invisible factors that stymie their progress. The wage gap is a case in point. Historically, Black women have had high labor force participation rates compared to other women. Even when they’re employed, they earn less than Asian American and White women. Almost 28 percent work in service positions earning hourly rates, which usually pay less. Pay inequality calculations are based

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2505 St. Louis Avenue St. Louis, MO 63106-2324 314-241-7057 E-mail: thegriotmuseum@aol.com

A Call for Visual Art Submissions The Griot Museum of Black History invites African-American women to participate in an exhibit of visual art entitled, “Black Women Speak.” Works should interpret issues faced by African-American women including historical experience, challenges and contributions, and influence in areas such as social justice and human rights, self-identity, and cultural relevance. The exhibit will complement the one-woman show “A Black Woman Speaks” that will be adapted by A Call to Conscience Theater Company (C2C), and presented at The Griot March 9-11, 2018. The exhibit will be on display March 1 – May 31, 2018. Artist may submit up to five images for consideration. Each work must include your name and contact information, title and description (i.e. size, medium), cost (if for sale), etc. Please send digital images for consideration to: thegriotmuseum@aol.com by December 23, 2017. Selections will be made and notification sent to you by December 31, 2017.

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SHEROES... cont.

on having the same educational background, experience and doing similar work, yet paid less. Of the course, White men are near the apex and it should be noted that Black men make more than Black women with all things being equal. It therefore goes without saying that in many instances gender bias trumps race bias, exploding another misconception that Black women are financially better off than Black men. That’s why the clarion call is “Equal Pay for Equal Work.”

Top Pay Earners in the U.S† Asian American Men

Non-Hispanic White Males

Asian American Women White Women Black Men

White Women Black Women

Native American Women Latina Women

The top four wage earners in the U.S. are: Asian American men, NonHispanic White men, Asian American women and White women. †The aforementioned rankings are incomplete as data showing pay gaps for every ethnicity and gender are not readily available. For more information, go to the Department of Labor website or AAUW website. It should also be noted that while Asian American men are the top earners, they represent less than three percent of the U.S. population while Non-Hispanic White males are around 33 percent.

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40


Wage Comparisons 1. 2. 3. 4.

Asian American men -- $1.17 White males (Non-Hispanic) -- $1.0000 Asian American women – 85¢ White Women -- 80¢

5. 6. 7. 8.

Black Men -- 79¢ Black Women -- 63¢ Native American Women -- 58¢ Latina Women -- 54¢

It’s clear that Black women and others are receiving a paycheck gut punch. Yet Black women are excelling in obtaining undergraduate and advanced degrees.

During the Civil Rights era, those less sympathetic

justified the slow inclusion of African Americans by saying they lacked education and special skills. While there was some patina of plausibility, African Americans were already on a steady course and have essentially closed the high school graduation gap and have pursued post-secondary education at increasingly higher rates.

Black women, in particular, have

showed up and showed out. According to the Roots.com: https://www.theroot.com/black-women-now-the-most-educated-group-in-us-1790855540,

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, between 2009 and 2010, black women earned 68 percent of all associate degrees awarded to black students, as well as 66 percent of bachelor’s degrees, 71 percent of master’s degrees and 65 percent of all doctorates awarded to black students. The report also says that the percentage of U.S. college students who are black increased from 10 to 15 percent from 1976 to 2012, while the percentage of white students among all U.S. college students fell from 84 to 60 percent. By both race and gender, a higher percentage of black women (9.7 percent) are enrolled in college than any other group, topping Asian women (8.7 percent), white women (7.1 percent) and white men (6.1 percent)

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SHEROES... cont.

Despite fierce resistance to inclusionary practices, coupled with the fact that African American men and women are some of the oldest Americans dating back to the 16 Century (and earlier), as well as their extraordinary th

achievements, they’re still lagging woefully behind. Some may wonder, was this “get an education and be more qualified” advice simply a ploy or a foil? In other words, there was no intention to dismantle a racist and sexist system and therefore maintain the status quo. Another socio-historic theme has been “Babies having babies,” although you don’t hear much about it nowadays. highest

out-of-marriage

birth

rates,

Black women still have the

which

could

exacerbate

the

feminization of poverty, representing single mothers with children. Some data show only 48 percent of Black women are married. But taking a closer look, studies show that 70 percent of educated Black women are married by age 40. Some Black women are OK with being single. In fact, we’re moving away from a hetero-normative society where everyone was expected to marry the opposite sex. At the same time, married couples usually do better economically, so marriage can be a viable way of raising ones standard of living. Through the ups and downs of “the struggle” for racial and gender equality, these political sheroes represent a heady paradox. Senator-elect Jones, as so many others, seem fascinated by the Rev. Dr. King’s prophesying that “the moral arc of the universe … bends toward justice.” But perhaps even Dr. King couldn’t foresee the uncanny role Black women are playing. But now it’s time for the quid pro quo, (the big pay-off). When will Black women reap their rewards?

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Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) said on Facebook that despite Black women voting at higher rates, they’re “continually underrepresented in elected office. Structural barriers,” she said, “play a key role in this, including a lack of access to resources and financial support …” On Twitter, Senator Harris, the only Black woman in the Senate, considered a 2020 presidential candidate, said Black women are looking for

more

than

a

big

thank

you.

"Let's

address

issues

that

disproportionately affect Black women — like pay disparity, housing & under-representation in elected office." Malaika Horne, PhD, is an academic writer and journalist.

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BLACK COMIX RETURNS - African American Comic Art & Culture

A hardcover collection of art and essays showcasing the best African American artists in today's vibrant comic book culture.

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The Last of the Houstonian Attorneys

F

rankie Muse Freeman was a civil rights attorney who implemented the Houstonian legal strategy of tearing down racism and inequality in America.

We celebrate her life because it is a testimony of a life lived and a metaphor for the continuum of movement toward the ideals for which America stands. We stand on her able shoulders as well as others who challenge America that we must be true to the mission statement of our country. “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” She embodied the best of that promise by becoming the 1st black woman to be appointed to the U.S. Civil Rights Commission by President Lyndon Johnson. President Johnson directed the commission to lay the foundation for local and state governments to build public school systems that were colorblind. The commission issued a report in 1967 which was a study on the discrimination in the South entitled, “Racial Isolation in the Public Schools.” Attorney Freeman issued a personal statement along with the report which said in part: “…None of the financial costs or the administrative adjustments necessary to bring integrated quality education will be as costly to the quality of American life in the long run as the continuation of our present educational policies and practices. For we are on a collision course which may produce within our borders two alienated and unequal nations confronting each other across a widening gulf created by a dual educational system based on income and race.”

ultimately influenced her to become a civil rights attorney. She took to heart that training and inculcated Houston’s directive to his students – use the law to change and attack discrimination and tear it down in America. Attorney Freeman became the lead attorney in the landmark case of Davis v. St. Louis Housing Authority which in 1952 led to the end of racial segregation in public housing in St. Louis. Frankie Muse Freeman told us in 2016 to vote –

‘But get it right’! We let her down, she also said:

“Keep your hand on the plow.” Let us work – to get it right and keep moving forward.

Pierre Blaine is the author of Movement: Race, Power and Culture in America Available on Amazon.com and at the History Museum.

Charles Houston returned to D.C. from service in the military and applied to Harvard Law School and was accepted. He graduated in 1922 with a Bachelor of Laws. In1923, he earned a doctorate, becoming a scholar at Harvard where he became the first black editor of the Harvard Law Review. Houston became a faculty member of Howard Law School and dean of the law school from 1930 -1935. Housted believed that a lawyer was “ a social engineer or a parasite on society” and therefore his role as a legal educator was to ingrain in his students that they were to use the law as social change agents as part of their social responsibility. In Frankie Freeman’s book – A Song of Faith and Hope she acknowledges that she and other law students at Howard would go and observe Thurgood Marshall who graduated from Howard in 1933. Marshall and his team of lawyers would go back to Howard and practice their oral arguments before the students in preparing for arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court. Frankie Muse Freeman was greatly influenced by Charles Hamilton Houston and Thurgood Marshall which Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE For Press info:

Peter Brian MARTIN, OWENS, and guest artist

Terence BLANCHARD to perform at the Grandel Theatre

For one night only at the Grandel Theater, international touring artist pianist Peter Martin joins vocalist Brian Owens with a guest appearance by jazz legend Terence Blanchard for an amazing night of song and jazz. Bassist Bob DeBoo and drummer Montez Coleman will complete this stellar group. Box office opens at 7 pm, concert at 8 pm. Tickets and additional information are available at www.metroplays. org or call 314.932.7414. Proceeds from the concert will support the Metro the Theater Company production of Bud, Not Buddy. About the Musicians: PETER MARTIN Peter Martin is an acclaimed jazz pianist who has toured six continents including a White House performance. He has collaborated with jazz greats including Diana Reeves, Wynton Marsalis and Chris Botti. Peter appeared in George Clooney’s 2005 film Good Night, and Good Luck and was the featured pianist and an arranger on the Grammy-winning soundtrack.

TERENCE BLANCHARD Multiple Grammy-winning jazz artist Terence Blanchard has recorded more than 30 critically acclaimed albums, composed more than 50 film soundtracks and in 2013, debuted Champion: An Opera in Jazz with Opera Theatre St. Louis. New Orleans born- and-based Blanchard has toured internationally, collaborated with a wide range of Jazz legends and has received numerous awards and recognitions About Metro Theater Company Since 1973, Metro Theater Company has been creating accessible sensory productions that respect young people’s intelligence, tell compelling stories, stimulate curiosity and provoke thoughtful reflection. The Company has reached a total audience of more than two million and has a national reputation for excellence in the field of professional theater for young audiences. Metro Theater Company has received major honors and awards, both locally and nationally.

BRIAN OWENS Brian Owens first attracted worldwide attention as lead singer with the U.S. Air Force band Sidewinder, whose videos drew more than 2.5 million hits on YouTube and led to appearances on Entertainment Tonight, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, at the White House and the World Series to name a few. Owens has produced more than 8 albums and tours nationally.

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Walking the Blue Line: A Police Officer Turned Community Activist Provides Solutions for the Racial Divide By Terrell Carter Bettie Youngs Book Publishers

$15.00 paperback

“As I recall my experiences, I find it incredulous that people in law enforcement honestly believe and say that a racial divide and racial profiling don’t exist. An officer’s mind is divided: first, between the police and the general public and second, between the police and minorities.”~ Terrell Carter Walking the Blue Line follows the author’s experiences growing up as a black child in St. Louis, MO, a racially charged city still trying to overcome its divided past, and his five year journey as a law enforcement officer which led him to reevaluate his views on citizens and police alike. Readers are taken on a compelling journey as he details personal stories of the challenges of navigating this new world, including how he had to testify against a former partner for falsifying a major drug arrest. Terrell details the thoughts and tactics of police officers based on their training in the police academy and lessons they learn on the streets and how this information can help citizens better understand why officers do what they do while still holding them accountable for protecting and serving their communities. Walking the Blue Line can be ordered from www.terrellcarter.net, Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and traditional booksellers.

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JAR MEL Reece Jarmel Reece is one of the best MC’s out today setting himself apart from many other Hip Hop artists. Working alongside Grammy Award Winning/MultiPlatinum Producer SHAM from the Trak*Starz, who produced Chingy, Ludacris, Usher,

Madonna, Janet Jackson, among others whom all have over 20 million records sold and counting, Jarmel has truly become known as ‘The Voice of the Nation’ Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

emerging from St. Louis, Missouri, better than ever as a multi-talented creative artist. Since going solo, Jarmel is committed to promoting positivity, avoiding vulgar language and having a realistic lyrical rhythm that highlights a creative genius unmatched by anyone in this era. With a style that represents every hood from coast to coast, Jarmel’s distinct vocal and lyrical combination of Midwest, Down South and East Coast flows set him above the over-glamorized fantasy life of current rap music. Jarmel’s concepts are vivid and relevant to today’s urban scene, satisfying even the most die-hard hip-hop purist. This drive earned him his current position within The Interstellar Music Group family. This power-packed combination is destined to bring a higher dimension of greatness to www.the-arts-today.com

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


the current 3-D entertainment industry. Check out his latest singles that include: Where Do We Go, I Want You,

Knowledge and Blessed, all available for purchase on Reverb Nation, Vevo, Spotify and heard on the DJ Pool. His latest single “Girls” speaks to the modern day woman and empowering her as a Goddess and Queen. The video directed by Cee Renée of CR Productions, showcases awesome cinematography and tells a story that captures the audience at first glance. Jarmel Reece is a force to be reckoned with and a positive light in the Arts Community of St. Louis. For more info, go to: https://www.reverbnation.com/ jarmelreece1, for booking: ceo@crthebrand. com.

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Enjoy the beloved classic on the big screen View in browser

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Community

Support

Winner of six Academy Awards – including Best Picture – and one of the American Film Institute’s Top 10 Greatest Movie Musicals of All Time, An American in Paris, stars Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly and features the timeless original music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin. Enjoy the musical film on the big screen while the SLSO performs the score live.

Buy Tickets Please note this is replacing the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra's May 12‐13 performances of Meredith Willson's "The Music Man."

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718 North Grand Boulevard St. Louis, MO 63103

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CONTACT:   Nancy Milton, Insight PR St. Louis 314-962-6400 nancy@InsightRocks.com Tom O'Keefe, Family Arena (636) 896-4289  tokeefe@familyarena.com  

The Family Arena Announces The Missouri River Music Fest with The Guess Who, Ambrosia and More Saturday, April 14, 2018 Tickets on sale Friday, January 5 WHAT:  Superstars from classic rock's glory days will come together for one night only at the 2018 Missouri River Music Fest at The Family Arena.  The Guess Who, Ambrosia, Bill Champlin, Stephen Bishop and John Ford Coley headline the event scheduled for Saturday, April 14, 2018.  Tickets go on sale, Friday, January 5, 2018 at https://www.metrotix.com/events/detail/mrmf.

WHO: The Guess Who is a group that's connected with the masses throughout a exultant hit parade spanning fourteen Top 40 hits, including "These Eyes," "Clap For the Wolfman," "Hand Me Down World," "No Time," "Star Baby" and "Share the Land." Add in fellow classics and double sided singles like their #1 rock anthem, "American Woman" and "No Sugar Tonight," plus "Laughing" and "Undun," and the Canadian-bred stateside conquerors are amongst music's most indelible treasures who are eternally etched within the very fabric of pop culture history. In its brief recording history, Ambrosia garnered five Grammy Nominations, five Hit Singles (including "You Are The Only Woman," "How Much I Feel," and "Biggest Part Of Me"), Heavy FM Airplay and the admiration and respect of the musical community.  All this was in addition to Sold Out concerts around the world. Today, the band is more alive and compelling than ever.  With three of the original members intact plus the addition of guitar ace Doug Jackson on electric guitar and backing vocals, Mary Harris contributing amazing keyboards and vocals, and the powerful and contemporary lead vocals and acoustic guitar of Ken Stacey, Ambrosia is exploring new musical territory and continuing to wow life-long fans and new converts alike. Bill Champlin is best known for being a member of Chicago, which he joined in 1981 and remained a member of for 28 years. However, his career encompasses much more. The Sons of Champlin formed in 1965 as a fivepiece band, and later expanded to seven members. The Sons recorded seven commercially released albums between 1968 and 1977 and gained a devoted fan base. Bill received two Grammy awards for his song writing and has released seven solo albums. He has recording credits on numerous albums by various artists that cover a 30-year period.

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Stephen Bishop released his first album, "Careless," in 1976. The album featured the hits "Save It For a Rainy Day," and "On and On." He sang the hit theme, "It Might Be You," from the movie, "Tootsie," as well as writing and/or singing for 13 other films including, "Animal House," and "Separate Lives" from "White Nights." His songs have been performed by artists such as: Phil Collins, Eric Clapton, Barbra Streisand, Art Garfunkel, Steve Perry, Stephanie Mills, Kenny Loggins, Johnny Mathis, Phoebe Snow, David Crosby, The Four Tops, Aswad and Pavarotti. There are songs you hear in your life that transport you to a certain time period or give you a special feeling. Songs like "I'd Really Love To See You Tonight," "Nights Are Forever Without You" and "Love Is The Answer" have that kind of effect on people. Those songs and numerous others have made John Ford Coley a singing legend. He has spent decades touring, writing, recording, and producing. WHEN:  Saturday, April 14, 2018 at 6:30 p.m. WHERE:  The Family Arena - 2002 Arena Parkway, St. Charles, MO 63303 TICKETS:  Tickets go on sale Friday, January 5 at 10 a.m. and can be purchased at the Family Arena Ticket Office or online at https://www.metrotix.com/events/detail/mrmf .  Prices: $85 (Gold Circle), $70 (Floor), $60 (100 Level Sidelines), $50 (100 Level Endzone), $40 (Upper Level) To charge by phone call MetroTix at 314-534-1111.  For help purchasing accessible seating, call The Family Arena ADA Hotline at 636-896-4234.    BUY TICKETS:  https://www.metrotix.com/events/detail/mrmf MORE:  Call The Family Arena event hotline at 636-896-4242 for more information, or visit www.familyarena.com. Suites are available for this event. Treat the family and friends, reward clients or employees or celebrate a special occasion with a private suite.  For details and pricing, contact Blake Rapert at 636-896-4211.                                                           ### MEDIA INFORMATION:   For advance interviews, images and additional information, contact Nancy Milton, Insight PR St. Louis, 314-962-6400 or nancy@InsightRocks.com. 

Insight PR St. Louis, 59 Wilshire Terr.,  , St. Louis, MO 63119 SafeUnsubscribe™ ibj1960@aol.com

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The Tammi Holland Show

WATCH NOW!

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


BLACK HISTORY BOY Episode #4

BLACK HISTORY BOY, (Ep. # 4) DESCRIBES HIS NEW SERIES TO THE PRESS. King Tut, Queen Nefertiti,King Mansa Musa, Black Samurai Sakanouye No Tamuramo, The Black Olmecs Of Mexico, Nubian Queen Amenirenas Donate $5.00 to help us spread the truth of our history. GOFUNDME https://www.gofundme.com/black-archaeologist-season-4 DVD's http://BlackArchaeologist.com http://kunaki.com/msales.asp?Publisherld=109447&pp=1

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Jamaa Habari

For Your

I

iII nformation

Kwanzaa

Desemba 26 – Januari 1

Background and History Kwanzaa is a lively, enriching, seven-day celebration of the Black value system called the Nguzo Saba, a term in the Kiswahili language of East and Central Afrika that literally means “Seven Pillars.” It is further translated to mean “Seven Principles.” These Seven Principles are the foundations upon which Afrikan culture stands and are traced back to Afrikan antiquity. These basic Black values can still be found in Afrikan communities throughout the Afrikan Diaspora. This survival is despite the effort by european forces to destroy all remnants of Afrikan culture and identity through the period of chattel slavery. This effort of using racial differences to subjugate a people, called racism, still continues today, thus making the celebration of Kwanzaa a clear act of cultural self–determination and pride. Kwanzaa is in the Afrikan harvest celebration tradition and means “First Fruits.” It is celebrated from Desemba 26th through Januari 1st. Since its creation in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga and the US organization, it is estimated that over 30 million people worldwide celebrate Kwanzaa today. The holiday is celebrated to heighten our recognition and commitment to those seven basic values, passed to us by our ancestors and to provide a reinforcing, uplifting cultural celebration for Black people. Kwanzaa is a non-religious and a non-heroic celebration.

The Nguzo Saba Umoja (Unity)- To strive for and maintain unity in self, family, community, neighborhood, nation race and world Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)- To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves instead of being defined, named, created for and spoken for by others Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)- To build and maintain our community together and to make our sisters’ and brothers’ problems our problems, and to solve them together Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)-To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and profit from them together Nia (Purpose)- To make as our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness Kuumba (Creativity)- To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it Imani (Faith)- To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle

How it is Celebrated Each day of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of the Nguzo Saba. Activities of that day reflect the principle of that day. The basic items used for Kwanzaa are the Mishumaa Saba (seven candles-3 red, 1 black and 3 green), a Kinara (candleholder) for seven candles, a Mkeka (straw mat), a Kikombe cha Umoja (Unity Cup) and Zawadi (gifts), given on the last day. The Mishumaa Saba are arranged in the Kinara–3 red on the left, 1 black in the middle and 3 green on the right. On each day of Kwanzaa, a candle is lit for that day. On the 1st day, the innermost black candle- Umoja– is lit and words are shared about Unity. Then, the Kikombe cha Umoja is passed to all present. Each person drinks from it and strongly says “Harambee!” meaning “We pull together!” On the 2nd day, the Umoja candle is lit, then the innermost red candle- Kujichagulia– then sharing about SelfDetermination. The next day, the previous candles are lit, then the innermost green candle- Ujima– then sharing. Continue outward each day, alternating colors, until all colors are lit on the 7th day-Imani. On the last day, a great celebration is held between many families called the Karamu (feast) . At the Karamu, the community comes together, eats and participates in activities centered on the Nguzo Saba. For more information, visit our website- www.teachsociety.org, our page on Facebook, call (314)875-9277, or at ww.teachorg33@gmail.com.

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Featured

Author

Submission

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Marsha

Cann

Recollecting HOLY GROUND, an Iron, and a Washtub

S

ee this old iron? My mother kept this iron because it belonged to her mother Annie Mae, who kept it because it belonged to her mother, Mama T – short for Thessalonia. Mama T was a slave, first in Mississippi, then Arkansas and that’s where Annie Mae was born. But let me tell you about this iron and why it’s so special. Everybody said that Annie Mae Tuck, my grandmother, was the best ironer in the state of Arkansas. She would put that iron on the stove and take it off at just the right time, each time to get that perfect pressing, crisp and smooth. And she sang from the minute her feet touched the floor in the morning till her body lay down at night. Wade in the water, wade in the water chillun, wade in the water, God’s gonna trouble the water… The white woman Annie Mae worked for – Idella Poole – was always the talk of the town because of her beautiful wardrobe. Annie Mae always kept her looking to atee. Now you know, an iron can be used for some other things besides ironing although that’s what it’s mostly used for. But sometimes it could be used as a door prop to let a cool breeze come through. The story was that one day – this was in the spring of 1922 – a mad dog came up in the yard. Annie Mae was washing clothes in the wash tub. Before she knew it, the dog was near about six feet away from her baby girl who was playing on the porch – that was my mama, Jessie. So Annie Mae got real still and whispered some words, then she went invisible and slipped up to the porch. She went into the core of her soul, into the knowing part, the place that folds space, freezes time, shape shifts. It happened quick. Then she came back visible and was standing between her baby girl and that mad dog. The iron caught her eye. That day, it was being used to prop open the front door. With one fell swoop she snatched up that iron and yelled out, “Get thee behind me Satan!” She raised the iron up over her head and said some words she had heard her Aunt Callie say to protect them from the KKK when they first got free. Bi di ba da way, Ba ba du way, Aum sha sha du way.….. Anyway that dog got unmad quick and went to crying and running, just as Annie Mae was about to give him a permanent headache. They say the iron must have had some kind of magical power because even though Annie Mae never actually struck the dog, there was an imprint right in the center of his forehead that matched the shape of the iron, and he never acted mad again, though he was cross-eyed from that dayon. Nobody could ever explain it. But Callie was my great, great aunt, Annie Mae’s aunt, and down

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RECOLLECTING HOLY... cont.

home everybody knows about the legend of Callie Tuck. She knew things. She was a true conjure woman. Oh, they say she could walk through storms, snatch up the lightning, and use it to heat up her medicine pot. They say she mixed her healing salve with magic from the full moon, to heal the wounds of every creature walking up on two or down on four. She was a healer. She knew about special words and prayers and things that worked like magic. And her washtub? By day it was just a washtub, but by night she used it as a medicine pot for whatever healing was needed. So this was a special washtub and some folks say that’s why Annie Mae’s laundry came out extra clean and bright – like new every time – ‘cause she had inherited this washtub from her Aunt CallieTuck. Some of you may be wondering how Annie Mae knew how to be invisible. Well, she learned that from Callie Tuck, too. “First child,” Aunt Callie told Annie Mae, “This is holy ground! Wherever you are…Know that the ancestors are always here, the presence of miracles, the very spirit of God, always right here, ready to stroke, stoke, or cloak you. Hear what I say now! Whatever it is you need at the time. The ancestors can help you open yourself and receive God’s will, that’s how you invoke the power. You know what I mean? Then the spirit can come forth and do things through you… supernatural to some but natural to others.” Callie Tuck took Annie Mae’s face in her hands, “You know what Imean?” Annie Mae felt the same energies and saw the same visions like her aunt Callie. She understood. It was something in her bones. “Wasn’t many come this way got the eye,” Callie continued, “You the only one I know of in this generation that’s got it.” Annie Mae looked deep into her aunt’s eyes and told her, “Yes ma’am, I feel it.” Callie Tuck knew it anyway. She knew Annie Mae could understand. This is what she taught her about going invisible: “See yourself moving without being seen. Shoo Shoo Shoo…Ola senna Nah tonga hey denana. Send a thought to those you need to be hidden from to freeze in time, redirect their thinking, their seeing. Kang ka buna…lili shante ife uchefuna…Shoo Shoo Shoo.” Now you remember these words I tell you, and you can go invisible when you need it. Annie Mae repeated the words until she knew them by heart. “See what you doing, child, is asking the ancestors to open up the way, light the way for you. Just get real still, say these words and see what happen. But don’t play around with it. It ain’t nothing to play with, you hear me?” Callie admonished. “Yes ma’am,” Annie Mae said. The first time Annie Mae had to go invisible was when she was 12 years old and on her way back from delivering some of Mama T’s canned pears. All of a sudden three white boys, big teenagers, jumped out from the woods laughing and hollering “Come here, gal.” The one boy reached out to grab Annie Mae, but she took off running. Her legs, though longer than most 12 year-old girls, were no match for these grown-up boys. They soon caught up to her and circled her. One of them said, “We been watching you, little gal, and we want some of that poon-tang!” The others hooted, laughed, slapped their thighs and yelped in agreement. They pushed her to the ground. Her hands dug into the dirt, dry and dusty from the August sun. Annie Mae was praying, and then she remembered. She saw herself moving without being seen, and then she shouted the special words to go invisible. “Shoo Shoo Shoo…Ola senna Nah tonga hey denana… Kang ka buna…lili shante ife pg.

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uchefuna…Shoo Shoo Shoo!” “What the hell is she saying?” one of the boys said. Just then Annie Mae began spinning so fast round and round. “This nigger must be crazy!” “Grab her!” And with that, a sudden wind came up and Annie Mae leaped into the air, opening her hands to release the dusty dirt, which swirled like a little tornado. In their attempt to grab her, the boys collided. When the dust cleared, they didn’t see Annie Mae anywhere. Then ping, ping, ping…they started feeling what felt like little rocks upside their heads. “Ooo…ouch… Owww,” they exclaimed. They didn’t know where these rocks were coming from. Annie Mae had come back visible, but was hiding up in a black walnut tree, using her trusty slingshot (which she always carried to shoo away bothersome critters that might come along) to shoot these boys with walnuts. “I’m getting out of here,” said one boy. “Me too,” another agreed and ran off. “Go on and run,” said the ring- leader, “I’m gon’ find that little nigger gal. She can’t befar.” Just then Annie Mae jumped down from the tree right onto the back of this boy yelling, “Get thee behind me, Satan! Bi di ba da way. Ba ba du way. Aum sha sha du way.” Then using both hands, she smashed a black walnut right in the center of his forehead. Dazed, that boy fell to his knees in pain, and Annie Mae ran off quick, glad to be getting away. Oooweee! The knot that rose up on that boy’s head never did go down. He was too scared to retaliate, and too shamed to tell anybody that a little 12-year-old colored gal had snatched a knot in his head. Folks called him Knot-Head after that. But my favorite story was about the washtub and how it was used for more than just a washtub. Callie Tuck was 12 years old when she and her mama and daddy first got brought to old man Lancaster’s plantation in the state of Tennessee. Her Daddy, my great-great-great granddaddy, was a seven-foot tall man, straight from Africa and her Mama my great-great-gr…—aw you know. Anyway, she was a mahogany black woman, beautiful! Men couldn’t stand to look at her. Too stunning, too beautiful, I’m telling you. People say sometimes men lost they minds or went blind and straight out fell dead from lookin’ at her. That’s what happened when Callie Tuck and them came to Lancaster’s. Her mama was named Bell and her daddy, they called him Fred, but his African name was Neferkara. He knew what his name was and where he come from, knew his true language and culture, and he passed that on, in little pieces as best he could to his family and all those around sensible enough to receive it. He was one who had the eye. By day he worked hard in the fields just like everybody else, but by night, he was the healer of all the brothers and sisters wherever he lived and the white folks, too, if they had sense enough to be worthy. Bell worked at the big house, did all the laundry, ironing and such. On all three plantations where they had lived, Bell never had to work in the fields. Even though she was not lightskinned, she was treated different, better. Her beauty and sweetness was so overwhelming, it was like she would put a spell on folks. Bell was not only beautiful, inside and out, she could also sing like the sweetest bird you ever heard. Oh lilili O lay lu O lay lay lu. The sound of her voice accompanied Neferkara when he was healing and laying on hands. It’s like they were connected, one spirit working together. Her voice, her humming and wailing, brought more healing power to the situation, such that miracles were commonplace around wherever they lived.

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RECOLLECTING HOLY... cont.

So anyway, like I said, some men would straight out lose their minds from looking at Bell because she was so stunning. At first sight, the Lancaster’s boy, their only child, Therlow, fell in love, or what he thought was love, but he had just went crazy. He went into some type of mania, not sleeping, not eating for a week, that’s how long Bell had been there. This wasn’t the first time somebody went crazy over her, so she just tried to stay away from him. Give him a chance to settle down. At the end of that first week, that fool told his folks he was going to take her away and marry her. His daddy laughed and told him, “Boy, you done completely lost your damn mind…what you talking about marrying a nigger gal, a slave? I’ll disown you, boy, write you out the damn will andthrow your ass in the crazy house. I’ll see you dead before I see you running away with a slave, disgracing this family! You better get your head straight.” But he didn’t. That very day Therlow shot Bell dead cause he knew he could never have her. The sound of the shot cracked through the still sky like a slave-driver’s whip. Neferkara was almost a mile away tending the tobacco field when his heart shuddered and he saw Bell as in a dream melting into the earth. In his trance, he leaped into the air, became a black raven, and in seconds was back to a man standing at Bell’s side. Callie and the other slaves came running from the fields, as the Lancasters dragged Therlow away, screaming Bell’s name. It seemed that time stopped. Neferkara quickly lifted Bell from where she had fallen on holy ground just beside the old washtub. He gently kissed her open mouth with his and sucked in her last breath. With Callie at his side, he carried Bell deep into the woods, Two of the slaves who also had the eye silently followed with the washtub. They moved with urgency, followed by the wailing women who, when they arrived at the hush harbor, walked seven times around the space, speaking Bell’s name, being her voice, singing her song, claiming holy ground. The men stood, left foot forward so hearts could go forth and stamp out any evil blocking the light, and when the women wailed, the men moaned in accord. Neferkara placed her in the center of this holy ground the others had prepared and laid on hands. Aum sha sha du way, Shoo, Shoo, Shoo He then breathed in the light from all the healing ever had, connected with all the healers ever healed while he walked around her seven times, The women brought water from the nearby stream, and after blessing it, prayed as they poured it into the washtub. Callie Tuck’s knees were shaking, but she stood still as the tree next to her. She dare not wipe her tears, but just let them fall at her feet onto the holy ground. Neferkara instructed her to bring the special herbs and oils, the frankincense, hyssop, leaves from the never-die-tree and more. Callie returned with it all, everything for the transformation, the blessing of her mother Bell. Neferkara bathed her in the blessed water, herbs and oils. The others circled him. All was quiet except the women who sang for Bell and wailed according to God’s will for resolution. Then Neferkara breathed Bell’s last breath back into her. All that could be done had been done. They prayed for divine order. It was time to leave things alone, time to let God. They wrapped Bell in the never die leaves and left her for the night. Next day, they were awakened by singing, a beautiful, glorious song was coming from the woods, from the hush harbor. Neferkara, Callie and all who could hear the song rushed to see. Bell! It was Bell’s voice. Yes, my great, great, great grandma Bell Tuck come back to life. pg.

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Bell stood straight up, right there in the washtub, light glowing all around, over, under, through her, nothing but light. Everybody said it was that last kiss, the breath he held and gave back to her, that did the final magic. Neferkara had visualized her transformation, and his wish, that she would not leave them, but become a bird in the morning, singing evermore, was about to come true. She had left that murdered body and flew away as the most beautiful bird, singing the most beautiful song ever heard. The bird Bell watched over Callie and came every night to the willow tree where Neferkara would be waiting to listen to her singing, to spend time with her. They would comfort each other all night sometimes. He died a year later, they say from a broken heart. Callie knew, though, that it was just his time to move on, be clothed anew according to God’s plan. Not to leave but just to change and become an ancestor. He was buried under that same willow tree where Bell sang to him. Folks said late at night you could still hear Bell’s song and sometimes see two birds sitting in the willow tree. Callie Tuck saw the birds all the time, she knew. She kept doing all the things her parents had taught her and grew in her skill as a healer. She also grew to be over six-feet tall, taking after her daddy Neferkara, also known as Fred Tuck. Callie took over doing the laundry for the Lancaster plantation, taking great care of the washtub that had been part of much healing, muchmagic. Four years later when freedom came, that nut Therlow had just come home from the asylum, still crazy as hell. One night he thought his own mama and daddy was Yankee soldiers and shot them dead. (Seem like they woulda thought to hide those guns). So there was Callie Tuck and the rest of them, free but with nowhere to go and nobody to keep them from going or staying. So the newly freed slaves of the Lancaster plantation decided to go ahead and bury the Lancasters and just keep everything going along as it was. Things were crazy during that time so nobody ever found out that ex-slaves were running things there at Lancaster’s, and whenever a white man was needed, they would just put a suit and a hat on Therlow. They made sure he would stay in the wagon and wave and that he didn’t say anything more than ‘good morning’ or ‘good evening’ – though he’d constantly mix up which time of day it actually was. Over the years, most of the other colored folks ventured off the plantation, looking for a better living, trying to find relatives and loved ones, or just trying to find their way. But Callie Tuck stayed. She had a new husband, Willie Ray and a son they named Frederick Douglass Tuck. Since Willie Ray never knew his parents, his last name had come from the white man that had owned him, so he took Callie’s name. The Tuck family grew and things changed, but that old iron was still used, mostly as a door prop and the washtub kept on healing and helping to provide a living right there on the farm they had “inherited.” Holy ground.

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sfmlkday.org/bcafcon go to:

SAN FRANCISCO / JANUARY 13-15

CELEBRATING

OUR

RICH CREATIVE HISTORY THROUGH COMICS AND SPECULATIVE SPECUL ARTS!

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BLACK WOMEN SPEAK A CALL TO CONSCIENCE AND THE GRIOT MUSEUM OF BLACK HISTORY Presents "Black Women Speak" A series of activities celebrating Women's History Month including an Artists’ Reception featuring Youth Poet Laureate, Bisa Adero, Black Women Speak Poetry with Shirley LeFlore, and solo performances of Beah Richards’ poem, “A Black Woman Speaks” starring St. Louis actress Ms. Thomasina Clarke. A Black Woman Speaks is a one-woman show that celebrates the life of legendary African-American actress and political activist Beah Richards who used her artistry to break down racial barriers. The play is a powerful commentary on the history of oppression and resistance of African American women from slavery to the present time. It calls for women of all ethnicities to work together for justice, peace and the betterment of humanity. Dr. Mary Helen Washington, Distinguish Professor of English at the University of Maryland & author of The Other Blacklist: The African American Literary and Cultural Left of the 1950s, will engage the audience in a post-show discussion on the current role of the African American feminist in today's social climate.

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Schedule of Events Sunday, March 4 Black Women Speak Artists’ Reception 3-5 p.m. Artists: Alfredia Bailey, Gundia Locke Clay, Dail Chambers, Stajah Curry, Jasmyn Diggs, Bonnie L. Edwards, Brittany Fernandez, Nanette Hageman, Sheri Hall, Erica Jones, Edna Patterson-Petty, Marilyn Robinson, Elaine Young and featuring St. Louis Youth Poet Laureate, Bisa Adero ******************

Wednesday, March 7 Black Women Speak Poetry! 7-9 p.m. 14th Street Gallery 2701 N. 14th St. Featuring Shirley LeFlore, Linda Smith, Pacia Elaine, Cheeraz Gormon, Cheryl D.S. Walker, Mari “Emcee” Carter, Sahara "Sista Sols" Scott, &Tasha "Unspoken" Archie

***************** A Black Woman Speaks Performances March 16, 17 @ 7 p.m. March 18 @ 3 p.m. Matinee Pre-Matinee Brunch 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

***************** Contact: A Call to Conscience 314-607-8919 The Griot Museum 314-241-7057

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DISPLACED

&ERASED

The history of Clayton, Missouri's uprooted black community. emmakriley.com

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Featured

Artist

Submission

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74


Thomas

BIO:

Karsten

Artist Thomas J. Karsten

Thomas J. Karsten was born in 1971, in St. Louis, Missouri, USA. He graduated high school from the St. Louis Priory School in 1989; received a B.A. in Art/Art History and Latin American Studies from Rice University in 1993; and a Juris Doctorate from St. Louis University School of Law in 1999.

His childhood obsession with Brazil led him to study abroad at the Universidade de São Paulo in 1991, where he did field research on Afro-Brazilian religions, such as Umbanda and Candomblé. During the decade in which he ended up living in Brazil (São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Salvador, Bahia), Karsten grew increasingly attuned to the rich and vast culture of the African Diaspora, eventually leading him to travel throughout West Africa and providing the inspiration for much of his artistic work. Currently, Karsten resides in Alton, Illinois. In addition to his art, he has a thriving legal practice in Clayton, Missouri.

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Tim Cunningham

Live at the Sheldon!

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Featured

Photography Submission

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Dominic

Cox

"Tamron Interview Images" Photographer: Dominic Cox email: dominic@dominiccox.com http://www.tamron-usa.com/enews/archives/2017/oct217_cox.html

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Circle of Light Associates

1515 VARNUM, St Louis, MO 63136 • $72,500 Residential | .265 acres • 3 bedrooms • 1 bathrooms • MLS# 17059099

This Beautiful Home is Ready for Family to move right in and Kick up their feet!! Your home has been completely rehabbed ready to pass all inspection!!

Rochelle DIXON Contact

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Zuka Arts Guild

ZUKA FRIDAY'S

Zuka Arts Guild Art Exhibition at 14th Street Artist Community The Zuka Artist Guild at the 14th Street Artist Community features a different visual artist every First Friday of the month starting 7 p.m. Zuka is a group of talented local artists with a history of producing collaborative artwork that dates back to 1974. ●

Every Friday @ 1 p.m. Live rhythm and blues with the band Renaissance

Bring your lunch and have fun!-FREE

First-Friday of each month, 7 p.m. till 10 p.m. Music, live art demos, raffling local artwork and artist marketplace. Free and open to the public. Street and lot parking available @ 2701 N. 14th Street (Old North St. Louis Community) 63106

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View this email in your browser

Valerie Ervin Keynote Speaker

Ervin has a long history as a labor leader. She is currently Executive Director, National Participatory Democracy Project, a project of the Working Families Organization.  

Buy your tickets here. If you cannot attend the anniversary, please consider making a donation for someone else to attend. Asante/thank you for all of you who've made that donation.

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TEN

The Empowerment Network for Men facing Prostate Cancer From: iHEART COMMUNITIES w/ JADE HARRELL

Prostate cancer is not only an invader of the human body it is an infiltrator of the human spirit. Survivor, Mellve Shahid made a promise to God to support and serve other men battling prostate cancer when he was diagnosed ten years ago. He founded The Empowerment Network and has been changing lives and creating hope for hundreds of men ever since. Click here for the podcast.

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Carolyn

‘Lady Cee’

Renée

Carolyn ‘Lady Cee’ Renée is the C.E.O.- (Creative Expressionist Owner) of CR The Brand, LLC from Brooklyn, New York. The Brand

utilizes a 5 point system of expressing beauty from the inside out with: 1) Theatre/Film Production through Cee-Renée Productions, 2) CR Styles Online Clothing Boutique, 3) Radio Personality, 4) Healing Cosmetics 5) Fashion Blogging and Influencing. Her talents propel her to share her experiences through acting and modeling as a Petite, Hippy, Curvy Diva and recently as Brand Ambassador for Pop Up Plus Clothing. Lady Cee’s talents include singing, cooking, writing and exemplifying beauty as the brand ambassador of CR

KOVL Radio on Tuesdays/Thursdays from 5-7pm. Stay tuned for her weekly podcast launching in February 2018 entitled, “Subjects Matters” where she pulls all the stops out to discuss topics with special guests and business owners in the St Louis area and nationwide. Lady Cee recently completed directing a music video ‘Girls’ for Hip Hop Artist Jarmel Reece which has over 3K views on social media including Vevo. She also starred as ‘Christine’ lead character in christian play-movie ‘The Wake Up Call Movie 2018’, set to be a huge hit in the film community to premiere in March 2018. Lady Cee’s ultimate dreams are: to connect resources in her community for unified healing; to write, direct and produce life changing film, play or tv sitcoms; and use her amazing voice to speak for the voice-less. She will continue to service her community through film, radio and body care products while being a light within the darkness.

~Namaste~ Check out her website for updates and more! www.CRTheBrand.com

The Brand. She moved to the St. Louis for public health, but found her true calling expressively creating artistic work. Cee enjoys using her voice to speak for the less fortunate advocating on important issues. She is the Lady of the house as radio personality with JJ and Ty on Agree2Disagree on

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Email: ceo@crthebrand.com Social Media: Instagram/ Twitter/FB:CRTheBrand

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


UPCOMING PROGRAMS & EVENTS

MFA Open Studios Saturday, January 27   4­8p   Lewis Center, 721 Kingsland Avenue

Go behind the scenes at this annual event to meet current Sam Fox School MFA students in their art studios. View work in progress, ask questions, and learn directly from these emerging artists working in painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, combined media, installation, and video.  Free and open to the public. Light refreshments provided. Parking available on­site. Sponsored by Women and the Kemper.

Spring Exhibitions Open February 2 Member Preview  6­7 Public Reception 7­9 Join us on Friday, February 2, for a reception celebrating the opening of the spring exhibitions.  Valet parking is available on the south side of Steinberg Hall on Forsyth Boulevard ($5; free for members). Find out more >>

© 2018 Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum | Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts | Washington University in St. Louis | One Brookings Drive |Campus Box 1214 | St. Louis, MO 63130 | kemperartmuseum.wustl.edu | 314.935.4523    Jackson Pollock (American, 1912­1956), Number 19, 1951. Screen print, 27 x 21". Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in St. Louis. University purchase, Yeatman Fund, 1952. © Pollock­Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

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John Jennings Associate Professor Visual Studies SUNY Buffalo tumblr: http://jijennin70. tumblr.com/

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Featured

Model

Submission

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Andriatsiaronimanga Manohisoa

Madagascar's Women

Photo Exhibit

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Madagascar's Women

Photo Exhibit

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#BlackDollsMatter

Buy Now!!!

Bring a sense of pride and strength to the extraordinary girl in your life. Madeline Delilah Doll and chapter book www.stagemotherproductions.com Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


CALL FOR ART “All Colors” OVERVIEW: “All Colors” is an invitational and juried arts exhibit featuring the art of approximately 100 artists and 200 pieces of art. The show takes place January 13 through February 28, 2018 at the St. Louis Artist Guild, 12 Jackson Avenue, Clayton, Missouri 63105. We expect strong attendance, as the “All Colors” exhibit is a fund raiser with art and related funds to benefit artist of all disciplines, small not for profit 501C3 organizations and community/neighborhood organizations. Clayton, and the surrounding region have long been supporters of the arts and Portfolio Gallery and the “All Colors” sponsors are committed to make this exhibit a successful fund raiser and to introduce the St. Louis Metropolitan region to artist that mainstream publications have overlooked. HOW TO APPLY: Online applications may be completed though Portfolio’s website at www.portfoliogallerystl.org Click the Call for Art link that will take you to the sign-up, upload and payment. Each application must include the requested uploaded images and an artist’s statement of 100 words or less explaining the artist’s creative process including specific information about technique and materials.

Submit your art now!

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


An artist's duty, as far as I am concerned, is to reflect the times. (Nina Simone)

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I choose to reflect the times and the situations in which I find myself. How can you be an artist and not reflect the times? (Nina Simone)

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Business Edge

workshops for individual artists

Essential Tax Knowledge for Artists and Freelancers Monday, February 5 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Rus Garofalo, owner of Brass Taxes, will guide you through the tax maze and offer suggestions that could save you money and a lot of aggravation. Plus we'll discuss the tax reform changes that may apply to you.

MO Sales Tax 101 Monday, February 12 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Does sales tax make you cringe? Accountant Jessica Seiffert, Rubin Brown, make it less daunting by covering all the basics, including what’s required if you participate in art shows or craft fairs. Co‐sponsored by the Saint Louis Arts Fair.

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Anatomy of a Contract Monday, March 5 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Although many of us still prefer to conduct our business on a handshake, vague verbal agreements can result in ugly misunderstandings. In addition to covering contract basics, this interactive session will help you sharpen your negotiation skills. Instructor: Attorney Mark Mueller

Purple Pain: Legal Lessons We Can Learn from Prince Monday, March 12 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Prince, the prolific and iconic superstar who passed away unexpectedly in 2016, can teach us sound legal lessons about creative entrepreneurship, intellectual property and estate planning. Our team of presenters will highlight the key takeaways.

Copyright Clinic Monday, April 2 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) Do you have pressing questions about copyright? Here’s your chance to learn the fundamentals from Attorney David E. Crawford. Then you’ll have an opportunity to spend 15 minutes talking to a volunteer lawyer. Consultations will be scheduled in person that evening and may not be available if you do not register in advance.

Licensing Copyrighted Works Monday, April 23 (6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) We’ll cover common terms and conditions found in copyright licenses, the difference between a license and an assignment and exclusive v. non‐exclusive licenses, splitting of rights, recording and maintaining your rights with the Copyright Office, works made for hire, termination rights and different types of payment terms. This discussion will also address open source and creative commons licenses. Presented in collaboration with the Copyright Alliance and World IP Week. Workshops are held at the Regional Arts Commission, 6128 Delmar. Free parking is available behind the Pageant or in the MetroLink lot. Tuition is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Can’t afford to pay? Please contact us to request a scholarship. 

Register Now

Defending Free Speech We've joined an amicus brief defending the freedom of artistic expression rights of David Pulphus (left), the St. Louis artist whose painting was removed from an exhibition at the U.S. Capitol. Washington, D.C.‐based Covington & Burling drafted the brief with substantial input from VLAA Volunteer Attorney Mark Sableman (right) of Thompson Coburn LLP. In all,17 arts substantial here input from VLAA service and advocacy organizations signed on. More Volunteer Attorney Mark Sableman (right) of Thompson Coburn  LLP. In all,17 arts service and advocacy organizations signed on. More here   

Artists, need arts­related legal or accounting assistance? Apply here.

Artists, need arts­related legal or accounting assistance? Apply here.

Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

www.vlaa.org

www.the-arts-today.com 314/863-6930 vlaa@stlrac.org

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


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ART OF FOOD


Taste BudWorthy: vol. 1

Blk Mkt Eats 9 S Vandeventer Ave St. Louis, MO 63108

S

o the beautiful thing about social media, in my opinion, is that you get to control what content you get to see on a consistent basis. Of course my Instagram and Facebook news feeds are filled with my favorite chefs, creative recipes, tutorial videos, new cocktails to try on your friends, etc. My absolute favorite posts are the ones that highlight local restaurants and ones around the world. One day while scrolling through my timeline, I stopped at this video that instantly had me salivating. Now I love sushi, but this video was highlighting a restaurant that makes sushi burritos! *gasp* YES! Sushi BURRITOS! My eyes were instantly glued to my phone screen. Then I found out this marvelous establishment is located in St. Louis! Ecstatic wasn’t even the appropriate word for my mood at that moment. There was no way I could let this place be unexplored by my taste buds much longer. That same weekend I made my way to Blk Mkt Eats to get my hands on a sushi burrito. The location is prime real estate… across the street from IKEA, 1 block away from SLU’s campus. I purposely took my mother with me, because I knew we weren’t going to order the same thing and I wanted to try whatever she was getting. The invite was for a purely selfish reason this time around, and

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I’m completely okay with that. Upon walking in, we were greeted by some of the friendliest staff I’ve ever encountered. After looking over their menu the foodie chef in me just wanted to go hug the owner & give the sincere thank you. The menu is fairly simple, so here’ how it works: You can turn any of the 7 sushi burritos into poké bowls! If you’re not into eating raw fish, there are shrimp, grilled and fried chicken options. If you can’t decide between those…they have SUSHI NACHOS! I decided on the Tasty As Cluck burrito… every single ingredient was delicious. It was all perfectly paired. Buttermilk fried chicken, kimchi slaw, arugula, crispy shallots, BLK MKT pickles, tempura crunch and (*drumroll please*) OG Fire Sauce. AH-MAY-ZING! I’m not a huge fan of spicy food, so I was slightly skeptical about the OG Fire Sauce. However, I ended up loving it and I even wanting more on the burrito. (So I ordered extra sauce on my second visit lol). My mom ended up trying out something completely different, the Shaka Poké Nachos. Crispy wonton chips were topped with Hawaiian inspired tuna poké, arugula, avocado, sesame seeds, crispy shallots, tempura crunch, alaea sea salt, scallions & the beloved OG Fire Sauce (that got substituted for unagi sauce). Beyond delicious!!! I’ve been to Blk Mkt Eats twice, two weeks in a row. I’m debating at this very moment if I should go grab a burrito right now. It’s that good! I would highly recommend to anyone who loves sushi and wants to try something different. www.the-arts-today.com

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


ART OF FOOD... cont.

Gelato Di Roso 5204 Wilson Ave St. Louis, MO 63110

My god daughter’s 3rd birthday party was held at Gelato Di Roso’s on The Hill. I’m pretty sure I’ve expressed this to you all before, but I am an ice cream lover!!! I will make and try any variety of frozen desserts and ice cream. Sherbet, gelato, sorbet, ice cream, frozen yogurt, frozen custard, soft serve, etc. they all can be taste tested. When I found out the party was being held at a gelato shop, I got excited because I had been fighting my sweet tooth cravings for too long. I’m a little

residential neighborhood, not to mention all the restaurants in the vicinity. Granted the day we went, was one of those Saturday afternoons it decided to warm up in November, so parking was a headache. I promise it’s worth the trip though.

Bon Appétit

traditional when it comes to flavors I am willing to try, I’ve been that way since I was a child. So I ordered two scoops, one Vanilla and the other Toasted Almond. They both had the smoothest texture, but that Toasted Almond was perfection! I felt like I should have been chewing with every bite because it authentically tasted like pure almonds. Now parking may be a little tricky because it is in a

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loves.


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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


“Acting White”

Share your Story Dear friends: I have been asked to write a chapter in a book that will address colorism in education. My chapter will focus on “acting white.” Specifically, when I was growing up, I was a “smart” student. My top performance in school, doing homework, raising my hand to answer questions, etc. often drew the accusation from my African American classmates and friends that I was “acting white.” Now, I know there are psychologists out there who say this is not true and does not exist. But alas, it was absolutely true for me. I have written about this in past works. I will do so again for this new book. I do know that many young folks today who continue to have such allegations hurled at them so feel free to share this email with whoever and have folks email me directly. I did a survey on this very question about 7 years ago and the results were consistent with my experiences decades ago. I’d like to update my earlier survey. I would love to hear from anyone out there who has a similar/related story either involving yourself or someone you know. I would like to include your story in the chapter. I will conceal your identity if you request. Do you have a story to share? If so, please email to me at: norwood@wulaw.wustl.edu. “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead Kimberly Norwood , Professor of Law | Washington University School of Law pg.

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ART OF HEALING

Your Ad or Article could be here!

Contact us if you have a contribution to the ART OF HEALING.

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RICKKITA EDWARDS

CARDIO-CORE & MORE AT NORTH COUNTY REC. CENTER

TIMES: MON WEDS FRI 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

She teaches a class 2 Mondays a month at Faith Miracle Temple 7:15 pm - 8:00 pm. (ALL CLASSES ARE FREE)

COMING SOON! WAIST-NOT FITNESS PERSONAL TRAINING #GETWAISTEDBYRICKKITA

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


LABOR DAY SPECIAL!! ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS FOR WEEKLY MEAL PREP, CONTACT INFO BELOW!

Meal prep plans, personal chef, and health coaching services available. Plans starting as low as $75.00- For limited time only!! For more information contact fabulouslyveganme@gmail.com and visit fabulouslyvegan.com!

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PREMIUM BLACK CAR SERVICE

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SEDANS & SUV’S AVAILABLE CALL 314.565.8907 FOR YOUR FREE QUOTE.

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TENDING THE

MIND The blues of scientific method complements the jazz of humanistic inquiry.

How do you minimize the probability that essential ideas fizzle and evaporate? Read. Reading helps you to locate your mind in the universe of possibilities. pg.

136


Read

Thomas S. Kuhn, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions David Faust, The Limits of Scientific Reasoning George Yancy, On Race: 34 Conversations in a Time of Crisis Richard Wright, The Color Curtain Brain Russell Roberts and Keith Foulcher, eds. Indonesian Notebook: A Sourcebook on Richard Wright and the Bandung Conference Jeremy Campbell, Grammatical Man: Information, Entropy, Language and Life Gaye Theresa Johnson and Alex Lukin, eds. Futures of Black Radicalism Gayle L. Ormiston and Raphael Sassower, Narrative Experiments: The Discursive Authority of Science and Technology

Reflect

Perhaps one or two people share my belief that it is valuable to read among the humanities, the social sciences and the empirical/theoretical “hard” sciences. You can search for common sense that isn’t common. If no one shares my belief, that is cool. Nothing is lost. I just gain a different perspective on what is unique in contemporary American life and savor the perspective. Purposeful uniqueness is somewhat rare in 2017. Is it a victim of paradox: to be in control is to be out of control? In the Age of Trump, being beyond control seems desirable. Use the power of paradox and the dislocations of what is relatively true in “the cultural/linguistic matrices in which science and technology take shape.” Yes, I agree with Ormiston and Sassower that we ought “not assume that Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

science and technology constitute domains of inquiry separate from inquiries undertaken in other traditional disciplines or areas of research, such as philosophy, aesthetics and literary criticism, music, or hermeneutics (the histories and theories of interpretation)” (ix). Do I assume holistic thinking or critical analysis that embraces non-traditional ways of knowing has power that all elected officials and want-to-be masters of the world should fear? YES. Should we think that individual adjusting of terms of engagement in arenas of global violence is necessary? YES. Does such adjustment preclude our being co-opted or even destroyed by forces of evil? HELL, NO. Language is language, and speaking out or writing against delays damage. It does not prevent damage absolutely. Let us not fall into delusions in matrices of stupidity.

Write

Writing helps us to deal with problems for a brief span of time. It doesn’t make the enormous problems of this world disappear; it does not resolve them. Problems are problems are problems, and they reproduce themselves endlessly. You already knew that? O.K. Did you also know how reassuring it is to have face-to-face conversations with people who realize H. L. T. Quan’s insights about the hidden dynamics of pure radicalism are more useful than the entertainment provided by Cornel West’s “Ta-Nehisi Coates is the neoliberal face of the black freedom struggle,” The Guardian, December 17, 2017? And the Guardian has fallen into such inattention that it did not care to correct the grammar of this sentence:”The disagreements between Coates and I are substantive and serious.” I suppose inattention is crucial for entertainment. Did you already know the stern discipline of Angela Davis’s thinking about the state of international affairs ultimately has greater value than Toni Morrison premature anointing of Coates as the heir of James Baldwin? Perhaps you are afraid to say what your heart thinks? That is something you are bound to know or to discover when you talk with people who are not mentally enslaved by our nation’s systemic propaganda. Our daily doses of tweeted propaganda. We do need for West to bring good, old-fashioned black prophetic fire to dinner; we do not need for him to tell us yet once more that Coates is the HNIC of good will for lukewarm, expendable neoliberals of all colors. First and last, Morrison’s observations about the damnation of the bluest eye and the presence/absence of Africans wherever www.the-arts-today.com

Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


TENDING THE MIND... cont.

stand us in good stead; the love and romance from her larder of fictions is not to be dismissed, but we have to be selective about how much of it we pass on. And as you write, do not hesitate to write that Jeffrey Goldberg went bananas in trying to be a Norman Mailer “White Negro” who could cast shade in a podcast --- Atlantic Interview, Episode 1, November 8, 2017 with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Coates in Paris. If you listen to the streamed interview, his mouth embarrasses him as if he had drunk three flutes too many of French wine. And his naughty raving, his lack of respect of talking to Coates as if Coates was the help for The Atlantic (yes, we know how much Coates has helped and been helped by the magazine) and to making cheap jokes with the very cosmopolitan Adichie, his verbal bad boy sounds were edited out of the transcript of the interview. Some of us have relentless ears and are not taken in by his saying “And the truth of the matter is that white people are often assholes to white people.” We know how an asshole from a tribe of chosen people sounds. If writing as much gets you into deep trouble, know that you have done a responsible job of tending the mind. Know that your blues and jazz are cooking some righteously radical dishes. Jerry W. Ward, Jr.

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ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble) Saturday, January 13, 2018 Pulitzer Arts Foundation 3716 Washington Blvd, 63108 map

Claire Chase – flute

Tyshawn Sorey – drums, percussion, glockenpsiel , compositions Cory Smythe – piano & compositions

7:00pm doors I 8:00pm concert  $20.00 Regular Admssion I $10.00 Students & Struggling Music Supporters advanced tickets available here Facebook event page here

additional info: NEWMUSICCIRCLE.ORG

https://iceorg.bandcamp.com Three years ago, NMC drew a standing-room-only crowd to the Pulitzer, to see Claire Chase, who The New York Times described as “one of the most electrifying flute players on the planet.” She now returns to St. Louis with multiinstrumentalist Tyshawn Sorey and pianist Cory Smythe, core members of the arts collaborative she founded, ICE, which The New Yorker described as “America’s foremost new music ensemble.”

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Midddle School Guide THE EDUCATION OF KEVIN POWELL: A BOY’S JOURNEY INTO MANHOOD READER’S GUIDE: MIDDLE SCHOOL (Grades 6-8)

EDUCATION

High School Guide THE EDUCATION OF KEVIN POWELL: A BOY’S JOURNEY INTO MANHOOD READER’S GUIDE: HIGH SCHOOL

College-Age/Adult Guide THE EDUCATION OF KEVIN POWELL: A BOY’S JOURNEY INTO MANHOOD READER’S GUIDE: COLLEGE-AGE/ADULT

If you would like to order bulk copies (20 copies of more) of The Education of Kevin Powell: A Boy's Journey into Manhood, at a discount, please contact one of our authorized independent booksellers: Michael Green c/o M Revak & Co lexlibris@earthlink.net 520-906-8661 Kori Wilson c/o Sister's Uptown Bookstore sistersuptownbookstore@yahoo.com 212-862-3680 James Fugate c/o Eso Won Books jmfugate@msn.com 323-290-1048

PLEASE NOTE The Education of Kevin Powell is also an AUDIOBOOK (as read by Kevin) available for purchase at Audible.com: http://tinyurl.com/hmvdypa

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Mission #2

View this email in your browser

We're not asking for a donation on #GivingTuesday.

As an organization committed to sustainably growing food, farmers, and community, we know that the kind of world we want to eat in relies on people like you showing up for good food. That's why we're asking you to support our mission in other ways this year, in lieu of asking you to support EarthDance with an end-of-year donation. Over the next few weeks leading up to the new year, we'll be sharing 5 EASY WAYS to grow the local, organic food

and farming movement, and asking you to commit your grocery shopping, your time, and even your social media shares to the cause this holiday season. Join us in this end-of-year campaign to put the #MissionBeforeMoney and see the impact of deepening your own engagement with our food system firsthand. 

We Loved Hearing from Many of You! Last week, we asked you to put the #MissionBeforeMoney and support the good food movement by shopping at farmers markets all winter long! We asked you to tell us how you plan to incorporate more local and organic produce into your meals, and you gave us great examples of ways you incorporated seasonal produce into your family's holiday feast! 

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What do I do? I help the college bound teens of busy parents write extraordinary college entrance essays. And, I provide perceptive leaders with trustworthy diversity & inclusion facilitation. My book, Chop: A Collection of Kwansabas for Fannie Lou Hamer, is available at www.femininepronoun.com

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Martin Luther King, Jr. after meeting with President Johnson to discuss civil rights, at the White House, 1963; Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C.; LC-DIG-ds-00836

Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Freedom Celebration

1960Now: Social Justice Movements, Past and Present Friday, January 19, 2018 7:00–8:30 pm; The Farrell Auditorium Free; tickets required. Sheila Pree Bright will share her most recent series, #1960Now, a collection of photographs linking today’s protest movements to those of the 1960s. Bright will discuss how she captures the essence of contemporary social justice movements while connecting her work to the photographs of Civil Rights Movement photographer Moneta Sleet Jr. FEATURING: Rose Fischer Confluence Chamber Orchestra Tickets are free, but seating is limited. Advance tickets recommended. Tickets may be reserved in person at the Museum’s Information Centers or through MetroTix at metrotix.com or 314.534.1111. All tickets reserved through MetroTix incur a service charge; the service charge is waived for tickets purchased at the Museum. Same day tickets, if available, can be obtained on-site only.

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BUD,

Metro Theater Company presents

No t Bu d d y

at the Grandel Theatre, February 4-25

Metro Theater Company (MTC) is proud to present Bud, Not Buddy by playwright Kristin Greenidge, score by Jazz Legend Terence Blanchard and based on the Newbery Medal and Coretta Scott King Award winning book by Christopher Paul Curtis.

Bradford and Phil Dunlap and Jazz STL to make this happen,” said Flood. “MTC audiences have never seen anything like this before. With the cast of eight, there will be 21 performers on the Grandel stage bringing this tale of family and music to vibrant life.”

Bud, Not Buddy follows ten-year-old Bud as he sets off on a journey to find his father who he believes is leading a traveling jazz band. Set in 1930s America, Bud’s odyssey is filled with the joy of finding family and plenty of live jazz music.

Tickets for the Mainstage production of Bud, Not Buddy are on sale now at www.metroplays.org.

It’s 1936 in Flint, Michigan, and 10-year-old Bud is sure about two things: he wants to find his father, and he isn’t called Buddy. The only clue he left has is a flyer advertising Herman E. Calloway and his band, the Dusky Devastators of the Depression. With this and his trusty suitcase in tow, Bud sets off on an epic journey of discovery, set to the sound of a live jazz band. Metro Theater Company is partnering with Jazz St. Louis to produce this wonderful play which combines eight actors with a 13-piece jazz band performing an original score composed by five-time, Grammy-winning jazz artist Blanchard to tell the story of a boy who finds a home and a passion for music. Bud, Not Buddy is perfect for the whole family! Metro Theater Artistic Director Julia Flood will direct Bud, not Buddy. Jazz St. Louis Director of Education Phil Dunlap will serve as Music Director. “We are the first company to do it after its commissioned debut at the Kennedy Center. We have created a great collaboration with Gene Dobson Copyright © 2017 - All rights reserved.

Media Contacts: Sarah Thompson, PR | Communications 314.884.8306, sarahtproductions@gmail.com Ron James, Communications & Marketing Director Metro Theater Company 314.932.7414, 314.605.4031 (cell), ron@metroplays.org

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


BUD, NOT BUDDY cont.

Bud, Not Buddy Cast

Antony Terrell (Jerry and others) recently performed in Metro Theater Company’s Hans Brinker and the Silver Skates and Games Dad Didn’t Play. He also appeared in The T.D. McNeal Story: From Serivitude to Civil Rights (A Call To Conscience). Antony has spent the past few years touring across the country with multiple Theatres for Young Audiences. New to the St. Louis area, he is already falling in love and cannot wait for all the adventures in store.

Myke Andrews (Bud) recently appeared as Lucas in Metro Theater Company’s touring show, Games Dad Didn’t Play. Other credits include the title role in Macbeth (Webster Conservatory) and Tom Robinson in To Kill A Mockingbird (Hope Summer Rep Theater). A native of New Orleans, Myke holds a BFA in Acting from the Conservatory of Theatre Arts at Webster University.

FeliceSkye Hutchinson (Ms. Thomas and others) is making her MTC debut. Stage credits: The Day The Waters Came (The Black Rep), Who Did It? The Three Pigs (The Black Rep), Once In A Wifetime (A Spoonful O’ Honey Theater Company), Echoes of Troy (Actors Repertory Theatre). FeliceSkye is a St. Louis native and graduate of The National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts (Washington, DC) with a certificate in Acting. She also won Best Actress at a recent St. Louis 48-Hour Film Festival and teaches performance, playwriting, team-building, and anti-bullying through The Black Rep and UrbArts.

Don McClendon (Herman E. Calloway and others) is a veteran St. Louis actor, working in several areas of theater, film, television and radio, all in the St. Louis area. Don worked with several area companies, including First Run Theater, St. Louis Actors’ Studio, St. Louis Shakespeare Company, Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, Upstream Theater, Unity Theater Ensemble, Insight Theatre, Gitana Productions, because why not? Theatre Company, Tesseract Theatre, The Black Rep, Clayton Community Theater and the #Every28Hour Play Festival in Saint Louis. Don can also be seen on the big screen locally, portraying a news broadcaster in Alvaro Aro’s short suspense film, “Sophie” , a stock car racer/mechanic in the upcoming “Dog Days: The Heartland” directed by Chad Carpenter, and the re-release of the Pirate Pictures/ Archlight Comics feature film, “Four Color Eulogy”, as comic book artist Dave Peters. Don would like to thank Metro Theater for this great opportunity. May we strive to be great all of our days.

Reginald Pierre (Jimmy and others) is a St. Louis native. He previously appeared at Metro Theater Company as Jackie Robinson in Jackie and Me. His more recent appearances include Snow White (ERA), 2017 LaBute New Theater Festival (St. Louis Actors’ Studio), Seven Guitars (The Black Rep), and Hamlet: See What I See (Rebel and Misfits Productions). As always, he thanks his family for their unwavering support.

Carl Overly Jr. (Lefty Lewis and others) has worked with Metro Theater Company several times, most recently as Corky Baker in And In This Corner… Cassius Clay. Recent credits: Of Mice and Men (SATE Ensemble Theatre), Oedipus Apparatus (West End Players), Trash Macbeth (ERA), The Further Adventures of Hedda Gabler (St. Louis Shakespeare), The World Begun (Shakespeare Festival St. Louis). Carl holds a BA in Theatre from Eastern Kentucky University and shares St. Louis Theater Circle awards for Best Dramatic Ensemble (Arcadia, West End Players) and Best Comedic Ensemble (The 39 Steps, SATE Ensemble Theatre).

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


Meet the Makers of An American Soldier, OTSL’s Newest World Premiere, January 25–29! Opera Theatre’s nationally acclaimed New Works, Bold Voices series is dedicated to creating new operas that resonate with our country in the 21st century. As OTSL prepares to launch the world premiere of An American Soldier, go behind the scenes with a series of exciting events across the St. Louis region, featuring renowned composer Huang Ruo and Tony Award­winning librettist David Henry Hwang.   An American Soldier traces Private Danny Chen’s journey in the US Army. In boot camp, Danny is welcomed by his band of brothers. But in Afghanistan, his own base becomes enemy territory as military hazing turns deadly. Based on a true story, this opera asks powerful questions about what it means to be an American today.   Most events are free! Learn more about each event below, and reserve your spot today. Due to limited capacities at each venue, advance reservations are essential to secure your spot.

Reserve Tickets  Online Call the Box Office at (314) 961­0644      

The Dramatic Vision of David Henry Hwang Thursday, January 25, 7 p.m.   Meet Tony Award­winning playwright and opera librettist David Henry Hwang at a public talk, presented in partnership with the St. Louis University Library Associates.     Free

Young Professionals Cocktail Reception Friday, January 26, 5:30 p.m.   Under 45? Join the composer and librettist for a happy hour celebrating the fusion of Asian and Western culture.   $10 includes light appetizers and up to two drinks per person. Learn More

Learn More  

     

The Danny Chen Story

The Music of Huang Ruo

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Saturday, January 27, 1:30 p.m.     Hear the true story of Danny Chen’s life and death and learn how military policies have been shaped as a result of his experiences at a panel event sponsored by St. Louis Public Radio.     Free

Monday, January 29, 7 p.m.   Attend a talk by Huang Ruo, one of today’s most innovative young composers, and enjoy a first listen to music from An American Soldier as you hear about his creative process in setting this story to music.   Free

Learn More Learn More

 

An American Soldier is made possible in part by the Fred M. Saigh Endowment at Opera Theatre and by the Sally S. Levy Family Fund for New Works, which provides support for contemporary opera and related community engagement activities.   Leadership support comes from the Whitaker Foundation, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Berges Family Foundation, and the Ferring Family Foundation, and with an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. A generous endowment gift from the late Pris McDonnell supports composer and librettist residencies.  

   

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE AND REHEARSAL SPACE    Sally S. Levy Opera Center   210 Hazel Ave   St. Louis, MO 63119   (314) 961­0171   GET DIRECTIONS  

MAIN PERFORMANCE LOCATION   BOX OFFICE   Loretto­Hilton Center   130 Edgar Road (at Big Bend)   St. Louis, MO 63119   (314) 961­0644 GET DIRECTIONS  

Opera Theatre promotes diversity and inclusiveness and affirms its ADA compliance.    You are receiving this email as a free service of Opera Theatre of Saint Louis.   If you would prefer not to receive periodic emails like this one from us then simply click here to unsubscribe.   

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


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Sycorax's Daughters

~ Edited by Kinitra Brooks, PhD, Linda D. Addison, Susana Morris, PhD. Forward by: Walidah Imarisha

A powerful, revealing anthology of dark fiction and poetry by Black women writers. The tales of what scares, threatens and shocks them will enlighten and entertain you. Sycorax’s Daughters’ stories and poems delve into demons and shape shifters from Carole McDonnell’s “How to Speak to the Bogeyman” and Sheree Renée Thomas’ “Tree of the Forest Seven Bells Turns the World Round Midnight” to far future offerings from Kiini Ibura Salaam’s “The Malady of Need”, Valjeanne Jeffers’ steampunk female detective in “Mona Livelong: Paranormal Detective II” and others. These thought-provoking twenty-eight stories and fourteen poems cover creatures imagined— vampires, ghosts, and mermaids, as well as the unexpected price paid by women struggling for freedom and validation in the past—slavery to science-fiction futures with transhumans and alternate realities. Leave the lights on and join these amazing authors as they share their unique vision of fear. Tiffany Austin - Tracey Baptiste - Regina N. Bradley - Patricia E. Canterbury - Crystal Connor - Joy M. Copeland - Amber Doe - Tish Jackson - Valjeanne Jeffers - Tenea D. Johnson - R. J. Joseph - A. D. Koboah Nicole Givens Kurtz - Kai Leakes - A. J. Locke - Carole McDonnell - Dana T. McKnight - LH Moore - L. Penelope - Zin E. Rocklyn - Eden Royce - Kiini Ibura Salaam - Andrea Vocab Sanderson - Nicole D. Sconiers - Cherene Sherrard - RaShell R. Smith-Spears - Sheree Renée Thomas - Lori Titus - Tanesha Nicole Tyler - Deborah Elizabeth Whaley - L. Marie Wood - K. Ceres Wright - Deana Zhollis

Review:

Sycorax's Daughters introduces us to a whole new legion of gothic writers. Their stories drip with history and blood leaving us with searing images and a chill emanating from shadows gathered in the corner. This anthology is historic in its recognition of women of color writers in a genre that usually doesn't know what to do with us.

- Jewelle Gomez, author The Gilda Stories

About the Editors: Kinitra D. Brooks, Ph.D. is an associate professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio. Her research interests include contemporary African American and Afro-Caribbean, black feminism, and horror studies. Linda D. Addison grew up in Philadelphia and received a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Carnegie-Mellon University. She is the award-winning author of four collections including How To Recognize A Demon Has Become Your Friend. She is the first African-American recipient of the HWA Bram Stoker Award® and has published over 300 poems, stories and articles. SUSANA M. MORRIS, PhD. is an associate professor of African American literature at Auburn University and co-founder of the popular feminist blog, The Crunk Feminist Collective. Sycorax's Daughters is available for Preorder on Amazon until March 10. Follow this link. http://amzn.to/2lsxgz3 ~~ Rochon Perry Publisher, Cedar Grove Publishing website: www.cedargrovebooks.com twitter.com/cedargrovebooks facebook.com/cedargrovepublishing

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Volume 4.10 January 28, 2018


OPPORTUNITIES

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CAREERS


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Over 30 Issues Published

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Arts Today vol 4 10  

Featured Creatives rule this issue...Take a look inside.

Arts Today vol 4 10  

Featured Creatives rule this issue...Take a look inside.

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