Initium Novum, Novum / Caput, Novum Initium

Page 1





Initium Novum ⇋ Novum Caput ⇋ Novum Initium

by appointment: Suite 744, 2 Old Brompton Road, London sw7 3dq, uk 32, Rue Ernest Allard, 1000, Brussels, belgium Mobile : + 44 [0] 7768236921 Email : enquiries@finch-and-co.co.uk Website : www.finchandco.art



1

A Large Byzantine Carved Marble Figure of an Apostle



2

Rare Polychrome Wall Fresco



3 L. S. Lowry 1920


4 A Rare and Large Sailors Scrimshaw Pan-Bone Plaque Engraved with Two Maritime Whaling Scenes



5 Fine Luba-Hemba Headrest with a Caryatid Female Support



6

A Rare Singhalo-Portuguese Ivory Corpus Christi



7 Exceptional Vinaigrette Pendant Attributed to Fortunato Pio Castellani In the shape of a Ancient Roman Oil Lamp


8

A Fine Spanish Silver Gold, Enamel and Diamond Set Pendant Depicting Mary and the Christ Child


9 Celtic Sandstone Head with Bared Teeth



10

A Fine and Large Quartz Crystal and Specimen Mineral Tower



11

Small Russian Tula Steel Dressing Table Tazza


12

A Fine Gold Mounted Agate Seal in Shagreen Case


13 Geometric Kuba Headrest


14

An Old Dry South African Headrest


15

A Chart of Universal History by F Needham, fecit Anno 1838 Housed within a Satinwood Box





16

Rare Pair of Tortoiseshell Roundels Attributed to Thomas Compigné



17 A Collection of Seven Flint Blade Cores Motte de Beurre




18

Watercolour Scale Drawing of a Ships Hull in Dock


19 Finely Carved Sword or Dagger Handle


20

An Ivory Handled Knife Initialled C S and Dated 1638



21

Two Fine Fijian Tabua


22

A Fine Palais Royale Ormolu Mounted Jewellery Box


23 Unusual Polished Steel Figure of Napoleon



24 The Thigh Bone of an Elephant



25 A Rare Jamaican Specimen Box


26

Fine Elongated Celtic Head from a Shrine




27 Fine Portrait Miniature of Georgina Latour by Mrs Mee



28

Fine Renaissance Bronze Model of a Toad


29 An Arctic Bering Sea Yupik Eskimo Walrus Ivory Attachment in the Form of a Seal Head


30 Inuit Walrus Ivory Polar Bear Head Whistle



31 Two Very Rare Amber Handled Knives Depicting Charles I and Queen Consort Henrietta Maria



32 Two Celtic Bronze Torcs


33 Graham Sutherland Untitled Miners in Two Tunnels




34 A Fine Large Pair of Hornbill Ear Pendants Anggang Gading


35 A Fine and Large Late Renaissance Turned Standing Rhinoceros Horn and Ivory Cup and Cover




36 An Impressive Large Chinese Chess or Games Board


37 Very Rare Hawaiian Black Seed Bead and Whale Tooth Necklace Lei Niho Palaoa




38 Fine Pair of Boxwood Portrait Roundels


39 Fine Pair of Hornbill Ear Pendants in the Form of the Aso-Aso Mythical Dragon-Dog


40

A Fine and Old Shona Headrest


41 Twenty One Pre-Columbian Mexican Aztec Texcoco Obsidian Spear and Arrow Head Scrapers Blades and Blade Cores


42

Fine Wedjat Eye Amulet


43 A Folk Art Carved Wood Walking Cane the Handle with a Large Figure of an Afro-American Gentleman


44 Heart Shaped Silver Mounted Wood Gun Powder or Priming Flask with Ivory Finial



45 An Exceptional Large Specimen of a Pacific Arctic Walrus Skull Complete with Tusks Odobenus Rosmarus


46 Fine Fijian Sperm Whale Tooth Breast Ornament Tabua


47 A Fine Marquesas Islands Boars-Tusk / Tooth Ear Pendant Ha‘akai with Three Tiki Figures


48 A Fine English Knife and Fork Dated 1701


49 Rare Travelling Fork and Three Knife Set


50

Set of Six Grand Tour Ivory Plaques of Roman Emperors



51 A Medieval English Carved Limestone Column Capital with Four Symmetrical Carved Heads



52 Collection of Four Large Baltic Amber Specimens


53 A Rare Example of a Carved Walnut Bracciale used for Pallone Col Bracciale



54 Fine Large and Rare Inuit Amulet of a Seal


55 A Rare Russian Tula Steel and Gilded Pin Cushion / Sewing Clamp


56 Fine Steel Framed Miniature Dressing Table Mirror with Pin Cushion



57 A Fine Roman Marble Torso of Doryphoros


58 An Unusual English Cut-Paper Model of a Font




59 Italian Baroque Ivory of Christ Crucified Attributed to Giovanni Antonio Gualterio (active Rome 1582–1620)


60

Two Unusual Netherlands Bronze Brass Swan Collars


61

A Very Rare and Finely Executed Oval Picque Cloak or Robe Brush


62

Graham Sutherland Tin Mine: Miner Resting in a Wall Cavity 1942



63 British Guiana War Club with Original Binding


64 A Large Kiribati Island Fish Hook


65 An Exceptional Rock Crystal Gold Mounted Oval Reliquary


66

A Large and Rare Double Sided Traveling Reliquary Case



67 Limestone Head of a Green Man


68

Ancient Bering Straight Eskimo Carved Walrus Ivory Drag Handle Depicting a Transformative Half ManPolar Bear


69 A Pair of Indian Ivory Padukas



70 Rare Russian Tula Steel Toast Rack


71 Japanese Book Study of The Art of Hawking


72 Mongolian Chinese Golden Altai Eagle Hunting Bonnet

73 Gold Falconer’s Call or Whistle with Pendant Loop



74 Carved Narwhal Relief from a Nef


75 A Large Gold Mounted Coral Signet Ring Depicting Leda and The Swan


76 View of Richmond Hill from the River Thames at Ham House


77 Large and Fine Hornbill Carved with a Demon Headed Figure Displaying Bulging Eyes and Long Fangs


78 Large and Fine Hornbill Carved with a Aso-Aso Mythical Dragon-Dog



79

An After the Antique Marble Portrait Bust of Cicero


80

Rare Australian Scrimshaw Pan-Bone Plaque 1880




81

Ben Nicholson Untitled Relief 1979



82

A Large Pair of Lead Figures of Scaramouche and Pantalone Attributed to John Cheere Circa 1755


1

A Fine and Large Byzantine Carved Marble Figure of an Apostle Sculpted from a Roman Marble Lintel The standing figure holding a book under his left arm with his weight also on his left leg, clothed in a full length tunic, tied above his navel.The protruding feet shown wearing sandals of a very simple leather cross design. The figure has been carved almost in the round however the exposed reverse reveals a Roman horizontal lintel with geometric carved design Marble Italy 9th–11th Century ad s i z e: 98 cm high, 36 cm wide, 19 cm deep – 38½ ins high, 14¹⁄₈ ins wide, 7½ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private Dutch collection, 1990’s Ex Private UK collection The Byzantine Empire, or Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantium), was a continuation of the Roman Empire, with its capital in Constantinople. The re-use of ancient Roman marble, especially architectural fragments, was a standard practice in many cultures, marble was an expensive material to obtain, thus re-carving a larger architectural fragment was both a practical and economic exercise. The present figure probably stood with a group of Apostles within a shrine or early Byzantine Church.

2

A Rare Polychrome Wall Fresco The fresco painted with five

Bodhisattvas standing amidst swirling clouds, each immortal with an aureole surrounding their heads, with long flowing robes Fresco, Plaster, Polychrome Wood Frame Ming Dynasty / 1368–1644 China s i z e: 29 cm high, 41 cm wide – 11³⁄₈ ins high, 16¹⁄₈ ins wide p rov e na nc e: Ex Seward Kennedy collection, 1970’s London Ex Private English collection

3 L. S. Lowry (1887–1976) Head of a Man Pencil on paper Signed and dated 1920 England / 1920 s i z e: 20 cm high, 20 cm wide – 8 ins high, 8 ins wide

repair to the reverse Anglo-American Early 19th Century s i z e: 17 cm high, 41 cm wide – 6¾ ins high, 16 ins wide p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: For two other large pan-bone scrimshaw plaques Finch and Co item no. 3, catalogue number 25, Winter 2015 and item no. 12, catalogue number 37, Winter 2021 The large flat thin slabs of panbone taken from a section at the rear of the sperm whale’s jaw were large enough to provide this panel and were a good surface on which the scrimshander could engrave whaling or whale related scenes. Except for the teeth, panbone was the favourite part of the sperm whale to scrimshand. Ship portraiture began in about 1800 and the portrayal of a ship and its gear was nearly always accurate for the scrimshanders knew their vessels exceedingly well after many long months at sea searching for their quarry.

4 A Rare and Large Sailors Scrimshaw Pan-Bone Plaque Engraved with Two Maritime Whaling Scenes of a Full Rigged Whaling Ship, a whaleboat with a full crew rowing in choppy waters, another scene close to the shoreline, depicting a hill fort on the escarpment The delicately engraved sky with unusual cloud formations and a crescent moon. Unusually divided into two halves, replicating an open book. The whole within a border of anchors, crossed swords, entwined hearts, foliage and canons. Old mellow colour with fine patina, an old horizontal break showing a Victorian

5 A Fine Luba-Hemba Headrest with a Caryatid Female Support Fine glossy patina, aged crack to base Wood Democratic Republic of Congo 19th Century / Early 20th Century s i z e: 14.5 cm high, 13.5 cm wide, 10 cm deep – 5¾ ins high, 5¼ ins wide, 4 ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 236, vol 2, EVV collection catalogue 2014 Purchased Parcours des Mondes, September 2014 Ex Private collection, Liége


6

A Rare and Large SinghaloPortuguese Ivory Corpus Christi Christo Morto Ivory Sri Lanka Late 16th / Early 17th Century / Circa 1600 s i z e: 33 cm high, 29 cm wide – 13 ins high, 11³⁄₈ ins wide / 37.5 cm high – 14¾ ins high (with base) The Portuguese occupied Ceylon (Sri Lanka) from 1505 until 1658. Similar to what happened in the Indian subcontinent or the Philippines, they commissioned local ivory carvers to sculpt christian statues and biblical scenes according to European models. These artefacts were then sold to monasteries, churches or wealthy laymen on the continent. Because of its scarcity ivory was utmost expensive and within that specific artistic trade, the ivory carvings from Ceylon were considered the most refined and were the most sought after. This corpus is a dazzling example of this craftmanship and artistic creativity: the elegance and fragile refinement are superb. Not only did the artist give extreme attention to anatomic details (ribs, toes, tendons of fingers and knees… ) but also the gracious facial expression make this artefact a unique and valuable object.

7 An Exceptionally Fine Vinaigrette / Pendant Attributed to Fortunato Pio Castellani (1794–1865) The pendant in the form of an

Ancient Roman Oil Lamp Gold, Enamel, Human Hair Italy / Circa 1860 s i z e: 1 cm high, 1.7 cm wide, 2.5 cm deep (without loop) ³⁄₈ ins high, 4⁄₈ ins wide, 1 ins deep (without loop) s e e: For an identical example in the Royal Collection, see: RCIN 65268, given to Queen Victoria by Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, 4th December 1862, in memory of his father’s, Prince Consort’s death anniversary, 14th December 1861 In the 19th century, one of the most famous jewellers that defined European trends was Fortunato Pio Castellani. Born in 1794, Castellani began work as a master goldsmith in his father’s workshop before opening his own shop in Rome in 1814. Then, in the 1850’s, he began attracting attention for being a leading figure in what was called the classical revival, the surging interest in old-style Grecian jewellery techniques. While jewellers up until that point often did not pay too much attention to history, doubting the relevance of long-gone fashions to the present-day, Castellani and his two sons, who joined him in his workshop, were fascinated with ancient jewellery techniques and sought to apply them to their own work. Castellani’s Estrucan-inspired designs became all the rage across Italy, France, and England. His workshop was often visited by members of the aristocracy. Fashionable women wore their bracelets and fringed necklaces in Greek style, brooches with Latin and Greek inscriptions and oakleaved diadems. His workshop, by that point under the direction of his sons Alessandra and Augusto, became involved in helping the trade of antiquities, sponsoring excavations and restoring artefacts.

8

A Fine Spanish Baroque Set Pendant Depicting Mary and the Christ Child in Polychrome Decoration Silver, Gold, Enamel and Diamonds Spain / Late 17th Century s i z e: 4.5 cm high, 2.5 cm wide, 0.8 cm deep – 1¾ ins high, 1 ins wide, ²⁄₈ ins deep

9 A Fine Celtic Sandstone Head with Bared Teeth The oval eyes with drilled pupils England / 200–300 a d s i z e: 20.5 cm high, 16 cm wide, 25 cm deep – 8 ins high, 6¼ ins wide, 97⁄₈ ins deep / 28.5 cm high – 11¼ ins high (with base) The Celts had a predilection for the human head. The tete coupée of the Celts like that of the Gorgon or Medusa of the Mediterranean had apotropaic powers and fulfilled the function of averting evil, and of conferring protection on the building into which they were incorporated. Celtic heads were often associated with springs and thermal waters as was the Roman image of Medusa and thus native Celtic symbolism became acceptable to the conquering Romans as the deeply indigenous cult of the head was comfortably masked under the image of Medusa. The best known of these vigorous male images and typical of many Romano British heads is the head carved on the shield of


the goddess Sulis, equated with Minerva, on the pediment of the temple of Sulis in Bath.

10

A Fine and Large Quartz Crystal and Specimen Mineral Tower Old paper label London housed under the original glass dome Minerals, Wood, Glass England / 19th Century s i z e: 47 cm high, 29 cm wide, 18 cm deep – 18½ ins high, 11½ ins wide, 7 ins deep Rock crystal is regarded as a semiprecious stone, an elite mineral and has always been in demand from craftsmen to cut and carve into faceted stones and beads and objects ranging from handles to chandeliers. The art of carving and engraving rock crystal has been well developed as the material lends itself especially well to this treatment. For centuries the stone and gem cutters of India, China and Europe have been carving superb objects from rock crystal. In the 9th and 10th centuries the Island of Madagascar supplied the mineral, however for the last 100 years Brazil has been the best source with individual crystals weighing up to 25 tons being found there.

11

A Small Russian Tula Steel Dressing Table Tazza The circular concave bowl, with a border of cut steel facets, raised upon a central turned stem centred by a cut steel border and heavy steel square foot

Steel Russia / Late 18th Century / Early 19th Century s i z e: 10.5 cm high, 9 cm dia. – 4¹⁄₈ ins high, 3½ ins dia. p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: For a Russian Tula steel gold and silver mounted pocket snuV box, Finch and Co item no. 52, catalogue number 25, Winter 2015 The Tula arms factory was founded in 1712 as Russia’s protracted war with Sweden caused the transference to Tula of the experienced master craftsmen from the Moscow armoury. The factory continued to fulfil state orders for arms, but gradually they became employed in the manufacture of luxury goods. Catherine the Great frequently gave gifts of Tula work to foreign representatives and diplomats praising the combination of blued steel with gold and gilt metal. As they were mainly intended for the Palaces of European Royalty these articles were extraordinarily expensive.

12

A Fine Gold Mounted Agate Seal Housed in its Original Shagreen Case The agate Seal with an Intaglio Head of a Classical Philosopher Agate, Gold, Shagreen England / Early 19th Century s i z e: 8.8 cm high – 3½ ins high / case: 2 cm high, 9.5 cm wide, 2.5 cm deep – ¾ ins high, 3¾ ins wide, 1 ins deep

13 A Fine Geometric Kuba Headrest with Brass Studs Old dry patina to underside and supports with a deeper colour and patina through use to the upper section Wood Democratic Republic of Congo Late 19th Century s i z e: 14 cm high, 22.5 cm wide, 8 cm deep – 5½ ins high, 8¾ ins wide, 3¹⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh

14 A Fine Old Dry South African Headrest Shona / Tsonga The two lugs to the underside with animal (Giraffe ?) hair and glass beads attached The X section divided by an horizontal barrel Old dry patina, a deeper colour to the extremities of the upper surface Wood, hair, glass beads South Africa / 19th Century s i z e: 14 cm high, 17 cm wide, 9.5 cm deep – 5½ ins high, 6¾ ins wide, 3¾ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 205, vol 2, EVV collection catalogue 2014 Purchased Colin Gross, Portobello Road, London 1970’s The carvers of South African headrests were always male, but not necessarily specialist craftsmen. As H.P Junod states many carved their own sticks, spoons, snuff boxes, and above all wooden pillows or headrests (H.P Junod The Arts and Crafts of North Eastern Tribes of South Africa. 1958 pg. 77) Headrests were personal items for private use and were not made


for public display. They were not indicators of status or rank, or used at communal events, but over time would become one with their owner, changing with their life as they became imbued with their spirit and were oiled and polished by their owners hair and body. The headrest was therefore regarded as an integral part of its owner and upon death was often buried with him.

15 A Superb Long Scroll Entitled A Chart of Universal History The rolled chart extends to a very long length attached to two handles with the unrolled chart starting at 4000 bc with Adam, Cain and Abel culminating in the year 1838, although the chart continues up to the year 2000 a d as a blank Housed within the original Satinwood Red Baize Lined Box Fine overall condition, retaining its strong original colour Paper, Cotton, Silk, Watercolour, Ink, Wood, Satinwood, Key A stamp to the reverse for: Malcomlson and Son, Portlaw (Portlaw is in the county of Wexford, the Macolmson family, Irish Quakers, were Corn and Cotton Magnates, their family home was Mayfield House) Ireland / Circa 1838 ad s i z e: approx: 43.5 cm high – 17¹⁄₈ ins high / 57 cm high – 22³⁄₈ ins high (with handles) Approx: 680 cm long – 267¾ long / 6.8 meters long – 22 feet long Case: 9.5 cm high, 60 cm wide, 18.5 cm deep – 3¾ ins high, 235⁄₈ ins wide, 7¼ ins deep The fascinating, unique history of the world signed and dated F Needham ‘fecit’ Anno 1838,

oVers the viewer a continuous trip throughout the ages of man, the ages of the world, and those cultures which sprang up and declined over the millennia. Starting at 4000 bc, moving quickly onto The Flood between the years 2348–2347 bc and moving through countless cultures and periods of time. Painted in watercolour with ink annotations along the entire length, the dates give a glimpse into the artist’s view upon the world and their personal insight into when the world sprang into life and takes the viewer on a journey up to 1838. Near to the end of the scroll, a delightful passage of time has been left blank presumably for future generations to fill in over time. However the scroll, gleaned from its wonderful original condition, must have been locked away for many generations, and thus was never completed. The Victorian age and early 20th century, those technical advancements, trains, planes and automobiles, various world wars, moving into the computer age can now all be left to the modern-day viewer’s own imagination. Viewing the scroll in its entirety can now give one hope for the future, the world and civilisation are now twenty two years past the final date on the scroll, the year 2000 !

16

A Rare Pair of Capriccios Tortoiseshell Roundels Attributed to Thomas Compigné Two-tone gold leaf and silver over a pressed tortoiseshell roundel and within the original pressed frames France Late 18th Century / Circa 1775 s i z e: 8 cm dia. – 3¹⁄₈ ins dia. / 10.5 cm dia. – 4¹⁄₈ ins dia. (framed)

Thomas Compigne was based in the Rue Grenetta at the Roi David. His speciality was exquisite pictures of country houses, townscapes and landscapes. His exquisite roundels executed in gouache, silver and gold on a pewter, card or tortoiseshell ground, were much admired and sought after by the rich cognoscenti of the day.

17 A Collection of Seven Neolithic Prepared Flint Blade Cores known as Motte de Beurre One with old ink inscription La Guerche Flint France, Abilly, Loire Valley Neolithic Stone Age / 8500 – 4500 b c s i z e: min: 15.5 cm high – 6¹⁄₈ ins high / max: 29 cm high, 11³⁄₈ ins high p rov e na nc e: Ex Finch and Co Ex Private London collection These flint blade cores are unmistakable for their rich butter yellow colour hence the term motte de beurre. Large flint knives were struck from these cores known as Livres du Beurre and can be up to 12 inches long. During the Neolithic period flint mines were dug at Le Grand – Pressigny in the southern Touraine and from here the flint cores were traded into Switzerland and beyond, being used as a form of currency. These massive cores of flint are thus both banks, and blanks from which all the many and various flake tools were struck that were used for spears, daggers, knives, scrapers and skinning tools. The flint has been sculpted with the shape of the tools last fashioned from it.


18

Watercolour Scale Drawing of a Ships Hull in Dock Entitled: Coupe sur la Largeur d’un Dock / Cut across the width of a Dock An old inscription to the reverse reading: (?) il dessin à la gouache des Docks de Dieppe projet de m. Lapeyre ing. en chef, en 1794 / (?) the drawing in gouache of the dockyards in Dieppe project of Mr Lapeyre engineer in chief, in 1794 Watercolour on Paper France / Late 18th Century s i z e: 37 cm high, 31.5 cm wide – 13½ ins high, 12¼ ins wide / 43 cm high, 37.5 cm wide – 17 ins high, 14¾ ins wide (framed)

19 A Finely Carved Sword or Dagger Handle with a Female Head Two Grimacing Faces Flanked by Two Kneeling Naked Figures A cartouche or shield with cross hatched design with a military trophy; swords, flags and spears behind Ivory, old metal repair, fine colour and patina from use France or Italy Late 17th / Early 18th Century s i z e: 13.5 cm long, 3.5 cm wide, 3 cm deep – 5³⁄₈ ins long, 1³⁄₈ ins wide, 1¼ ins deep

20

An Ivory Handled Knife Dated 1638 and Initialled C S Engraved with a depiction of St Matthias and to the opposing side a figure of an elegant Gentleman holding aloft a Goblet Steel, gilt, ivory France / 1638 s i z e: 22 cm long – 85⁄₈ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection

s e e: For a similar knife, no. 173, Eight Centuries of European Knives, Forks, and Spoons, an Art Collection; Klaus Marquardt, Arnoldsche Art Publishers, 1997, from the first half of the 17th Century

21

Two Fine Fijian Tabua Both with old collection auction labels One tabua with mellow yellow colour and fine patina, the other example of a whiter natural colour, both with good colour from wear and use Whale-Tooth Fiji / Early 19th Century s i z e: 13.5 cm long, 4.5 cm wide, 3.5 cm deep – 5³⁄₈ ins long, 1¾ ins wide, 1³⁄₈ ins deep and 14.5 cm long, 4.5 cm wide, 3.5 cm deep – 55⁄₈ ins long, 1¾ ins wide, 1³⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Stoneleigh Abbey Preservation Trust Ltd. Christies, London, Tribal Art, 10th November 1981, lot 295 Ex Private collection c f: Christies auction catalogue notes: Oceanic material from The Musuem at Stoneleigh Abbey appears to have been collected by William Henry, 2nd Baron Leigh (1824–1905) and his son, Francis Dudley, 3rd Baron Leigh (1855–1938) c i t e s: certificate no’s. 608695/01 and 608695/02 On the islands of Fiji in Western Polynesia sperm whale ivory was highly valued and culturally important. The presentation tabua may be considered as the ultimate talisman of Fiji. It is the repository of great mana whose importance is enhanced according to the chiefliness and status of the individual presenting it.

22

A French Palais Royale Ormolu Mounted Mother of Pearl Box A jewellery or trinket box, the lid inset with a painted gouache of a townscape entitled Ansicht von Wien and signed Wigand Mother of Pearl, Ormolu, Gouache, Glass France / Early 19th Century s i z e: 4 cm high, 13 cm wide, 7.5 cm deep – 1¾ ins high, 5¹⁄₈ ins wide, 3 ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Finch and Co, item no. 18a, catalogue number 19, Summer 2012 Originally made in the workshops of the Palace of the Duc d’ Orleans in Paris, these mother of pearl luxury articles became popular with fashionable Parisian society. This example of a Palais Royale box with a painted picturesque Viennese view was most probably made for the Austrian market and is a fine example of the grand tour souvenirs brought home by the aristocratic tourists of the day.

23 An Unusual Large Polished Steel Figure of Napoleon (1769–1821) The heavy steel figure standing in Military attire with sword by his side Steel France / England 19th Century / dated 1849 s i z e: 26.5 cm high – 10³⁄₈ ins high / base: 8 cm x 8 cm sq. – 3¹⁄₈ ins sq. x 3¹⁄₈ ins sq. p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection The naivety of the sculpture would suggest a provincial manufacturer of steel and possibly made as an apprentice piece.


24 The Thigh Bone of an Elephant Superb Colour and Patina Bone Africa / 17th–18th Century s i z e: approx 95 cm long – 37³⁄₈ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private UK collection / Ex Finch and Co Ex Peter Petrou Ltd. Ex Oliver Hoare Ltd. Ex Private collection c f: This impressive very old elephant femur bone reputedly once belonged to Charles Wilson Peale (1741–1827) Artist, Soldier, Scientist, Inventor, Politician and Naturalist, and can be seen proudly propped beside him in his selfportrait of 1822, entitled The Artist in His Museum now on display at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts in Philadelphia, USA.

25 A Rare West-Indian Marquetry Specimen Work or Sewing Box Attributed to Ralph Turnbull or James Pitkin An interior lift out tray housing a number of lidded compartments Specimen Woods, Metal, Key Jamaica Kingston / Circa 1835–40 s i z e: 11.5 cm high, 31.5 cm wide, 24 cm deep – 4½ ins high, 12½ ins wide, 9½ ins deep Ralph Turnbull, a Scottish immigrant to the islands, was probably the best known makers among several other cabinet makers of repute in Jamaica during the early to mid 19th century. He arrived on the island with his two brothers in around 1815. Mostly famed for their exclusive use of exotic local timbers including: bitterwood, logwood, wild olive, candlewood, coffee and prickly yellow.

26

A Fine Elongated Celtic Head from a Shrine An indentation to the crown of the head for divination and oVerings Limestone England 1st Century bc to 1st Century a d s i z e: 39 cm high, 13 cm wide, 16.5 cm deep – 15³⁄₈ ins high, 5¹⁄₈ ins wide, 6½ ins deep / 44 cm high – 17¼ ins high (with base) p rov e na nc e: Ex Private UK collection It is from Roman Britain, under the influences of Roman provincial art that the majority of British Celtic cult heads stem. Heads constitute the most prolific of Romano-Celtic cult objects, and the distribution of the heads found is revealing as they are nearly always from the north of England, often in the regions near Hadrian’s Wall. In an area that was so turbulent and open to attack it is not surprising that the cult of the human head became so prominent.

27 A Fine Portrait Miniature on Ivory of Georgina Latour by Mrs Mee (about 1770–1851) Inscribed on paper to the reverse in an early 19th century hand: Georgina Latour. Born daughter of Joseph Francis Louis Latour Esquire of Heuchstone Park, Bedfordshire – partner in Coutts’ Bank. 1796–1868 Married – Edward Marjoribanks of Ewden and Greenlands, county of Buckinghamshire – partner in Coutts’ Bank. Fourth son of Edward Marjoribanks of Hallyards and Lees – 1808

Died – April 1849 Painted by Mrs Mee 1808 Oil on ivory, original gilt frame English Circa 1808 s i z e: 10 cm high, 7.5 cm wide – 4 ins high, 3 ins wide / 23.8 cm high, 21.5 cm wide – 9³⁄₈ ins high, 8½ ins wide (framed) p rov e na nc e: Finch and Co, item no. 60, catalogue number 11, 2007 Ex Private Belgian collection Mrs Anne Mee was born Anne Foldsone, the daughter of John Foldsone who earned a living as a picture copyist in Oxford Market, London. It is said that at an early age she helped her father by mixing his paints and preparing his canvases for him and that at twelve years of age she was a pupil of the portrait painter George Romney. However, when her father died in 1784 she was obliged to leave the French ladies school in Westminster where she had shown an aptitude for music, poetry and painting and earn a living in order to support her mother and eight brothers and sisters. Her portrait painting became much admired and she had no difficulty in obtaining a distinguished clientele, and under their patronage she consequently came to the notice of George IV. From 1790–1791 she worked at Windsor Castle and a number of her miniatures remain in the Royal collection. By this time she was said to be so much in demand that it was not advisable to pay for a miniature in advance! Indeed, by 1804 she was charging forty guineas for a single portrait. In 1793 she married Joseph Mee of Mount Anna, County Armagh by whom she had six children by the time she was thirty-three. Mrs Mee did not abandon her profession upon her marriage


despite the fact that her barrister husband forbade her to paint the portrait of any man. So great was his jealousy that he decreed ladies only and that they were not to be accompanied into the studio by gentlemen. She exhibited at the Royal Academy from 1804–1837 and in 1814 completed an important commission for George IV to paint a series of large miniature portraits of fashionable court beauties. She died at the great age of 81 in Hammersmith on 28th may 1851. Although she was a pupil and protégé of Romney there is a trace of Cosway in her technique, which was sometimes lacking in draftsmanship. Her work can be of an uneven quality and varies a great deal. However, this miniature is a particularly fine example of her work.

had intellectual appeal as natural specimens and were often destined for the Wunderkammer of scholarly collectors.

29 A Fine Yupik Eskimo Attachment in the Form of a Seal Head with Baleen Inlaid Eyes Fine colour and patina, through use Walrus Ivory, Baleen Bering Strait Late 18th / Early 19th Century s i z e: 3 cm high, 2 cm wide, 4 cm deep – 1¼ ins high, ¾ ins wide, 1½ ins deep / 3.5 cm high – 1³⁄₈ ins high (on base) s e e: For other fasteners and attachments Finch and Co, item no. 12, catalogue number 28, Summer 2017 and item no. 52, catalogue number 35, Winter 2020

30 28

Fine Renaissance Bronze Model of a Toad Superb dark brown colour and patina Bronze Italy Padua / 16th Century s i z e: 5 cm high, 7.5 cm wide, 9.5 cm deep – 2 ins high, 3 ins wide, 3¾ ins deep c f: For a similar Toad with a toad balanced on its back, see Samuel H. Dress collection, National Gallery of Art, Washington, accession number: 1957.14.88 In the 16th century, Padua was at the centre of scientific exploration. A famous university town, there was also an abundance of workshops producing small bronzes of crustaceans, shells, small reptiles and amphibians, which were sometimes cast from nature, these

An Inuit Walrus Ivory Polar Bear Head Whistle Fine glossy patina and mellow colour, worn from use Walrus Ivory Inuit / Late 19th Century s i z e: 2.5 cm high, 5.5 cm deep, 3.4 cm wide – 1 ins high, 2¹⁄₈ ins deep, 1³⁄₈ ins wide Probably made by the Inuit at the turn of the 19th century for sale or trade with the shipping fleet traveling along the coast. The size and form of the whistle resembles that which was being used by commercial shipping fleets which in turn had continued the tradition of a boatswain whistle or call (bosun’s)

31 Two Very Rare Amber Handled Knives Depicting Charles I and

Queen Consort Henrietta Maria Amber, silver gilt, silver, steel, leather Original leather case (with a 19th century replacement lid) German Königsberg 17th Century / Circa 1630 s i z e: knives: 21.7 cm long – 8½ ins long / case: 24.8 cm long – 9¾ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: Finch and Co item no. 28 c, catalogue number 30, Summer, 2018 for an amber portrait bust eating knife The Baltic region produced a steady supply of fine quality amber, with a number of centres concentrating on the production of amber related works of art, from large caskets, to cutlery and small oval portraits. Many items were intended for an export market as surely the two knives we have depicting Charles I (1600–1649) and Queen Consort Henrietta Maria (1609–1669) were made for the English market. The handles of eating knives became much more elegant and decorative in the 17th century and changes to the shape of the blade occurred when eating habits dictated it was no longer necessary to spike food with a knife, so the blade became shorter with the sharp point removed. As dining ceremony and cuisine changed so did the nature, provision and use of cutlery whether it was for the display of largesse and power, the cementing of political or business affinities or the enjoyment of the company and conversation of friends. During the 16th century cutlery was used at table for serving food rather than for eating it. However, during the next century this began to be superseded once the use of forks became the fashion.


32 Two Celtic Bronze Torcs Fine ancient colour and patina Old labels: Cemetrie Juni Ville Coll. Fou(r ?)cait and W. try (?) les Reims Coll Paoulzin (?) Europe Late Bronze Age / 800–600 b c s i z e: approx: 14 cm dia. – 5½ ins dia. and 13.5 cm dia. – 5¼ ins dia. p rov e na nc e: Tetragon, London 1980’s Ex Private English collection The torc or neck-ring is often regarded as the principal and iconic piece of jewellery manufactured and used by the Celts. Classical writers mention torcs being worn by naked Celtic warriors in battle, but those found in graves occur only around the necks of women or girls. Torcs were also worn by women around the upper arm and sometimes around the waist. Torcs had a symbolic value as indicators of the social standing of the owner and were also valued for their precise metal content, providing the Iron Age Celts with a dual purpose object. However, the torcs that occur in hoards were most probably not used as prestigious jewellery, but only as ritual currency on special ceremonial occasions.

33 Graham Sutherland (1903–1980) Untitled Miners in Two Tunnels Pencil, pen and ink, chalk and wash on paper England / 1940–1945 s i z e: 16.5 cm high, 23.5 cm wide – 6½ ins high, 9¼ ins wide

e x h i b i t e d: Graham Sutherland From Darkness to Light, Penlee House and Museum, Penzance, 14th September–23rd November 2013 l i t e r at u r e: Graham Sutherland, From Darkness into Light, Penlee House and Museum, Penzance, Paul Gough, Sanson and Company, 2013, illustration in colour, pg. 25

34 A Fine Large Pair of Hornbill Ear Pendants Anggang Gading One depicting the Osa-Osa Mythical Dragon-Dog the other with a Large Figural Demon Headed Figure Kalimantan Borneo 19th Century s i z e: 10.4 cm high, 5.1 cm wide – 4¹⁄₈ ins high, 2 ins wide and 9.8 cm high, 5.3 cm wide – 37⁄₈ ins high, 2¹⁄₈ ins wide p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Luc Sanders, Dendermonde, Belgium Ex Private collection

35 A Fine and Large Late Renaissance Turned Standing Cup and Cover on Knopped Foot of Impressive Size Old smooth patina, age cracks to foot Rhinoceros Horn and Ivory German / First Half 17th Century s i z e: 33 cm high, 11 cm dia (max) – 13 ins high, 4¼ ins dia. (max) p rov e na nc e: Ex Finch and Co, item number 77, catalogue number 20, Summer 2013 Ex Private collection s e e: Finch and Co item no. 16, catalogue number 34, Summer 2020, for another example, and item no. 57, catalogue number 12,

for a turned rhinoceros horn vessel and item no. 12, catalogue number 9, for three 18th century turned rhinoceros horn vessels c f: A cup and cover of similar shape engraved with the inscription The Exalted Roman Emperor Rudolf II’s Goblet Which Protects Against Poison – The Unconquerable Emperor’s Hand Shaped This Ingenious Goblet D 406.766 / 339 Royal Danish Kunstkammer, Copenhagen, National Museum The Milanese master instructor of turning Giovanni Ambrogio Maggiore visited Bavaria on various occasions between 1574 and 1593 to teach the Duke Wilhelm this newly invented form of art, creating marvellous objects from natural substances. Maggiore also trained the artist Georg Wecker who went on to become in 1578 Dresden’s court turner for life to the Elector Augustus of Saxony. Regarded at the time as a form of advanced mechanical technology, the art of virtuosity turning in ivory, ebony and rhinoceros horn became a princely pastime for Drechselnder souverän. Rhinoceros horn objects were regarded as items of great rarity and prestige in Renaissance Europe, but they had been regarded as objects of great value with inherent magical properties for well over one thousand years before this time in China, and by the early 17th century Chinese cups and vessels of carved rhinoceros horn were being exported to Europe to meet the demand for exotic curiosities for the cabinets of wealthy collectors.

36 An Impressive Large Chinese Wood Chess or Games Board with


Two Scalloped Integral Trays The sixty four squares forming the grid with mother of pearl inlay The entire solid board carved from a huge block of burr wood Fine colour and patina Chinese Elm or Lacebark Elm China Late 18th or Early 19th Century s i z e: 3.5 cm high, 54.5 cm wide, 45 cm deep – 1³⁄₈ ins high, 21½ ins wide, 17¾ ins deep

37 A Very Rare Hawaiian Necklace Consisting of Twenty Black Seed Beads and a Whale Tooth Pendant Lei Niho Palaoa Fine colour and rich patina Whale-Tooth, seed and old blue velvet cord Hawaii / 19th Century s i z e: Pendant: 4.5 cm high – 1¾ ins high / Necklace: approx: 46 cm long – 18 ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection Purchased in a London antique market in the 1970’s s e e: For a Lei Niho Palaoa with braided hair sold by Finch and Co item no.1, catalogue number 22, Summer 2014 c f: For a similar example see; Polynesian Art, Edward Dodd; Robert Hale & Company, London, page 140 Like the crowns of European royalty, hook shaped pendants made from the teeth of sperm whales were worn by Hawaiian Ali’i as marks of noble birth. They served as visual symbols of exalted status and could be worn by persons of high rank of both genders. Lei Niho Palaoa were worn as formal regalia as the 19th century Hawaiian historian David Malo has written: in battle or on occasions of ceremony and display. The name of these pendants

translates as whale tooth necklace which was the preferred material used in the early 19th century when it could only be obtained through the chance strandings of sperm whales as they passed by on their annual migrations. Archaeologists have found other pendants in shell, bone and coral which indicates that it is the distinctive hook shaped form of the pendant, rather than the material, which serves as the symbol of chiefly authority.

Mythical Dragon-Dog Dayak, Kenyah or Kayan Borneo / 19th Century s i z e: 5 cm dia. – 2 ins dia. (max) and 4.5 cm dia. 1¾ ins dia. (max) p rov e na nc e: Ex collection François Coppens, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium Ex Private collection s e e: For a similar earring, Finch and Co item no. 49 c., catalogue number 27, Winter 2016

40 38 A Fine Pair of Boxwood Portrait Roundels After the Bronze Statues surrounding the cenotaph at the Hofkirche Court Church, Innsbruck, Austria Old ink inventory numbers to reverse: 4856 and 4686 (and fragment of old paper collection label) Minor losses, good colour and patina Boxwood Austro / German / 17th Century s i z e: 8.5 cm dia. 2 cm deep (max) – 3¼ ins dia. ¾ ins deep (max) Emperor Maximilian’s Cenotaph is housed in the Hofkirche in Innsbruck, Austria, built in 1553. The cenotaph is surrounded by twenty-eight bronze statues of ancestors, relatives and important historical figures. Created between 1502 and 1555, the sculptors included Peter Vischer the Elder, Hans Leinberger, G. Löfler, Leonhart Magt and Veit Stoẞ. Three of the statues are based on designs by Dürer.

39 Fine Pair of Hornbill Ear Pendants in the Form of the Aso-Aso

A Fine and Old Shona Headrest with Five Central Rings Superb aged crusty and smooth patina Partial old loss to one circle Wood South Africa / 19th Century s i z e: 15 cm high, 22 cm wide, 7.5 cm deep – 6 ins high, 85⁄₈ ins wide, 3 ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 206, vol 2, EVV collection catalogue 2014 Purchased Portobello Road, 1970’s The abstract designs of these Shona headrests evoke the form of a human body. The triangle and circle motifs stretch up the vertical support unites to touch the top where triangles are pierced and run across the smooth dark surface.

41 Twenty One Pre-Columbian Mexican Aztec Texcoco Obsidian Spear and Arrow Heads Scrapers Blades and Blade Cores some with old ink inscribed paper labels variously reading Obsidian Spear Heads and Chips (Volcanic Glass) from Mexico Lent by H Fell Pease Esq. M.P. and Obsidian Arrow Heads San Martin Mexico James


Backhouse and Chips Made in Shaping Arrow and Spear Heads Mexico Obsidian James Backhouse Inscribed on the reverse of a Late 19th Century visiting card for Mrs and Miss Fell Pease 25 Ennismore Gardens S W Obsidian, paper Mexico / Circa 1000–1500 ad s i z e: 16 cm long, 4.5 cm dia. – 6¼ ins long, 1¾ ins dia. p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection / Ex Finch and Co, item no. 15, catalogue number 28, Summer 2018 Ex Private collection The Aztecs developed great skill in fashioning objects from Obsidian, a hard and brittle volcanic glass that is extremely difficult to work. It was used in Mesoamerica from the earliest times by all the various settlements in the Basin of Mexico until the arrival of the Spanish. Obsidian can have grey, green or golden reflections according to type and was obtained by collecting blocks of it on the surface or by mining the large deposits that existed in the area. Regarded as a valuable commodity, obsidian was given to the Aztec capital as a form of tribute by the local communities. To the Aztecs, black obsidian symbolised the night and the cold. The omnipotent god of fate Tezcatlipoca or smoking mirror was associated with the material as one of his attributes was an obsidian divinatory mirror. Later after the Spanish conquest, this god’s association with sacrifice, blood and obsidian drew a parallel between Aztec belief and Christian crucifixion imagery, and obsidian became requested by the Jesuit priests for the making of portable travelling altars which were used as liturgical instruments in their conversion of the indigenous people.

profession, and even to provide satirical social commentary.

42 A Fine Wedjat Eye Amulet Faience, Glaze Egypt / Late Period / 664–332 bc s i z e: 3.5 cm high, 4 cm wide, 0.7 cm deep – 1³⁄₈ ins high, 1½ ins wide, ²⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Foxwell collection, collected pre-1930 Ex Tetragon, London One of the most popular amulets in ancient Egypt, the wedjat eye represents the healed eye of the god, Horus. Depicting a combination of a human and a falcon eye, as Horus was often associated with a falcon. The ancient Egyptian name, wedjat, means the one that is sound. In Egyptian mythology Horus’ eye was injured or stolen by the god Seth and then restored by Thoth. The wedjat eye embodies healing powers and symbolises rebirth. Amulets of this shape were thought to protect its wearer and to transfer the power of regeneration onto him or her. It was used by both the living as well as the dead.

43 A Folk Art Carved Wood Walking Cane the Handle with a Large Figure of an Afro-American Black Gentleman Wood, Glass Eyes American / Circa 1860’s s i z e: 103 cm long – 40½ ins long Canes have long been a popular form of expression for American folk artists and from simple carved figurative depictions they could deliver complex messages. Canes were used to express political sentiment, advertise a user’s

44 A Heart Shaped Silver Mounted Field Maple Burr Wood Gun Powder or Priming Flask with Ivory Finial Field Maple Burr Acre Campestre, Silver, Ivory Germany / Late 17th Century s i z e: 11.5 cm high, 9 cm wide, 3.5 cm deep – 4½ ins high, 3½ ins wide, 1³⁄₈ ins dia. deep s e e: Finch & Co item no. 5, catalogue number 24, Summer 2015 for a German heart shaped tortoiseshell silver mounted flask and item no. 75, catalogue 34, Summer 2020 for a Spanish Colonial mother of pearl silver mounted flask Powder or priming flasks made of exotic natural materials were often produced for show rather than as serious hunting accoutrements used to carry gunpowder for charging a muzzle loading gun. They were fashion accessories worn with the hunting dress of the period and functioned as prestige objects.

45 An Exceptional Large Specimen of a Pacific Arctic Walrus Skull Complete with Tusks Odobenus Rosmarus Mounted on an Oak Shield (old paper collection number 121) Old lot number to reverse: 983 Arctic / Circa 1900 s i z e: walrus: 70 cm long – 27½ ins long shield and walrus: 76 cm high – 297⁄₈ ins high


p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 107, vol 1, EVV collection catalogue 2014 No. 121, from Knockdown House collection, Argyll, lot 983, Phillips, Scotland, July 1990 Ex Private collection Mr James Lamont s e e: For an example on a shield see Finch and Co item no. 4, catalogue number 4, 2004 and also item no. 18, catalogue number 26, Summer 2016 The largest, heaviest pinniped, the Pacific male walrus is a huge animal. Record specimens can measure more than 13 feet long and weigh up to 3500lbs. Ranging the Polar Seas at the top of the world they are the constant inhabitants of the ice floes, following them south in the Winter and north in the Summer. In about 870 ad a Viking Norseman named Othere recorded that he had made a voyage beyond Norway to hunt for Hvalross, horse whales which he declared have in their teeth bones of great price and excellence. Norse colonists living in Southwest Greenland historically paid a tribute in walrus tusks to the Papal Legate in Rome where they were regarded as a form of currency. For the next three centuries the Norwegians hunted the walrus among the islands of the far North taking as many as one thousand or more annually. Today, under protection, the walrus again number several thousand in the Bering Sea area.

46 Fine Fijian Sperm Whale Tooth Breast Ornament Tabua With old drilled suspension holes for sinnet cord, inscribed with native

symbolic graffiti Aged smooth silky patination Whale Tooth Fiji / Early 19th Century s i z e: 17 cm long, 5.5 cm wide, 4.5 cm deep – 65⁄₈ ins long, 2¹⁄₈ ins wide, 1¾ ins deep s e e: For a collection of three Tabua see Finch and Co item no. 126, catalogue number 16, Spring 2010, including a tooth with old native graffiti Fijian men of rank wore a variety of neck and chest ornaments made mostly from the sperm whale ivory that was made readily available in the early 19th century by the seafaring whalers hunting in the South Seas. Tabua have a profound ceremonial significance on Fiji and were highly important as presentation items during dynastic exchanges at weddings, funerals and other gatherings.

47 A Fine Marquesas Islands BoarsTusk / Tooth Ear Pendant Ha‘akai with Three Tiki Figures Old vertical pierced stone drilled hole, worn through use Superb colour and patina Boar Tusk Marquesas Islands Early 19th Century s i z e: 2 cm high, 5 cm wide – ¾ ins high, 2 ins wide p rov e na nc e: Ex Private London collection s e e: Finch and Co item no. 40, catalogue number 33, Winter 2019 for a larger Ha’akai and also, Polynesia, The Mark and Carolyn Blackburn Collection of Polynesian Art, entry no. 241 for a similar pendant of the same size Marquesas chiefs and men of rank adorned themselves for feasts and important ceremonies with ear

ornaments in a variety of types, from large and imposing, to small and discrete. Known as Ha‘kakai they were carved from sperm whale teeth with the smaller examples sometimes made from boars tusks. Originally the teeth were obtained from the seasonal and occasional beach strandings of the whales, and were regarded as precious and valuable objects. Later in the early 19th with the coming of the European and American whalers, and the Sandalwood traders, the whales teeth became more plentiful as they were traded by the ship’s captains and crew in exchange for food and other supplies. Both men’s large, and women’s small, Hakakai were carved with the enigmatic tiki figures, however these are not recorded or described before the early 19th century. It could be suggested that the earlier type of pendant were carved from Boars Tusk due to their availability. Pigs and Boars have been recorded as being brought to the islands as early as the 4th century a d .

48 A Fine English Knife and Fork Initialled E I and Dated 1701 The Ivory handles with silver inlay designs of Tulips and Spiralling Leaves highlighted with sealing wax and dyed green ivory inlay Cutler mark for Ephraim How Silver, steel, sealing wax, ivory Original leather sheath England 18th Century / 1701 s i z e: Knife: 19 cm long – 7½ ins long / Fork: 16.5 cm long – 6½ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: For a similar late 17th Century English eating knife, from the Bill Brown collection, Finch


and Co item no. 28b, catalogue number 30, Summer 2018 and also a pair of late 17th Century knife and fork from the Roger Warner collection, item no. 59, catalogue number 15, Autumn 2009 Ephraim How, became a freeman of the Cutlers Company in 1682 and Master in 1706, he died in 1720. The cutlers mark used was a heart and crown, How and also a dagger. With the restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 the short and rather severe puritan knife began to be replaced with a longer blade, curved and spatulate at the tip, which eventually acquired a distinct sabre look with a pistol shaped handle. Much of the surviving cutlery from this mid 17th century period seems to be quality pieces such as these examples, which have been treasured and preserved as family heirlooms.

49 A Rare Travelling Fork and Three Knife Set Two knives and fork handles inlaid with silver and red sealing wax decoration with a Tulip design to each, one single knife with piqué decoration to the top Cutlers mark to three blades: a crowned M Ivory, silver, gilt, sealing wax, leather traveling case England 17th Century s i z e: knives: 16.8 cm long – 6 5⁄₈ ins long (max) fork: 16.5 cm long – 6½ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: for a similar set, Ashmolean Musuem, Oxford, inv. no. 1949 / 260 (three knives and one fork in a travelling sheath / case

50 A Fine Set of Six Grand Tour Ivory Plaques of Roman Emperors Domit, C. Caes, Nerva, Traian, D. IVL, Pertin carved in relief Each within gilt bronze oval frames Ivory, gilt bronze Italy / Early 19th Century s i z e: 5.6 cm high, 5 cm wide – 2¼ ins high, 2 ins wide Domit: Domitian (a d 51–a d 96) / C. Caes: Caius Caesar Augusti Filius son of Augustus / Nerva: Marcus Cocceius Nerva (ad 30–a d 98) / Traian: Marcus Ulpius Traianus (a d 53–a d 117) / Pertin: Publius Helvius Pertinax (ad 126–a d 193)

s i z e: min: 6.5 cm high – 2½ ins high / max: 12.5 cm high – 5 ins high / 640 grams – 22.5 ounces p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh s e e: A similar group of specimens can be seen in Finch and Co item no. 66, catalogue number 8, 2006, also item no. 110, catalogue 4, item no. 44, catalogue 21, Autumn 2013 and item no. 31, catalogue number 35, Winter 2020 Amber is the petrified plant sap of prehistoric pine trees. These fossil resins were known in Germany as Bernstein or burning stones due to their flammability and amber is classified as a Caustobiolite together with coal and oil shale. The oldest amber artefacts in the world have been found in England. Rough beads from Gough’s cave in Cheddar, Somerset, that date from 11,000 to 9,000 bc .

51 A Medieval English Carved Limestone Column Capital with Four Symmetrical Carved Heads The large bulbous capital with four carved faces divided by vertical braided twisted hair descending from above Limestone England / 14th Century s i z e: 24 cm high, 30 cm dia. – 9½ ins high, 117⁄₈ ins dia. / 27 cm high – 105⁄₈ ins high (with base)

52 A Collection of Four Large Baltic Amber Specimens Fine colour and Patina Germany / Poland Approx : 100 million years old

53 A Rare Example of a Northern Italian Carved Walnut Bracciale used for Pallone Col Bracciale a traditional team game played with a hollow spiked glove gripped on the inside and worn on the forearm The protruding wedge shaped blunted spikes known as Bischeri Wood, Metal Italy / Late 17th / Early 18th Century s i z e: 19 cm high, 21 cm dia. – 7½ ins high, 8¼ ins dia. s e e: for other examples, Finch and Co item no. 73, catalogue number 16, 2010, item no. 42, catalogue number 28, Summer 2017 and item no. 39, catalogue number 29, Winter 2017. Also a Veneto Istrian marble sculpture depicting a player of the Renaissance game


wearing a Spiked wooden Bracciale, item no. 38, catalogue number 29, Winter 2017 From the mid 16th century, when the first official regulations were invented by Antonio Scaino from Salÿ, Pallone con bracciale was a particularly popular street sport played with heavy spiked hollow walnut cylinders that were worn over the right or left forearm. These would be used to strike inflated balls back and forth on courts often marked out on town squares or streets. A designated server called a mandarino first puts the ball into play, but each receiving player can reject any of the serves. Weighing up to two kilos, the bracciale could cause serious injuries amongst players. It is said that the 16th century Renaissance artist Veronese was exiled from Verona for a time for putting out the eye of another player with an ill-judged swing.

54 A Fine Large and Rare Inuit Amulet of a Seal Laying on His Back with Flippers Cradling His Face Inlaid with baleen to the length of the belly, eyes and nostrils Two pierced holes for attachment to a ridge on the reverse Superb golden colour and patina, through use Walrus ivory, baleen Inuit / 18th / Early 19th Century s i z e: 12.5 cm long, 3.5 cm wide, 4.5 cm high – 47⁄₈ ins long, 1³⁄₈ ins wide, 16⁄₈ ins high p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection

55 A Russian Tula Steel and Gilded Pin Cushion / Sewing Clamp With a view of Stockholm Palace or The Royal Palace Steel, Velvet, Blued Steel, Fire Gilt

Russia, Tula / Late 18th Century s i z e: 10.5 cm high, 4 cm wide, 2 cm deep – 4¹⁄₈ ins high, 1½ ins wide, ¾ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: For a pair of Russian Tula blued steel scissors decorated with a scene of the Winter Palace, St Petersburg, Finch and Co item no. 34, catalogue 31, Winter 2018 Founded in 1712, the Tula arms factory held many experienced master craftsmen from the Moscow armoury. After the Royal visit of Catherine II to the armoury in 1787, Tula’s distinctive style came into its own and its products became highly sought after. The Tula masters often presented their best works to the Empress. Catherine the Great’s passion for Tula ware was so great that she merged her collection with that of her crown jewels and placed it in a special gallery at the Winter Palace.

56 A Fine Steel Framed Miniature Dressing Table Mirror with Pin Cushion Raised upon a serpentine marble base Old paper Parisian retailers label to the reverse of the mirror German / Austria / Berlin or Vienna First half 19th Century s i z e: 13.5 cm high, 9 cm wide, 8 cm deep – 5¼ ins high, 3½ ins wide, 3¹⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection

57 A Fine Roman Marble Torso of Doryphoros Modelled as a Standing

Naked Warrior his upper body elegantly curved in order to balance a spear over his left shoulder The surface has been cleaned slightly and lightly re-worked in the late 18th / early 19th century removing the puntello on the figures right hip which would originally have supported the position of the right arm Marble Italy / 1st / 2nd Century a d s i z e: 16.5 cm high, 9 cm wide, 5 cm deep – 6½ ins high, 3½ ins wide, 2 ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection, Bavaria, Germany, acquired in the 20th Century (originally mounted in the 19th Century on a Roman marble architectural fragment repurposed as a display base) The missing bronze prototype of the Doryphoros sculpture, portrayed somewhat larger than life-size, would have been cast around 440 bc , however it is currently only recognised from later (mostly Roman era) marble copies. Polykleitos, a prominent Greek sculptor, created a sculptural piece as a presentation of his textual treatise that illustrated what he regarded to be the absolutely balanced and harmonious dimensions of the human body in the sculptural form. The Greek medical author Galen remarked about the Doryphoros in the 2nd century a d as the ideal aesthetic embodiment of the Greeks’ yearning for balance and elegance, which is expressed in the ideally proportionate carved male nude. Chrysippus believes that beauty consists not in the ratios or commensurability of the component aspects of the body, but in the paired comparison of the sections, such as that of palm to palm, and of all the digits to


the palms and wrists, and those to the forearms, and of the forearms to the upper arms, and, in reality, of all of it to everything else, as written in Polykleitos’ canon. The marble statue and bronze head discovered at Herculaneum were not recognised as Polykleitos’ work until 1863. A partial Doryphoros body in basalt, in the Medici collections at the Uffizi, as Kenneth Clark observed, expresses the appearance of bronze and is done with exceptional care. It maintains some of the intensity and focus of the predecessor absent in the full-size boxy marble copies. The best-known version of the Doryphoros was discovered in Pompeii and is housed in Naples’ Museo Nazionale. A bronze herma of Apollonios, also housed in the museum, is regarded by many experts to be an almost faultless reproduction of the genuine Doryphoros head.

58 An Unusual English Victorian Cut-Paper Model of a Font Raised upon an oval wood foot, with an old paper label reading: Sketch for a Font …. (?) Wood, paper, gilt, polychrome England / 19th Century s i z e: 20 cm high, 14 cm wide, 16 cm deep – 77⁄₈ high, 5½ wide, 6¼ ins deep Baptism was and is the sacrament that brought the fresh initiate into the bosom of Christendom and made him / her one of the church community. As such, baptismal fonts were, obviously, as vital a part of the church as were the shrines and chapels. The cut-paper model, although Victorian in date, follows the style and design of many Norman fonts with the

addition of an elaborate font cover, often raised and lowered onto the font by a pulley system within a church, the covers were carved in wood, usually with a similar design to the main structure of the font. Also visible on the model is a kneeling bench resting upon the font step.

59 A Fine Italian Baroque Ivory of Christ Christo Vivo Attributed to Giovanni Antonio Gualterio (active Rome 1582–1620) Old inventory number in black ink to reverse 21153 Fine colour and patina One finger missing to right hand, part left hand and four fingers a 19th century replacement Ivory Italy Early 17th Century / Circa 1610 s i z e: 28.5 cm high 18.5 cm wide – 11¼ ins high, 7¼ ins wide s e e: For a figure of Christ attended by the Virgin Mary and Saint John signed by Giovanni Antonio Gualterio dated 1613 see Finch and Co item no. 20, catalogue number 29, Winter 2017 c f: A fragmentary statuette of Christ in the Victoria and Albert Museum by Gualterio A. 68–1927 and another in Dresden Grünes Gewölbe dated 1599 Gualterio’s muscular form of his Corpus Christi carvings have a similarity to the late drawings of Michelangelo (1475–1564). He made a speciality of ivory crucifixes, and the carving of Christ’s loincloth is typical of his work, together with the treatment of the hair and the tender carving of the open mouth revealing Christ’s upper teeth. Gualterio is known to have carried

out commissions for Cardinal, later Grand Duke, Ferdinand de' Medici (1548–1608) who ordered a crucifix from him and then immediately sent it as a diplomatic gift to Spain. Two surviving crucifixes both have Spanish provenances, and perhaps because he partially polychromed his ivories, Gualterio’s work was favoured and in demand in Spain.

60

Two Swan Collars One collar with polychrome decorated studs one collar with an engraved number: 1 Brass / Bronze, Polychrome The Netherlands 17th / Early 18th Century s i z e: 4.5 cm high, 8.5 cm dia. – 1¾ ins high, 3¼ ins dia. and 3 cm high, 7 cm dia. – 1¼ ins high, 2¾ ins dia. p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 182, vol 1, EVV collection catalogue 2014 For another example see: Finch and Co item number, 13, catalogue 30, Summer 2018 Originally a native of northern Europe the mute swan Cygnus Olor was domesticated early on and raised in captivity first for its meat, and later for its great beauty. Medieval records show that there were domesticated flocks in Britain just prior to the 12th century and that swans were regarded as the property of the Crown. They could only be raised and traded under royal licence enforced by the King or Queen’s Swan Master and his deputies. Today an annual ceremony of swan upping is still performed on the River Thames in July where all mute swans are rounded up and marked for ownership either by the Crown or by the Vintners and Dyers Livery Companies, who were granted


rights of ownership in the 15th century. The welfare of the birds is still taken seriously at this event at which they are inspected, weighed and ringed or marked with a nick to the beak.

61

A Very Rare and Finely Executed Oval Piqué Cloak or Robe Brush The ivory silver mounted oval panel with brass piqué decoration and red sealing wax The bristles with a decorative dyed hair design forming four diamond shapes in red and green Ivory, brass, sealing wax, hair England Early 18th Century / Circa 1720 s i z e: 6.5 cm high, 12 cm wide, 8.5 cm deep – 25⁄₈ ins high, 46⁄₈ ins wide, 3³⁄₈ ins deep The survival of this rare brush, originally from a large dressing table set is remarkable, the overall condition is superb. In almost unused condition, the brush would have been used by a chamber maid or valet for brushing a full length velvet cloak or robe once the owner is wearing the garment.

62

Graham Sutherland (1903–1980) Tin Mine: Miner resting in a Wall Cavity 1942 Ink, pencil and gouache England / 1942 s i z e: 35 cm high, 23.5 cm wide – 13¾ ins high, 9¼ ins wide e x h i b i t e d: Graham Sutherland From Darkness to Light, Penlee House and Museum, Penzance,

14th Sept.–23rd Nov. 2013 National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, 7th Dec. 2013–23rd Mar. 2014. Sutherland, The War Drawings, Imperial War Museum, London, 1982, catalogue no. 7 Palazzo Reale, Milano, June–July 1979 l i t e r at u r e: Graham Sutherland, From Darkness into Light, Penlee House and Museum, Penzance, Paul Gough, Sanson and Company, 2013, illustration in colour, pg.10 R. Tassi, Sutherland, Disegni di Guerra, Electra, Milano, 1979, number 70, pg. 80

63 A British Guiana War Club with Original Binding An old label attached reading: British Guiana War Club Fine dark patina Wood, Fibre British Guiana / 19th Century s i z e: 39 cm high, 9 cm wide, 6.5 cm deep – 15³⁄₈ ins high, 3½ ins wide, 25⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection

64 A Large Kiribati Islands Fish Hook Probably used for hunting shark Fine colour and patina through signs of use Wood, fibre Micronesia / Gilbert Islands / Kiribati / 19th Century s i z e: 48 cm high, 14.5 cm wide, 3 cm deep – 187⁄₈ ins high, 56⁄₈ ins wide, 1¼ ins deep

65 An Exceptional Rock Crystal Gold Mounted Oval Reliquary The verre eglimisé decorated rock crystal painted with a scene of St Peter praying before Christ upon the Cross Rock Crystal, gold, velvet

Spain Crystal – 16th Century Gold Frame – 17th Century Velvet covered traveling case / shrine – 19th Century s i z e: 8 cm high, 5 cm wide, 1 cm deep – 3¹⁄₈ ins high, 2 ins wide, ³⁄₈ ins deep Case: 12 cm high, 9 cm wide, 2 cm deep – 4¾ ins high, 3½ ins wide, ¾ ins deep

66

A Large and Rare Double Sided Traveling Reliquary Case Revealing Two Oval Miniatures Painted in Oil and Four Oval Rock Crystal Windows Containing Religious Reliquaries and Ancient Relics The initials: MRA representing Mary and IHS representing Jesus engraved to either side of the case Gilt Copper Flemish 17th Century s i z e: 8.5 cm high, 6.2 cm wide, 3 cm deep – 3³⁄₈ ins high, 2³⁄₈ ins wide, 1¹⁄₈ ins deep Reliquaries in the form of jewellery or lockets housing tiny relics first appeared in the early 16th century. Designed with portability in mind, they were often acquired by the faithful on pilgrimages.

67 A Powerful Head of a Green Man Carved with Oak Leaves protruding from his mouth Limestone England / 13th–14th Century s i z e: 19.5 cm high, 17 cm wide, 23 cm deep – 7¾ ins high, 6¾ ins wide, 9 ins deep


The Pagan origins of the Green Man are mysterious, also known as the Wildman of the Woods’ and Jack in the Green his image occurs all over the world, from the ancient Aztec and Mayan cultures of Mexico to the Swayambhunath Temple in Kathmandu. In Britain, carvings of him can be found in over a hundred cathedrals and churches, but no clear explanation is given in Christian doctrine as to why representations of the Green Man are universal. In Christianity green is the liturgical colour of new life and in particular of the triumph of life over death just as green spring overcomes winter.

68

An Ancient Bering Straight Eskimo Walrus Ivory Drag Handle Depicting a Transformative Half Man-Polar Bear The long necked bear with a shaman crouched riding on his back, wearing a mask (?) Fine aged colour and patina Bering Strait Early Punuk 800–1200 ad s i z e: 3.5 cm high, 10 cm long, 1.5 cm wide – 1½ ins high, 4 ins long, ½ ins wide p rov e na nc e: Ex European Private collection / Ex Finch and Co, item no. 75, catalogue number 28, Summer 2017 / Ex Oliver Hoare Ltd. London During the winter time, a ringed seal, is brought home over the ice with the aid of drag handles. This small sculpture has a dual function acting as a handle and as an amuletic hunting charm which assists the hunter in finding his prey, guiding his harpoon and appeasing the spirit of the

animal. Many half-creatures are known in Eskimo mythology and are frequently illustrated in their ivory carvings, especially on drag handles.

69 A Pair of Padukas the Toe Knob Sandal of the Indian Mendicant Sadhu Fine colour and patina Ivory India / 17th – 18th Century s i z e: 6.5 cm high, 21.5 cm long – 2½ ins high, 8½ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex Private London collection s e e: For a pair of Padukas sold by Finch and Co, item no. 50, catalogue number 7, 2005 The earliest known Indian wooden sandal was excavated in Western Bengal and dated to 2000 bc . Padukas are worn by holy men as they wander from village to village and are ideally suited to the hot harsh Indian climate. Made of wood cut in the shape of a footprint with a post and knob at the front, which is held by the big and second toe, they fit in perfectly with the practices and directions laid down for the behaviour and daily life of the mendicant Sadhu.

Early 19th Century s i z e: 16.5 cm high, 22.5 cm wide, 12 cm deep – 6½ ins high, 87⁄₈ ins wide, 46⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private English collection s e e: For a Tula cut steel miniature sewing thread swift or winder sold by Finch and Co to The Metro­ politan Musuem of Art, New York in 2011, see item no. 103, catalogue number 17, Spring 2011 Tula is a region in Russia in the Srednerossky hills to the south of Moscow whose capital town of Tula has been famous for the remarkable metalwork it has produced since the construction of the armoury by Peter the Great in 1712. The mastery of the craftsmen and their diamond cutting of the steel works of art, as well as arms and armour, was unrivalled throughout Europe.

71 A Japanese Book Illustrating and Depicting the Study of The Art of Hawking Twenty two wood-block prints Paper, thread Japan / Mid 19th Century s i z e: 23 cm high, 16 cm wide – 9 ins high, 6¼ ins wide

72 70 A Rare Russian Tula Steel Toast Rack of an Elegant Oval Form Divided into six divisions, the steel is both turned, faceted and engraved Steel Russia / Late 18th Century /

A Mongolian Chinese Golden Altai Eagle Hunting Bonnet a Jade Amulet in the Form of a Bear Attached to the Leather Plume and a Distinctive Cut Leather Ruyi Head Flap to the Rear Leather, Jade Mongolia / Early 19th Century s i z e: 9 cm high, 7.5 cm wide, 10 cm deep – 3½ ins high, 3 ins wide, 4 ins deep


p rov e na nc e: Ex Private New York collection Ex Finch and Co, item number 6, catalogue number 27, Winter 2016

73 A Very Rare Gold Falconer’s Call or Whistle with Pendant Loop Perhaps for a Noble Lady Blown with the aid of an inserted reed English or French 15th–16th Century s i z e: 5 cm long – 2 ins long p rov e na nc e: Found in the 19th century Ex Finch and Co, item no. 5, catalogue number 27, Winter 2016 Private English collection

74 A Finely Carved Relief from a Nef Depicting sea-monsters writhing whilst devouring each other with choppy waves to the border Attributed to the workshop of Georg Pfründt (1603–1663) Narwhal Germany / 17th Century s i z e: 14 cm wide, 4 cm deep – 5½ ins wide, 15⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection Edric Van Vredenburgh, published no. 3, vol 1, EVV collection catalogue 2014 Ex Phillips Auction House, Bond Street, London (The Pink Room) early 1970’s Georg Pfründt was born in Flachslanden, Germany in 1603. A pupil of Leonard Kern (1588–1662) there are numerous similarities between Kern, Johann Georg Kern (1622–1698) and Pfründt. The composition of exotic carved cups, goblets and elaborate mounted vessels were very popular in European Renaissance Princely Kunstkammer’s with depictions of

dolphins and sea-monsters carved in ivory and narwhal tusk, exotic materials in themselves, they were highly sought after and valued.

75 A Fine and Large Gold Mounted Coral Signet Ring Depicting Leda and the Swan The carved coral oval plaque carved in deep relief Gold, Mediterranean Coral (Eagle Head Hallmark for 18 ct Gold) France / 19th Century / Circa 1850 s i z e: 3 cm high, 3 cm wide, 2.2 cm deep – 1¹⁄₈ ins high, 1¹⁄₈ ins wide, 7⁄₈ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private Irish collection Leda and the Swan is both a story and subject in art from Greek mythology in which the God Zeus, in the form of a Swan, seduces or rapes Leda. The subject was rarely seen in large scale sculpture in antiquity, however small scale depictions such as cameos, engraved gems, rings and terracotta oil lamps are well represented.

76 A Fine Circular Painted Watercolour of Richmond Hill from the River Thames with Reverse Painted Convex Glass Scene of a Traveller between Two Tress within a black and gilt circular border, two barges under full sail upon the river An old label to the reverse entitled: Richmond Hill in the County of Surrey from the River Thames at Ham House

Housed within an original turned alabaster frame England / Late 18th Century s i z e: 10 cm dia. – 4 ins dia. / 14.5 cm dia. 5¾ ins dia. (framed)

77 A Large and Fine Hornbill Carved with a Demon Headed Figure Displaying Bulging Eyes and Long Fangs Borneo / 19th Century s i z e: 10.8 cm high, 22 cm long – 4¼ ins high, 8¼ ins long p rov e na nc e: Ex collection François Coppens, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium / Ex Private collection

78

A Large and Fine Hornbill Carved with a Aso-Aso Mythical Dragon-Dog Borneo / 19th Century s i z e: 12 cm high, 22.5 cm long – 4¾ ins high, 87⁄₈ long p rov e na nc e: Ex collection François Coppens, Sint-Niklaas, Belgium / Ex Private collection

79

An After the Antique Marble Portrait Bust of Cicero Signed to the reverse Franco Franchi Copió in Carrara Marble Italy / Early 19th Century s i z e: 62 cm high – 24½ ins high s e e: For a marble bust of Homer, by Franco Franchi, see Finch and Co item no. 9, catalogue number 32, Summer 2019

80

A Rare Scrimshaw Pan-Bone Pictorial Plaque Depicting a whaling ship in the south seas, two whaling boats amongst three surfacing whales, two further whales on the surface in front of the prow


Titled Taking Whale, Australia, 1880 Fine colour and patina Whale Pan-Bone Australia / Late 19th Century / 1880 s i z e: 7 cm high, 27.5 cm wide, 4 cm deep – 2¾ ins high, 10¾ ins wide, 1½ ins deep p rov e na nc e: Ex Private collection

81

Ben Nicholson (1894–1982) Untitled Relief 1979 Oil on carved board Signed, dated and inscribed verso Nicholson, worked and reworked, Brissago & Hampstead, 1979 England / 1979 s i z e: 48 cm high, 82 cm wide – 19 ins high, 32¼ ins wide p rov e na nc e: Waddington Galleries, London Helly Nahmad Gallery, London Ex Private UK collection e x h i b i t e d: Fuji Television Gallery, Tokyo, 25th March–11th April, 1982, no.17, illustrated Ben Nicholson, 21st September–11th April, 2001, Helly Nahmad Gallery, no. 48, illustrated in colour Ben Nicholson: Paintings, Reliefs and Drawings, Bernard Jacobson Gallery, London, 4th April–16th June 2012

82

A Large Rare Pair of Lead Figures of Scaramouche and Pantalone Attributed to John Cheere Lead England / 18th Century / Circa 1755 s i z e: 97 cm high – 38¼ ins high and 99 cm high – 39 ins high p rov e na nc e: Private collection, the Netherlands, 19th century

Private collection, Italy / with Gertrude Rudigier, Munich, 1980 Private collection, Germany Christies London, 2nd December 2014, lots 97 and 98 / with Daniel Katz, London Ex Private collection These energetic figures of Scaramouche and Pantalone from the Commedia dell’Arte can be firmly attributed to John Cheere (1709–1787). He was the leading lead caster in 18th century England. Further statues by Cheere can be found in the gardens of many of England’s greatest country houses; including Castle Howard, Hampton Court Palace, Syon House, Chiswick House and Keddleston Hall. His statues were a feature of many fashionable 18th century gardens until the arrival of Capability Brown and his Arcadian landscapes. In the late 1750’s, he received his most important commission of garden statuary, ninety lead statues and groups for the Royal Palace at Queluz in Portugal for King Pedro III. The commission, which reflects the close diplomatic ties between Britain and Portugal throughout the 18th century, was probably instigated by Dean Joseph Wilcocks, who had been Chaplain of the British Factory in Lisbon. Whilst the leads represent the high point of Cheere’s oeuvre, he was also a prolific caster of plaster busts and statues. Thus by the 1750’s Cheere’s reputation as a maker of garden statuary par excellence had reached its height, as is clear from the Portuguese Royal commission towards the end of the decade, which adds an international dimension to his oeuvre. The present figures are rare and evidence the variety of Cheere’s repertoire, which ranged from classical figures, after the antique

to Punch and Judy characters. It is known that he produced statues of such characters, as has been outlined by J.T. Smith in Streets of London, a contemporary account written in the mid 18th century gives the following description of John Cheere’s yard: The figures were cast in lead as large as life and frequently painted with an intention to resemble nature. They consisted of Punch, Harlequin, Columbine and other pantomimical characters. Pantalone and Scaramouche are, of course, figures from the Commedia dell’Arte, but they would have been well known to English customers at the time since they often appeared in Punch and Judy shows. Pantalone was the greedy Venetian merchant with a cat on his shoulder, and Scaramouche, a coward who was frequently beaten by Harlequin. In the early 18th Century, puppet theatres, with the English interpretation of Commedia dell’Arte characters such as Punch and Judy as well as Scaramouche and Pantalone were extremely popular. Perhaps the most well known was Martin Powell’s, attracting sizeable crowds to his puppet theatre at Covent Garden. Given the close proximity to Hyde Park Corner it is more than likely that it was here that John Cheere would have encountered the characters of Scaramouche and Pantalone for the first time.

re l a te d l ite ra tu re T. Friedman; The Man at Hyde Park Corner Sculpture by John Cheere 1709–1787, exhibition catalogue Temple Newsam, Leeds, 1974 J. P. S. Davis; Antique Garden Ornament: 300 Years of Creativity: Artists, Manufacturers and Materials, Woodbridge, 1991, p. 31


Design by Prof. Phil Cleaver & Jennifer Penny of etal-design etal@etal-design.com Photography by Phil Connor phillip_connor@icloud.com Additional photography by Speltdoorn Studio SP RL speltdoornalain@yahoo.fr (entries 6, 35, 45, 53, 59, 77 Alexander Fox alexgfox@aol.com (entries 3, 62 81) Printed and bound in Great Britain by Pureprint

78)

© 2022 Finch Co isbn 978-1-912930-74-6 No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without the permission in writing of the publisher.