Page 1

For Teachers and Parents

A Good Audience… stays seated, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Dear Grownups: Welcome to the NSO’s Music for Young Audiences Concert, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to orchestra music and instruments. Please help your young concert-goers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program Before or after the concert, you may want the children to listen to some or all of these musical selections from the concert repertoire. Point out that some of the music will sound different at the concert because the musicians will adapt it for their instruments and use excerpts rather than full pieces. Ask children whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. The METRONONE “Non Pui Andrai” from The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The DONUT “Habañera” from Carmen by Georges Bizet The DRAWINGS Variations on “Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman” (“Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The MYSTERY BOX Turkish March, III from Piano Sonata No. 11 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The SHOW-OFFS From Grand Duo Concertant by Giovanni Bottesini The CHICKENS from The Barber of Seville Overture by Gioachino Rossini The END from The William Tell Overture Gioachino Rossini

All music transcribed and arranged by Heather LeDoux Green and Paul DeNola. Drawings by Paul DeNola.

More Fun With Music

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Deborah F. Rutter President

Music for Young Audiences

Mario R. Rossero

Senior Vice President Education

Additional support for NSO Music for Young Audiences is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; the Kimsey Endowment; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; and the U.S. Department of Education.

“Preview” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peek at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/multimedia/VideoStories/ welcome-to-the-kennedy-center/concert-hall

Upcoming Family Concerts

April 29, 2018—Bernstein! Inside the Music

Go with the Flow

Vary It

As you listen to the music during the concert, imagine how you would move to each piece. Would you dance? Gallop? Skip? Move back and forth? Pretend to fly? Or something else? Think about what movements match the music and rhythms.

Different versions of the same song, like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,” are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6.

5

Chairman

Music Director National Symphony Orchestra

Here are some post-performance activities for children:

Take a small container without a lid (this will be your instrument’s body) and two or three rubber bands (these will be your “strings”). Stretch the rubber bands around the container and across the open side (with help from a grownup). Now pluck the strings with your fingers. Notice how the bands vibrate. This is what making music looks and sounds like. Discuss ways to change the sounds with your friends.

David M. Rubenstein

Gianandrea Noseda

Please build on your concert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert, performed by the full NSO::

Make Your Own String Instrument

CUESHEET PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David M. Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2018 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more about NSO education programs, see kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

EXPLORE MORE!

Two musicians. Two string instruments.

No words, but lots of music…and maybe a playful disagreement or two. Get ready for plenty of great music and madcap musical fun!

Go to KC Connections on ARTSEDGE artsedge.kennedy-center.org/students/kc-connections

6

Performed by NSO Musicians Paul DeNola, bass Heather LeDoux Green, violin

Hello, teachers and pa

David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of the NSO.

Presenting Sponsor of Performances for Young Audiences

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an


Making Musical Fun with String Instruments Stringing Along Meet Heather and Paul. They are friends who like to have fun and tease each other. They also happen to love playing music together on their string instruments. Heather plays the violin and Paul plays the double bass (we’ll call it the bass for short). Watch how they have a great time in ways that go with the music.

Only the Sound of Music During the show, Heather and Paul never say a word. They communicate using costume pieces (like hats and goofy glasses) and objects (like signs). They also use mime—silently communicating through different looks on their faces and body movements. The only sound you’ll hear is amazing music, and lots of it. To help you get ready, here are a few things you should know:

Melody That’s the tune you hum or sing when listening to a favorite song. The violin often plays the melody.

Rhythm

Dynamics

Rhythm is repeating patterns of strong and weak beats. These patterns make you want to tap your foot or clap when you hear the music. At the performance, the deep, low-sounding bass often plays the rhythm.

The softness or loudness of the music is called dynamics. Notice that both the violin and the bass can play loud or soft, and the instruments can sound especially loud when they are played at the same time.

Harmony

Tempo

Harmony is what you hear when several sounds, or notes, are played at the same time on purpose. These different notes can be played on the same instrument or by blending notes from two or more instruments (like the violin and bass, of course!).

The speed of music is called its tempo. Some music is fast, some slow—and some in between. Watch for the metronome—a mechanical box that makes clicking sounds—providing a steady beat for practicing music.

Variations During the performance, listen for the song “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” A famous composer (a person who writes music) named Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) wrote changes called variations for the main melody, or theme. You can think of a theme and variation like this:

Theme

Variations

A theme is a melody that is repeated in a musical composition.

A variation is the theme with a few changes.

Music of Motion o kes f the bow across th o r t s e strings to make different sounds. Heather and Paul usually use long and short But sometimes they pluck the strings with their fingers, and the musical word for that is pizzicato (pronounced pitz-uh-KAH-toh). 2

All the music at the concert is played using just the violin and the bass. They are part of the string family of instruments (which also includes the viola and cello). These instruments are all made of wood and have four strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The bodies of the instruments have a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Of course, the violin and bass are different in size. That means they are played differently—Heather holds her violin against her chin, but Paul’s bass stands on the floor. The different sizes also mean the instruments sound a lot different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes, so…which will sound the highest and which the lowest?

3

BASS

Neck Strings

Grip

Fingerboard

Stick

F-Holes Hair

Chinrest

Meet the Musicians

l plays bass Pau

At the end of the performance, you’ll hear music you might have heard before because it’s been used in movies, cartoons, and TV shows. The music is called the William Tell Overture, and it helps tell the story of a hero rallying his army against an enemy. Can you imagine the troops charging?

VIOLIN

Photo by Steve Wilson

her plays viol t a i He

n

String-Playing Style

Meet the Instruments

4

Longtime musician friends Paul and Heather love to perform music they think kids will enjoy. Heather started playing violin when she was just three years old, and practiced like crazy to keep up with her big sister. Paul started out playing trumpet, switched to guitar, and then the bass in high school—and there was no going back. Today both Heather and Paul are members of the National Symphony Orchestra.


Making Musical Fun with String Instruments Stringing Along Meet Heather and Paul. They are friends who like to have fun and tease each other. They also happen to love playing music together on their string instruments. Heather plays the violin and Paul plays the double bass (we’ll call it the bass for short). Watch how they have a great time in ways that go with the music.

Only the Sound of Music During the show, Heather and Paul never say a word. They communicate using costume pieces (like hats and goofy glasses) and objects (like signs). They also use mime—silently communicating through different looks on their faces and body movements. The only sound you’ll hear is amazing music, and lots of it. To help you get ready, here are a few things you should know:

Melody That’s the tune you hum or sing when listening to a favorite song. The violin often plays the melody.

Rhythm

Dynamics

Rhythm is repeating patterns of strong and weak beats. These patterns make you want to tap your foot or clap when you hear the music. At the performance, the deep, low-sounding bass often plays the rhythm.

The softness or loudness of the music is called dynamics. Notice that both the violin and the bass can play loud or soft, and the instruments can sound especially loud when they are played at the same time.

Harmony

Tempo

Harmony is what you hear when several sounds, or notes, are played at the same time on purpose. These different notes can be played on the same instrument or by blending notes from two or more instruments (like the violin and bass, of course!).

The speed of music is called its tempo. Some music is fast, some slow—and some in between. Watch for the metronome—a mechanical box that makes clicking sounds—providing a steady beat for practicing music.

Variations During the performance, listen for the song “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” A famous composer (a person who writes music) named Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) wrote changes called variations for the main melody, or theme. You can think of a theme and variation like this:

Theme

Variations

A theme is a melody that is repeated in a musical composition.

A variation is the theme with a few changes.

Music of Motion o kes f the bow across th o r t s e strings to make different sounds. Heather and Paul usually use long and short But sometimes they pluck the strings with their fingers, and the musical word for that is pizzicato (pronounced pitz-uh-KAH-toh). 2

All the music at the concert is played using just the violin and the bass. They are part of the string family of instruments (which also includes the viola and cello). These instruments are all made of wood and have four strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The bodies of the instruments have a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Of course, the violin and bass are different in size. That means they are played differently—Heather holds her violin against her chin, but Paul’s bass stands on the floor. The different sizes also mean the instruments sound a lot different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes, so…which will sound the highest and which the lowest?

3

BASS

Neck Strings

Grip

Fingerboard

Stick

F-Holes Hair

Chinrest

Meet the Musicians

l plays bass Pau

At the end of the performance, you’ll hear music you might have heard before because it’s been used in movies, cartoons, and TV shows. The music is called the William Tell Overture, and it helps tell the story of a hero rallying his army against an enemy. Can you imagine the troops charging?

VIOLIN

Photo by Steve Wilson

her plays viol t a i He

n

String-Playing Style

Meet the Instruments

4

Longtime musician friends Paul and Heather love to perform music they think kids will enjoy. Heather started playing violin when she was just three years old, and practiced like crazy to keep up with her big sister. Paul started out playing trumpet, switched to guitar, and then the bass in high school—and there was no going back. Today both Heather and Paul are members of the National Symphony Orchestra.


Making Musical Fun with String Instruments Stringing Along Meet Heather and Paul. They are friends who like to have fun and tease each other. They also happen to love playing music together on their string instruments. Heather plays the violin and Paul plays the double bass (we’ll call it the bass for short). Watch how they have a great time in ways that go with the music.

Only the Sound of Music During the show, Heather and Paul never say a word. They communicate using costume pieces (like hats and goofy glasses) and objects (like signs). They also use mime—silently communicating through different looks on their faces and body movements. The only sound you’ll hear is amazing music, and lots of it. To help you get ready, here are a few things you should know:

Melody That’s the tune you hum or sing when listening to a favorite song. The violin often plays the melody.

Rhythm

Dynamics

Rhythm is repeating patterns of strong and weak beats. These patterns make you want to tap your foot or clap when you hear the music. At the performance, the deep, low-sounding bass often plays the rhythm.

The softness or loudness of the music is called dynamics. Notice that both the violin and the bass can play loud or soft, and the instruments can sound especially loud when they are played at the same time.

Harmony

Tempo

Harmony is what you hear when several sounds, or notes, are played at the same time on purpose. These different notes can be played on the same instrument or by blending notes from two or more instruments (like the violin and bass, of course!).

The speed of music is called its tempo. Some music is fast, some slow—and some in between. Watch for the metronome—a mechanical box that makes clicking sounds—providing a steady beat for practicing music.

Variations During the performance, listen for the song “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star.” A famous composer (a person who writes music) named Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (MO-tzart) wrote changes called variations for the main melody, or theme. You can think of a theme and variation like this:

Theme

Variations

A theme is a melody that is repeated in a musical composition.

A variation is the theme with a few changes.

Music of Motion o kes f the bow across th o r t s e strings to make different sounds. Heather and Paul usually use long and short But sometimes they pluck the strings with their fingers, and the musical word for that is pizzicato (pronounced pitz-uh-KAH-toh). 2

All the music at the concert is played using just the violin and the bass. They are part of the string family of instruments (which also includes the viola and cello). These instruments are all made of wood and have four strings. Musicians play them by using a bow (a stick of wood with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The bodies of the instruments have a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Of course, the violin and bass are different in size. That means they are played differently—Heather holds her violin against her chin, but Paul’s bass stands on the floor. The different sizes also mean the instruments sound a lot different. The smaller the instrument, the higher the sound it makes, so…which will sound the highest and which the lowest?

3

BASS

Neck Strings

Grip

Fingerboard

Stick

F-Holes Hair

Chinrest

Meet the Musicians

l plays bass Pau

At the end of the performance, you’ll hear music you might have heard before because it’s been used in movies, cartoons, and TV shows. The music is called the William Tell Overture, and it helps tell the story of a hero rallying his army against an enemy. Can you imagine the troops charging?

VIOLIN

Photo by Steve Wilson

her plays viol t a i He

n

String-Playing Style

Meet the Instruments

4

Longtime musician friends Paul and Heather love to perform music they think kids will enjoy. Heather started playing violin when she was just three years old, and practiced like crazy to keep up with her big sister. Paul started out playing trumpet, switched to guitar, and then the bass in high school—and there was no going back. Today both Heather and Paul are members of the National Symphony Orchestra.


For Teachers and Parents

A Good Audience… stays seated, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Dear Grownups: Welcome to the NSO’s Music for Young Audiences Concert, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to orchestra music and instruments. Please help your young concert-goers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program Before or after the concert, you may want the children to listen to some or all of these musical selections from the concert repertoire. Point out that some of the music will sound different at the concert because the musicians will adapt it for their instruments and use excerpts rather than full pieces. Ask children whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. The METRONOME “Non Piu Andrai” from The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The DONUT “Habañera” from Carmen by Georges Bizet The DRAWINGS Variations on “Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman” (“Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The MYSTERY BOX Turkish March, III from Piano Sonata No. 11 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The SHOW-OFFS From Grand Duo Concertant by Giovanni Bottesini The CHICKENS from The Barber of Seville Overture by Gioachino Rossini The END from The William Tell Overture Gioachino Rossini

All music transcribed and arranged by Heather LeDoux Green and Paul DeNola. Drawings by Paul DeNola.

More Fun With Music

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Deborah F. Rutter President

Music for Young Audiences

Mario R. Rossero

Senior Vice President Education

Additional support for NSO Music for Young Audiences is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; the Kimsey Endowment; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; and the U.S. Department of Education.

“Preview” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peek at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/multimedia/VideoStories/ welcome-to-the-kennedy-center/concert-hall

Upcoming Family Concerts

April 29, 2018—Bernstein! Inside the Music

Go with the Flow

Vary It

As you listen to the music during the concert, imagine how you would move to each piece. Would you dance? Gallop? Skip? Move back and forth? Pretend to fly? Or something else? Think about what movements match the music and rhythms.

Different versions of the same song, like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,” are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6.

5

Chairman

Music Director National Symphony Orchestra

Here are some post-performance activities for children:

Take a small container without a lid (this will be your instrument’s body) and two or three rubber bands (these will be your “strings”). Stretch the rubber bands around the container and across the open side (with help from a grownup). Now pluck the strings with your fingers. Notice how the bands vibrate. This is what making music looks and sounds like. Discuss ways to change the sounds with your friends.

David M. Rubenstein

Gianandrea Noseda

Please build on your concert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert, performed by the full NSO::

Make Your Own String Instrument

CUESHEET PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David M. Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2018 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more about NSO education programs, see kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

EXPLORE MORE!

Two musicians. Two string instruments.

No words, but lots of music…and maybe a playful disagreement or two. Get ready for plenty of great music and madcap musical fun!

Go to KC Connections on ARTSEDGE artsedge.kennedy-center.org/students/kc-connections

6

Performed by NSO Musicians Paul DeNola, bass Heather LeDoux Green, violin

Hello, teachers and pa

David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of the NSO.

Presenting Sponsor of Performances for Young Audiences

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an


For Teachers and Parents

A Good Audience… stays seated, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Dear Grownups: Welcome to the NSO’s Music for Young Audiences Concert, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to orchestra music and instruments. Please help your young concert-goers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program Before or after the concert, you may want the children to listen to some or all of these musical selections from the concert repertoire. Point out that some of the music will sound different at the concert because the musicians will adapt it for their instruments and use excerpts rather than full pieces. Ask children whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time. The METRONONE “Non Pui Andrai” from The Marriage of Figaro by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The DONUT “Habañera” from Carmen by Georges Bizet The DRAWINGS Variations on “Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman” (“Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star”) by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The MYSTERY BOX Turkish March, III from Piano Sonata No. 11 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart The SHOW-OFFS From Grand Duo Concertant by Giovanni Bottesini The CHICKENS from The Barber of Seville Overture by Gioachino Rossini The END from The William Tell Overture Gioachino Rossini

All music transcribed and arranged by Heather LeDoux Green and Paul DeNola. Drawings by Paul DeNola.

More Fun With Music

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Deborah F. Rutter President

Music for Young Audiences

Mario R. Rossero

Senior Vice President Education

Additional support for NSO Music for Young Audiences is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; the Kimsey Endowment; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; and the U.S. Department of Education.

“Preview” the Concert Hall We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peek at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/multimedia/VideoStories/ welcome-to-the-kennedy-center/concert-hall

Upcoming Family Concerts

April 29, 2018—Bernstein! Inside the Music

Go with the Flow

Vary It

As you listen to the music during the concert, imagine how you would move to each piece. Would you dance? Gallop? Skip? Move back and forth? Pretend to fly? Or something else? Think about what movements match the music and rhythms.

Different versions of the same song, like “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star,” are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6.

5

Chairman

Music Director National Symphony Orchestra

Here are some post-performance activities for children:

Take a small container without a lid (this will be your instrument’s body) and two or three rubber bands (these will be your “strings”). Stretch the rubber bands around the container and across the open side (with help from a grownup). Now pluck the strings with your fingers. Notice how the bands vibrate. This is what making music looks and sounds like. Discuss ways to change the sounds with your friends.

David M. Rubenstein

Gianandrea Noseda

Please build on your concert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert, performed by the full NSO::

Make Your Own String Instrument

CUESHEET PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David M. Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2018 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more about NSO education programs, see kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

EXPLORE MORE!

Two musicians. Two string instruments.

No words, but lots of music…and maybe a playful disagreement or two. Get ready for plenty of great music and madcap musical fun!

Go to KC Connections on ARTSEDGE artsedge.kennedy-center.org/students/kc-connections

6

Performed by NSO Musicians Paul DeNola, bass Heather LeDoux Green, violin

Hello, teachers and pa

David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of the NSO.

Presenting Sponsor of Performances for Young Audiences

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an

Profile for Kennedy Center Education Digital Learning

NSO Music for Young Audiences: The String Thing  

ATTENTION: kids, parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, rubber chickens... but especially kids and rubber chickens! Step right up to...

NSO Music for Young Audiences: The String Thing  

ATTENTION: kids, parents, grandparents, uncles, aunts, cousins, rubber chickens... but especially kids and rubber chickens! Step right up to...

Profile for artsedge