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Be a Beatboxer!

PF

BUH FFF

THUMF

After the concert, pick two or three beatbox sounds that Christylez made and try making them yourself. If you’re having trouble, try saying short words like “bun” and “put” making the “b” and “p” sounds very strong and the rest of the words shorter and quieter. Once you can do a few sounds, try putting them together in new rhythms or patterns.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Deborah F. Rutter President

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor Steven Reineke will lead approximately 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians.

A Good Audience ...

CUESHEET PERFORMANCE GUIDE

 tays seated S n Watches and listens carefully n and claps n

Have fun!

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Kids’ Chat After the 4 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the conductor and concert artists on stage.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at these upcoming NSO Family Concerts performed by the full NSO: April 4, 2018 — NSO Pops: Black Violin April 29, 2018 — Bernstein! Inside the Music The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6.

Mario R. Rossero Senior Vice President, Education

Family Concert Gianandrea Noseda Music Director National Symphony Orchestra Gary Ginstling Executive Director National Symphony Orchestra Additional support for the NSO Family Concerts is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; Macy’s; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education; and the Women’s Committee for the National Symphony Orchestra. Funding for Access and Accommodation Programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David M. Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2018 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org /perfectpitch

Presented in the David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of the NSO.

EX PLORE MORE !

Go to KC Connections on ARTSEDGE artsedge.kennedy-center.org/students/kc-connections Presenting Sponsor of Performances for Young Audiences

WGL is the proud sponsor of the NSO Family Concerts

Kennedy Center Concert Hall Steven Reineke, conductor with Christylez Bacon, human beatbox and Wytold, electric cello


Breaking Out of the Musical Beatbox About the Performance

The Concert Program Candide Overture by Leonard Bernstein Allegro from Symphony No. 10 in E minor by Dmitri Shostakovich (duh-MEE-tree shaw-stah-KOH-vitch)

“How to Play the Cello” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “ Homework at Home” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “It’s the Beatbox” (Baroque Style) by Christylez Bacon*

What happens when you mix the National Symphony Orchestra, two special guest musicians, two unique instruments, different musical styles, and old and new music? You’re about to find out in this concert that breaks out of the box and puts music together in fun and surprising ways.

Ready, Remix! You might have heard a remixed song on the radio or TV—it sounds like the old song, but different, right? Remix simply means adding new parts or styles to an existing song. That could mean different beat patterns, instruments, or parts to the melody (the part you hum along to). During the performance, listen for how the classics (old) go “classix” (new) in “Homework at Home,” which adds new instruments and sounds to the second movement of Symphony no. 7 by Ludwig van Beethoven (pronounced (LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven). After the performance, try to listen to the original version to hear how the music was changed. Remix can also mean mixing things up—and that happens, too! In today’s concert, you’ll hear the full orchestra play classical music (music that you expect to hear in concert halls). Plus, you’ll hear new music played by the guest musicians with the orchestra.

meet the guest musicians and instruments Christylez Bacon Christylez (chris-styles) grew up in Washington, D.C.—just about four miles from the Kennedy Center. His family didn’t have money to buy musical instruments, so as a young boy Christylez drummed on upside-down buckets and trash cans—and then used just his mouth (beatboxing). Today he plays many instruments (watch for the guitar, conga drum, and spoons at the concert) and tells stories through rap, which is poetry performed to a beat with music.

…and the Human Beatbox CYMBAL

SNARE DRUM

TURNTABLE

Think of sounds of instruments you play by hitting (like drums), rubbing, shaking, or scraping. When you make these sounds using only your mouth, lips, tongue, and voice, that’s called a human beatbox. Beatboxing started with hip hop music in the 1970s, but today you can hear it in many types of music—even on stage with a full orchestra.

BASS DRUM KEYBOARD LOUDSPEAKER

“Montagues and Capulets” from Romeo and Juliet by Sergei Prokofiev

Wytold started playing cello at age 10. Later he took a break and learned guitar. When he started playing cello again, he added styles from the guitar, like strumming the strings. He also wanted to mix different kinds of music—and the electric cello helped him do that and more.

(SAIR-gay pro-KOF-ee-ef)

“I Arrow” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “Mambo Sauce” by Christylez Bacon* “Mambo” from West Side Story Overture by Leonard Bernstein * arranged by Eric Allen

Watch and listen for the electric cello played by Wytold (left) and the human beatbox by Christylez Bacon (right), along with all the instruments of the NSO. Photos by Yassine El Mansouri

Wytold

…and the Electric Cello The electric cello gets its big sound from being, well, plugged in. So, unlike the traditional cello (which makes louder sounds from its hollow resonating chamber and is so large the musician usually sits down to play it), the electric cello is smaller and easier to carry. The electric cello also has six strings instead of the usual four, giving it a wider range of sounds.

Listen for ... n

the many sounds Christylez and Wytold create with their instruments

n

music and song lyrics (words) from or about Washington, D.C.


Breaking Out of the Musical Beatbox About the Performance

The Concert Program Candide Overture by Leonard Bernstein Allegro from Symphony No. 10 in E minor by Dmitri Shostakovich (duh-MEE-tree shaw-stah-KOH-vitch)

“How to Play the Cello” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “ Homework at Home” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “It’s the Beatbox” (Baroque Style) by Christylez Bacon*

What happens when you mix the National Symphony Orchestra, two special guest musicians, two unique instruments, different musical styles, and old and new music? You’re about to find out in this concert that breaks out of the box and puts music together in fun and surprising ways.

Ready, Remix! You might have heard a remixed song on the radio or TV—it sounds like the old song, but different, right? Remix simply means adding new parts or styles to an existing song. That could mean different beat patterns, instruments, or parts to the melody (the part you hum along to). During the performance, listen for how the classics (old) go “classix” (new) in “Homework at Home,” which adds new instruments and sounds to the second movement of Symphony no. 7 by Ludwig van Beethoven (pronounced (LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven). After the performance, try to listen to the original version to hear how the music was changed. Remix can also mean mixing things up—and that happens, too! In today’s concert, you’ll hear the full orchestra play classical music (music that you expect to hear in concert halls). Plus, you’ll hear new music played by the guest musicians with the orchestra.

meet the guest musicians and instruments Christylez Bacon Christylez (chris-styles) grew up in Washington, D.C.—just about four miles from the Kennedy Center. His family didn’t have money to buy musical instruments, so as a young boy Christylez drummed on upside-down buckets and trash cans—and then used just his mouth (beatboxing). Today he plays many instruments (watch for the guitar, conga drum, and spoons at the concert) and tells stories through rap, which is poetry performed to a beat with music.

…and the Human Beatbox CYMBAL

SNARE DRUM

TURNTABLE

Think of sounds of instruments you play by hitting (like drums), rubbing, shaking, or scraping. When you make these sounds using only your mouth, lips, tongue, and voice, that’s called a human beatbox. Beatboxing started with hip hop music in the 1970s, but today you can hear it in many types of music—even on stage with a full orchestra.

BASS DRUM KEYBOARD LOUDSPEAKER

“Montagues and Capulets” from Romeo and Juliet by Sergei Prokofiev

Wytold started playing cello at age 10. Later he took a break and learned guitar. When he started playing cello again, he added styles from the guitar, like strumming the strings. He also wanted to mix different kinds of music—and the electric cello helped him do that and more.

(SAIR-gay pro-KOF-ee-ef)

“I Arrow” by Christylez Bacon and Wytold Lebing* “Mambo Sauce” by Christylez Bacon* “Mambo” from West Side Story Overture by Leonard Bernstein * arranged by Eric Allen

Watch and listen for the electric cello played by Wytold (left) and the human beatbox by Christylez Bacon (right), along with all the instruments of the NSO. Photos by Yassine El Mansouri

Wytold

…and the Electric Cello The electric cello gets its big sound from being, well, plugged in. So, unlike the traditional cello (which makes louder sounds from its hollow resonating chamber and is so large the musician usually sits down to play it), the electric cello is smaller and easier to carry. The electric cello also has six strings instead of the usual four, giving it a wider range of sounds.

Listen for ... n

the many sounds Christylez and Wytold create with their instruments

n

music and song lyrics (words) from or about Washington, D.C.


Be a Beatboxer!

PF

BUH FFF

THUMF

After the concert, pick two or three beatbox sounds that Christylez made and try making them yourself. If you’re having trouble, try saying short words like “bun” and “put” making the “b” and “p” sounds very strong and the rest of the words shorter and quieter. Once you can do a few sounds, try putting them together in new rhythms or patterns.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Deborah F. Rutter President

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor Steven Reineke will lead approximately 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians.

A Good Audience ...

CUESHEET PERFORMANCE GUIDE

 tays seated S n Watches and listens carefully n and claps n

Have fun!

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Kids’ Chat After the 4 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the conductor and concert artists on stage.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at these upcoming NSO Family Concerts performed by the full NSO: April 4, 2018 — NSO Pops: Black Violin April 29, 2018 — Bernstein! Inside the Music The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6.

Mario R. Rossero Senior Vice President, Education

Family Concert Gianandrea Noseda Music Director National Symphony Orchestra Gary Ginstling Executive Director National Symphony Orchestra Additional support for the NSO Family Concerts is provided by A. James & Alice B. Clark Foundation; Macy’s; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education; and the Women’s Committee for the National Symphony Orchestra. Funding for Access and Accommodation Programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by the U.S. Department of Education. Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David M. Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2018 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org /perfectpitch

Presented in the David M. Rubenstein is the Presenting Underwriter of the NSO.

EX PLORE MORE !

Go to KC Connections on ARTSEDGE artsedge.kennedy-center.org/students/kc-connections Presenting Sponsor of Performances for Young Audiences

WGL is the proud sponsor of the NSO Family Concerts

Kennedy Center Concert Hall Steven Reineke, conductor with Christylez Bacon, human beatbox and Wytold, electric cello

National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert: Let’s Remix the Classix!  

What would the classics sound like with a Hip Hop beat? How about as a mashup with some cool rockin’ rhythms? Find out when the NSO reunites...

National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert: Let’s Remix the Classix!  

What would the classics sound like with a Hip Hop beat? How about as a mashup with some cool rockin’ rhythms? Find out when the NSO reunites...