Page 1

What to Watch for: ■

the way Raymonda’s mother welcomes guests into her home with a sweep of her hands. how Abderakham communicates his obsession for Raymonda by grasping his chest. How can you tell he is promising her riches and lands? Raymonda’s rejection of Abderkham when she puts her hands between his face and hers.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Deborah F. Rutter President

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

The story of Raymonda is told through movement and gestures. Look out for small movements of the hands or head that the characters use to show how they are feeling.

Cuesheet

NO WORDS NEEDED

MARIINSKY BALLET

WORKING REHEARSAL

Mario R. Rossero Senior Vice President, Education Support for this working rehearsal is made possible by Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; and the U.S. Department of Education.

Raymonda

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Russian Cultural Initiatives are supported by The Vladimir Potanin Foundation. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.artsedge.kennedy-center/org Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

Valery Gergiev, Artistic Director of the Mariinsky Theatre Yuri Fateev, Deputy Director of the Ballet Company Gavriel Heine, Conductor

The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2016 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts PHOTO BY VALENTIN BARANOVSKY

Watch how Raymonda often conveys her feelings with small hand and head movements.

PHOTO BY NATASHA RAZINA


About the Working Rehearsal RAYMONDA

Choreography by Marius Petipa (1898) Revised version by Konstantin Sergeyev (1948) with choreographic fragments by Fyodor Lopukhov; Music by Alexander Glazunov; Libretto by Lidia Pashkova and Marius Petipa.

THE BALLET MASTER Marius Petipa (1818–1910) is often called “the father of classical ballet.” Although he was born in Marseilles, France, Petipa made a name for himself as a choreographer at the Imperial Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia. He was responsible for shifting the art form from its French origins to an essentially Russian art form—laying the foundation for traditional ballet choreography well into the 20th century. Under Petipa’s watchful eyes, ballets were meticulously researched and produced in close consultation with composers and designers. Petipa choreographed more than 60 full-length ballets including The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and Le Corsaire.

Petipa utilized the entire stage and created beautiful patterns with the corps de ballet by placing dancers in diagonal or parallel lines.

THE STORY OF RAYMONDA Act I Party preparations are underway for Raymonda’s birthday in a grand castle in medieval Hungary. Foreign nobles begin to arrive, including the father of Jean de Brienne. He asks Raymonda, the niece of a noblewoman, to marry his son and gives the family a tapestry portrait of the handsome knight when she agrees. Also in attendance is Abderakham, a Saracen warrior. He is enchanted by Raymonda’s beauty, and vows he will do everything in his power to have her as his bride. Raymonda is also haunted by the White Lady, the ghostly protector of the castle, who warns the castle when someone is in danger as well as punishes those who do not follow family traditions. At the end of the party, Raymonda falls asleep and dreams that the White Lady has ordered Raymonda to follow her.

The Saracen is captivated by Raymonda and offers her anything to be his bride.

PHOTO BY VALENTIN BARANOVSKY

Just then, the tapestry portrait comes to life. Her knight leads her to a beautiful castle, but it magically changes and becomes a desert tent. The Saracen warrior appears and pursues Raymonda in a threatening manner. Suddenly, she falls unconscious. When she awakens, she is unsure of her surroundings. But when a ray of sunlight focuses on the portrait of Jean de Brienne, she realizes that it was all a dream.

Act III illustrates one of Petipa’s specialties: a collection of dances called divertissements that showcase the talents of a ballet company. Petipa liked to create a big spectacle with many dancers on stage to wow his audience.

What to Watch for: ■

Act II The wedding of Raymonda and Jean de Brienne is about to take place. As guests arrive Raymonda anxiously awaits her betrothed. Abderakham approaches her repeatedly, declaring his love and promising riches and control of his lands. When she refuses, he attempts to abduct her, but is blocked by Jean de Brienne. They duel, and Abderakham is killed. His party carries him away while Raymonda and de Brienne unite.

Act III The guests rejoice at the wedding of Raymonda and Jean de Brienne in a lavish celebration. PHOTO BY NATASHA RAZINA

SHOWING OFF

how the costuming changes with each dance; some have a medieval character. how the corps, or large group of dancers, provides a frame around the action of the soloists. the different mood and character of each of the dances. See if you can notice a particular movement that is repeated by the dancers in each section. the grand pas classique hongrois (a series of Hungarian dances) in Act III. Do any of the dances enhance the “story” of the ballet? Watch for a variety of groups including nine couples, four men, two ladies, and solos by Jean de Brienne and Raymonda.


About the Working Rehearsal RAYMONDA

Choreography by Marius Petipa (1898) Revised version by Konstantin Sergeyev (1948) with choreographic fragments by Fyodor Lopukhov; Music by Alexander Glazunov; Libretto by Lidia Pashkova and Marius Petipa.

THE BALLET MASTER Marius Petipa (1818–1910) is often called “the father of classical ballet.” Although he was born in Marseilles, France, Petipa made a name for himself as a choreographer at the Imperial Theatre in Saint Petersburg, Russia. He was responsible for shifting the art form from its French origins to an essentially Russian art form—laying the foundation for traditional ballet choreography well into the 20th century. Under Petipa’s watchful eyes, ballets were meticulously researched and produced in close consultation with composers and designers. Petipa choreographed more than 60 full-length ballets including The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, and Le Corsaire.

Petipa utilized the entire stage and created beautiful patterns with the corps de ballet by placing dancers in diagonal or parallel lines.

THE STORY OF RAYMONDA Act I Party preparations are underway for Raymonda’s birthday in a grand castle in medieval Hungary. Foreign nobles begin to arrive, including the father of Jean de Brienne. He asks Raymonda, the niece of a noblewoman, to marry his son and gives the family a tapestry portrait of the handsome knight when she agrees. Also in attendance is Abderakham, a Saracen warrior. He is enchanted by Raymonda’s beauty, and vows he will do everything in his power to have her as his bride. Raymonda is also haunted by the White Lady, the ghostly protector of the castle, who warns the castle when someone is in danger as well as punishes those who do not follow family traditions. At the end of the party, Raymonda falls asleep and dreams that the White Lady has ordered Raymonda to follow her.

The Saracen is captivated by Raymonda and offers her anything to be his bride.

PHOTO BY VALENTIN BARANOVSKY

Just then, the tapestry portrait comes to life. Her knight leads her to a beautiful castle, but it magically changes and becomes a desert tent. The Saracen warrior appears and pursues Raymonda in a threatening manner. Suddenly, she falls unconscious. When she awakens, she is unsure of her surroundings. But when a ray of sunlight focuses on the portrait of Jean de Brienne, she realizes that it was all a dream.

Act III illustrates one of Petipa’s specialties: a collection of dances called divertissements that showcase the talents of a ballet company. Petipa liked to create a big spectacle with many dancers on stage to wow his audience.

What to Watch for: ■

Act II The wedding of Raymonda and Jean de Brienne is about to take place. As guests arrive Raymonda anxiously awaits her betrothed. Abderakham approaches her repeatedly, declaring his love and promising riches and control of his lands. When she refuses, he attempts to abduct her, but is blocked by Jean de Brienne. They duel, and Abderakham is killed. His party carries him away while Raymonda and de Brienne unite.

Act III The guests rejoice at the wedding of Raymonda and Jean de Brienne in a lavish celebration. PHOTO BY NATASHA RAZINA

SHOWING OFF

how the costuming changes with each dance; some have a medieval character. how the corps, or large group of dancers, provides a frame around the action of the soloists. the different mood and character of each of the dances. See if you can notice a particular movement that is repeated by the dancers in each section. the grand pas classique hongrois (a series of Hungarian dances) in Act III. Do any of the dances enhance the “story” of the ballet? Watch for a variety of groups including nine couples, four men, two ladies, and solos by Jean de Brienne and Raymonda.


What to Watch for: ■

the way Raymonda’s mother welcomes guests into her home with a sweep of her hands. how Abderakham communicates his obsession for Raymonda by grasping his chest. How can you tell he is promising her riches and lands? Raymonda’s rejection of Abderkham when she puts her hands between his face and hers.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Deborah F. Rutter President

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

The story of Raymonda is told through movement and gestures. Look out for small movements of the hands or head that the characters use to show how they are feeling.

Cuesheet

NO WORDS NEEDED

MARIINSKY BALLET

WORKING REHEARSAL

Mario R. Rossero Senior Vice President, Education Support for this working rehearsal is made possible by Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; and the U.S. Department of Education.

Raymonda

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Russian Cultural Initiatives are supported by The Vladimir Potanin Foundation. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.artsedge.kennedy-center/org Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

Valery Gergiev, Artistic Director of the Mariinsky Theatre Yuri Fateev, Deputy Director of the Ballet Company Gavriel Heine, Conductor

The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2016 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts PHOTO BY VALENTIN BARANOVSKY

Watch how Raymonda often conveys her feelings with small hand and head movements.

PHOTO BY NATASHA RAZINA

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Widely considered the last “grand ballet” of the 19th century, Raymonda is set in medieval Hungary and follows a countess torn between her b...

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