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MEET CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH He’s the music director leading the NSO, and you may call him “maestro.” That’s because he’s mastered conducting orchestras and playing the piano all over the world. He believes music is one of the strongest forces known to man, and he’s also committed to fostering young musicians. Washingtonian magazine calls him “one of the most exciting classical conductors of the day.”

ABOUT THE NSO The NSO numbers 96 musicians and is performing its 84th season. It has performed at the Kennedy Center every year since the venue opened in 1971, and in 1986 became formally affiliated with the Kennedy Center. PHOTOS BY SCOTT SUCHMAN

Deborah F. Rutter President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director National Symphony Orchestra NSO Open Rehearsals are made possible in part by the generous support of The Clark Charitable Foundation; Kaplan, Inc.; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; U.S. Department of Education; and The Volgenau Foundation.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Open Rehearsal and Question-and-Answer Session with Christoph Eschenbach and NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about education at the Kennedy Center at  www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education but do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

© 2015 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Attending an open rehearsal differs from attending an actual concert, though your role as a quiet listener is the same. That’s because the orchestra is here to work—to practice and perfect their playing for the public performance. The conductor might stop the orchestra and repeat passages or pieces, or the orchestra might not rehearse the entire program. Afterward, the NSO cello soloists join Christoph Eschenbach on stage for a Question-andAnswer session. Have your questions ready for them.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Cuesheet

Attending the Open Rehearsal


About the Rehearsal Welcome to the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) open rehearsal and question-and-answer session with the NSO Music Director Christoph Eschenbach, featuring three NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie. During this rehearsal, Maestro Eschenbach will conduct a program that includes music by Johann Strauss Jr. (pronounced YOH-hahn STRAUS), Krzysztof Penderecki (KZHIHSHT-off pen-deh-RETS-kee), and Ludwig van Beethoven (LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven).

THE CONCERT PROGRAM Overture to Die Fledermaus (The Bat) by Johann Strauss Jr. (1825–1899) Since its premiere in 1874, Die Fledermaus (dee FLAY-der-mouse) has been one of the most beloved operettas ever written, thanks to its light-hearted, zany plot and infectious musical score. The production opens with an eight-minute overture that gives a medley or sampling of all the music to come. Inspired by the popular dance music of the time, including the waltz, polka, and can-can, the exuberant opening music assures the audience they are in for a lively, joyous performance. Listen for the… ■

overture’s rondo form, beginning and ending with the same theme, and with the other tunes alternating throughout.

central waltz’s swirling, downwardrushing melody that suggests a sense of animated merriment. instrumental, rhythmic build-up that leads into the music’s jubilant conclusion.

Concerto Grosso for Three Cellos and Orchestra by Krzysztof Penderecki (born 1933) This powerful, expressive, modern-day piece was inspired by the Baroque concerto grosso or “big concerto,” in which a small group of soloists is featured against a larger ensemble—in this case, three soloists from the NSO play against the backdrop of the entire orchestra. And although all three soloists play identical instruments, the cello, they are introduced individually and establish their own identities within the music’s opening movement. Listen for the… ■

sweeping, sorrowful sounds of the cello that intensify the music’s thoughtful, haunting, and sometimes anguished tone. complex conversations between the soloists as the piece progresses; the cellos mirror, overlap, and echo one another, and even toss phrases back and forth, creating unique harmonies and textures.

Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) Beethoven wrote all kinds of music for orchestra, singers, pianists, string quartets, and more. But he became especially famous for his symphonies, the music he wrote for orchestras. His Fifth Symphony—one of the most famous symphonies of all time— immediately captures the listener’s attention with its simple but ominous four-note opening motif (moh-TEEF)— “da-da-da-DUM.” Often interpreted as the sound of “fate knocking at the door,” the motif is repeated with variations throughout the entire work.

Listen for the… ■

different variations to the core motif; slight changes in rhythm, pitch, key, and instrumentation that allow the motif to take on different qualities from foreboding to triumphant. contrasting shifts in tempo or speed, and dynamics (whether the music is loud or quiet); the music moves quickly between pianissimo (pee-ah-NEEsee-moh) or very quiet, and crescendo (kreh-SHEN-doh) or rise, building tension and intensity in the music.

MEET THE CELLO The cello, the second largest instrument in the string family, often plays a supporting or harmonizing role in the full orchestra. Composers, however, have also recognized the uniqueness of its deeper, human-like voice in telling their stories, especially of love, longing, and loss. Pictured left to right, Penderecki’s Concerto Grosso for Three Cellos and Orchestra features NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie.


About the Rehearsal Welcome to the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) open rehearsal and question-and-answer session with the NSO Music Director Christoph Eschenbach, featuring three NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie. During this rehearsal, Maestro Eschenbach will conduct a program that includes music by Johann Strauss Jr. (pronounced YOH-hahn STRAUS), Krzysztof Penderecki (KZHIHSHT-off pen-deh-RETS-kee), and Ludwig van Beethoven (LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven).

THE CONCERT PROGRAM Overture to Die Fledermaus (The Bat) by Johann Strauss Jr. (1825–1899) Since its premiere in 1874, Die Fledermaus (dee FLAY-der-mouse) has been one of the most beloved operettas ever written, thanks to its light-hearted, zany plot and infectious musical score. The production opens with an eight-minute overture that gives a medley or sampling of all the music to come. Inspired by the popular dance music of the time, including the waltz, polka, and can-can, the exuberant opening music assures the audience they are in for a lively, joyous performance. Listen for the… ■

overture’s rondo form, beginning and ending with the same theme, and with the other tunes alternating throughout.

central waltz’s swirling, downwardrushing melody that suggests a sense of animated merriment. instrumental, rhythmic build-up that leads into the music’s jubilant conclusion.

Concerto Grosso for Three Cellos and Orchestra by Krzysztof Penderecki (born 1933) This powerful, expressive, modern-day piece was inspired by the Baroque concerto grosso or “big concerto,” in which a small group of soloists is featured against a larger ensemble—in this case, three soloists from the NSO play against the backdrop of the entire orchestra. And although all three soloists play identical instruments, the cello, they are introduced individually and establish their own identities within the music’s opening movement. Listen for the… ■

sweeping, sorrowful sounds of the cello that intensify the music’s thoughtful, haunting, and sometimes anguished tone. complex conversations between the soloists as the piece progresses; the cellos mirror, overlap, and echo one another, and even toss phrases back and forth, creating unique harmonies and textures.

Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 by Ludwig van Beethoven (1770–1827) Beethoven wrote all kinds of music for orchestra, singers, pianists, string quartets, and more. But he became especially famous for his symphonies, the music he wrote for orchestras. His Fifth Symphony—one of the most famous symphonies of all time— immediately captures the listener’s attention with its simple but ominous four-note opening motif (moh-TEEF)— “da-da-da-DUM.” Often interpreted as the sound of “fate knocking at the door,” the motif is repeated with variations throughout the entire work.

Listen for the… ■

different variations to the core motif; slight changes in rhythm, pitch, key, and instrumentation that allow the motif to take on different qualities from foreboding to triumphant. contrasting shifts in tempo or speed, and dynamics (whether the music is loud or quiet); the music moves quickly between pianissimo (pee-ah-NEEsee-moh) or very quiet, and crescendo (kreh-SHEN-doh) or rise, building tension and intensity in the music.

MEET THE CELLO The cello, the second largest instrument in the string family, often plays a supporting or harmonizing role in the full orchestra. Composers, however, have also recognized the uniqueness of its deeper, human-like voice in telling their stories, especially of love, longing, and loss. Pictured left to right, Penderecki’s Concerto Grosso for Three Cellos and Orchestra features NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie.


MEET CHRISTOPH ESCHENBACH He’s the music director leading the NSO, and you may call him “maestro.” That’s because he’s mastered conducting orchestras and playing the piano all over the world. He believes music is one of the strongest forces known to man, and he’s also committed to fostering young musicians. Washingtonian magazine calls him “one of the most exciting classical conductors of the day.”

ABOUT THE NSO The NSO numbers 96 musicians and is performing its 84th season. It has performed at the Kennedy Center every year since the venue opened in 1971, and in 1986 became formally affiliated with the Kennedy Center. PHOTOS BY SCOTT SUCHMAN

Deborah F. Rutter President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director National Symphony Orchestra NSO Open Rehearsals are made possible in part by the generous support of The Clark Charitable Foundation; Kaplan, Inc.; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; U.S. Department of Education; and The Volgenau Foundation.

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Open Rehearsal and Question-and-Answer Session with Christoph Eschenbach and NSO cellists Steven Honigberg, James Lee, and David Teie

Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Kennedy Center education and related artistic programming is made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about education at the Kennedy Center at  www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education but do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

© 2015 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Attending an open rehearsal differs from attending an actual concert, though your role as a quiet listener is the same. That’s because the orchestra is here to work—to practice and perfect their playing for the public performance. The conductor might stop the orchestra and repeat passages or pieces, or the orchestra might not rehearse the entire program. Afterward, the NSO cello soloists join Christoph Eschenbach on stage for a Question-andAnswer session. Have your questions ready for them.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Cuesheet

Attending the Open Rehearsal

Christoph Eschenbach and NSO Cellists: Open Rehearsal and Question-and-Answer Session  

This program features the cello, the second largest instrument in the string family. Composers have recognized the instrument’s unique, deep...

Christoph Eschenbach and NSO Cellists: Open Rehearsal and Question-and-Answer Session  

This program features the cello, the second largest instrument in the string family. Composers have recognized the instrument’s unique, deep...