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This line from the Bible reminds people we need both physical and spiritual nutrition for our wellbeing. In fact, bread plays an enormous role in many religious traditions—from the Catholic Eucharist to the Jewish motzi (MOH-tsee), or blessing over bread. Near the end of the play, after the bread emerges from the oven, the actors recite the motzi. By blessing the bread, the actors offer thanks for food and for life.

WHAT TO WATCH, LISTEN, (AND SMELL!) FOR During the performance, pay special attention to: how the long communal table is used for many purposes to suggest different settings—like a wedding reception, an Italian village, and a beauty salon how the actors use everyday objects to create sounds such as a rainstorm simple costumes and props, like hats, fans, and umbrellas dramatic lighting effects to suggest changes in location, weather, and mood how the tactile sign interpreters (dressed in black) guide the actors across the stage, hand the actors props, and help with communication the delicious smell of baking bread

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT After the performance, discuss these questions with your friends and family: How do you share your feelings and thoughts? What does a smile say? What does a push mean? Why do you think you need to connect with others? How do you express your connection to others?

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Alicia B. Adams Vice President, International Programming Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy’s Foundation; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas.

NALAGA’AT THEATER DEAF-BLIND ACTING ENSEMBLE Not by Bread Alone Directed by Adina Tal Presented in partnership with VSA

Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Major support is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein. Additional support is provided by A. Huda and Samia Farouki, The Florence Gould Foundation, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, Amalia Perea Mahoney and William Mahoney, The Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater, and the State Plaza Hotel. International government support is provided by the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of China, the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States, the Embassy of Israel in the United States, the Canada Council for the Arts, The National Theatre of Iceland, and the Japan Foundation. Major support for education and related artistic programming is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program, the National Committee for the Performing Arts, and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2014 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

What is it like to live in a world of darkness and silence? Find out as the actors of this unusual Israeli theater troupe share their memories, dreams, and joyful moments…while baking bread!

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

“Man does not live by bread alone, but by all that comes forth from the mouth of God.”

Cuesheet

WHAT ABOUT THE BREAD?


ALL PHOTOS BY TOMER SHOV

"Welcome to Our Bakery and Welcome to Our Lives" WHAT HAPPENS IN THE PLAY Not by Bread Alone begins the minute you enter the theater. As you take your seat, you notice 11 deaf-blind actors already onstage kneading bread dough. The actors, however, are not playing characters; they are playing themselves. During the course of the play, the actors reveal their personal stories and hopes. In a series of short scenes, they act out everyday dreams and experiences—like being a magician, having a famous stylist do their hair, or getting married. The most unusual part is that the action happens over the course of bread baking. As the bread bakes, you get to ask: “What happens when the bread is done?”

COMMUNICATING THROUGH EVERY SENSE Nalaga’at (pronounced nah-lah-GAHT and means "please touch") Theater’s deaf-blind actors communicate among themselves and with the audience through words, voices, touch, vibration, sign language, and tactile sign language (where the person who is deaf-blind understands the signs by touching the signers' hands). For

example, the actors rely on touch to move across the stage. They grasp each other’s elbows for guidance and feel their way along the edges of a table. Occasionally, a drumbeat is heard. When the actors feel the vibration of the air or the vibration of the wooden stage floor created by the drumbeat, they know that it is the start of a new scene. The actors share their stories in many ways. Some speak or sign in Hebrew Sign Language (ISL); others speak or sign in Russian Sign Language (RSL). The hearing interpreters on stage speak in Hebrew and sign in ISL. There are also hearing interpreters sitting in front of the stage signing in American Sign Language (ASL) for members of the audience. One actor even types his story on a brailler, which is a braille typewriter, and then reads the words by touch as he speaks them. In addition, projected English captions are screened on stage.

Based in Tel Aviv, Israel, Nalaga’at Theater Deaf-Blind Acting Ensemble is the only theater company in the world whose actors are all deaf-blind.

THE PLAY’S MESSAGE The actors represent a diverse mix of people—many native Israelis, some immigrants from other countries, and (interestingly enough!) one actor is from Iran. Some are married; others have children; a few reside alone. Regardless, all come together onstage to show that people cannot survive by bread alone. What feeds and nourishes us physically and spiritually are our daily experiences and connections to other people.

ABOUT NALAGA’AT THEATER Nalaga’at Theater Deaf-Blind Acting Ensemble rehearsed Not by Bread Alone for two years. During that time, the actors learned to be aware of vibrations in the air or on the stage from the beating of a drum and to rely on one another for cues delivered by the touch of a hand, foot, or knee. They also learned to bake bread and complete the task by the time the play ends. The

hearing and sighted tactile interpreters had to learn a lot too, such as what it is like to communicate and navigate through the world with the actors who have limited or no vision and hearing.

USHER SYNDROME: WHY DO SOME PEOPLE BECOME DEAF-BLIND? Most of the actors were born deaf and later lost their eyesight due to a rare genetic condition called Usher Syndrome. Each year, about 50,000 children in the United States are born with this syndrome and experience hearing loss that tends to get more severe with age. By adolescence, these children begin to lose their vision. A large percentage of people with Usher Syndrome are of the Jewish faith whose families have genetic ties to Eastern Europe. There is no cure for Usher Syndrome, but researchers are working to discover its cause and treatment.


ALL PHOTOS BY TOMER SHOV

"Welcome to Our Bakery and Welcome to Our Lives" WHAT HAPPENS IN THE PLAY Not by Bread Alone begins the minute you enter the theater. As you take your seat, you notice 11 deaf-blind actors already onstage kneading bread dough. The actors, however, are not playing characters; they are playing themselves. During the course of the play, the actors reveal their personal stories and hopes. In a series of short scenes, they act out everyday dreams and experiences—like being a magician, having a famous stylist do their hair, or getting married. The most unusual part is that the action happens over the course of bread baking. As the bread bakes, you get to ask: “What happens when the bread is done?”

COMMUNICATING THROUGH EVERY SENSE Nalaga’at (pronounced nah-lah-GAHT and means "please touch") Theater’s deaf-blind actors communicate among themselves and with the audience through words, voices, touch, vibration, sign language, and tactile sign language (where the person who is deaf-blind understands the signs by touching the signers' hands). For

example, the actors rely on touch to move across the stage. They grasp each other’s elbows for guidance and feel their way along the edges of a table. Occasionally, a drumbeat is heard. When the actors feel the vibration of the air or the vibration of the wooden stage floor created by the drumbeat, they know that it is the start of a new scene. The actors share their stories in many ways. Some speak or sign in Hebrew Sign Language (ISL); others speak or sign in Russian Sign Language (RSL). The hearing interpreters on stage speak in Hebrew and sign in ISL. There are also hearing interpreters sitting in front of the stage signing in American Sign Language (ASL) for members of the audience. One actor even types his story on a brailler, which is a braille typewriter, and then reads the words by touch as he speaks them. In addition, projected English captions are screened on stage.

Based in Tel Aviv, Israel, Nalaga’at Theater Deaf-Blind Acting Ensemble is the only theater company in the world whose actors are all deaf-blind.

THE PLAY’S MESSAGE The actors represent a diverse mix of people—many native Israelis, some immigrants from other countries, and (interestingly enough!) one actor is from Iran. Some are married; others have children; a few reside alone. Regardless, all come together onstage to show that people cannot survive by bread alone. What feeds and nourishes us physically and spiritually are our daily experiences and connections to other people.

ABOUT NALAGA’AT THEATER Nalaga’at Theater Deaf-Blind Acting Ensemble rehearsed Not by Bread Alone for two years. During that time, the actors learned to be aware of vibrations in the air or on the stage from the beating of a drum and to rely on one another for cues delivered by the touch of a hand, foot, or knee. They also learned to bake bread and complete the task by the time the play ends. The

hearing and sighted tactile interpreters had to learn a lot too, such as what it is like to communicate and navigate through the world with the actors who have limited or no vision and hearing.

USHER SYNDROME: WHY DO SOME PEOPLE BECOME DEAF-BLIND? Most of the actors were born deaf and later lost their eyesight due to a rare genetic condition called Usher Syndrome. Each year, about 50,000 children in the United States are born with this syndrome and experience hearing loss that tends to get more severe with age. By adolescence, these children begin to lose their vision. A large percentage of people with Usher Syndrome are of the Jewish faith whose families have genetic ties to Eastern Europe. There is no cure for Usher Syndrome, but researchers are working to discover its cause and treatment.


This line from the Bible reminds people we need both physical and spiritual nutrition for our wellbeing. In fact, bread plays an enormous role in many religious traditions—from the Catholic Eucharist to the Jewish motzi (MOH-tsee), or blessing over bread. Near the end of the play, after the bread emerges from the oven, the actors recite the motzi. By blessing the bread, the actors offer thanks for food and for life.

WHAT TO WATCH, LISTEN, (AND SMELL!) FOR During the performance, pay special attention to: how the long communal table is used for many purposes to suggest different settings—like a wedding reception, an Italian village, and a beauty salon how the actors use everyday objects to create sounds such as a rainstorm simple costumes and props, like hats, fans, and umbrellas dramatic lighting effects to suggest changes in location, weather, and mood how the tactile sign interpreters (dressed in black) guide the actors across the stage, hand the actors props, and help with communication the delicious smell of baking bread

THINGS TO THINK ABOUT After the performance, discuss these questions with your friends and family: How do you share your feelings and thoughts? What does a smile say? What does a push mean? Why do you think you need to connect with others? How do you express your connection to others?

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Alicia B. Adams Vice President, International Programming Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy’s Foundation; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas.

NALAGA’AT THEATER DEAF-BLIND ACTING ENSEMBLE Not by Bread Alone Directed by Adina Tal Presented in partnership with VSA

Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Major support is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein. Additional support is provided by A. Huda and Samia Farouki, The Florence Gould Foundation, The Blanche and Irving Laurie Foundation, Amalia Perea Mahoney and William Mahoney, The Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater, and the State Plaza Hotel. International government support is provided by the Ministry of Culture of the People’s Republic of China, the Embassy of the People’s Republic of China in the United States, the Embassy of Israel in the United States, the Canada Council for the Arts, The National Theatre of Iceland, and the Japan Foundation. Major support for education and related artistic programming is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program, the National Committee for the Performing Arts, and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2014 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

What is it like to live in a world of darkness and silence? Find out as the actors of this unusual Israeli theater troupe share their memories, dreams, and joyful moments…while baking bread!

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

“Man does not live by bread alone, but by all that comes forth from the mouth of God.”

Cuesheet

WHAT ABOUT THE BREAD?


Not by Bread Alone