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PHOTO BY CRISTINA HIRST

All members of the Enso String Quartet play instruments from the “String Family,” including the violin, viola, and cello. All three instruments are made of wood, share similar shapes, and have (you guessed it!) strings! And all create sound when a musician uses a bow or finger to make these strings vibrate. But what are the differences? Here’s how to tell them apart. Test your skills during the performance. Look for…how each instrument is played. The black chinrests on the violin and viola tell you they are held under the player’s chin. The cello is played upright, held between the player’s knees. Listen for…the differences in pitch, or the high or low notes each instrument is able to produce. Although the smallest, the violin can create the highest notes. The viola, while cousin to the violin, has a deeper, more mellow voice. The cello’s bigger body allows for lower, richer tones. LISTEN UP! Learn about the history of classical music at Classical Music in America http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/ multimedia/series/AudioStories/ classical-music-in-america

Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by Adobe Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy’s Foundation; The Morris and

Performance Guide

THE STRING FAMILY

Michael M. Kaiser President

Enso String Quartet

Cuesheet

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

The Many Moods of Music A Performance and Demonstration

Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; and Washington Gas. The Fortas Chamber Music Concerts are supported by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Education and related artistic programs are made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

PHOTO BY JUERGEN FRANK


About the Performance

During The Many Moods of Music, some of the music you will hear includes:

ENSO STRING QUARTET: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

Known for their high-energy performances and musical versatility, the Enso String Quartet has proven they are much more than your average chamber music group. Get to know them as they perform a wide range of musical styles, and discuss how music is created and why it affects us as listeners.

From left to right: Nelson, Reardon, Belcher, Marcus

EXCERPTS FROM STRING QUARTET IN C MAJOR, OP. 76, NO. 3 AND OTHERS BY JOSEPH HAYDN (1732–1809) In each excerpt, listen for the musical theme, or subject of the composition repeated throughout the piece. Then listen for the variation, or small change to each theme, which adds texture and layers that change the music’s tone and intensity.

The Quartet’s string instruments include: Richard Belcher (cello), John Marcus (violin), Maureen Nelson (violin), and Melissa Reardon (viola). Now based in New York City, the ensemble originally formed in 1999 at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. The ensemble’s name, “enso,” was inspired by the Japanese Zen painting of the circle which represents many things: perfection and imperfection, the moment of chaos that is creation, the emptiness of the void, the endless circle of life, and the fullness of the spirit. PHOTO BY RICHIE HAWLEY

Meet musicians Maureen Nelson, John Marcus, Melissa Reardon, and Richard Belcher, who together make up the Enso String Quartet, one of the country’s most exciting young ensembles.

THE CONCERT PROGRAM

EXCERPTS FROM STRING QUARTET NO. 4, 4TH AND 5TH MOVEMENTS BY BÉLA BARTÓK (1881–1945) Listen for pizzicato (pronounced PITZih-KAH-toh), a playing technique in which the musician plucks the strings of their instrument with their fingers instead of using a bow. This creates a very different sound and adds a feeling of urgency in this folk music. EXCERPT FROM STRING QUARTET IN F MAJOR, 2ND MOVEMENT BY MAURICE RAVEL (1875–1937) Be sure to listen for pizzicato and the sudden changes in dynamics, or volume, which help form the music’s lively dance rhythm.

IMPROVISATIONS/VARIATIONS BY MAUREEN NELSON Composed by one of the Enso String Quartet’s own violinists, this piece is based on Peruvian Quechua (KETCHwah) musical traditions. The Quechua Indians of the Central Andes region of South America are the direct descendents of the Incas. Their folk music ranges from upbeat and patriotic to beautiful and haunting. “MILLE REGRETZ” BY JOSQUIN DES PREZ (1450–1521) The sorrowful love song “Mille Regretz” (or “Thousand Regrets”) is a French chanson, or lyric-driven song, popular during the Renaissance. EXCERPT FROM “KREUTZER SONATA,” 4TH MOVEMENT BY LEOŠ JANÁCEK (1854–1928) Inspired by a Leo Tolstoy novella, the music tells the tragic story of a woman who escapes her unhappy marriage only to end up in a worse situation. In the fourth and final movement, listen for changes in the music’s tempo, or speed, and think about how they help you to understand the story. “BAGEL ON THE MALECON” BY LEV “LJOVA” ZHURBIN (1978) Incorporating different elements of Cuban music, this work is a mix of relaxed and upbeat sounds. Listen for non-traditional playing techniques early in the piece, such as the musicians tapping the instruments with their hands.


About the Performance

During The Many Moods of Music, some of the music you will hear includes:

ENSO STRING QUARTET: WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

Known for their high-energy performances and musical versatility, the Enso String Quartet has proven they are much more than your average chamber music group. Get to know them as they perform a wide range of musical styles, and discuss how music is created and why it affects us as listeners.

From left to right: Nelson, Reardon, Belcher, Marcus

EXCERPTS FROM STRING QUARTET IN C MAJOR, OP. 76, NO. 3 AND OTHERS BY JOSEPH HAYDN (1732–1809) In each excerpt, listen for the musical theme, or subject of the composition repeated throughout the piece. Then listen for the variation, or small change to each theme, which adds texture and layers that change the music’s tone and intensity.

The Quartet’s string instruments include: Richard Belcher (cello), John Marcus (violin), Maureen Nelson (violin), and Melissa Reardon (viola). Now based in New York City, the ensemble originally formed in 1999 at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. The ensemble’s name, “enso,” was inspired by the Japanese Zen painting of the circle which represents many things: perfection and imperfection, the moment of chaos that is creation, the emptiness of the void, the endless circle of life, and the fullness of the spirit. PHOTO BY RICHIE HAWLEY

Meet musicians Maureen Nelson, John Marcus, Melissa Reardon, and Richard Belcher, who together make up the Enso String Quartet, one of the country’s most exciting young ensembles.

THE CONCERT PROGRAM

EXCERPTS FROM STRING QUARTET NO. 4, 4TH AND 5TH MOVEMENTS BY BÉLA BARTÓK (1881–1945) Listen for pizzicato (pronounced PITZih-KAH-toh), a playing technique in which the musician plucks the strings of their instrument with their fingers instead of using a bow. This creates a very different sound and adds a feeling of urgency in this folk music. EXCERPT FROM STRING QUARTET IN F MAJOR, 2ND MOVEMENT BY MAURICE RAVEL (1875–1937) Be sure to listen for pizzicato and the sudden changes in dynamics, or volume, which help form the music’s lively dance rhythm.

IMPROVISATIONS/VARIATIONS BY MAUREEN NELSON Composed by one of the Enso String Quartet’s own violinists, this piece is based on Peruvian Quechua (KETCHwah) musical traditions. The Quechua Indians of the Central Andes region of South America are the direct descendents of the Incas. Their folk music ranges from upbeat and patriotic to beautiful and haunting. “MILLE REGRETZ” BY JOSQUIN DES PREZ (1450–1521) The sorrowful love song “Mille Regretz” (or “Thousand Regrets”) is a French chanson, or lyric-driven song, popular during the Renaissance. EXCERPT FROM “KREUTZER SONATA,” 4TH MOVEMENT BY LEOŠ JANÁCEK (1854–1928) Inspired by a Leo Tolstoy novella, the music tells the tragic story of a woman who escapes her unhappy marriage only to end up in a worse situation. In the fourth and final movement, listen for changes in the music’s tempo, or speed, and think about how they help you to understand the story. “BAGEL ON THE MALECON” BY LEV “LJOVA” ZHURBIN (1978) Incorporating different elements of Cuban music, this work is a mix of relaxed and upbeat sounds. Listen for non-traditional playing techniques early in the piece, such as the musicians tapping the instruments with their hands.


PHOTO BY CRISTINA HIRST

All members of the Enso String Quartet play instruments from the “String Family,” including the violin, viola, and cello. All three instruments are made of wood, share similar shapes, and have (you guessed it!) strings! And all create sound when a musician uses a bow or finger to make these strings vibrate. But what are the differences? Here’s how to tell them apart. Test your skills during the performance. Look for…how each instrument is played. The black chinrests on the violin and viola tell you they are held under the player’s chin. The cello is played upright, held between the player’s knees. Listen for…the differences in pitch, or the high or low notes each instrument is able to produce. Although the smallest, the violin can create the highest notes. The viola, while cousin to the violin, has a deeper, more mellow voice. The cello’s bigger body allows for lower, richer tones. LISTEN UP! Learn about the history of classical music at Classical Music in America http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/ multimedia/series/AudioStories/ classical-music-in-america

Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by Adobe Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy’s Foundation; The Morris and

Performance Guide

THE STRING FAMILY

Michael M. Kaiser President

Enso String Quartet

Cuesheet

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

The Many Moods of Music A Performance and Demonstration

Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; and Washington Gas. The Fortas Chamber Music Concerts are supported by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for educational programs at the Kennedy Center is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. Education and related artistic programs are made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet have been developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education and do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education. You should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

PHOTO BY JUERGEN FRANK

Profile for Kennedy Center Education Digital Learning

Enso String Quartet  

Known for their high-energy performances and musical versatility, the Enso String Quartet has proven they are much more than your average ch...

Enso String Quartet  

Known for their high-energy performances and musical versatility, the Enso String Quartet has proven they are much more than your average ch...

Profile for artsedge