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For Teachers and Parents Dear Grownups:

A Good Audience…

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program The musicians will perform a repertoire that includes the musical selections below. Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time.

Concerto for Four Violins in D major, Allegro, by Georg Philipp Telemann (TELL-eh-mahn) Burlesque for Three Violins, Op. 9, by Friedrich Hermann

Wait! There’s More!

The Carnival of Venice: Brilliant Fantasy for Four Violins, Op. 119, by Charles Dancla “Ah, vous dirai je, maman,” Variations for Four Violins, Op. 161, by Charles Dancla

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children: Part of playing music is being able to follow a rhythm. Before or after the concert, clap a rhythm, like slow-slowfast-fast. Ask a friend to copy you. Then switch roles. Try as many different patterns as you like. Why do you think some rhythms are easier to copy than others?

Vary It The performance includes a song that you might recognize as “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” but it is different, too. How does it sound different to you? The version performed is a French folk song. Different versions of the same song are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Education and related artistic programs are made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

artsedge.kennedy-center.org

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, performed by the full NSO: Sunday, May 19, 2013 — The Cricket in Times Square The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo”

“Preview” the Concert Hall

Copycat

Kinderkonzert

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

6

The contents of this Cuesheet were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government. ©2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge. kennedy-center.org/ perfectpitch Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Ever wonder how people become good at playing musical instruments? Find out with the help of four violinists from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), who will show you the ABCs of music and playing the violin. It’s so much fun, you’ll want to cheer “Viva (long live) Violins”! David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by NSO violinists: Elisabeth Adkins Paula Akbar Holly Hamilton Jane Bowyer Stewart and Special Guest Cecily Newman

Hello, teachers and pa

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an


The 123s of Music

At the Concert At the performance, four violin players will act out the story of how they learned to play their favorite instrument—the violin, of course!— with the help of their music teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh. You can’t miss her because she has purple hair and big glasses, and she loves music. During the performance, you’ll see how the musicians went from trying to play their first notes to being able to perform amazing music. To help you get ready, let’s take a sneak peek at some of the ideas from the performance. Pay close attention to the words in bold—they’ll help you understand music and the performance.

Think about a clock ticking or a horse galloping. Those patterns are rhythms. Rhythm is created when sounds are organized into groups and then repeated. Notice how these patterns can differ—some are steady, like a clock ticking. Some are groups of slower and faster, softer and louder sounds, like a horse galloping.

Tuning In To play together, musicians need to pay attention to intonation (pronounced in-tohNAY-shuhn). Intonation means that when two or more musicians play the same notes, the notes sound exactly the same. Violinists do this by placing their fingers on the correct spots on the instrument. They tighten or loosen the strings to make sure the instrument is in tune. During the performance, watch for how the teacher uses a pitch pipe, a little device that produces a tone, to help her students tune their instruments. Playing together also sometimes means playing different notes at the same time on purpose. This is called harmony.

The ABCs of Music Remember learning your ABCs? Learning to play a musical instrument like the violin starts kind of like that. Students begin by learning to make specific sounds, or tones, which are written down as musical notes. These notes are like letters, grouped in musical scales—kind of like the alphabet. Once you learn your notes, you can put them together to make music (like spelling words and making sentences).

Playing in Style During the performance, you’ll also see and hear ways violinists practice and add style to their playing, including: arpeggio (ahr-PEJ-ee-oh)—related notes played one after the other bouncing bow—creating sound by lightly bouncing the bow on the strings double stop—playing two notes at the same time by drawing (pulling) the bow across two strings dynamics—the level of sound (playing softer or louder) pizzicato (pitz-uh-KAH-toh)— with fingers instead of using the bow vibrato (vi-BRAH-toh)—fast, little changes back and forth in the sound of a note

Showtime! Young musicians who have practiced are ready for a recital (a performance by students). They just have one last thing to do—a rehearsal. At the rehearsal, they play their repertoire (REP-er-twahr), which is all the music for the concert, one time through without stopping. Rhythm plays a special role in music. It’s what makes you want to tap your foot, snap your fingers, or clap your hands when you hear the music. It’s made up of strong and weak beats in a repeating pattern. Getting to know the rhythm—and being able to count it—helps you sing and play music by yourself and along with others.

2

Meet the Performers Your musician hosts today are Paula Akbar (who will play the role of the teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh), Jane Stewart, Holly Hamilton, and Elisabeth Adkins. They all started playing the violin as young children. Then, they kept learning and practicing, and today they all perform with the National Symphony Orchestra. And they aren’t even all the violins in the orchestra. Big orchestras like the NSO often have between 80 to 100 musicians, and about 20 to 30 of them are violinists. Imagine the sound they can make together! Special guest Cecily Newman is a sixth grader at Swanson Middle School in Arlington, Virginia. She plays the piano, flute, and violin, and is the daughter of Elisabeth Adkins.

Hair Stick

Grip

3

F-Holes

Neck Strings Fingerboard

Photo by Carol Pratt

And Also Starring…the Violin! The violin is a stringed instrument. It is made of wood with four metal strings. Musicians play the violin using a bow (a wooden stick strung with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The body of the instrument has a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Violins belong to the string family of instruments. The other stringed instruments are the viola, cello, and double bass. Although stringed instruments have similar shapes, they are different sizes, and they make very different sounds. The violin is the smallest, and it makes the highest sound. The double bass, the biggest instrument (usually more than 3 feet tall) makes the lowest sound. To make stringed instruments easier for young children to play, they all come in smaller sizes. During the performance, look for the half-sized violins on stage.

4


The 123s of Music

At the Concert At the performance, four violin players will act out the story of how they learned to play their favorite instrument—the violin, of course!— with the help of their music teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh. You can’t miss her because she has purple hair and big glasses, and she loves music. During the performance, you’ll see how the musicians went from trying to play their first notes to being able to perform amazing music. To help you get ready, let’s take a sneak peek at some of the ideas from the performance. Pay close attention to the words in bold—they’ll help you understand music and the performance.

Think about a clock ticking or a horse galloping. Those patterns are rhythms. Rhythm is created when sounds are organized into groups and then repeated. Notice how these patterns can differ—some are steady, like a clock ticking. Some are groups of slower and faster, softer and louder sounds, like a horse galloping.

Tuning In To play together, musicians need to pay attention to intonation (pronounced in-tohNAY-shuhn). Intonation means that when two or more musicians play the same notes, the notes sound exactly the same. Violinists do this by placing their fingers on the correct spots on the instrument. They tighten or loosen the strings to make sure the instrument is in tune. During the performance, watch for how the teacher uses a pitch pipe, a little device that produces a tone, to help her students tune their instruments. Playing together also sometimes means playing different notes at the same time on purpose. This is called harmony.

The ABCs of Music Remember learning your ABCs? Learning to play a musical instrument like the violin starts kind of like that. Students begin by learning to make specific sounds, or tones, which are written down as musical notes. These notes are like letters, grouped in musical scales—kind of like the alphabet. Once you learn your notes, you can put them together to make music (like spelling words and making sentences).

Playing in Style During the performance, you’ll also see and hear ways violinists practice and add style to their playing, including: arpeggio (ahr-PEJ-ee-oh)—related notes played one after the other bouncing bow—creating sound by lightly bouncing the bow on the strings double stop—playing two notes at the same time by drawing (pulling) the bow across two strings dynamics—the level of sound (playing softer or louder) pizzicato (pitz-uh-KAH-toh)— with fingers instead of using the bow vibrato (vi-BRAH-toh)—fast, little changes back and forth in the sound of a note

Showtime! Young musicians who have practiced are ready for a recital (a performance by students). They just have one last thing to do—a rehearsal. At the rehearsal, they play their repertoire (REP-er-twahr), which is all the music for the concert, one time through without stopping. Rhythm plays a special role in music. It’s what makes you want to tap your foot, snap your fingers, or clap your hands when you hear the music. It’s made up of strong and weak beats in a repeating pattern. Getting to know the rhythm—and being able to count it—helps you sing and play music by yourself and along with others.

2

Meet the Performers Your musician hosts today are Paula Akbar (who will play the role of the teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh), Jane Stewart, Holly Hamilton, and Elisabeth Adkins. They all started playing the violin as young children. Then, they kept learning and practicing, and today they all perform with the National Symphony Orchestra. And they aren’t even all the violins in the orchestra. Big orchestras like the NSO often have between 80 to 100 musicians, and about 20 to 30 of them are violinists. Imagine the sound they can make together! Special guest Cecily Newman is a sixth grader at Swanson Middle School in Arlington, Virginia. She plays the piano, flute, and violin, and is the daughter of Elisabeth Adkins.

Hair Stick

Grip

3

F-Holes

Neck Strings Fingerboard

Photo by Carol Pratt

And Also Starring…the Violin! The violin is a stringed instrument. It is made of wood with four metal strings. Musicians play the violin using a bow (a wooden stick strung with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The body of the instrument has a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Violins belong to the string family of instruments. The other stringed instruments are the viola, cello, and double bass. Although stringed instruments have similar shapes, they are different sizes, and they make very different sounds. The violin is the smallest, and it makes the highest sound. The double bass, the biggest instrument (usually more than 3 feet tall) makes the lowest sound. To make stringed instruments easier for young children to play, they all come in smaller sizes. During the performance, look for the half-sized violins on stage.

4


The 123s of Music

At the Concert At the performance, four violin players will act out the story of how they learned to play their favorite instrument—the violin, of course!— with the help of their music teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh. You can’t miss her because she has purple hair and big glasses, and she loves music. During the performance, you’ll see how the musicians went from trying to play their first notes to being able to perform amazing music. To help you get ready, let’s take a sneak peek at some of the ideas from the performance. Pay close attention to the words in bold—they’ll help you understand music and the performance.

Think about a clock ticking or a horse galloping. Those patterns are rhythms. Rhythm is created when sounds are organized into groups and then repeated. Notice how these patterns can differ—some are steady, like a clock ticking. Some are groups of slower and faster, softer and louder sounds, like a horse galloping.

Tuning In To play together, musicians need to pay attention to intonation (pronounced in-tohNAY-shuhn). Intonation means that when two or more musicians play the same notes, the notes sound exactly the same. Violinists do this by placing their fingers on the correct spots on the instrument. They tighten or loosen the strings to make sure the instrument is in tune. During the performance, watch for how the teacher uses a pitch pipe, a little device that produces a tone, to help her students tune their instruments. Playing together also sometimes means playing different notes at the same time on purpose. This is called harmony.

The ABCs of Music Remember learning your ABCs? Learning to play a musical instrument like the violin starts kind of like that. Students begin by learning to make specific sounds, or tones, which are written down as musical notes. These notes are like letters, grouped in musical scales—kind of like the alphabet. Once you learn your notes, you can put them together to make music (like spelling words and making sentences).

Playing in Style During the performance, you’ll also see and hear ways violinists practice and add style to their playing, including: arpeggio (ahr-PEJ-ee-oh)—related notes played one after the other bouncing bow—creating sound by lightly bouncing the bow on the strings double stop—playing two notes at the same time by drawing (pulling) the bow across two strings dynamics—the level of sound (playing softer or louder) pizzicato (pitz-uh-KAH-toh)— with fingers instead of using the bow vibrato (vi-BRAH-toh)—fast, little changes back and forth in the sound of a note

Showtime! Young musicians who have practiced are ready for a recital (a performance by students). They just have one last thing to do—a rehearsal. At the rehearsal, they play their repertoire (REP-er-twahr), which is all the music for the concert, one time through without stopping. Rhythm plays a special role in music. It’s what makes you want to tap your foot, snap your fingers, or clap your hands when you hear the music. It’s made up of strong and weak beats in a repeating pattern. Getting to know the rhythm—and being able to count it—helps you sing and play music by yourself and along with others.

2

Meet the Performers Your musician hosts today are Paula Akbar (who will play the role of the teacher, Madame Mavis Pugh), Jane Stewart, Holly Hamilton, and Elisabeth Adkins. They all started playing the violin as young children. Then, they kept learning and practicing, and today they all perform with the National Symphony Orchestra. And they aren’t even all the violins in the orchestra. Big orchestras like the NSO often have between 80 to 100 musicians, and about 20 to 30 of them are violinists. Imagine the sound they can make together! Special guest Cecily Newman is a sixth grader at Swanson Middle School in Arlington, Virginia. She plays the piano, flute, and violin, and is the daughter of Elisabeth Adkins.

Hair Stick

Grip

3

F-Holes

Neck Strings Fingerboard

Photo by Carol Pratt

And Also Starring…the Violin! The violin is a stringed instrument. It is made of wood with four metal strings. Musicians play the violin using a bow (a wooden stick strung with a tight ribbon of horsehair) in their right hand and pressing the string with the fingers of their left hand. The body of the instrument has a hollow center. This center is called a resonating chamber, and it makes the sound of the strings loud and strong. That sound comes out of the two f-shaped holes. Violins belong to the string family of instruments. The other stringed instruments are the viola, cello, and double bass. Although stringed instruments have similar shapes, they are different sizes, and they make very different sounds. The violin is the smallest, and it makes the highest sound. The double bass, the biggest instrument (usually more than 3 feet tall) makes the lowest sound. To make stringed instruments easier for young children to play, they all come in smaller sizes. During the performance, look for the half-sized violins on stage.

4


For Teachers and Parents Dear Grownups:

A Good Audience…

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program The musicians will perform a repertoire that includes the musical selections below. Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time.

Concerto for Four Violins in D major, Allegro, by Georg Philipp Telemann (TELL-eh-mahn) Burlesque for Three Violins, Op. 9, by Friedrich Hermann

Wait! There’s More!

The Carnival of Venice: Brilliant Fantasy for Four Violins, Op. 119, by Charles Dancla “Ah, vous dirai je, maman,” Variations for Four Violins, Op. 161, by Charles Dancla

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children: Part of playing music is being able to follow a rhythm. Before or after the concert, clap a rhythm, like slow-slowfast-fast. Ask a friend to copy you. Then switch roles. Try as many different patterns as you like. Why do you think some rhythms are easier to copy than others?

Vary It The performance includes a song that you might recognize as “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” but it is different, too. How does it sound different to you? The version performed is a French folk song. Different versions of the same song are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Education and related artistic programs are made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

artsedge.kennedy-center.org

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, performed by the full NSO: Sunday, May 19, 2013 — The Cricket in Times Square The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo”

“Preview” the Concert Hall

Copycat

Kinderkonzert

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

6

The contents of this Cuesheet were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government. ©2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge. kennedy-center.org/ perfectpitch Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Ever wonder how people become good at playing musical instruments? Find out with the help of four violinists from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), who will show you the ABCs of music and playing the violin. It’s so much fun, you’ll want to cheer “Viva (long live) Violins”! David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by NSO violinists: Elisabeth Adkins Paula Akbar Holly Hamilton Jane Bowyer Stewart and Special Guest Cecily Newman

Hello, teachers and pa

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an


For Teachers and Parents Dear Grownups:

A Good Audience…

stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps. Have fun!

Welcome to the NSO Kinderkonzerts, designed to introduce children in pre-kindergarten through grade 2 to musical instruments of the orchestra. Please help your young concertgoers read and understand the information in this Cuesheet. The information and activity ideas below are designed to help you further the children’s concert experience.

The Concert Program The musicians will perform a repertoire that includes the musical selections below. Before or after the concert, you may want to have the children listen to some or all of these musical selections if you have access to them in the library or online. Ask children to see whether they can recognize the music when they hear it the second time.

Concerto for Four Violins in D major, Allegro, by Georg Philipp Telemann (TELL-eh-mahn) Burlesque for Three Violins, Op. 9, by Friedrich Hermann

Wait! There’s More!

The Carnival of Venice: Brilliant Fantasy for Four Violins, Op. 119, by Charles Dancla “Ah, vous dirai je, maman,” Variations for Four Violins, Op. 161, by Charles Dancla

More Fun With Music Here are some activities for children: Part of playing music is being able to follow a rhythm. Before or after the concert, clap a rhythm, like slow-slowfast-fast. Ask a friend to copy you. Then switch roles. Try as many different patterns as you like. Why do you think some rhythms are easier to copy than others?

Vary It The performance includes a song that you might recognize as “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” but it is different, too. How does it sound different to you? The version performed is a French folk song. Different versions of the same song are called variations. Take a song you know, and try creating a variation for it—like changing the words or doing parts of it faster or slower. Share it with friends and see whether they recognize it.

Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation, The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Education and related artistic programs are made possible through the generosity of the National Committee for the Performing Arts and the President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts.

Before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Hall of States. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

artsedge.kennedy-center.org

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

We hope you have so much fun at the concert that you’ll come back soon to hear a performance of the full National Symphony Orchestra—that’s 100 musicians! When they all play together, they perform on the big stage in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Get a sneak peak at the Hall (and even go backstage) in the playful online tour led by former NSO Associate Conductor Emil de Cou at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/nsoed.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please build on your Kinderkonzert experience by joining us at the next National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, performed by the full NSO: Sunday, May 19, 2013 — The Cricket in Times Square The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center.org/nso/nsoed

5

Michael M. Kaiser President

Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo”

“Preview” the Concert Hall

Copycat

Kinderkonzert

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

6

The contents of this Cuesheet were developed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Education. However those contents do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal government. ©2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge. kennedy-center.org/ perfectpitch Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Ever wonder how people become good at playing musical instruments? Find out with the help of four violinists from the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO), who will show you the ABCs of music and playing the violin. It’s so much fun, you’ll want to cheer “Viva (long live) Violins”! David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Performed by NSO violinists: Elisabeth Adkins Paula Akbar Holly Hamilton Jane Bowyer Stewart and Special Guest Cecily Newman

Hello, teachers and pa

rents! Please see page 5 for d activities. information an


Viva Violins: National Symphony Orchestra Kinderkonzert