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Sweetly sings the symphony, Heartfelt strings in harmony. hmmmm… Drumsticks beat and boldly bugles call, Bringing forth a sunny smile on all. Maximus Musicus, music mouse. Maximus Musicus ‘Bout music is so curious. Concert over, musicians stand, Audience claps, bravo for the band! Maxi, Maxi, Maxi, Maxi mouse, Happily exploring the huge concert house. Maximus Musicus, music mouse.

WAIT! THERE’S MORE! During the festival, visit the Nordic Cool 2013 free interactive space just for kids where you can learn more about the Nordic region, create art, and play games. Located in the Nations (South) Gallery on the Roof Terrace Level from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher Maximus Musicus Visits the Orchestra is supported by the Nordic Culture Fund.

Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts. Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. — as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Maximus Musicus

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Maximus Musicus, Went inside a very large house, Into a hole he quickly crept, Cuddled up and soundly slept. Maxi, Maxi, Maxi, Maxi mouse, Happily exploring the huge concert house. Maximus Musicus, music mouse.

Visits the Orchestra Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Ilan Volkov, Conductor Valur Freyr Einarsson, Narrator Adapted from the book Maximus Musicus Visits the Orchestra by Hallfrídur Ólafsdóttir with illustrations by Þórarinn Már Baldursson

Want to know how an orchestra prepares for a concert? Well then, come along and join Maximus Musicus (or Maxi, for short), on his marvelous musical adventure.

Cuesheet

ICELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

MAXI’S SONG


ABOUT THE STORY Brrrr. It’s a cold, snowy night when a little mouse named Maxi runs into the nearest building for a warm night’s sleep. In the morning, he wakes up to unfamiliar noises and discovers he is backstage at a concert hall, right in the middle of an orchestra rehearsal. Maxi watches the musicians warm up, fascinated by the different instruments and sounds. When the orchestra begins to practice, Maxi is amazed by all the ways music can be played—soft, loud, slow, fast, happy, sad. And, Maxi loves them all!

WHAT MAKES AN ORCHESTRA? While hiding on stage, Maxi learns about the four sections, or families of instruments, that make up the orchestra: The string section is made up of violins, violas, cellos, basses, and harps. These instruments are made of wood and have (you guessed it!) strings. They make sound when a bow or finger is used to make these strings vibrate.

The woodwind section gathers the flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons. Woodwinds can be made from a variety of materials, but they all create sound when a musician blows air across a hole or reed (a thin strip of woody grass).

The brass section includes horns, trumpets, trombones, and tubas. Brass instruments are made of metal. Players blow air and “buzz” their lips against a mouthpiece to create sounds that can be very loud. The percussion section is home to drums, chimes, gongs, cymbals, and whistles. Members of this family make sound by being hit, shaken, rubbed, or scraped—or any action that makes all or part of the instruments vibrate.

THE CONCERT PROGRAM After the musicians tune their instruments, you and Maxi will hear the wonderful sounds of the orchestra playing:

Boléro by Maurice Ravel It’s a rollercoaster of a musical ride as this piece begins soft and sad, but gets louder and happier as more instruments join in. Listen for how the loudness and softness changes the mood or feel of the music.

Symphony No. 5, 1st movement by Ludwig van Beethoven You may be familiar with this piece, or at least its very famous opening musical notes, “da-da-da-DUM.” Listen for how many different ways these notes are repeated throughout the piece.

“Maxi’s Song” by Hallfrídur Ólafsdóttir After you hear Maxi’s story, sing and act along with the orchestra. You’ll find the words on the back of this Cuesheet. Practice them before the concert.

“Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copland This slow marching music salutes our everyday heroes. Listen for the steady, strong beats of the drums and the expressive, patriotic sounds of the trumpets.

On Sprengisandur by Sigvaldi Kaldalóns

See how many of these instruments you can spot during the performance!

where travelers try to pass through as quickly as possible. Listen for how the music’s fast tempo sounds like a hurrying horseman.

This Icelandic folk song tells the story of a horseman’s journey through Sprengisandur, Iceland—a dangerous, ancient pass in the middle of nowhere,

LISTEN UP! Check out more on orchestras, their instruments, and their music at Perfect Pitch: http://artesdge. kennedy-center.org/interactives/ perfectpitch


ABOUT THE STORY Brrrr. It’s a cold, snowy night when a little mouse named Maxi runs into the nearest building for a warm night’s sleep. In the morning, he wakes up to unfamiliar noises and discovers he is backstage at a concert hall, right in the middle of an orchestra rehearsal. Maxi watches the musicians warm up, fascinated by the different instruments and sounds. When the orchestra begins to practice, Maxi is amazed by all the ways music can be played—soft, loud, slow, fast, happy, sad. And, Maxi loves them all!

WHAT MAKES AN ORCHESTRA? While hiding on stage, Maxi learns about the four sections, or families of instruments, that make up the orchestra: The string section is made up of violins, violas, cellos, basses, and harps. These instruments are made of wood and have (you guessed it!) strings. They make sound when a bow or finger is used to make these strings vibrate.

The woodwind section gathers the flutes, oboes, clarinets, and bassoons. Woodwinds can be made from a variety of materials, but they all create sound when a musician blows air across a hole or reed (a thin strip of woody grass).

The brass section includes horns, trumpets, trombones, and tubas. Brass instruments are made of metal. Players blow air and “buzz” their lips against a mouthpiece to create sounds that can be very loud. The percussion section is home to drums, chimes, gongs, cymbals, and whistles. Members of this family make sound by being hit, shaken, rubbed, or scraped—or any action that makes all or part of the instruments vibrate.

THE CONCERT PROGRAM After the musicians tune their instruments, you and Maxi will hear the wonderful sounds of the orchestra playing:

Boléro by Maurice Ravel It’s a rollercoaster of a musical ride as this piece begins soft and sad, but gets louder and happier as more instruments join in. Listen for how the loudness and softness changes the mood or feel of the music.

Symphony No. 5, 1st movement by Ludwig van Beethoven You may be familiar with this piece, or at least its very famous opening musical notes, “da-da-da-DUM.” Listen for how many different ways these notes are repeated throughout the piece.

“Maxi’s Song” by Hallfrídur Ólafsdóttir After you hear Maxi’s story, sing and act along with the orchestra. You’ll find the words on the back of this Cuesheet. Practice them before the concert.

“Fanfare for the Common Man” by Aaron Copland This slow marching music salutes our everyday heroes. Listen for the steady, strong beats of the drums and the expressive, patriotic sounds of the trumpets.

On Sprengisandur by Sigvaldi Kaldalóns

See how many of these instruments you can spot during the performance!

where travelers try to pass through as quickly as possible. Listen for how the music’s fast tempo sounds like a hurrying horseman.

This Icelandic folk song tells the story of a horseman’s journey through Sprengisandur, Iceland—a dangerous, ancient pass in the middle of nowhere,

LISTEN UP! Check out more on orchestras, their instruments, and their music at Perfect Pitch: http://artesdge. kennedy-center.org/interactives/ perfectpitch


Sweetly sings the symphony, Heartfelt strings in harmony. hmmmm… Drumsticks beat and boldly bugles call, Bringing forth a sunny smile on all. Maximus Musicus, music mouse. Maximus Musicus ‘Bout music is so curious. Concert over, musicians stand, Audience claps, bravo for the band! Maxi, Maxi, Maxi, Maxi mouse, Happily exploring the huge concert house. Maximus Musicus, music mouse.

WAIT! THERE’S MORE! During the festival, visit the Nordic Cool 2013 free interactive space just for kids where you can learn more about the Nordic region, create art, and play games. Located in the Nations (South) Gallery on the Roof Terrace Level from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher Maximus Musicus Visits the Orchestra is supported by the Nordic Culture Fund.

Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts. Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. — as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Maximus Musicus

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

Maximus Musicus, Went inside a very large house, Into a hole he quickly crept, Cuddled up and soundly slept. Maxi, Maxi, Maxi, Maxi mouse, Happily exploring the huge concert house. Maximus Musicus, music mouse.

Visits the Orchestra Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall Ilan Volkov, Conductor Valur Freyr Einarsson, Narrator Adapted from the book Maximus Musicus Visits the Orchestra by Hallfrídur Ólafsdóttir with illustrations by Þórarinn Már Baldursson

Want to know how an orchestra prepares for a concert? Well then, come along and join Maximus Musicus (or Maxi, for short), on his marvelous musical adventure.

Cuesheet

ICELAND SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

MAXI’S SONG

Iceland Symphony Orchestra | Maximus Musicus Visits the Orchestra  

Meet Maximus Musicus, a mouse who discovers many funny and wonderful sounds during his visit to a concert hall. Based upon a popular book, t...

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