Page 1

HEMSING SISTERS

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Performance/Demonstration

Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

Thanks to their upbringing and deep roots in Norway’s folk music traditions, the sisters developed a unique approach to classical music, fusing the two styles together. They are known for this fresh sound, and are considered two of Norway’s biggest rising stars.

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel.

Eldbjørg (left) and Ragnhild (right) Hemsing

YOU, THE AUDIENCE After the performance, Ragnhild and Eldbjørg will do a Question-and-Answer session, so be sure to have your questions ready.

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. — as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

PHOTO BY TOMM HANSEN

PHOTO OF RAGNHILD HEMSING BY THOR ØSTBYE

International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

The Hemsing sisters grew up in a musical family and were introduced to both classical and Norwegian folk traditions at an early age. Now in their early 20s, Ragnhild and Eldbjørg are a great duo though each is an acclaimed soloist in her own right. Both ladies have performed together and alone with leading orchestras in Norway and Europe, as well as at numerous music festivals around the world.

Cuesheet

THE

Sister/Sister


About the Program

Get to know the Hemsing sisters and their musical style as they perform a diverse program of classical masterpieces, in addition to some lesser-known, traditional Norwegian folk songs. You’ll have the opportunity to learn the art of active listening and how to interpret classical music.

The Violin

Neck Strings Fingerboard

Hair F-Holes

Stick

Grip The Bow

The Music of Norway Ragnhild and Eldbjørg grew up in a mountain village in Valdres (pronounced vahl-drace), a district in southern Norway with a strong folk music tradition. The sisters will play a selection of folk songs that demonstrate the music’s emphasis on playfulness and freedom. These pieces are often intended for dancing and encourage musical improvisation.

ALL IN THE STRING FAMILY The Hemsing sisters each play the violin and Hardanger fiddle, both members of the “String Family,” a group of instruments categorized for their commonalities. They are made of wood, share similar shape, and have (you guessed it!) strings! However, while these instruments may look the same at first glance, they do have very different sounds. Check out all of their similarities and differences below and see if you can tell the two apart during the performance: Both instruments are played the same way. The performer holds one end under the chin and the other end in one hand, which is also used to press the strings against the fingerboard. By using those fingers to change the length of the vibrating string, the player alters the highness or lowness of the notes. The other hand “plays” the instrument by drawing a bow across the strings—or using the fingers to pluck the strings, which is called pizzicato (pronounced PITZ-uh-KAH-toh).

The violin and Hardanger fiddle both have a set of four strings. But, the Hardanger fiddle also has an additional four or five strings located underneath the fingerboard. These are not played on, but if the fiddle is tuned correctly, they will resonate wonderfully when the upper strings are played, creating a very specific sound. The violin has a range of about four octaves. The Hardanger fiddle can be tuned up to 25 different ways, resulting in a much greater range of notes that can be played. As opposed to the violin, Hardanger fiddles are ornately decorated with patterns. These designs vary and represent the style of the instrument’s maker. While there are countless compositions written for the violin, the Hardanger fiddle is based on a tradition without written notes. Music is learned and played completely by ear.

PHOTO BY GLENN DONNELLAN

Meet Norwegian violinists Ragnhild and Eldbjørg Hemsing (pronounced RAHNGnill and ELD-eh-BORG), sisters who have been playing together since the ages of five and seven.

The Hardanger fiddle


About the Program

Get to know the Hemsing sisters and their musical style as they perform a diverse program of classical masterpieces, in addition to some lesser-known, traditional Norwegian folk songs. You’ll have the opportunity to learn the art of active listening and how to interpret classical music.

The Violin

Neck Strings Fingerboard

Hair F-Holes

Stick

Grip The Bow

The Music of Norway Ragnhild and Eldbjørg grew up in a mountain village in Valdres (pronounced vahl-drace), a district in southern Norway with a strong folk music tradition. The sisters will play a selection of folk songs that demonstrate the music’s emphasis on playfulness and freedom. These pieces are often intended for dancing and encourage musical improvisation.

ALL IN THE STRING FAMILY The Hemsing sisters each play the violin and Hardanger fiddle, both members of the “String Family,” a group of instruments categorized for their commonalities. They are made of wood, share similar shape, and have (you guessed it!) strings! However, while these instruments may look the same at first glance, they do have very different sounds. Check out all of their similarities and differences below and see if you can tell the two apart during the performance: Both instruments are played the same way. The performer holds one end under the chin and the other end in one hand, which is also used to press the strings against the fingerboard. By using those fingers to change the length of the vibrating string, the player alters the highness or lowness of the notes. The other hand “plays” the instrument by drawing a bow across the strings—or using the fingers to pluck the strings, which is called pizzicato (pronounced PITZ-uh-KAH-toh).

The violin and Hardanger fiddle both have a set of four strings. But, the Hardanger fiddle also has an additional four or five strings located underneath the fingerboard. These are not played on, but if the fiddle is tuned correctly, they will resonate wonderfully when the upper strings are played, creating a very specific sound. The violin has a range of about four octaves. The Hardanger fiddle can be tuned up to 25 different ways, resulting in a much greater range of notes that can be played. As opposed to the violin, Hardanger fiddles are ornately decorated with patterns. These designs vary and represent the style of the instrument’s maker. While there are countless compositions written for the violin, the Hardanger fiddle is based on a tradition without written notes. Music is learned and played completely by ear.

PHOTO BY GLENN DONNELLAN

Meet Norwegian violinists Ragnhild and Eldbjørg Hemsing (pronounced RAHNGnill and ELD-eh-BORG), sisters who have been playing together since the ages of five and seven.

The Hardanger fiddle


HEMSING SISTERS

David M. Rubenstein Chairman

Performance/Demonstration

Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

Thanks to their upbringing and deep roots in Norway’s folk music traditions, the sisters developed a unique approach to classical music, fusing the two styles together. They are known for this fresh sound, and are considered two of Norway’s biggest rising stars.

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel.

Eldbjørg (left) and Ragnhild (right) Hemsing

YOU, THE AUDIENCE After the performance, Ragnhild and Eldbjørg will do a Question-and-Answer session, so be sure to have your questions ready.

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. — as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

PHOTO BY TOMM HANSEN

PHOTO OF RAGNHILD HEMSING BY THOR ØSTBYE

International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts.

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

The Hemsing sisters grew up in a musical family and were introduced to both classical and Norwegian folk traditions at an early age. Now in their early 20s, Ragnhild and Eldbjørg are a great duo though each is an acclaimed soloist in her own right. Both ladies have performed together and alone with leading orchestras in Norway and Europe, as well as at numerous music festivals around the world.

Cuesheet

THE

Sister/Sister

The Hemsing Sisters: A Performance and Demonstration  

Meet Norwegian violinists Ragnhild and Eldbjørg Hemsing, sisters who have been playing together since the ages of five and seven. Get to kno...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you