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■ ■ ■

the musician gets free from being stuck—twice everyday foods and objects are used the pickup truck becomes a small stage

LISTEN FOR… ■ ■ ■

the music by the accordion, trumpet, and double bass how the music changes when the wolf appears how you know Little Red Riding Hood’s feelings without hearing her when her mother tells her to go to grandmother’s house

THINK ABOUT… ■

what lessons you learned from the story and the performance what items from around your school or home you would choose to represent Little Red Riding Hood, grandmother, and the wolf, and why

Meet the Theater Company Teatret Gruppe 38 (pronounced TEE-AY-trut GROOP) comes from Denmark. You might notice that the performers speak English a little differently. That’s called an accent, and they have one because their first language is Danish, not English. They perform all over the world, and they love telling a good story on stage in ways that might challenge and surprise you.

A GOOD AUDIENCE… stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps at the end. Have fun and be prepared to be surprised!

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

WATCH FOR HOW…

Cuesheet

DENMARK’S TEATRET GRUPPE 38

The Tale End

A Sonatina

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher This presentation is sponsored by the Danish Arts Council Committee for the Performing Arts.

Think you know the story of Little Red Riding Hood? Well, wait until you see how a storyteller, two musicians, a chicken, and some everyday items tell the story of the little girl and the big bad wolf. Just remember to bring your imagination!

A Sonatina is supported by the Nordic Culture Fund.

Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts. Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. —as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at The Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by


A Different Kind of Storytelling ABOUT THE PERFORMANCE

LITTLER, LIGHTER, AND LOONIER

A GRIMM TALE

A storyteller and two musicians want to perform the story Little Red Riding Hood. But getting ready to tell the story turns out to be half the work—and fun. Watch the storyteller’s crazy efforts to get everyone (including a chicken!) and everything she needs ready for the performance. Notice especially the items she gathers and introduces to you. These “players,” as she calls them, will take on important roles in the story.

Wondering why the performance of Little Red Riding Hood is called A Sonatina? Good question! There’s no one right answer, but here are some things to think about. “Sonatina” (pronounced son-uh-TEE-nuh) usually refers to a piece of music that’s often shorter and, though serious, also a little more playful. How could a word that normally describes music describe this performance, too? Look for ideas as the show unfolds. See how the performers go about their telling of a tale—a tale that involves terrible danger. Afterward, discuss your thoughts on the title with your family and friends.

Little Red Riding Hood is a fairy tale, like Sleeping Beauty and Hansel and Gretel. These kinds of stories often have magical beings or events and teach a moral or lesson. Charles Perrault (from France) and Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (brothers from Germany) wrote versions of these tales hundreds of years ago. The version you’ll see mostly follows the Grimms’ story. It’s a scary one about a girl who travels through a forest to visit her sick grandmother. Along the way, she meets a mean and hungry wolf with a wicked plan.

THE STORYTELLER’S TOOLBOX During the performance, your storyteller gets help telling the story from her musician friends and an old pickup truck that becomes a little stage. She also uses some other storytelling tools: ■

Simple props (objects actors use) to stand in for characters and actions

Simple costume changes, like changing coats or hats

Different voices, like a higher voice for Little Red Riding Hood

Different movements, like sudden, rough movements for the wolf

Different faces, like wide eyes to show fear

TROUBLE—AND GETTING OUT OF IT During the performance, one of the musicians gets stuck and needs help. It happens twice! And both times, the storyteller says, “It’s really stupid for you to be dependent on other people every time you want to get out.” Do you agree with her? Who else gets stuck and can’t get out without help? What lessons could you learn from their troubles?


A Different Kind of Storytelling ABOUT THE PERFORMANCE

LITTLER, LIGHTER, AND LOONIER

A GRIMM TALE

A storyteller and two musicians want to perform the story Little Red Riding Hood. But getting ready to tell the story turns out to be half the work—and fun. Watch the storyteller’s crazy efforts to get everyone (including a chicken!) and everything she needs ready for the performance. Notice especially the items she gathers and introduces to you. These “players,” as she calls them, will take on important roles in the story.

Wondering why the performance of Little Red Riding Hood is called A Sonatina? Good question! There’s no one right answer, but here are some things to think about. “Sonatina” (pronounced son-uh-TEE-nuh) usually refers to a piece of music that’s often shorter and, though serious, also a little more playful. How could a word that normally describes music describe this performance, too? Look for ideas as the show unfolds. See how the performers go about their telling of a tale—a tale that involves terrible danger. Afterward, discuss your thoughts on the title with your family and friends.

Little Red Riding Hood is a fairy tale, like Sleeping Beauty and Hansel and Gretel. These kinds of stories often have magical beings or events and teach a moral or lesson. Charles Perrault (from France) and Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm (brothers from Germany) wrote versions of these tales hundreds of years ago. The version you’ll see mostly follows the Grimms’ story. It’s a scary one about a girl who travels through a forest to visit her sick grandmother. Along the way, she meets a mean and hungry wolf with a wicked plan.

THE STORYTELLER’S TOOLBOX During the performance, your storyteller gets help telling the story from her musician friends and an old pickup truck that becomes a little stage. She also uses some other storytelling tools: ■

Simple props (objects actors use) to stand in for characters and actions

Simple costume changes, like changing coats or hats

Different voices, like a higher voice for Little Red Riding Hood

Different movements, like sudden, rough movements for the wolf

Different faces, like wide eyes to show fear

TROUBLE—AND GETTING OUT OF IT During the performance, one of the musicians gets stuck and needs help. It happens twice! And both times, the storyteller says, “It’s really stupid for you to be dependent on other people every time you want to get out.” Do you agree with her? Who else gets stuck and can’t get out without help? What lessons could you learn from their troubles?


■ ■ ■

the musician gets free from being stuck—twice everyday foods and objects are used the pickup truck becomes a small stage

LISTEN FOR… ■ ■ ■

the music by the accordion, trumpet, and double bass how the music changes when the wolf appears how you know Little Red Riding Hood’s feelings without hearing her when her mother tells her to go to grandmother’s house

THINK ABOUT… ■

what lessons you learned from the story and the performance what items from around your school or home you would choose to represent Little Red Riding Hood, grandmother, and the wolf, and why

Meet the Theater Company Teatret Gruppe 38 (pronounced TEE-AY-trut GROOP) comes from Denmark. You might notice that the performers speak English a little differently. That’s called an accent, and they have one because their first language is Danish, not English. They perform all over the world, and they love telling a good story on stage in ways that might challenge and surprise you.

A GOOD AUDIENCE… stays seated, stays quiet, doesn’t eat, listens, and claps at the end. Have fun and be prepared to be surprised!

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education Nordic Cool 2013 is presented in cooperation with the Nordic Council of Ministers

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

WATCH FOR HOW…

Cuesheet

DENMARK’S TEATRET GRUPPE 38

The Tale End

A Sonatina

and Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. Presenting Underwriter HRH Foundation Festival Co-Chairs The Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Marilyn Carlson Nelson, and Barbro Osher This presentation is sponsored by the Danish Arts Council Committee for the Performing Arts.

Think you know the story of Little Red Riding Hood? Well, wait until you see how a storyteller, two musicians, a chicken, and some everyday items tell the story of the little girl and the big bad wolf. Just remember to bring your imagination!

A Sonatina is supported by the Nordic Culture Fund.

Major support is provided by the Honorable Bonnie McElveen-Hunter, Mrs. Marilyn Carlson Nelson and Dr. Glen Nelson, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, David M. Rubenstein, and the State Plaza Hotel. International Programming at the Kennedy Center is made possible through the generosity of the Kennedy Center International Committee on the Arts. Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by Adobe Foundation; The Clark Charitable Foundation; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Macy*s Foundation; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; Park Foundation, Inc.; Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; U.S. Department of Education; Washington Gas; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program. —as of December 31, 2012

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. Learn more about Education at The Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2013 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Profile for Kennedy Center Education Digital Learning

Teatret Gruppe 38 | A Sonatina  

A unique and comedic look at the classic story of Little Red Riding Hood from the internationally renowned Danish company, Gruppe 38. See ho...

Teatret Gruppe 38 | A Sonatina  

A unique and comedic look at the classic story of Little Red Riding Hood from the internationally renowned Danish company, Gruppe 38. See ho...

Profile for artsedge