Page 1

23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:34 PM

Page 1

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Dear Grownups:

The information on this page is designed to help you further the adventure of Princess of Kaguya with your children.

At the

, you are the

.

Saying Goodbye Princess of Kaguya doesn’t have a feel-good “Hollywood” ending, so you may find it appropriate to start a conversation with your child about the natural role of saying goodbye. Perhaps you have close friends or family members who have moved—leaving you, but finding another place that’s a good fit for them. Remind your child that there are ways to lessen the burden of parting from a loved one: You can reminisce about good times, appreciate what the person has brought to your life, and move on to your own new beginning. Part of the show’s uplifting message is that “there are times when you have to endure and overcome the grief of parting with each other.” Ask your child how he or she thinks the Woodcutter and the Wife will do this. When Princess Kaguya leaves, how will their lives change?

Warm Up Your Imagination

This is different from

a

ing

or

. You are in the same room with

the

. They do best when you

and

carefully.

Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

like it when

Here are some activities you may want to help children try after the performance: MAKE YOUR OWN SHADOW PUPPET THEATER

Guide your children as they craft silhouettes out of cardboard, creating handles out of popsicle sticks, chopsticks, or the cardboard tube from a paper towel roll. Drape a bed sheet or tablecloth over the edge of a table. Dim the room lights and, using flashlights or a directed desk or standing lamp, start the show.

the

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by the President's Advisory Committee on the Arts, Capital One Bank, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Clark Charitable Foundation, Fight for Children, Inc., Mr. James V. Kimsey, The Kirstein Family Foundation, The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Linda and Tobia Mercuro, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Park Foundation, Inc., the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, Mrs. Irene Pollin, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk, Ms. Beverly Walcoff, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Verizon Foundation.

Presented by Silhouette Theatre TSUNOBUE and The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Sponsored by The Japan Foundation, THE TOKYO CLUB, and New Heritage Theatre Group

reacts to parts of the story

Endorsed by The Embassy of Japan in the United States of America

that are

,

,

or

s s e c P r in a y u g a K f o Performed by Shadow Puppet Theatre TSUNOBUE Tokyo, Japan Nowadays, people have actually traveled to the moon, but a long, long time ago, the night sky was still a mystery. Back then, people would stare at the moon and think up all sorts of stories about it. Princess of Kaguya is one such tale—perhaps the most famous one of all.

. If you like www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge

ADD A DIMENSION

TSUNOBUE performed Princess of Kaguya using shadow puppets, but your children can reenact the show using any other type of puppet you’d like. Old tube socks + yarn for hair = a hand puppet Kaguya. Old glove fingers + a toothpick axe = a finger puppet woodcutter. Encourage your children to build three-dimensional puppets to represent the characters in any story they enjoy. Create a travel kit and the puppets can join you for car trips and vacations.

the

, show it by

at the end.

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedycenter.org/education

audience

watch

movie

performers

sad

listen

The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2012 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

TV

5

funny

clapping

performance

happy

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

A Good Audience

Cuesheet

For Teachers and Parents


23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:36 PM

Page 4

The Story of Princess Kaguya The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter

The Shadow Puppet Theater

Meet the Main Characters

In a Land Far, Far Away

Here are the most important people you’ll meet in the story:

Princess Kaguya and her parents live in a village near Tokyo, the capital of Japan. TSUNOBUE, the shadow puppet theater that performs this show, is also from Tokyo.

The Woodcutter: Taketori no Okina, an old man who works as a bamboo TSUNOBUE (pronounced tsoo-no-BOOfurniture maker and lives in a mountain eh) adapted this puppet theater version village not far from Tokyo, the capital of Princess of Kaguya (KAH-goo-yah) city of Japan. He finds from an old Japanese Princess Kaguya while Princess Kaguya’s name fairy tale called “The Tale working late one night. means “Shining Beauty.” of the Bamboo Cutter,” His Wife: An old woman which was written in the who has been married to the 10th century, more than woodcutter for many years. one thousand years ago. She helps to raise Princess Kaguya.

What Happens in the Story

One night, in the Japanese countryside, a childless woodcutter named Taketori no Okina (tah-keh-TOR-ee no OH-kee-nah) goes out to work by the light of the moon. He chops open a bamboo stem, planning to use it to make furniture, and discovers something unusual inside: a thumb-sized baby girl! The woodcutter and his wife decide to raise the baby as their own, and she grows into a very beautiful, human-sized young woman. In fact, Princess Kaguya is so lovely that five different princes are willing to do anything, even fight dragons, just to marry her. Then the Emperor himself proposes. What will Princess Kaguya say? It turns out she has a surprise for everyone.

2

WASHINGTON, DC

TOKYO

A Puppet Primer: Many Sizes, Many Shapes TSUNOBUE’s shadows are only one of many types of puppets. Others include: Finger—the puppet body fits on one finger Hand/glove/sock—one hand moves the puppet from inside Rod—named for the rods and sticks used to move the puppet String or marionette—held up and moved by strings

Princess Kaguya: An incredibly tiny baby girl who appears in the center of a bamboo stem.

During the performance of Princess of Kaguya, TSUNOBUE uses 80 different puppets. Some represent scenery, or objects such as this chariot, and others are characters in the story.

The Scholar: A wise man from Tokyo who comes to help name Princess Kaguya. The Emperor: The leader of Japan and one of the men who wants to marry Princess Kaguya.

Body—life-sized or bigger, body puppets are often seen in parades

Artists have used puppets to tell stories, entertain, and teach lessons for thousands of years. By using red, yellow, and blue colored filters in front of bright lights, TSUNOBUE creates background colors and different landscapes on the screen.

How the Tale Is Told TSUNOBUE makes its large puppet cut-outs from a thin building material called plywood. Its small puppets are made of plastic. By holding these puppets behind a vinyl screen and shining 30 lights on them, TSUNOBUE creates shadow puppets. In TSUNOBUE’s shadow puppet shows, the audience sees silhouettes of characters and other major story elements.

3

4


23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:36 PM

Page 4

The Story of Princess Kaguya The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter

The Shadow Puppet Theater

Meet the Main Characters

In a Land Far, Far Away

Here are the most important people you’ll meet in the story:

Princess Kaguya and her parents live in a village near Tokyo, the capital of Japan. TSUNOBUE, the shadow puppet theater that performs this show, is also from Tokyo.

The Woodcutter: Taketori no Okina, an old man who works as a bamboo TSUNOBUE (pronounced tsoo-no-BOOfurniture maker and lives in a mountain eh) adapted this puppet theater version village not far from Tokyo, the capital of Princess of Kaguya (KAH-goo-yah) city of Japan. He finds from an old Japanese Princess Kaguya while Princess Kaguya’s name fairy tale called “The Tale working late one night. means “Shining Beauty.” of the Bamboo Cutter,” His Wife: An old woman which was written in the who has been married to the 10th century, more than woodcutter for many years. one thousand years ago. She helps to raise Princess Kaguya.

What Happens in the Story

One night, in the Japanese countryside, a childless woodcutter named Taketori no Okina (tah-keh-TOR-ee no OH-kee-nah) goes out to work by the light of the moon. He chops open a bamboo stem, planning to use it to make furniture, and discovers something unusual inside: a thumb-sized baby girl! The woodcutter and his wife decide to raise the baby as their own, and she grows into a very beautiful, human-sized young woman. In fact, Princess Kaguya is so lovely that five different princes are willing to do anything, even fight dragons, just to marry her. Then the Emperor himself proposes. What will Princess Kaguya say? It turns out she has a surprise for everyone.

2

WASHINGTON, DC

TOKYO

A Puppet Primer: Many Sizes, Many Shapes TSUNOBUE’s shadows are only one of many types of puppets. Others include: Finger—the puppet body fits on one finger Hand/glove/sock—one hand moves the puppet from inside Rod—named for the rods and sticks used to move the puppet String or marionette—held up and moved by strings

Princess Kaguya: An incredibly tiny baby girl who appears in the center of a bamboo stem.

During the performance of Princess of Kaguya, TSUNOBUE uses 80 different puppets. Some represent scenery, or objects such as this chariot, and others are characters in the story.

The Scholar: A wise man from Tokyo who comes to help name Princess Kaguya. The Emperor: The leader of Japan and one of the men who wants to marry Princess Kaguya.

Body—life-sized or bigger, body puppets are often seen in parades

Artists have used puppets to tell stories, entertain, and teach lessons for thousands of years. By using red, yellow, and blue colored filters in front of bright lights, TSUNOBUE creates background colors and different landscapes on the screen.

How the Tale Is Told TSUNOBUE makes its large puppet cut-outs from a thin building material called plywood. Its small puppets are made of plastic. By holding these puppets behind a vinyl screen and shining 30 lights on them, TSUNOBUE creates shadow puppets. In TSUNOBUE’s shadow puppet shows, the audience sees silhouettes of characters and other major story elements.

3

4


23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:36 PM

Page 4

The Story of Princess Kaguya The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter

The Shadow Puppet Theater

Meet the Main Characters

In a Land Far, Far Away

Here are the most important people you’ll meet in the story:

Princess Kaguya and her parents live in a village near Tokyo, the capital of Japan. TSUNOBUE, the shadow puppet theater that performs this show, is also from Tokyo.

The Woodcutter: Taketori no Okina, an old man who works as a bamboo TSUNOBUE (pronounced tsoo-no-BOOfurniture maker and lives in a mountain eh) adapted this puppet theater version village not far from Tokyo, the capital of Princess of Kaguya (KAH-goo-yah) city of Japan. He finds from an old Japanese Princess Kaguya while Princess Kaguya’s name fairy tale called “The Tale working late one night. means “Shining Beauty.” of the Bamboo Cutter,” His Wife: An old woman which was written in the who has been married to the 10th century, more than woodcutter for many years. one thousand years ago. She helps to raise Princess Kaguya.

What Happens in the Story

One night, in the Japanese countryside, a childless woodcutter named Taketori no Okina (tah-keh-TOR-ee no OH-kee-nah) goes out to work by the light of the moon. He chops open a bamboo stem, planning to use it to make furniture, and discovers something unusual inside: a thumb-sized baby girl! The woodcutter and his wife decide to raise the baby as their own, and she grows into a very beautiful, human-sized young woman. In fact, Princess Kaguya is so lovely that five different princes are willing to do anything, even fight dragons, just to marry her. Then the Emperor himself proposes. What will Princess Kaguya say? It turns out she has a surprise for everyone.

2

WASHINGTON, DC

TOKYO

A Puppet Primer: Many Sizes, Many Shapes TSUNOBUE’s shadows are only one of many types of puppets. Others include: Finger—the puppet body fits on one finger Hand/glove/sock—one hand moves the puppet from inside Rod—named for the rods and sticks used to move the puppet String or marionette—held up and moved by strings

Princess Kaguya: An incredibly tiny baby girl who appears in the center of a bamboo stem.

During the performance of Princess of Kaguya, TSUNOBUE uses 80 different puppets. Some represent scenery, or objects such as this chariot, and others are characters in the story.

The Scholar: A wise man from Tokyo who comes to help name Princess Kaguya. The Emperor: The leader of Japan and one of the men who wants to marry Princess Kaguya.

Body—life-sized or bigger, body puppets are often seen in parades

Artists have used puppets to tell stories, entertain, and teach lessons for thousands of years. By using red, yellow, and blue colored filters in front of bright lights, TSUNOBUE creates background colors and different landscapes on the screen.

How the Tale Is Told TSUNOBUE makes its large puppet cut-outs from a thin building material called plywood. Its small puppets are made of plastic. By holding these puppets behind a vinyl screen and shining 30 lights on them, TSUNOBUE creates shadow puppets. In TSUNOBUE’s shadow puppet shows, the audience sees silhouettes of characters and other major story elements.

3

4


23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:34 PM

Page 1

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Dear Grownups:

The information on this page is designed to help you further the adventure of Princess of Kaguya with your children.

At the

, you are the

.

Saying Goodbye Princess of Kaguya doesn’t have a feel-good “Hollywood” ending, so you may find it appropriate to start a conversation with your child about the natural role of saying goodbye. Perhaps you have close friends or family members who have moved—leaving you, but finding another place that’s a good fit for them. Remind your child that there are ways to lessen the burden of parting from a loved one: You can reminisce about good times, appreciate what the person has brought to your life, and move on to your own new beginning. Part of the show’s uplifting message is that “there are times when you have to endure and overcome the grief of parting with each other.” Ask your child how he or she thinks the Woodcutter and the Wife will do this. When Princess Kaguya leaves, how will their lives change?

Warm Up Your Imagination

This is different from

a

ing

or

. You are in the same room with

the

. They do best when you

and

carefully.

Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

like it when

Here are some activities you may want to help children try after the performance: MAKE YOUR OWN SHADOW PUPPET THEATER

Guide your children as they craft silhouettes out of cardboard, creating handles out of popsicle sticks, chopsticks, or the cardboard tube from a paper towel roll. Drape a bed sheet or tablecloth over the edge of a table. Dim the room lights and, using flashlights or a directed desk or standing lamp, start the show.

the

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by the President's Advisory Committee on the Arts, Capital One Bank, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Clark Charitable Foundation, Fight for Children, Inc., Mr. James V. Kimsey, The Kirstein Family Foundation, The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Linda and Tobia Mercuro, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Park Foundation, Inc., the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, Mrs. Irene Pollin, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk, Ms. Beverly Walcoff, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Verizon Foundation.

Presented by Silhouette Theatre TSUNOBUE and The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Sponsored by The Japan Foundation, THE TOKYO CLUB, and New Heritage Theatre Group

reacts to parts of the story

Endorsed by The Embassy of Japan in the United States of America

that are

,

,

or

s s e c P r in a y u g a K f o Performed by Shadow Puppet Theatre TSUNOBUE Tokyo, Japan Nowadays, people have actually traveled to the moon, but a long, long time ago, the night sky was still a mystery. Back then, people would stare at the moon and think up all sorts of stories about it. Princess of Kaguya is one such tale—perhaps the most famous one of all.

. If you like www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge

ADD A DIMENSION

TSUNOBUE performed Princess of Kaguya using shadow puppets, but your children can reenact the show using any other type of puppet you’d like. Old tube socks + yarn for hair = a hand puppet Kaguya. Old glove fingers + a toothpick axe = a finger puppet woodcutter. Encourage your children to build three-dimensional puppets to represent the characters in any story they enjoy. Create a travel kit and the puppets can join you for car trips and vacations.

the

, show it by

at the end.

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedycenter.org/education

audience

watch

movie

performers

sad

listen

The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2012 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

TV

5

funny

clapping

performance

happy

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

A Good Audience

Cuesheet

For Teachers and Parents


23825_Kaguya:22825_Kaguya

2/6/12

2:34 PM

Page 1

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

Dear Grownups:

The information on this page is designed to help you further the adventure of Princess of Kaguya with your children.

At the

, you are the

.

Saying Goodbye Princess of Kaguya doesn’t have a feel-good “Hollywood” ending, so you may find it appropriate to start a conversation with your child about the natural role of saying goodbye. Perhaps you have close friends or family members who have moved—leaving you, but finding another place that’s a good fit for them. Remind your child that there are ways to lessen the burden of parting from a loved one: You can reminisce about good times, appreciate what the person has brought to your life, and move on to your own new beginning. Part of the show’s uplifting message is that “there are times when you have to endure and overcome the grief of parting with each other.” Ask your child how he or she thinks the Woodcutter and the Wife will do this. When Princess Kaguya leaves, how will their lives change?

Warm Up Your Imagination

This is different from

a

ing

or

. You are in the same room with

the

. They do best when you

and

carefully.

Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

like it when

Here are some activities you may want to help children try after the performance: MAKE YOUR OWN SHADOW PUPPET THEATER

Guide your children as they craft silhouettes out of cardboard, creating handles out of popsicle sticks, chopsticks, or the cardboard tube from a paper towel roll. Drape a bed sheet or tablecloth over the edge of a table. Dim the room lights and, using flashlights or a directed desk or standing lamp, start the show.

the

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by the President's Advisory Committee on the Arts, Capital One Bank, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, The Clark Charitable Foundation, Fight for Children, Inc., Mr. James V. Kimsey, The Kirstein Family Foundation, The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc., Linda and Tobia Mercuro, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Park Foundation, Inc., the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation, Mrs. Irene Pollin, Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. J. Stolwijk, Ms. Beverly Walcoff, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Verizon Foundation.

Presented by Silhouette Theatre TSUNOBUE and The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Sponsored by The Japan Foundation, THE TOKYO CLUB, and New Heritage Theatre Group

reacts to parts of the story

Endorsed by The Embassy of Japan in the United States of America

that are

,

,

or

s s e c P r in a y u g a K f o Performed by Shadow Puppet Theatre TSUNOBUE Tokyo, Japan Nowadays, people have actually traveled to the moon, but a long, long time ago, the night sky was still a mystery. Back then, people would stare at the moon and think up all sorts of stories about it. Princess of Kaguya is one such tale—perhaps the most famous one of all.

. If you like www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge

ADD A DIMENSION

TSUNOBUE performed Princess of Kaguya using shadow puppets, but your children can reenact the show using any other type of puppet you’d like. Old tube socks + yarn for hair = a hand puppet Kaguya. Old glove fingers + a toothpick axe = a finger puppet woodcutter. Encourage your children to build three-dimensional puppets to represent the characters in any story they enjoy. Create a travel kit and the puppets can join you for car trips and vacations.

the

, show it by

at the end.

Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedycenter.org/education

audience

watch

movie

performers

sad

listen

The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2012 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

TV

5

funny

clapping

performance

happy

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

PERFORMANCE GUIDE

A Good Audience

Cuesheet

For Teachers and Parents

Princess of Kaguya  

Uncover the story of Taketori no Okina, a childless bamboo cutter as he makes a mysterious discovery inside a stalk of bamboo: a beautiful,...

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