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About the Music, Words, and Art The music Carnival of the Animals was written by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns in 1886 for two pianos and orchestra. He wrote it for a few friends, but people loved the music’s humor and imagination so much that it has become one of his most popular works. The words that rhyme and help you imagine each animal’s personality are written and spoken by Jack Prelutsky, a very famous American poet. And if the art looks somehow familiar to you, it is by Mary GrandPré, the illustrator for all seven Harry Potter books.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor Tito Muñoz will lead the 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians. n Stays seated

A Good Audience…

n Stays quiet. n Watches and listens carefully. n Claps at the end.

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra

The Macy*s Foundation and Washington Gas are the proud sponsors of the NSO Family Concerts.

Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by The Clark Charitable Foundation; the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; the Park Foundation, Inc.; the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education; the Verizon Foundation; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

Kids’ Chat After the 3 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the concert artists.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at next year’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, performed by the full NSO at 1 pm and 3 pm on the following Sundays: October 28, 2012—Halloween Concert March 24, 2013—Tchaikovsky Discovers America (a Classical Kids Live Production) May 19, 2013—TBA The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center org/nso/nsoed

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning.

FAMILY CONCERT

Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

Tito Muñoz, conductor Jack Prelutsky, poetry and narration Lisa Emenheiser, piano Eileen Cornett, piano Mary GrandPré, images

The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2012 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.


A Musical Romp Through the Zoo Today you’ll hear the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) perform music about animals, including the popular piece in 14 movements by Camille Saint-Saëns (pronounced kuhMEEL san-SAHNZ) called Carnival of the Animals. Each part describes a different animal in music, poetry, and pictures. Join the colorful creatures of the animal kingdom as they roar, hop, fly, swim, and more in this funny musical journey.

9. The Cuckoo (clarinet, pianos) Thinking of a cuckoo clock? In the wild, I’m not so loud—you have to listen closely to recognize my gentle “cuckoo” call played by the clarinet.

10. Birds

1. The Lion

6. Kangaroos

(all string instruments*, pianos)

(pianos)

After a brief musical introduction, picture me, the king of beasts, marching to this proud music. Of course, I wouldn’t be a worthy lion without a few “roars.” Listen how the pianos give me my voice.

Can’t. Stop. Hopping. And the pianos make it extra fun, too.

7. Aquarium

11. Pianists

2. Hens and Roosters

(violins, violas, cellos, flute, glockenspiel, pianos)

(all string instruments, pianos)

(violins, violas, clarinet, pianos) We hens are always pecking, and those old roosters are always crowing (listen how the clarinet does this).

3. The Donkeys of the Wild (pianos) You know how us donkeys love to horse around! Doesn’t it sound like we’re chasing each other when the pianos play fast?

4. The Tortoise (all string instruments, piano) Everythinggg is waaayyy sloooower for meeee, even a fast dance song. You might recognize it speeded up—it’s called the “Can-Can.”

5. Elephants (double basses, piano) Even though we’re supersized, we still like to dance, especially to the double bass, one of the largest (and lowest sounding) instruments in the orchestra. * The string instruments are the violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.

Swim with us fish on the waves of the string instruments and flute, and enjoy the tinkling sound of water from the pianos and glockenspiel (pronounced GLOK-uhn-shpeel), a percussion instrument made of metal bars and played with small mallets or hammers.

8. Personages with Long Ears (violins) Okay, we’re donkeys. Or, if you like, people who behave like donkeys (that is to say, not very wisely). Listen how the violins create our “hee-haw” sound.

(all string instruments, flute, pianos) Can you hear us? Our high-pitched singing is played by flute and pianos and the sounds of the jungle are from string instruments.

Hey, why are we young pianists in the zoo? It seems like the composer (person who wrote the music) thinks our practicing the piano sounds a little like wild animals. See what you think.

14. Finale (all string instruments, piccolo, clarinet, glockenspiel, xylophone, pianos) Time for us to say farewell in grand fashion. Listen closely to see if you recognize little bits of the music of the lion, donkeys, hens and roosters, and kangaroos.

12. Fossils (all string instruments, clarinet, xylophone, pianos) I’m not around anymore, but my dinosaur bones (fossils) are. Listen to my skeleton rattle thanks to the xylophone (a percussion instrument with wooden bars that the player strikes with a mallet or hammer).

After the performance, talk with a friend or family member about which instrument would best match you (like the flute matched the birds or the double bass matched the elephants) and why.

The Concert Program

13. The Swan

Along with Carnival of the Animals, the orchestra will perform other works about animals including:

(cello, pianos)

Tiger in the Sun (Fanfare for the Tigers) by Michael Torke (TOR-key)

I’m a big white bird—the most beautiful of them all, if I do say so myself. See whether you can imagine my graceful swimming (the sounds of the cello) on gently lapping water (the pianos).

“Flight of the Bumblebee” by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Don Quixote, Op. 35, Variation 2 by Richard Strauss The Birds, “The Hen” by Ottorino Respighi (res-PEE-ghee) Circus Polka by Igor Stravinsky Duetto Buffo di Due Gatti by Gioachino Rossini Jennifer Waters, soprano Sarah Mesko, mezzo-soprano


A Musical Romp Through the Zoo Today you’ll hear the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO) perform music about animals, including the popular piece in 14 movements by Camille Saint-Saëns (pronounced kuhMEEL san-SAHNZ) called Carnival of the Animals. Each part describes a different animal in music, poetry, and pictures. Join the colorful creatures of the animal kingdom as they roar, hop, fly, swim, and more in this funny musical journey.

9. The Cuckoo (clarinet, pianos) Thinking of a cuckoo clock? In the wild, I’m not so loud—you have to listen closely to recognize my gentle “cuckoo” call played by the clarinet.

10. Birds

1. The Lion

6. Kangaroos

(all string instruments*, pianos)

(pianos)

After a brief musical introduction, picture me, the king of beasts, marching to this proud music. Of course, I wouldn’t be a worthy lion without a few “roars.” Listen how the pianos give me my voice.

Can’t. Stop. Hopping. And the pianos make it extra fun, too.

7. Aquarium

11. Pianists

2. Hens and Roosters

(violins, violas, cellos, flute, glockenspiel, pianos)

(all string instruments, pianos)

(violins, violas, clarinet, pianos) We hens are always pecking, and those old roosters are always crowing (listen how the clarinet does this).

3. The Donkeys of the Wild (pianos) You know how us donkeys love to horse around! Doesn’t it sound like we’re chasing each other when the pianos play fast?

4. The Tortoise (all string instruments, piano) Everythinggg is waaayyy sloooower for meeee, even a fast dance song. You might recognize it speeded up—it’s called the “Can-Can.”

5. Elephants (double basses, piano) Even though we’re supersized, we still like to dance, especially to the double bass, one of the largest (and lowest sounding) instruments in the orchestra. * The string instruments are the violins, violas, cellos, and double basses.

Swim with us fish on the waves of the string instruments and flute, and enjoy the tinkling sound of water from the pianos and glockenspiel (pronounced GLOK-uhn-shpeel), a percussion instrument made of metal bars and played with small mallets or hammers.

8. Personages with Long Ears (violins) Okay, we’re donkeys. Or, if you like, people who behave like donkeys (that is to say, not very wisely). Listen how the violins create our “hee-haw” sound.

(all string instruments, flute, pianos) Can you hear us? Our high-pitched singing is played by flute and pianos and the sounds of the jungle are from string instruments.

Hey, why are we young pianists in the zoo? It seems like the composer (person who wrote the music) thinks our practicing the piano sounds a little like wild animals. See what you think.

14. Finale (all string instruments, piccolo, clarinet, glockenspiel, xylophone, pianos) Time for us to say farewell in grand fashion. Listen closely to see if you recognize little bits of the music of the lion, donkeys, hens and roosters, and kangaroos.

12. Fossils (all string instruments, clarinet, xylophone, pianos) I’m not around anymore, but my dinosaur bones (fossils) are. Listen to my skeleton rattle thanks to the xylophone (a percussion instrument with wooden bars that the player strikes with a mallet or hammer).

After the performance, talk with a friend or family member about which instrument would best match you (like the flute matched the birds or the double bass matched the elephants) and why.

The Concert Program

13. The Swan

Along with Carnival of the Animals, the orchestra will perform other works about animals including:

(cello, pianos)

Tiger in the Sun (Fanfare for the Tigers) by Michael Torke (TOR-key)

I’m a big white bird—the most beautiful of them all, if I do say so myself. See whether you can imagine my graceful swimming (the sounds of the cello) on gently lapping water (the pianos).

“Flight of the Bumblebee” by Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov Don Quixote, Op. 35, Variation 2 by Richard Strauss The Birds, “The Hen” by Ottorino Respighi (res-PEE-ghee) Circus Polka by Igor Stravinsky Duetto Buffo di Due Gatti by Gioachino Rossini Jennifer Waters, soprano Sarah Mesko, mezzo-soprano


About the Music, Words, and Art The music Carnival of the Animals was written by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns in 1886 for two pianos and orchestra. He wrote it for a few friends, but people loved the music’s humor and imagination so much that it has become one of his most popular works. The words that rhyme and help you imagine each animal’s personality are written and spoken by Jack Prelutsky, a very famous American poet. And if the art looks somehow familiar to you, it is by Mary GrandPré, the illustrator for all seven Harry Potter books.

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Darrell M. Ayers Vice President, Education

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor Tito Muñoz will lead the 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians. n Stays seated

A Good Audience…

n Stays quiet. n Watches and listens carefully. n Claps at the end.

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra

The Macy*s Foundation and Washington Gas are the proud sponsors of the NSO Family Concerts.

Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided in part by The Clark Charitable Foundation; the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities; Mr. James V. Kimsey; The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.; The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation; the Park Foundation, Inc.; the Paul M. Angell Family Foundation; an endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation; the U.S. Department of Education; the Verizon Foundation; and by generous contributors to the Abe Fortas Memorial Fund, and by a major gift to the fund from the late Carolyn E. Agger, widow of Abe Fortas. Major support for the Kennedy Center’s educational programs is provided by David and Alice Rubenstein through the Rubenstein Arts Access Program.

Kids’ Chat After the 3 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the concert artists.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at next year’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, performed by the full NSO at 1 pm and 3 pm on the following Sundays: October 28, 2012—Halloween Concert March 24, 2013—Tchaikovsky Discovers America (a Classical Kids Live Production) May 19, 2013—TBA The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center org/nso/nsoed

www.kennedy-center.org/artsedge Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, an education program of the Kennedy Center. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning.

FAMILY CONCERT

Learn more about Education at the Kennedy Center at www.kennedy-center.org/education

Tito Muñoz, conductor Jack Prelutsky, poetry and narration Lisa Emenheiser, piano Eileen Cornett, piano Mary GrandPré, images

The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement from the Federal Government. © 2012 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO.

Carnival of the Animals: National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert  

Ready for a puzzling riddle? When does a piano hop like a kangaroo, a violin bray like a donkey, and a cello swim like a swan? In Carnival o...

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