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Classical Kids LIVE!

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor David Amado will lead approximately 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians so that the music and the spoken words always work together.

A Good Audience… n

S  tays seated (and doesn’t get up to gather papers that might drift off the stage!).

n

Stays quiet.

n

Watches and listens carefully.

n

Claps at the end.

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Kids’ Chat After the 3 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the concert artists on stage.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at next season’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, which are performed on the following Sundays by the full NSO: October 16, 2011—Peter and the Wolf March 4, 2012—The Mozart Experience with Magic Circle Mime Company May 13, 2012—Carnival of the Animals The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Washington Gas is the proud sponsor of the NSO Family Concerts. The NSO Family Concerts are supported through a generous endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation.

Produced by Classical Kids Music Education

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by The U.S. Department of Education, The President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts, and The Clark Charitable Foundation.

Based on the original work by Barbara Nichol

Beethoven Lives Upstairs Light design by Paul Pement Production Stage Management & Technical Coordination by Paul Pement Dramaturge & Music Timing by Paul Pement Costume Design by Alex Meadows The theatrical concert version of Beethoven Lives Upstairs is an adaptation of the best-selling and award-winning Classical Kids audio recording, Beethoven Lives Upstairs, produced by Susan Hammond and originally directed as a staged concert by Peter Moss with additional direction by Dennis Garnhum. Classical Kids® is a trademark of Classical Productions for Children Ltd., used under exclusive license to Pement Enterprises, Inc., and produced by Classical Kids Music Education, NFP. All Classical Kids CD and DVD recordings are marketed by The Children’s Group. Actors and Production Stage Manager are members of Actors’ Equity Association.

www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, a program of the Kennedy Center Education Department. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. Cuesheets are made possible by the U.S. Department of Education, AT&T, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, James V. Kimsey, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Newman’s Own Foundation, and Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. Stolwijk, and the Verizon Foundation.

Paul Pement, director, producer, and stage manager Susan Hammond, series creator Natalie Berg and Thad Avery, actors

Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall

For more about the performing arts and arts education, visit the Kennedy Center’s Education Department online at www.kennedy-center.org/education The U.S. Department of Education supports approximately one-third of the budget for the Kennedy Center Education Department. The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2011 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

David Amado, conductor

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by


About the Story

Like a Rock Star

Life gets crazy for 10-year-old Christoph when none other than Ludwig van Beethoven (pronounced LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven) moves in to his house. The composer (writer of music) makes lots of noise, scatters papers everywhere, and acts angry. Christoph writes letters to his uncle looking for help. But as time passes, he begins to see Mr. Beethoven and his music differently.

Beethoven once said, “There are and there will be thousands of princes. There is only one Beethoven.” Beethoven might not be someone you would think of as a rock star, but in his time, he was. Just like today’s stars, he became famous for breaking rules and trying new things—like adding new instruments, increasing the size of the orchestra, and creating music that “painted” pictures of nature. People listened, liked it, and wanted more.

About the Performance

Greatest Hits

The performance includes two actors telling the story and a lot of Beethoven’s music performed by the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO). The story is fiction—that means it’s made up—but it includes very real facts about the very real Beethoven.

Starting Small, Thinking Big Beethoven was born in a small city (Bonn) in Germany in 1770. He started playing the piano when he was very small—so small he had to stand on a bench to reach the keys. He gave his first public piano performance when he was only 10 years old. At age 11, he quit school to study music full-time. Later, Beethoven moved to Vienna, Austria, to study and live. He went on to become one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven’s Challenge The story takes place from 1822 to 1825 in Vienna, Austria — t hat’s about 4,500 miles from your seat in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall.

When he was only 27 years old, Beethoven noticed he could no longer hear high notes (like the sounds of birds singing). Over the next 20 years, Beethoven slowly became completely deaf, meaning he could not hear any sounds. No one knows what caused Beethoven’s deafness. During the performance, learn what Beethoven did to his piano so he could “hear” his music.

Beethoven wrote all kinds of music, but he became most well-known for the long works called symphonies (SIM-fuh-neez) that he wrote for orchestras. His Fifth Symphony includes one of the most famous openings of all time. See whether you recognize the “da-da-da-DUM” when you hear it. During the performance, you’ll also hear parts of his famous Ninth Symphony (including “Ode to Joy”), plus Moonlight Sonata, Für Elise, and many other works.

Listen foicrth…at you

us thoven’s m s, or  ny of Bee a TV, concert , s ie v o m om recognize fr tones ng ri e rm cell phon ater or a sto w e k li , re tu of na ) n sounds loved nature o (Beeth ven story, elp tell the h t a th ts c effe n sound bells u h like c rch

n

Photo © Classical Kids Live; Classical Kids LIVE! performance of Beethoven Lives Upstairs with the Cleveland Orchestra. Actor pictured: Natalie Berg

At first Christoph (shown here) is upset by the “madman” upstairs. But he soon learns a few lessons about what happens when you get to know someone — especially Beethoven.


About the Story

Like a Rock Star

Life gets crazy for 10-year-old Christoph when none other than Ludwig van Beethoven (pronounced LOOD-vig VAHN BAY-toh-ven) moves in to his house. The composer (writer of music) makes lots of noise, scatters papers everywhere, and acts angry. Christoph writes letters to his uncle looking for help. But as time passes, he begins to see Mr. Beethoven and his music differently.

Beethoven once said, “There are and there will be thousands of princes. There is only one Beethoven.” Beethoven might not be someone you would think of as a rock star, but in his time, he was. Just like today’s stars, he became famous for breaking rules and trying new things—like adding new instruments, increasing the size of the orchestra, and creating music that “painted” pictures of nature. People listened, liked it, and wanted more.

About the Performance

Greatest Hits

The performance includes two actors telling the story and a lot of Beethoven’s music performed by the National Symphony Orchestra (NSO). The story is fiction—that means it’s made up—but it includes very real facts about the very real Beethoven.

Starting Small, Thinking Big Beethoven was born in a small city (Bonn) in Germany in 1770. He started playing the piano when he was very small—so small he had to stand on a bench to reach the keys. He gave his first public piano performance when he was only 10 years old. At age 11, he quit school to study music full-time. Later, Beethoven moved to Vienna, Austria, to study and live. He went on to become one of the greatest composers of all time.

Beethoven’s Challenge The story takes place from 1822 to 1825 in Vienna, Austria — t hat’s about 4,500 miles from your seat in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall.

When he was only 27 years old, Beethoven noticed he could no longer hear high notes (like the sounds of birds singing). Over the next 20 years, Beethoven slowly became completely deaf, meaning he could not hear any sounds. No one knows what caused Beethoven’s deafness. During the performance, learn what Beethoven did to his piano so he could “hear” his music.

Beethoven wrote all kinds of music, but he became most well-known for the long works called symphonies (SIM-fuh-neez) that he wrote for orchestras. His Fifth Symphony includes one of the most famous openings of all time. See whether you recognize the “da-da-da-DUM” when you hear it. During the performance, you’ll also hear parts of his famous Ninth Symphony (including “Ode to Joy”), plus Moonlight Sonata, Für Elise, and many other works.

Listen foicrth…at you

us thoven’s m s, or  ny of Bee a TV, concert , s ie v o m om recognize fr tones ng ri e rm cell phon ater or a sto w e k li , re tu of na ) n sounds loved nature o (Beeth ven story, elp tell the h t a th ts c effe n sound bells u h like c rch

n

Photo © Classical Kids Live; Classical Kids LIVE! performance of Beethoven Lives Upstairs with the Cleveland Orchestra. Actor pictured: Natalie Berg

At first Christoph (shown here) is upset by the “madman” upstairs. But he soon learns a few lessons about what happens when you get to know someone — especially Beethoven.


Classical Kids LIVE!

75 Musicians Led by One Conductor At today’s concert, conductor David Amado will lead approximately 75 members of the National Symphony Orchestra in playing the music. The conductor is a person who leads the orchestra. Conductors generally use their right hand to tell the orchestra how fast to play and use their left hand to tell the musicians how loud or soft to play. Some use a slender white stick called a baton as they conduct. At the concert, watch how the conductor communicates with the musicians so that the music and the spoken words always work together.

A Good Audience… n

S  tays seated (and doesn’t get up to gather papers that might drift off the stage!).

n

Stays quiet.

n

Watches and listens carefully.

n

Claps at the end.

Wait! There’s More! Musical Instrument “Petting Zoo” One hour before the concert, enjoy hands-on fun with the instruments that the musicians will play on stage in the Kennedy Center Atrium. A project of the Women’s Committee for the NSO.

Kids’ Chat After the 3 p.m. performance, stick around to ask questions of the concert artists on stage.

Upcoming Family Concerts Please plan to join us at next season’s National Symphony Orchestra Family Concerts, which are performed on the following Sundays by the full NSO: October 16, 2011—Peter and the Wolf March 4, 2012—The Mozart Experience with Magic Circle Mime Company May 13, 2012—Carnival of the Animals The NSO also presents full orchestra Young People’s Concerts for school groups in the Concert Hall each season during the school day for grades 3 through 6. For more about NSO education programs, see www.kennedy-center org/nso/nsoed

Orchestra Interactive Enjoy an interactive exploration of orchestras, their instruments, and their music at the Perfect Pitch Web site at: artsedge.kennedy-center.org/perfectpitch

David M. Rubenstein Chairman Michael M. Kaiser President Christoph Eschenbach Music Director, National Symphony Orchestra David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Washington Gas is the proud sponsor of the NSO Family Concerts. The NSO Family Concerts are supported through a generous endowment from the Ryna and Melvin Cohen Family Foundation.

Produced by Classical Kids Music Education

Additional support for Performances for Young Audiences is provided by The U.S. Department of Education, The President’s Advisory Committee on the Arts, and The Clark Charitable Foundation.

Based on the original work by Barbara Nichol

Beethoven Lives Upstairs Light design by Paul Pement Production Stage Management & Technical Coordination by Paul Pement Dramaturge & Music Timing by Paul Pement Costume Design by Alex Meadows The theatrical concert version of Beethoven Lives Upstairs is an adaptation of the best-selling and award-winning Classical Kids audio recording, Beethoven Lives Upstairs, produced by Susan Hammond and originally directed as a staged concert by Peter Moss with additional direction by Dennis Garnhum. Classical Kids® is a trademark of Classical Productions for Children Ltd., used under exclusive license to Pement Enterprises, Inc., and produced by Classical Kids Music Education, NFP. All Classical Kids CD and DVD recordings are marketed by The Children’s Group. Actors and Production Stage Manager are members of Actors’ Equity Association.

www.artsedge.kennedy-center.org Cuesheets are produced by ARTSEDGE, a program of the Kennedy Center Education Department. ARTSEDGE is a part of Verizon Thinkfinity, a consortium of free educational Web sites for K-12 teaching and learning. Cuesheets are made possible by the U.S. Department of Education, AT&T, the Carter and Melissa Cafritz Charitable Trust, James V. Kimsey, The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation, Newman’s Own Foundation, and Dr. Deborah Rose and Dr. Jan A. Stolwijk, and the Verizon Foundation.

Paul Pement, director, producer, and stage manager Susan Hammond, series creator Natalie Berg and Thad Avery, actors

Presented in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall

For more about the performing arts and arts education, visit the Kennedy Center’s Education Department online at www.kennedy-center.org/education The U.S. Department of Education supports approximately one-third of the budget for the Kennedy Center Education Department. The contents of this Cuesheet do not necessarily represent the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government. © 2011 The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

Please recycle this Cuesheet by sharing it with friends!

David Amado, conductor

David and Alice Rubenstein are the Presenting Underwriters of the NSO. Performances for Young Audiences is made possible by

Beethoven Lives Upstairs: National Symphony Orchestra Family Concert  

What to do about the loud neighbor upstairs? When Ludwig van Beethoven moves into his family's Vienna boarding house, young Christoph begins...

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