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#creativestate The official magazine of Arts NC State FALL 2019

Friends of the College

60 years ago, an iconic series made its debut PAGE 30

Dance, Joy and Justice PAGE 38

arts.ncsu.edu

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135 Guest Rooms Event Spaces WXYZ Lounge & Terrace Free WiFi & Car Charging Gonza Tacos y Tequila Jubala Coffee Call us for our Go Pack Rate


PHOTO BY MARC JACKSON

Dear Friends – A

INSIDE THIS ISSUE #creativestate Vignettes .............................. 9 Friends of the College ................................ 30 Dance, Joy and Justice .............................. 38 Power Sound of the South ......................... 46 Dining Guide ............................................ 49 Donors ..................................................... 50 Coda ........................................................ 54 Events Fall Events Calendar ................................... 6 NC State LIVE Fall 2019 . . ............................ 16 Gregg Museum Fall 2019............................ 20 University Theatre Fall 2019 ....................... 26

ON THE COVER The leading jazz violinist of our time, MacArthur Foundation “Genius Grant” fellow Regina Carter has been a regular performer on the NC State LIVE series since 1996. She returns to Stewart Theatre on September 28 with a program of music by the great Ella Fitzgerald. PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER DRUKKER

s another academic year begins to take shape, we are looking forward to not only what we’ve planned but also to the opportunities that will present themselves throughout the year. We get excited about what I like to call dreaming – how can we create additional programming, how can we reach new audiences, how can we impact our community – these are just some of the thoughts we embrace regularly. In this issue of #creativestate we pay homage to dreamers that preceded us, Gerald Erdahl and Henry Bowers, who created and organized the nationally-recognized guest artist series known as Friends of the College. Friends of the College most certainly reached new audiences, created additional programming, and impacted our community all at once. Gerald’s vision and Henry’s subsequent leadership led to many of the arts offerings we present today and their passion for the arts remains lit within all of us. When possible, we want to engage with professional artists who can be with us for extended periods of time. This year, as part of the NC State LIVE series, we’re proud to present the exciting and bold dance company Contra-Tiempo in residence for eight days, with a performance on October 25. Thanks to a generous grant from and partnership with PNC Bank, Contra-Tiempo will present several workshop events both on campus and in the community for a variety of participants – perhaps one of whom will be you! It’s exciting to witness the success of our Entrepreneurship in the Arts program, and in this issue you’ll learn about one student capstone team who has been instrumental in the creation and growth of one of Raleigh’s newest and vibrant chamber music ensembles. We are so thankful for your support of Arts NC State, and I look forward to seeing many of you throughout the coming months.

Rich Holly Executive Director for the Arts arts.ncsu.edu

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#creativestate The official magazine of Arts NC State FALL 2019 | VOLUME 5, ISSUE 1 Arts NC State is the collective voice of the visual and performing arts programs of North Carolina State University.

2019

The Crafts Center Dance Program Gregg Museum of Art & Design Department of Music NC State LIVE University Theatre DIAMOND

AWARD

Arts NC State is part of the Division of Academic and Student Affairs.

TRAVEL. CULTURE. FOOD.

Rich Holly Associate Dean and Executive Director for the Arts ADVERTISERS MAKE THIS MAGAZINE POSSIBLE For advertising information, contact mktulber@ncsu.edu. Arts NC State 3140 Talley Student Union Campus Box 7306 Raleigh NC 27695 arts.ncsu.edu artsncstate@ncsu.edu Mark K.S. Tulbert Director of Arts Marketing

If you like North Carolina, you’ll love Our State. Visit ourstate.com to subscribe.

Ticket Central: 919.515.1100 Administration Offices: 919.513.1800 This magazine was not produced or mailed with state-appropriated funds.


Arts NC State Who We Are THE CRAFTS CENTER Open to campus and the community, the Crafts Center provides hands-on, immersive, lifelong learning skills. Focus areas include clay, wood, jewelry, lapidary, mixed media, photography, glass and fibers. Students and patrons from all disciplines, backgrounds, and skill sets find a welcoming, supportive and creative home here. crafts.arts.ncsu.edu

DANCE PROGRAM This nationally recognized program educates, empowers and inspires NC State student dancers and choreographers to find and express their creative voice.  dance.arts.ncsu.edu

GREGG MUSEUM OF ART & DESIGN A collecting and exhibiting museum with over 35,000 objects, the Gregg makes art accessible to the NC State community and public. It’s the museum of NC State University, where objects spark ideas – and admission is always free.  gregg.arts.ncsu.edu

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC NC State Music provides educational opportunities for student and community participants through a variety of ensembles and courses, and offers both Music Minor and Arts Entrepreneurship Minor curricula. The department also serves as a cultural resource for the university and the greater community through numerous performances and presentations.  music.arts.ncsu.edu

NC STATE LIVE NC State LIVE has established a regional and national reputation for presenting a professional performing arts season of the highest artistic excellence, connecting artists and audiences in a meaningful exploration of the diverse cultures and issues that define our communities and world.  live.arts.ncsu.edu

UNIVERSITY THEATRE Open to all NC State students, regardless of major, University Theatre’s mission is to provide quality theatrical, artistic and practical experiences for the students and larger campus as well as Triangle communities. theatre.arts.ncsu.edu


EVENTS

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CALENDAR 2019 FALL

THE DANCE PROGRAM FALL CONCERT

will feature modern, dance-theatre, hip-hop, urban-Latin, Afro-Cuban, Bollywood and African diaspora dances. Thursday and Friday, November 21 and 22 in Stewart Theatre.

F E AT U R E S

VIGNETTES

PHOTO BY JILLIAN CLARK

  NC STATE LIVE   UNIVERSITY THEATRE   THE CRAFTS CENTER   GREGG MUSEUM   DANCE PROGRAM   DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC

AUGUST-SEPTEMBER   Fantastic Fauna: Chimeric Creatures Gregg Museum of Art & Design Through January 26   Les Tireux d’Roches The Pour House Music Hall August 27   Southern Surreal: Masterpiece Furniture by Tilden Stone Gregg Museum of Art & Design Through September 8   PMC Lecture: George Ruckert Price Music Center, Room 110 September 5

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  Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South Gregg Museum of Art & Design September 5-December 29

  Southbound: Ride the Bus with Titus Brooks Heagins Gregg Museum of Art & Design September 21

  Amythyst Kiah The Pour House Music Hall September 10

  How I Made This: Fahad Al Suwaidi The Crafts Center September 26

  Artist talk with Tom Rankin Gregg Museum of Art & Design September 12   How I Made This: Brenda Hornsby Heindl The Crafts Center September 12   Yoga in the Garden Gregg Museum of Art & Design September 19   conTEXT: A Calligraphic Journey The Crafts Center September 20-November 7

  Artist talk with photographers Tama Hochbaum, Margaret Sartor and MJ Sharp Gregg Museum of Art & Design September 26   Our Town Titmus Theatre September 26-29, October 2-6   Regina Carter: Simply Ella Stewart Theatre September 28


  Artist talk with Beauvais Lyons: Do you believe in centaurs? Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 24

  How I Made This: Annie Cicale The Crafts Center October 4

  PMC Lecture: James Isabirye Price Music Center, Room 110 October 24

  Nobuntu Stewart Theatre October 4

  Contra-Tiempo: joyUS justUS Stewart Theatre October 25

  Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 17-March 15   Symposium: Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology Gregg Museum of Art & Design and NC State University Libraries October 18

  Southbound: Ride the Bus with Daniel Kariko Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 26   Theatreworks USA: Rosie Revere, Engineer & Friends Stewart Theatre October 27   Halloween at the Gregg Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 31

  Wind Ensemble Stewart Theatre November 5   Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra Stewart Theatre November 10   ARS414 Fluxus Exhibition The Crafts Center November 11-18 F E AT U R E S

  Docent-led tour of Southbound Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 10

  Nella Stewart Theatre November 2

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  Southbound: Meet curators Mark Sloan and Mark Long Gregg Museum of Art & Design October 3

EVENTS

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

  Jazz Ensemble II Stewart Theatre November 13

 TICKETS  FOR

919.515.1100 and arts.ncsu.edu

LEARN MORE AND CONNECT! arts.ncsu.edu    artsncstate

  Fall Choral Collage Stewart Theatre October 18   Fefu and her Friends Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre October 23-27

You have two opportunities to hear great choral music this fall, with the FALL CHORAL COLLAGE on October 18 and the CHORAL HOLIDAY CONCERT on December 6, both in Stewart Theatre. PHOTO BY ERIN ZANDERS

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  Artist talk with   Wolfgang A Cappella Suzanne Anker Stewart Theatre Gregg Museum of Art & Design November 17 November 14   Artist talk with   Symphonic Band Deborah Luster Stewart Theatre Gregg Museum of Art & Design November 14 November 21   The Colored Museum Titmus Theatre November 14-17, 20-24

  PMC Lecture: Stewart Carter Price Music Center, Room 110 November 21

  Jazz Ensemble I Stewart Theatre November 15

  Dance Program Fall Concert Stewart Theatre November 21-22

  Canadian Brass Stewart Theatre November 16

  Ladies in Red Stewart Theatre November 23

  35th Annual Crafts Fair The Crafts Center November 23-24   Raleigh Civic Symphony Stewart Theatre November 24 DECEMBER   Wind Ensemble Holiday Concert Stewart Theatre December 5   Choral Holiday Concert Stewart Theatre December 6   Acappology Stewart Theatre December 7 JANUARY   Grains of Time Stewart Theatre January 11   The Crafts Center Instructors’ Exhibition The Crafts Center January 13-March 6   Design by Time Gregg Museum of Art & Design January 23-May 17   PMC Lecture: Tiber F.M. Falzett Price Music Center, Room 110 January 23

Catch the WIND ENSEMBLE in their fall concert on November 5, and their holiday concert on December 5, both in Stewart Theatre. PHOTO BY ERIN ZANDERS

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FOR TICKETS 919.515.1100 arts.ncsu.edu


EVENTS F E AT U R E S

PHOTO BY ROBERT DAVEZAC

VIGNETTES

#creativestate VIGNETTES

CONTEMPO ENSEMBLE Ed Butler, percussion Jim Crew, keyboard, accordion Lauren Dunseath, cello Dovid Friedlander, violin Tracy Friedlander, horn Shana Tucker, cello Lisa Veronica Wood, vocals GUESTS FOR THE INAUGURAL CONCERT Sam Gold, viola Doug Largent, bass Alejandro Pinzon, bandoneon NC STATE ARTS ENTREPRENEURSHIP CONSULTING TEAM Derek Armour John Foley Joseph Hall Griffin Mathews, team leader John Wilson Gary D. Beckman, advisor

NC STATE STUDENTS CRAFT A PLAN FOR BREAKING THE CLASSICAL MOLD Tracy was following the classical musician playbook. With two performance degrees under her belt, she was gunning for a coveted (and fiercely competitive) permanent full-time orchestra job. While not her ultimate goal, when a full-time per-service offer came from the North Carolina Symphony, she decided to move from Chicago to Raleigh. And Raleigh turned into home. Tracy met her husband (violinist Dovid Friedlander, associate concertmaster of the NC Symphony), became a mother, and priorities changed. She still wanted a music career, but without hopping back on the arduous orchestra audition circuit. Her first move was to create the Crushing Classical podcast, which she describes as “an ongoing series of provocative interviews with musicians who are pioneering a new path in the classical music genre.” Tracy seeks out folks who are working to redefine what a classical music career can mean. Looking to expand the reach of her podcast, Tracy Friedlander made a connection to Gary Beckman, director of entrepreneurial studies in the arts in the Department of Music at NC State. The discussion quickly shifted to her dream of

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PHOTO BY GEORGE WHITESIDE

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creating a new ensemble – one that blends classical and contemporary musicians – and a match was made with Beckman’s arts entrepreneurship students. As a capstone project, five NC state students – Griffin Matthews, Derek Armour, John Foley, Joseph Hall and John Wilson – worked with Tracy during the spring 2018 semester to create an ambitious business plan for her new ensemble, Contempo. Friedlander uses the word “extraordinary” to describe her experience working with the NC State arts entrepreneurship program team. “It was the first time I felt my project become real. Having in-depth conversations with the team and answering their thoughtful questions caused this dream that existed largely in my head to take form and move forward, something all arts entrepreneurs need when taking big leaps outside the comfort zone.” Contempo was created to cross lines, in both genre and the relationship between performers and audience. Tracy’s aim is to build a modern concert experience that occupies the space “between a band in a bar and a buttonedup symphony concert.” On a Sunday afternoon in February, Contempo Ensemble played their first public concert to a packed room at downtown Raleigh’s Imurj. It was magical. Ten stellar musicians in a classical meets jazz meets world music performance, featuring strings, accordion, drums, vocals, keyboards, horn and even a bandoneon (resembles an accordion, and is essential for tango music). Plans are in the works for their next concert on November 24, also at Imurj (imurj.com). Follow Contempo Ensemble on Facebook to keep up with their performances as well as their journey from start-up to sustainability – one classical musician’s dream of forging a new path to a classical music career, assisted by the think and do students in NC State’s arts entrepreneurship program.

AN EVENING WITH MARGARET ATWOOD A literary legend with over 50 novels, Margaret Atwood is best known for her dystopian novel, The Handmaid’s Tale. On November 15, in conjunction with the exhibition Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures, Atwood will speak at NC State University, sharing her thoughts on how she uses literature to explore our genetic engineering futures. Her talk with focus on her novel Oryx and Crake, which covers a host of issues including genetic manipulation, corporate domination, and global pandemics. Opening on October 17, Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology is an art-science exhibition and symposium of artists, scientists and humanities scholars, led by the NC State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center. The exhibition will be shown at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design, in the physical and digital display spaces of the Libraries, and on the grounds of the North Carolina Museum of Art. Learn more about the exhibition on page 24. The Genetic Engineering and Society Center at NC State University serves as an international hub of interdisciplinary research, engaged scholarship and inclusive dialogues surrounding opportunities and challenges associated with genetic engineering and society.

Tickets for Margaret Atwood’s talk go on sale September 13. Details are available at go.ncsu.edu/atwood.


VIGNETTES

PHOTOS BY ROBERT DAVEZAC

EVENTS

THE CRAFTS FAIR GROWS F E AT U R E S

What do you do when you have a really popular Crafts Fair, and you have no more space? Solutions: a) add a day of shopping, and b) take it to the street! The annual Holiday Crafts Fair, now in its 35th year at the NC State Crafts Center, turns into a two-day festival for 2019, with the addition of shopping from 10am to 2pm on Sunday, November 24 (remember: it’s always the weekend before Thanksgiving). After last year’s record attendance, this year’s fair will have more artists than ever before. Saturday (10am-5pm) will include outdoor live music, dance and theatre performances by Arts NC State students. Food trucks from Fatboys Kitchen, Crispy Gyoza and Bourbon Street Beignets will be on-site. All crafts vendor booths will be indoors. Jensen Drive (in the front of The Crafts Center) will be closed on Saturday, but traffic will move as usual on Dunn and Cates Avenues. The Coliseum Parking Deck will be open, and parking will be free and available for both days of the event. The annual fair features work by Crafts Center instructors, members and staff, and NC State students. You’ll find one-of-a-kind, handmade works by more than 50 of the Center’s local artists representing a variety of media, including clay, fibers, glass, jewelry, sculpture, painting, wood, photography and mixed media.

Holiday Crafts Fair Saturday, November 23, 10am-5pm Sunday, November 24, 10am-2pm $3 per person (free for children under age 10) Free for NC State students with campus ID

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CONTEXT: A CALLIGRAPHIC JOURNEY

F E AT U R E S

The fall semester exhibition in the Crafts Center gallery will feature works by the Triangle Calligraphers’ Guild and by Carol Fountain Nix, a mixed media painter, calligrapher/ lettering artist and designer who is also director of the Crafts Center. The Triangle Calligraphers’ Guild is a consortium of lettering arts artists with interests in calligraphy, letterforms, sign painting, bookmaking, papermaking, illumination, ancient manuscripts, history and traditions, tools and materials. conTEXT: A Calligraphic Journey features a wide variety of calligraphic works – from formal to abstract. The exhibition will highlight artwork in a range of media as well as 3D works relating to the breadth of programs offered at the Crafts Center.

The exhibition opens with a free public reception on Friday, September 20, 5:308:30pm, and runs through November 7.

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NC STATE ARTIST EARNS NATIONAL RECOGNITION The great Nina Simone, known as the “High Priestess of Soul,”was born in Tryon, North Carolina. This summer, the National Trust for Historic Preservation launched a campaign to help restore and preserve her childhood home – an effort that has attracted the support of artists like John Legend and Yusuf/Cat Stevens. Sculptor, muralist, illustrator, and NC State alumnus Dare Coulter ’15 was selected by the National Trust to create the artwork for the campaign. Arts NC State regulars know Dare from her 36’ x 7’ mural – Colors of the Nile – that she created for NC State LIVE’s 2017 Nile Project residency. That mural now has a permanent home at Green Elementary School in Raleigh.

Learn more about the campaign to save Nina Simone’s North Carolina home at savingplaces.org, and Dare Coulter’s artwork at darecoulter.com.


F E AT U R E S

PHOTO BY ROBERT DAVEZAC

VIGNETTES

Roxanne Hicklin had been rooting for NC State sports teams for many years already. The late Kay Yow was a dear friend, and Roxanne has lifetime seats to all women’s basketball games. She belongs to the Wolfpack Club and is a Charter Partner at the Lonnie Poole Golf Course. Hicklin also loves the arts. For over 35 years, she managed the world-renowned art collection at SAS. Her career placed her in a comfortable position financially – comfortable enough that Roxanne could consider creating a philanthropic legacy. In 2016, Roxanne began meeting with members of NC State’s development team. She told them stories about her life, her family, her career, and what she cares most about. She shared her financial priorities, which include her family, athletics, and the arts. Over the course of many meetings and conversations, Hicklin and her development team collaborated on finding the right fit for her philanthropic energy, time and funds. One day, Roxanne learned about the Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf Endowment for Creativity in the Performing Arts. This fund financially

EVENTS

A JOURNEY TOWARD GIVING

supports the Creative Artist Award, annual awards for exceptional students engaged in the performing arts. Roxanne’s reaction was immediate: Is there a similar award endowment for visual artists? Not yet. And with that, Roxanne discovered her philanthropic home. Fast forward a few years and Roxanne is an engaged, enthusiastic, forward-thinking volunteer and donor. She serves on the Friends of Arts NC State Board of Advisors. She established the Roxanne Hicklin Visual Artist Award Endowment and has already bestowed three student awards. Her first, to Claire Hider in 2017, came with wonderful opportunities both for Roxanne and Claire. Roxanne purchased one of Claire’s paintings, and another of Claire’s paintings became part the SAS art collection. Roxanne treats her award as though it is a living thing; she tends to it carefully so it may grow and help a larger and more diverse group of students. Her initial gift established an award to creators of two-dimensional art, the kind you can hang on the wall. Two years later, she made an additional contribution to her endowment to establish an award for artists creating threedimensional work. Never one to stand still, Hicklin is already considering her next move, toward establishing a third award for makers of digital art. Hicklin is retired now, and while she keeps busy with her grand-niece and grand-nephew and as the longtime golf coach at Cary Academy, she has more time to invest in philanthropy. Over the course of her retirement years, Roxanne looks forward to seeing her endowment grow and evolve. That experience is already creating tremendous meaning for her, and it all happened because she took a meeting for coffee. Roxanne forged a relationship with her NC State collaborators – one of trust in pursuit of a common goal – that has enhanced her life while benefiting the lives of NC State students. It’s a story Roxanne is glad to share in hopes that others will reach out and find, in her words, “where their hearts lie.”

To learn more about investing in Arts NC State, please contact Jill Orr, director of development, at 919.513.4101 or jhorr2@ncsu.edu.

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JAMES BUDINICH

ALLISON LOGGINS-HULL

composer Allison LogginsHull will premiere a new work for the Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra, based on her personal experiences as an African-American woman in today’s cultural landscape. She is one-half of the critically acclaimed duo Flutronix, praised by The Wall Street Journal for being able “to redefine the instrument.” The final new work of the season will be from Grammynominated songwriter Tift Merritt, a Raleigh native. The Other Side of Hungry River is a site-specific song cycle exploring the emotional history of the Raleigh property

GEORGIA SHREVE

TIFT MERRITT

destined to become an iconic public park. Dorothea Dix Hospital was built on a former slave plantation, operated for over 150 years as a mental institution, and closed controversially. Merritt notes that “layers of archived materials, oral histories, medical records, empty buildings and collective memory remain. This work aims to metabolize this complicated past and demonstrate how storytelling is a healing tool for both individual and community.” Tift Merritt will perform with the Raleigh Civic Symphony as part of the work’s premiere.

PHOTO BY ALEXANDRA VALENTI

F E AT U R E S

Shortly after arriving as the Department of Music’s new director of orchestral studies in fall 2014, Peter Askim set an ambitious goal of commissioning a new work for every concert by the university’s orchestras. The 2019-20 academic year marks the fifth consecutive season with new compositions performed on each concert – four new works per year – by the Raleigh Civic Symphony and the Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra. With the twentieth composition landing in the spring of 2020, the theme of 20 for ’20 emerged. Fall 2019 concerts will include new works by James Budinich and Georgia Shreve. James Budinich is pursuing a Ph.D. in composition at Duke, and previously earned his Master of Music in composition from Binghamton University. He composes music inspired by minimalism, Croatian folk traditions, and American popular music. The Raleigh Civic Symphony will premiere a multimedia work by Georgia Shreve, a noted composer, fiction writer, playwright and poet. Her works have been performed on multiple occasions at Carnegie Hall, and her rock opera Love Sick premiered at New York’s National Sawdust in December. In spring 2020, flutist and

PHOTO BY ELENA SIPPEL

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20 FOR ’20: NC STATE’S ORCHESTRAS CELEBRATE NEW VOICES AND SOUNDS


A terrific perk of living in a college town is the free, fascinating lecture opportunities open to campus and the community. Each year the Department of Music at NC State invites distinguished scholars and artist-performers from the United States and abroad to participate in the Price Music Center Lecture Series. These presentations have related music to a wide variety of social, cultural and aesthetic themes that demonstrate both music’s universality and its unique embeddedness in particular places and times. The PMC Series has presented lectures on music’s hope-giving power following Haiti’s earthquake, its multiple roles during the Arab Spring, African-Americans’ struggles for civil rights, in addition to storytelling in Korea, throat-singing from Mongolia, and wedding songs of rural Morocco. Since its inception in 2006, this free lecture series has contributed to North Carolina State’s globalization initiatives and significantly enriched and broadened the horizons of our students and community.

JAMES ISABIRYE, lecturer of music and drama, Kyambogo University, Kampala, Uganda (Thursday, October 24). Dr. Isabirye’s research interests include indigenous models of music education, and the revival of indigenous musical practices. He has worked with communities in the Busoga Kingdom of Uganda to revive Bigwala (gourd trumpet ensemble) music and dance, as well as the Entenga royal drums of the Buganda Kingdom.

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PRICE MUSIC CENTER LECTURES

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TIBER F.M. FALZETT

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GEORGE RUCKERT, senior lecturer emeritus at MIT (Thursday, September 5). With an extensive background in both Western and North Indian classical music, Dr. Ruckert studied the Hindustani sarod (lute) and vocal music with sarod master Ali Akbar Khan for over 30 years and served as teacher and director of the Ali Akbar College of Music in California during that time.

STEWART CARTER, professor of music, Wake Forest University (Thursday, November 21). Dr. Carter will discuss new instruments for the Chinese folk orchestra. He is past president of the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music and the American Musical Instrument Society. Carter’s research interests include instruments of China, both ancient and modern. At Wake Forest, he teaches music history and theory, and directs the Collegium Musicum Vocal Ensemble. TIBER F.M. FALZETT (Thursday, January 23) is the inaugural holder of the Scottish Heritage USA visiting lectureship in Scottish Gaelic Studies at UNC-Chapel Hill. A Scottish Gaelic speaker as well as a singer and bagpiper, Dr. Falzett especially values opportunities to share the Scottish Gaelic language and its music with others, along with the power that both language and music hold in breaking down barriers and bringing people together.

All lectures will be presented in Price Music Center, Room 110, at 7pm. No tickets are required. 15


EVENTS VIGNETTES F E AT U R E S NELLA PHOTO BY NINA RODRIGUES 16 #CREATIVESTATE


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NC State LIVE Fall 2019 F

F E AT U R E S

rom Zimbabwean a cappella to jazz violin, from Indian dance to Japanese Taiko drumming, the artists of NC State LIVE will expand your world. Adhering to and celebrating its mission to connect artists and audiences in a meaningful exploration of the diverse cultures and issues that define our communities and world, the 2019-2020 NC State LIVE mainstage series includes artists who represent 14 different countries. The season gives focus to women who not only excel in male-dominated fields, but break the molds of their genres. It includes artists who joyfully mix dance and music to tell compelling stories, artists who add humor to make classical music accessible, and artists who will inspire and transport you.

REGINA CARTER Saturday, September 28 at 8pm Stewart Theatre For Grammy-nominated artist Regina Carter, the violin isn’t simply an improvisational vehicle; it’s a passport to unexpected realms. Her quest for beauty combined with her passion for excellence earned Carter the prestigious “Genius Grant” from the MacArthur Foundation. She’s been an NC State LIVE audience favorite since 1996. Regina’s recent release, Ella: Accentuate the Positive, and world tour, Simply Ella, mark the 100th birthday of the incomparable Ella Fitzgerald. An influence that began in childhood and has remained with Regina throughout her life, she shares a visceral connection to Ella’s sublime music.

REGINA CARTER PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER DRUKKER

MAKE IT A DATE NIGHT. Learn more about Bistro and a Show at go.ncsu.edu/bistro.

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EVENTS

CONTRA-TIEMPO: JOYUS JUSTUS

VIGNETTES

With live music by Las Cafeteras Friday, October 25 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

NOBUNTU PHOTO BY WERNER PUNTIGAM

NOBUNTU F E AT U R E S

Friday, October 4 at 8pm Stewart Theatre Get lost in the rich tones of Zimbabwe. Nobuntu, an all-female a cappella quintet, has drawn praise worldwide for their inventive performances that masterfully blend traditional Zimbabwean songs with Afro-jazz and gospel tunes. The ensemble’s concerts are a treat of pure voices, combined with lively percussion, traditional instruments such as the mbira (thumb piano), and vibrant dancing. If you’re a fan of Ladysmith Black Mambazo, you definitely want to check-out this ensemble of young African female performers who celebrate and preserve their culture through art, cleverly mixing past and present.

NC STATE LIVE @ THE POUR HOUSE With Stewart Theatre getting tech upgrades (see page 54), NC State LIVE opened the season by heading downtown to The Pour House Music Hall, with concerts by Quebec’s Les Tireux d’Roches on August 27, and Southern Gothic songster Amythyst Kiah on September 10. Look for announcements of future off-campus (and out-of-the-box) events as NC State LIVE works to expand its programming options.

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“The dancing was superb, the music outstanding and the message was potent, timely and positive.” (LA Dance Chronicle) The fierce minds of multilingual Los Angeles-based dance company Contra-Tiempo have concocted joyUS justUS, an urban-Latin dance and music experience that melds community stories with powerful social dance. To make the evening even more special, there will be live music by Las Cafeteras, an indie-Latinx band born in East L.A. that has taken the music scene by storm. Learn more about this artist residency on page 38. Presented by

CONTRA-TIEMPO PHOTO BY STEVE WYLIE

THEATREWORKS USA: ROSIE REVERE, ENGINEER & FRIENDS Sunday, October 27 at 3pm Stewart Theatre (Kidstuff Series) Little ones can’t help but dance along to this inspiring new musical based on the clever books Rosie Revere, Engineer; Iggy Peck, Architect; and Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty. Be treated to Rosie’s big dreams, Iggy’s passion for architecture, and Ada’s fearless curiosity – a fabulous adventure through STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math)! Recommended for inquisitive out-of-the-box thinkers ages 5 to 10 and their families.


EVENTS

SPRING 2020 PERFORMANCES Marcus Roberts and the Modern Jazz Generation Friday, January 24

Yamato: The Drummers of Japan Friday, February 28

CANADIAN BRASS PHOTO BY DANIEL D’OTTAVIO

CANADIAN BRASS

Saturday, November 2 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

Saturday, November 16 at 8pm Stewart Theatre

 FOR TICKETS 919.515.1100 arts.ncsu.edu

Maybe you remember their joyous performances with Friends of the College in Reynolds Coliseum? Perhaps you’ve caught one of their riveting PBS specials? The game-changing Canadian Brass ensemble has performed in virtually every major concert hall in the world, been seen by hundreds of millions of people on television, sold two million of its approximately 100 albums worldwide, and contributed nearly 600 new works and arrangements to the brass quintet repertoire. Experience the unparalleled musicality, good humor, and love of performing that has almost single-handedly elevated the art of the brass quintet.

Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia: The Very Hungry Caterpillar & Other Eric Carle Favourites Sunday, March 22 (Kidstuff Series)

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NELLA

Nella has a voice that will transport you. Raised on the picturesque Isla de Margarita in Venezuela, this Berklee College of Music graduate blends Andalusian and Venezuelan folkloric traditions with classical training and contemporary flair. Her charisma and talent is undeniable. Nella has performed with Jennifer Lopez, Carlos Vives and Susana Baca. More recently, Nella starred in Oscar Award winner Asghar Farhadi’s film, Everybody Knows, featuring Javier Bardem and Penélope Cruz, where she performs songs written by composer Javier Limón exclusively for the screenplay.

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Shana Tucker Saturday, February 15

L.A. Theatre Works: SEVEN Thursday, March 26 Leela Dance Collective: SPEAK (Indian Kathak and American tap) Friday-Saturday, April 17-18 LIVE @ Lake Raleigh 2020 Music Maker Blues Revue Thursday, April 16 Violet Bell Thursday, April 30 Caique Vidal & Batuque Thursday, May 14 The Collection Thursday, May 28

MAKE IT A DATE NIGHT. Learn more about Bistro and a Show at go.ncsu.edu/bistro.

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Gregg Museum of Art & Design

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Fall 2019 SOUTHBOUND PHOTOGRAPHS OF AND ABOUT THE NEW SOUTH A joint exhibition presented by the Gregg Museum of Art & Design at NC State and the Power Plant Gallery at Duke September 5-December 29, 2019 What comes to mind when one envisions “the South”? Depending on perspective, time frame, and the individual, the answer to this question can be quite complicated. In concert with Click!, the Triangle area’s annual monthlong festival of photography, NC State’s Gregg Museum and Duke’s Power Plant Gallery have joined forces to present Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, an exhibition that seeks to examine how the South has changed, and even to question what part of the United States should be included in the area defined as the South. Curators Mark Sloan and Mark Long, of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, have attempted to refocus the vision of the South through the eyes of photographers, poets and mapmakers whose images of the New South represent places and images they saw as indelibly and irrefutably “Southern.”

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GREG MILLER, DUCK RIVER, 2008

The South has been transformed multiple times over through war, historical events, cultural shifts, economic upheavals, and the shattering of social norms. Beginning with the economic issues of slavery and industrialization, and moving through Reconstruction, civil rights, reinvention and rebirth, the South has long represented a way of life that is by turns puzzling, fascinating, horrifying and comforting. It has also been the inspiration for many artists, especially photographers. The lifestyles and daily experiences revealed through the photographs in Southbound serve to remind the viewer that the response to what is seen relies as much on personal interpretation as it does on personal definition. Beauty and ugliness, drama and dignity are all held up for contemplation in these images. The exhibition questions and refutes the typical understanding of what it means to live in the South, explores what it means to be Southern, reveals new images of undiscovered aspects, and examines the tensions in a region that continues to change and evolve. Such changes can be deeply unsettling. “Progress” can be a double-edged sword, with connections to the past rendered fragile in the face of development. Images of “traditional identities as anchors in a changing world” (as curators Sloan and Long have put it) figure

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strongly, and might even be seen as a comfort of sorts in this decades-long journey of resilience, celebration of tradition, and exhilaration over new transformation. Southbound is a joint exhibition between NC State’s Gregg Museum of Art & Design and Duke’s Power Plant Gallery, located in the American Tobacco Campus in Durham. The two components of the show open September 5 at the Gregg and September 6 at Power Plant, and run through December 29. For more information, and for links to a comprehensive website dedicated to Southbound, please visit gregg.arts.ncsu.edu. Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South was organized by the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, College of Charleston School of the Arts.

FREE PROGRAMS AT THE GREGG On most Thursday evenings (when the Gregg is always open until 9pm), free public programs are offered. Events include artist talks, lectures, tours, yoga, and opening receptions. See the calendar on page 6 or visit gregg.arts.ncsu.edu/ programs for the latest list of events.


July 18, 2019-January 26, 2020

MOROCCAN MOUSE PARROT

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COLUBER JEREMI

According to Lyons, the Hokes Archives (and yes, the homophonous name is quite intentional) was “founded in 1901 by Everitt Ormsby Hokes” and “is devoted to the fabrication and documentation of rare and unusual cultural artifacts.” Lyons has originated traveling exhibitions, including one displayed in 2007 at the site (and on the anniversary) of the legendary “Scopes Monkey Trial” in Dayton, Tennessee, which offer alternatives to accepted theories of evolution and suggests that creatures long believed to be mythological – such as half-man/ half-horse centaurs – were, in fact, entirely real. As Lyons states, “My studio work over the past thirty years has explored various forms of academic parody. My subjects have included archaeology, folk art, medicine, zoology and always various forms of biography. Prints are central to much of my work, as printed culture makes both science and history possible.” His work has been presented at over 80 galleries and museums across the United States, and his prints are in numerous public collections, including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.  Professor Lyons will present a talk – “Do You Believe in Centaurs?” – on October 24 at 6pm as one of the many educational programs at the Gregg Museum offered in conjunction with its concurrent exhibition, Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology.

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Evolution. Differentiation. The wondrous variety of individual creatures, each diverging from the others. Since long before Charles Darwin envisioned the process of evolution, many scientists, thinkers, and theorists have put forth their own ideas of how the multitude of all living creatures came into being. Enter Dr. Beauvais Lyons, an art professor and self-appointed director of the Hokes Archives, a quasi-academic organization based at the University of Tennessee. Part archaeologist, part scientist, part satirist, part artistic visionary, Lyons, on behalf of the Association for Creative Zoology, presents evidence that exotic creatures found throughout the animal world offer proof of the creative presence in all things. Fantastic Fauna is comprised of meticulously rendered lithographs and taxidermy specimens ofcreatures that have never been seen before. These exhibits stand as a representation of the Hokes Archives’ collection of imaginary archaeology, zoology and medicine, and are prime examples of what Lyons calls “zoomorphic juncture,” or the combination of former species into new works of creation from the building blocks of existing organisms.

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FANTASTIC FAUNA CHIMERIC CREATURES BY BEAUVAIS LYONS

LEMUR DARWINUS

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ART’S WORK IN THE AGE OF BIOTECHNOLOGY SHAPING OUR GENETIC FUTURES

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October 17, 2019-March 15, 2020

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Evolution has gotten us this far. Design may take it from here. Aimed at raising awareness about genetic engineering, biotechnologies, and their consequences through the lens of art and design, Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology: Shaping Our Genetic Futures is an art-science exhibition organized by the NC State University Libraries and the Genetic Engineering and Society Center, and shown at the Gregg Museum of Art & Design, in the physical and digital display spaces of the Libraries, and on the grounds of the North Carolina Museum of Art. By combining science and art and design, participating artists offer new insights about genetic engineering by bringing it out of the lab and into public places to challenge viewer’s understandings about the human condition, the material of our bodies, and the consequences of biotechnology. The exhibits, integrated curriculum, and cross-campus dialogues will raise awareness and discussion about biotechnologies and their consequences in our society while drawing upon art practices that reach new communities. Organizers hope that exhibits at both the Gregg and the Libraries will prompt discussion about genetics in society and offer viewers new ways to think about their role in the genetic revolution. Visitors are also encouraged to visit From Teosinte to Tomorrow, a 100 x 100foot corn maze planted at the North Carolina Museum of Art’s museum park. This immersive, experiential work takes visitors on an agricultural trip back in time to see the origins of the corn they buy from the grocery today and consider the millennia of cultivation and hybridization techniques that have produced it. Exhibition participants were both solicited and chosen through an open call to artists, scientists, designers and makers at all career stages. Many

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participants have exhibited widely and achieved international recognition, including Christina Agapakis, Jon Davis, Siren Genomics, Kirsten Stolle, Paul Vanouse, Adam Zaretsky, Joe Davis, Emilia Tikka, Emeka Ikebude, Jennifer Willet, Charlotte Jarvis, Maria McKinney, Kerasynth, Ciara Redmond, Aaron Ellison, David Buckley Borden, and Joel Ong. These artists have made a stunning and thought-provoking range of work. McKinney reinterprets pre-Christian European harvest rituals as precursors to modern genomics in their shared aspiration to influence how nature behaves in future generations of animal and plant species. She makes connections between ritual objects like a corn dolly – an object made through the intricate handcraft of binding straw with the final sheaf of that year’s crop – and contemporary practices of bioinformatics and breeding strategies to create more physically healthy and commercially productive animals. Ikebude makes portraits out of hundreds of thousands of used toothpicks collected from restaurants which retain people’s DNA and microbiomes in the saliva, blood and food particles on the toothpicks. He raises questions about the location of identity in the complex relationship between one’s body and the microbial community one hosts. Art’s Work is guest curated by Hannah Star Rogers, an accomplished curator, poet and current STIS Visiting Scholar at the University of Edinburgh. Rogers received her MFA in poetry from Columbia University and Ph.D. at Cornell University on the intersection of art and science. She curated Making Science Visible: The Photography of Berenice Abbott, which received an exhibits prize from the British Society for the History of Science and resulted in an invited lecture at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. She is past Director of Research and Collaboration for Emerge: Artists and Scientists Redesign the Future 2016 and served as Guest Bioart Curator for 2017. Art’s Work developed out of ideas generated during a symposium of scientists, artists and scholars at the Hunt Library and an interactive pop-up exhibit at CAM Raleigh in April 2017. Six nationally recognized artists working in the realm of biotechnology and genetic engineering showed their work and hosted over 1,100 visitors during the First Friday event at CAM. People


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touched extracted DNA, sniffed perfumes from extinct flower species, and listened to improvisational musicians interpret genetic structures as musical scores. Feedback from the event and discussion topics from the symposium helped exhibition organizers to focus the art-science lens through which this work can be seen. Author Margaret Atwood will visit NC State as a part of Art’s Work on Friday, November 15 at 6pm in the State Ballroom of Talley Student Union. The author will read from and discuss her 2003 novel Oryx & Crake, covering a host of issues including genetic manipulation, corporate domination, and global pandemics (see page 10.)

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SIRE BY MARIA MCKINNEY The bull bears a sculpture inspired by an ancient tradition related to celebrating the harvest. The original ritual involved making a corn dolly from the final sheaf of each year’s crop. Maria McKinney’s reinterpretation addresses not only the ritual itself, by creating a sculpture using modern materials (brightly colored artificial insemination tubes), but also comments on the idea that humans now have tremendous influence over animals and their genes through breeding and other means.

SYMPOSIUM On Friday, October 18, the Genetic Engineering and Society Center (GES), the NC State University Libraries, and the Gregg Museum of Art & Design will host a daylong symposium to discuss the Art’s Work in the Age of Biotechnology exhibition. The symposium will bring together artists and scientists (from both natural and social sciences), as well as humanities and art scholars, NC State students, high school teachers and students, and continuing education students from the senior community. The symposium places art at the center of discussions about the future of biotechnology by presenting works in which artists appropriate tools and techniques of modern biotechnology that have, until recently, been the exclusive purview of scientists. Learn more at go.ncsu.edu/artswork.

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CABARET, SPRING 2019 PHOTO BY RON FOREMAN

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University Theatre 2019-2020

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he four highly-praised plays that make up University Theatre’s 2019-2020 season offer perspectives on life cloaked in the American experience. Thornton Wilder’s Our Town provides a glimpse into small town America with an exploration of the sentimental view of our past. George C. Wolfe’s The Colored Museum presents a satirical look at what it means to be Black in contemporary America. Terrence McNally’s musical, Ragtime, explores the intersection of three very different populations in and around New York City at the turn of the 20th century. Finally, heritage and ancestry are front and center in Christopher Durang’s comedy as Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike wrestle with our contemporary problems with both pathos and wit.

OUR TOWN September 26-October 6 Titmus Theatre The beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning play by Thornton Wilder offers a nostalgic remembrance of neighborly ways and sentimental romance. But it is also a reminder of the cycles of our life – the certainty of childhood, the bewilderment of adolescence, the joys and losses of adulthood. Life in Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire is precious because even the simplest life is beautiful when we look closely. Directed by Mia Self.

THE COLORED MUSEUM November 14-24 Titmus Theatre George C. Wolfe’s satire has electrified, discomforted and delighted audiences of all colors, redefining our ideas of what it means to be Black in contemporary America. Presented in eleven vignettes – from “Git on Board” to “The Last Mama-on-the-Couch Play” – the museum’s “exhibits” undermine Black stereotypes, old and new, and return to the facts of what being Black means. Directed by Ron Foreman.

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BRIGHT STAR, THEATREFEST 2019

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PHOTO BY RON FOREMAN

THE ROYAL FAMILY, SPRING 2019

CABARET, SPRING 2019

PHOTO BY RON FOREMAN

PHOTO BY RON FOREMAN

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RAGTIME February 19-23 Stewart Theatre

April 1-11 Titmus Theatre Siblings Vanya and Sonia live in their ancestral home in Pennsylvania where they spend their days bemoaning their small lives and tiny cherry orchard – if it can even be called an orchard. When their rich movie star sister, Masha, comes for a visit with her sexy young boyfriend, Spike, she informs Vanya and Sonia that she is selling the house. Chaos and revenge plots ensue. While Christopher Durang plays on Anton Chekov’s characters and situations, the audience doesn’t need to know Chekov’s plays to enjoy this absurd and hilarious comedy. Directed by Rachel Klem.

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October 23-27 Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre Set in 1935, this celebrated play by Cuban American writer María Irene Fornés has an all-female cast, and focuses on gender roles and the struggle against female stereotypes. Unhappy in their marriages, their homes, and their social lives, Fefu and Her Friends presents a snapshot of women interacting with each other without men around – illustrating the struggle for women to control as many elements and people around them to escape this fate. Directed by Rachel Klem. Presented in “promenade” style, the audience travels to different locations in Thompson Hall to observe the action of the play.

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VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE

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A glorious musical adaptation of E.L. Doctorow’s novel, with music by Stephen Flaherty, book by Terrence McNally, and lyrics by Lynn Ahrens. Historical figures like Emma Goldman, Booker T. Washington, and Evelyn Nesbitt intersect with three groups of New Yorkers – the upper crust of New Rochelle, the African Americans of Harlem, and the Eastern European immigrants living on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Boundaries are crossed, alliances are forged, and lives are explosively altered in this glorious musical. Directed by Mia Self.

Open Door Series

STUDENT SHORTS March 18-22 Kennedy-McIlwee Studio Theatre A ten-minute play showcase. University Theatre’s Open Door Series is a student-focused program designed to explore content meaningful and relevant to our college students as they navigate relationships with each other and the broader world.

TICKETS  919.515.1100  arts.ncsu.edu

LEARN MORE AND CONNECT!  theatre.arts.ncsu.edu  ncstateuniversitytheatre   @NCSUTheatre   @ncstateuniversitytheatre

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AN AUDIENCE OF THOUSANDS GATHERED IN REYNOLDS COLISEUM FOR AN ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE THAT WAS PART OF THE FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE SERIES.

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The remarkable story of how NC State’s Reynolds Coliseum became a major arts destination BY ROY C. DICKS

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EONARD BERNSTEIN. VAN CLIBURN. BEVERLY SILLS. ANDRÉ PREVIN. LEONTYNE PRICE. ISAAC STERN. These beloved artists, famous for their performances and best-selling recordings, were in high demand around the world during the second half of the 20th century. And yet they also appeared at North Carolina State University during the heights of their careers, performing for audiences of up to 12,000 a night in concerts that cost about a dollar per ticket. How was that possible? The answer lies in the remarkable story of the Friends of the College (FOTC) concert series, which brought these luminaries and many more to the campus from 1959 to 1994. The series was unique for its extremely low-priced tickets and for covering expenses solely by subscriptions and student union administrative support. After just six seasons, it became the largest subscription series in the country. In this 60th anniversary year, it’s appropriate to take a look at the bold

vision and fervent support that made FOTC such a success. In the late 1950s, North Carolina State College, in its pre-university days, was mainly a technical and agriculture school serving around 6,000 students. Although two other area academic institutions, Duke University in Durham and the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, had high-quality performing arts series, NC State had none. Gerald Erdahl, director of the college’s student union, felt students weren’t getting well-rounded educations with so few opportunities to experience professional performing arts programs on campus. He wanted to change that by bringing in world-class orchestras, singers, instrumentalists and dance companies. After positive meetings with other union administrators, faculty members and Raleigh civic leaders, FOTC was born. But there were two hurdles to negotiate before moving forward. The first was finding an accommodating venue, because the college didn’t have an

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PAGE 32: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) ISAAC STERN, BEVERLY SILLS, LEONARD BERNSTEIN, ANDRÉ PREVIN, LEONTYNE PRICE, VAN CLIBURN. PAGE 33: “7 PROGRAMS - 7 DOLLARS” POSTER FROM THE 1963-64 SEASON, AND THE ROYAL MARINES TATTOO POSTER FROM 1965.

appropriate auditorium with enough seats. The only option was William Neal Reynolds Coliseum, a 12,000-seat arena used for everything from basketball games to ice-skating shows. Although seemingly unsuitable, Reynolds had actually been tested a few years earlier when Erdahl scheduled a performance by the Longines Symphonette, a popular radio orchestra. The acoustics were found surprisingly acceptable, with no need for amplification. Based on that experience, FOTC organizers decided to use the coliseum. The other challenge was attracting enough ticket buyers to cover the costs of presenting first-class performers. Because NC State students were to be allowed two free tickets per concert, the series needed funding from audiences outside the campus. It was decided that the season would be only by subscription (no individual concert tickets), to secure necessary advance funds and also to provide marketable exclusivity. Erdahl came up with the idea of modeling the FOTC subscription campaign on the United Way model. Volunteers in hierarchical tiers of colonels, captains, and lieutenants would urge

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friends, relatives and co-workers to purchase subscriptions, with prizes and free tickets going to those who sold the most. The inaugural 1959-60 season boasted four programs: the Philharmonia Hungarica, recently formed from musicians who had fled their country’s Soviet takeover; an evening of readings by actor Vincent Price; pianist Lorin Hollander, a fifteen-yearold prodigy on his first tour; and flamenco dancer José Greco and his company. Subscriptions were $6 for an individual, $10 for couples and $24 for groups of six. The modest one-week campaign, held only in the Raleigh area, resulted in 2,600 subscriptions that easily covered expenses. The opening concert with the Philharmonia Hungarica was a big success. Works by Rossini, Beethoven and two Hungarian composers, received warmly appreciative ovations. The concert proved that, even with a make-shift stage and chairs set up on the main floor, the coliseum would serve the purpose. The other three programs were also well received. One unplanned constant was revealed that first season – the nightly train that rumbled and whistled through campus during concert hours. Each year thereafter, artists were warned, most taking it in stride with humor and making it part of the performance. Positive public response led to a grander scope for the 1960-61 series, which included superstar conductor Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, a choir from Yugoslavia, and Archibald MacLeish’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play, J.B. Volunteers had no trouble selling the season, this time reaching out to areas beyond Raleigh and thereby tripling subscription sales.


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Bernstein’s appearance gave the series a huge boost. After a program of Schumann and Tchaikovsky, Bernstein wittily praised the audience of 8,000 for being very quiet during each piece and very loud after each ended. The other concerts that season were also well attended, although after the J.B. presentation, along with the Vincent Price readings the previous season, it was determined that spoken word presentations didn’t really work in the coliseum. FOTC expanded substantially for the 1961-62 season with six programs for five dollars, generating 9,000 subscriptions. Programs included Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, the Roger Wagner Chorale, operatic soprano Birgit Nilsson, Philippine and Polish folk-dance groups, and an unprecedented three-night run by the New York City Ballet. That was the first time a proscenium stage curtain was needed to create offstage entrance wings. On opening night, the curtain came loose and fell to the stage, exposing the dancers waiting to go on. After a short delay for stagehands to reattach the curtain, both audience and ballet company had a great evening. That October 1961 program was, tragically, the last one Gerald Erdahl would witness, because he died of a stroke the next month. But his solid organizational structure allowed Henry Bowers, assistant director of student activities at the student union since 1957, a smooth transition to being its director and the FOTC administrative head. Bowers had been involved with the series from the beginning and, under his guidance for the next 26 years, it flourished.

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TOP: GERALD ERDAHL, FOUNDER OF FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE. BOTTOM: HENRY BOWERS, DIRECTOR, 1961-1987.

The series was already forging fierce loyalties in subscribers and volunteers. Martha Zaytoun was a prime example. She moved with her husband and children from Rocky Mount to Raleigh in 1960. She was delighted to discover FOTC and immediately bought subscriptions for her whole family, something she continued doing every season thereafter. Looking back now, she fondly remembers the joy the concerts brought. “We would all arrive an hour early to make sure we got front row seats,” she says. “It was a

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wonderful way to expose my children to great music and dance in live performances.” Zaytoun’s enthusiasm soon led her to volunteer to sell tickets, working her way up to colonel status and often winning prizes for the most subscriptions sold. The number of concerts increased in the next season, the first of a dozen subsequent seasons to employ the iconic slogan, “Seven Dollars for Seven Concerts.” The 196263 series had orchestras from Paris, the Hague, Leningrad and Minneapolis, a German children’s choir, and an evening of Leonard Bernstein stage works. It also had the first of what became a hugely popular category over the years – regimental bands, pipes and drums from various parts of the United Kingdom. Visiting artists were not accustomed to the nontraditional coliseum setup or to the huge crowds, leading to some wariness upon first arrival. But most performers felt differently after the experience. Sir Malcolm Sargent, having conducted his concert with the Royal Philharmonic in October 1963, stated, “The sound quality is very good and I was amazed to be performing before so many thousands. The Friends series is unique in the world.” Subscriptions climbed to 11,000 for the 1963-64 fifth anniversary season. Although concerts had been singlenight performances so far, the appearance of pianist Van Cliburn in October 1963 would cause that to change. Worldfamous after winning the 1958 Tchaikovsky Competition in

Moscow, Cliburn drew virtually all that season’s subscribers, plus over a thousand more attendees (students only had to show ID cards to get their two free tickets, so their numbers were not known in advance). The venue was filled to capacity, with some ticket holders having to be turned away. Therefore, beginning with the 1964-65 season, concerts were scheduled for two nights each (and three for popular dance companies), a standard maintained, with few exceptions, throughout the rest of FOTC’s 35 years. The series’ popularity continued to be driven by such marquee names as pianist Arthur Rubinstein, operatic soprano Anna Moffo, violinist Yehudi Menuhin, the American Ballet Theatre, and the Vienna Philharmonic. With multiple performances of each program, subscription sales reached 19,000 in 1969. Attendees came from most everywhere in North Carolina, while others traveled from Virginia and South Carolina. Chartered buses began arriving, parking in convenient lots next to the coliseum. This caused some stir initially during warmer months, when the venue’s windows were open (it was not air-conditioned). The buses would warm up their engines before the end concerts, adding unwelcome sounds to the music being performed (the problem was soon corrected). Everyone involved with FOTC seemed filled with a deep sense of ownership and camaraderie. The relaxed informality of the coliseum made it easy for


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THE RITE OF SPRING In November 1986, the Martha Graham Dance Company performed for three nights in Reynolds Coliseum. All three concerts closed with Graham’s “The Rite of Spring.” When reviewing Graham’s groundbreaking dance work for The New York Times in 1984, Anna Kisselgoff called her “an artist of the greatest depth” and said, “her triumph was complete. In the premiere of her version of ‘The Rite of Spring,’ she has given us a treatment of Stravinsky's score unlike any other.”

families, students and co-workers to enjoy the presentations. With no reserved seats, attendees could pick their favorite spots, whether on the side over the stage, far in the back for the best sound balance, or behind the orchestras to watch the conductors’ faces. And audiences accepted the uncomfortable seats as part of the experience. In the early 1970s, FOTC continued its impressive run with illustrious artists such as opera soprano Joan Sutherland; dynamic conductor Seiji Ozawa, with the New York Philharmonic; pianist André Watts and composer/conductor André Previn with the London Symphony orchestra (who appeared in three additional seasons). That same period also saw changes to the long-established “seven for seven” concept.

Rising artists’ fees and venue rental rates, combined with sales reaching the coliseum’s seating capacity, forced the series to consider higher prices or fewer concerts. For the 197273 series, FOTC decided to offer five programs at the seven-dollar rate, still a bargain for such attractions as Washington National Ballet’s “Sleeping Beauty” and Eugene Ormandy conducting the Philadelphia Orchestra. However, after two additional five-concert seasons, and a setback from the 1974 gasoline crisis, subscriptions fell to 15,000. With the 1975-76 season, the series went back to seven concerts with a price increase to ten dollars. Subscriptions soon shot up, reaching 21,000 for the 1978-79 season. That was mostly due to the inclusion of Beverly Sills, the singer whom Time magazine had dubbed, “America’s Queen of Opera.” On her first night, 12,000 people showed up, the series’ largest crowd yet. That figure was then exceeded the second night by nearly another thousand, made possible by bringing in extra chairs and removing the stage curtain. Through most of the 1980s, subscriptions remained steady, ranging from 18,000 to the alltime high in 1985 of 22,500. Besides the return of many favorite artists, the series programmed

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IN 1992, BOBBY MCFERRIN WAS GUEST CONDUCTOR OF THE RALEIGH CIVIC SYMPHONY FOR A CONCERT AS PART OF FRIENDS OF THE COLLEGE.

first-time appearances of the Pennsylvania Ballet, opera star Shirley Verrett, folksinger Burl Ives, violinist Itzhak Perlman and the Canadian Brass, the latter going on to perform in four different seasons over an eight-year period (they return to the university campus on the NC State LIVE series this fall – see sidebar). During that period, despite the series’ continuing success, it became clear that the landscape was changing. Artists’ fees began to rise rapidly in the 1980s, nearly tripling by the end of the decade. The top-ranked orchestras and dance companies were touring less because of rising transportation costs. And competing series were springing up in new venues at area cities and universities. FOTC subscription costs were forced up, first to $15, then to $23 and $25, to manage seven concerts per season. By the time Henry Bowers retired from NC State University in 1987, after 30 years of service, the challenges were only worsening. Ronald Butler, the associate vice chancellor for student affairs, took over from Bowers, determined to keep the series affordable and high-quality. For his first two seasons, the $25 subscriptions averaged 19,000 members. But with the 1989-90 season’s increase to $30 subscriptions, the numbers fell to 15,000, despite such programs as operatic baritone,

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Sherrill Milnes, pianist Vladimir Feltsman, the Moscow Philharmonic, and classical comedian Victor Borge. Butler tried some innovations in the new decade, including single ticket sales and a section of reserved seats. He also tweaked programming to include some crossover artists such as trumpet player Doc Severinsen and jazz vocalist Bobby McFerrin, each performing with area orchestras. But subscription sales plummeted to 10,000 and below, with the series reduced to five concerts for $35 in the 1992-93 season. There was a last-ditch effort to test the viability of FOTC in some form by scheduling one program in December (another group of regimental bands) and one in April (the Dresden State Orchestra) at $15 each. The sales goals were not met, however, and they became the final concerts in FOTC’s 35-year run. There had been some hope that the long-planned new university sports arena could save the series through bigger and more comfortable facilities, but the continued delays in arena funding prevented that hope from being realized. Still, as Henry Bowers recently reminisced, “We achieved all our goals and helped create a wider audience for performing arts on the campus and in the community.” Today, many of us who attended FOTC concerts still have vivid memories of them. One I cherish was Birgit Nilsson’s recital in 1968, in which she pushed aside the microphone in front of her before unleashing her laser-beam voice into the far reaches of the coliseum. I also still marvel at having witnessed both the 1978 and the 1989 performances of Mahler’s Symphony


With the exception of the current Canadian Brass photo, all images in this article were provided by the Special Collections Research Center, North Carolina State University Libraries, Raleigh, North Carolina, based in D. H. Hill Jr. Library. The Friends of the College archive collection is found at UA 018.001. Learn more about the Center at lib.ncsu.edu/scrc. Canadian Brass photo by Daniel D’Ottavio.

CANADIAN BRASS One of the most beloved groups to perform for Friends of the College was Canadian Brass. From 1984 to 1991, they appeared on the series four times. Known for their impeccable musicianship combined with humor (or humour, as they would spell it on their side of the border), Canadian Brass is renowned the world over. Dressed in their signature black suits paired with white sneakers, every performance exhibits genre-bending versatility and joy. In honor of the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Friends, NC State LIVE is bringing Canadian Brass back to campus for a concert in Stewart Theatre on November 16. Friends of the College is a huge part of the arts legacy at NC State University, so it is fitting to pay tribute to the iconic series that made Raleigh a vibrant cultural hub, and demonstrated the need for a strong arts environment on the NC State campus.

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Roy C. Dicks was a performing arts writer and critic with the Raleigh News & Observer for 21 years and with the weekly Raleigh Spectator for eight years. He is a member of the Music Critics Association of North America and has written for Opera Quarterly, Dance Magazine and American Record Guide.

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For a list of all the Friends of the College performances by year and category, visit go.ncsu.edu/fotc.

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No. 8, famously known for requiring a thousand performers (they nearly made it each time with multiple choruses and several combined orchestras). And my very first program in 1967, a staged performance of Carl Orff’s “Carmina Burana” by Les Grands Ballets Canadiens that set me on a lifelong pursuit of other stagings of Orff’s gripping choral work. A Facebook fan page created this year for the FOTC concerts has garnered a number of enthusiastic reminiscences. Some are from people who were children at the time, taken to concerts by their parents, who then grew up and took their own children to them. Former NC State students who took in the free concerts have written about what they meant to their learning experiences. NC State University’s current 35,000 students have access to an impressive range of performing arts from campus-based groups and from visiting artists on the NC State LIVE series. They now also have unprecedented choices in Raleigh and Triangle venues. But for those of us who were here while FOTC brought the world’s best to our doorstep at very affordable prices, there never can be quite the same thrills today that those events provided. 

Tuba legend and founding member Chuck Daellenbach (far right) is the last original member of the quintet still touring.

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JOY

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F E AT U R E S

BY KELLY McCALL BRANSON

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Contra-Tiempo interweaves theatre, music and dance to celebrate our shared humanity

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

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HE IDEA FOR Contra-Tiempo’s latest production came to its artistic director, Ana Maria Alvarez in a dream, a dream she had on the night her previous work, Agua Furiosa premiered. “It was such an intense, heavy piece,” says Alvarez, of Agua Furiosa’s themes of racial conflict, economic inequity and the politics of water. “I knew I had to flip the script. I wanted to illuminate what it means to be joyful in a time when joy is a struggle, to activate joy – as a kind of superpower!” And so began ContraTiempo’s three-year journey to joyUS justUS, an eveninglength piece that interweaves theatre, live music, storytelling, soundscape and dance to address difficult themes of oppression and injustice, but through a converse lens of strength, resilience and radical celebration of our shared humanity. NC State LIVE, along with sponsor PNC, will present joyUS justUS in Stewart Theatre on October 25. Fundamental to this work is the idea that the audience experience should transcend mere watching and witnessing. From the ground up, the piece evolved through a collaborative process, with Alvarez, her urban Latin dance theatre company and their South L.A. community. Its essence is a microcosm of the cultural diversity and the human

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PHOTO BY STEVE WYLIE

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connections, the struggles and the joy of the people in their world, their place. But rather than merely presenting that story to its audience, Contra-Tiempo actively opens the narrative to include the people of this place too. Community participation, onstage and in the audience, are integral to the joyUS justUS

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experience – with the deliberate intention for connection and bridge-building and inclusion in an ever-widening circle that is this story of communal, interdependent humanness. This collaborative spirit is precisely what attracted PNC to the joyUS justUS project at NC State. As part of their commitment to


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A WORK OF US And the collaboration continued in the studio. Alvarez encouraged her dancers to bring their own personal experiences, ideas and skills to shaping the work. “I wanted to crack open this opportunity to present not only one single voice, but for other voices to be heard,” she says. “How could the dancers not be puppets,

not just performers, but actually create their own work in this space.” Each dancer was asked to generate their own, authentic material. Movement phrases, song ideas, rhythms, poetry, text, spiritual practices and entire sections were generated by members of the ensemble and incorporated throughout the piece. The performers sing. They talk. They play improvised instruments. They beat rhythms on their bodies. And of course, they dance. The piece is performed against a backdrop of colorful altar quilts created by Emily Orling, celebratory in their vibrancy, and lending an air of the sacred to the performance. The costumes, designed by Charlese Antoinette, are likewise bold and joyous and powerful in color and pattern. This interweaving of the voices of the performers and the voices of their community, of texture and color and pattern, is given even more depth with a sonic landscape crafted by d. Sabela grimes. The sounds of Alvarez’s young sons laughing and crying, conversations among the ensemble, Sabor Session recordings, a voiceover of Jamaican spiritual leader, Mooji and the cacophony of protests in L.A., Mexico and Brazil, all spark an emotional aural connection to the themes of struggle and joy and shared humanity.

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REACHING OUT, OPENING UP At its core, joyUS justUS is about connection. “It’s the root – whoever we are, wherever we come from,” says Alvarez, “our deepest and most profound desire is to connect.” The company spent two years making just such connections with the people of their own community, hosting “Sabor Sessions” (from the Spanish word for flavor) at community centers in South L.A. These “get downs” were free and open to anyone every Friday evening. They were dance classes to learn hip-hop, house, Afro-Cuban and Salsa from the company’s teaching artists. (An essential role for all the members of Contra-Tiempo is to develop not only skills as dancers, but as dance leaders as well – what Alvarez calls the Contra-Tiempo engagement methodology.) They also held “council,” an indigenous practice of storytelling, in

which participants shared their personal experiences of justice and joy. There were choreographic labs, where every six weeks or so, the company would share a snippet of the work they had developed as they carried what they had learned at the Sabor Sessions back to their studio, and then they further honed the pieces with feedback from these labs. Sometimes six people would show; sometimes 50. They included folks of all ages. “Parents brought their kids, thinking it was a dance class for them,” laughs Alvarez, “ but then they wound up joining in themselves.” Ladies showed up thinking it was aerobics class and found themselves sharing profoundly personal experiences in the story circle. “For us, community engagement and artistic expression are inextricably linked,” says Alvarez. “The experiences, cultural creations and ‘we-stories’ of our communities are the inspiration and motivation for our art making.” Indeed, the Sabor Sessions created the framework for creating joyUS justUS.

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making the arts accessible to everyone, PNC seeks to fund arts and cultural projects that “meet the community where they are.” Their sponsorship includes a game-changing grant of $65,000, which will support an eight-day residency with Contra-Tiempo at NC State, to include, among other events, a pop-up performance in downtown Raleigh, “radical joy sessions” (participatory workshops) with NC State students and Raleigh youth, and the inclusion of approximately 40 Triangle residents onstage at the performance in Stewart Theatre.

LIVE ON STAGE – LAS CAFETERAS Joining these sounds is the exuberant genre-bending music of Las Cafeteras, performed

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PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ARTISTS

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LAS CAFETERAS

live on stage. This East L.A. band fuses Afro-Mexican, hip-hop, folk, Native American, funk and ranchera. They are known for their Son Jorocho sound – a Spanish-CreoleAfrican musical fusion from the south of Mexico, and Zapateado, an Afro-Mexican dance style of rhythmic tapping, akin to tap dance. Las Cafeteras plays traditional instruments like the jarana an eight-string rhythm guitar, the quijada, the jawbone of a donkey, and the tarima, which is actually a wooden platform, deployed as a percussion instrument. Their

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lyrics aim to inspire love and justice. “We want to celebrate in a time of hate, where love and music and dance become a revolutionary act.” Says Hector Flores, vocalist, jarana player and zapateado with Las Cafeteras. “Las Cafeteras is the band version of Contra-Tiempo,” quips Alvarez. “And ContraTiempo is the dance version of Las Cafeteras.” NORTH CAROLINA ROOTS Alvarez comes by her activism honestly; she grew up in Greensboro, North Carolina, the daughter of Cuban-

American parents who were union organizers and civil rights activists. (They met as students at Duke.) She calls herself a movement child. “I knew that whatever it was I wound up doing one day would have to make a difference in this world.” Alvarez attended high school at the North Carolina School of the Arts. When she was 19, she participated in an Urban Bush Women summer intensive and there, came to realize she could be a dancer and a changemaker. (Choreography would come later.) She came to see


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ANA MARIA ALVAREZ

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In the spring of 2017, two dancers from Contra-Tiempo returned to NC State for a residency with students in the Panoramic Dance Project. They taught the students an excerpt from Agua Furiosa, which the students performed in both the Panoramic spring concert and in October 2017 as part of the ACCelerate Festival of Creativity and Innovation at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. FINDING CONNECTION In addition to joy as an act of positive resistance, and connectivity as a path to that joy, another theme emerged during the two years of Friday night Sabor Sessions: the sacred feminine. This was somewhat unexpected for Alvarez, but as they sat in council week after week listening to the heartfelt stories of the community, so many were centered around the

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social dance as inextricably connected to social change – the idea that, throughout history, through every kind of oppression, abuse, subjugation and brutality, people still found the capacity to move together in joy as a kind of resistance to that injustice, a triumph of the human spirit. Alvarez has taken Salsa back to its roots as a mode of expression for the working class. She notes the idea of resistance between partners, inherent to the dance, as a kind of metaphor for the push and pull of power dynamics. As an arts activist Alvarez has taken on environmental issues, food and water inequities, the racial injustice of our justice system, patriarchal oppression, immigration and exile. “Art and action are two sides of the same coin,” says Alvarez. “They both require imagining possibilities and then creating what doesn’t yet exist.” This upcoming fall residency at NC State is a natural step in NC State LIVE’s long artistic relationship with Alvarez and her company. In 2016, NC State LIVE engaged ContraTiempo in a three-day residency in conjunction with the presentation of Agua Furiosa. “The conversations Ana Maria had with NC State students during that residency – about inclusion, privilege and social justice – clearly resonated in very deep and personal ways with them,” shares NC State LIVE director Sharon Moore. “Her exuberant spirit and passion for transforming the world through dance is completely captivating.”

profound influence of mothers and grandmothers – and also Madre Tierra, Mother Earth. “It made so much sense, relative to the idea of resistance as celebration and resilience, to talk about upsetting the patriarchy, coming from the perspective, not of fighting, but of celebrating the feminine.” And just as this work unfolded as a collaborative work in its creation, its performance continues to invite collaboration, participation, inclusion. “Our goal is not to just drop in and perform,” says Alvarez. “We’re making meaningful connections that ripple outside the performance space into the greater community.” In Raleigh, as in each city they visit, Contra-Tiempo will invite people from different community and religious organizations (ideally, diverse groups that might not otherwise occupy the same

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TAKING ART INTO THE COMMUNITY The News & Observer story announcing the August 2 opening of the redesigned Moore Square calls it “a wide-open symbol of Raleigh’s commitment to democracy in public spaces.” It’s hard to think of a more fitting location for Contra-Tiempo to move outside a formal theatre space for a pop-up performance in downtown Raleigh. Moore Square is one of Raleigh’s two surviving original parks, conceived by surveyor William Christmas when he created the layout for the city in 1792. Over the centuries, Moore Square has been – as described on the city website – “a place of gathering, reflection, entertainment and recreation for the citizens of Raleigh.” The park has long been a point of intersection between historically African American neighborhoods, downtown businesses, schools, thriving restaurants, and places of worship. It is adjacent to City Market and Marbles Kids Museum, and for decades has been the home of Artsplosure, the Raleigh Arts Festival. A primary goal of the NC State LIVE residency project with Contra-Tiempo is to move the artistic experience beyond the formal performance, and engage with participants throughout our campus and community. A midday pop-up showing in Moore Square Park on October 23 is one of many engagement opportunities being planned for the week leading up to the October 25 performance in Stewart Theatre. The generous support of PNC – through their commitment to fund arts and cultural projects that “meet the community where they are” – has been critical to this innovative project.

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Kelly McCall Branson is a freelance writer who has written about the arts, dining, travel, sustainable living and home building for regional and local publications throughout the Southeast.

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space) to take a place on the stage as the “Community Altar.” Acting as a metaphorical bridge between performers and audience, blurring the lines that separate the two and inviting all to be more than passive observers, but active participants. In addition, a small group of movement artists from the community will perform several of the individual pieces. Each seat in the theatre will have a piece of fabric to be used in self-expression – a flag to wave or wear or just hold, in shared celebration. Even the lighting is designed to promote connectivity, with the whole theatre, during one number, being filled with starlight. “We are star dust,” wrote Alvarez in her 2018 journal. “I am hearing this everywhere we go – the affirmation of our human bodies being intrinsically linked to the cosmos – that my exhale is your inhale, that we are all part of a whole.”There is much call and response during the performance, and it closes with one big dance party. “It all comes down to inclusion and connectivity,” says Alvarez. “At the root of our disconnect is the inability to be in the same space and to really listen to people we have differences with. But what if art could facilitate that – could help us see how really connected we all are? That could change the world.” 

To learn more about the artist residency events, visit go.ncsu.edu/contra.

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PHOTO BY DAN JAHN

Alyssa McInnis ‘22 enjoys a “once in a lifetime” experience performing with the Marching Band at the Eiffel Tower in Paris.


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MORE

POWER More Musicians + More Donors = A Bigger and Better Marching Band

W

ITH A LEGACY spanning more than a century, the Wolfpack community takes great pride in the marching band. Over the past 15 years especially, the Marching Band has swelled in size and lives up to its longtime nickname: the Power Sound of the South. Dr. Paul Garcia, the band’s director since 2006, expressed his excitement about the growth of the band. “Last year, we auditioned approximately 160 incoming students to join the marching band,” says Garcia. “That’s a huge increase from five or ten years ago.” Marching Band members shrug off the long

days and the many hours practicing both on their own and together. The hard work, often in 90 degree heat, is worth it for the experiences they share and the relationships they build with their fellow student-musicians. “I love the Marching Band. I love the people and having 350 friendly faces around campus,” said Haley Ni ‘21. “The sections are like families, and everyone is so dedicated. I just love everything about it.” Some of those shared experiences recur every week during football season. For many, their strongest memory of their time in band is their first time running out onto the field at Carter Finley Stadium in front of thousands of cheering NC State fans. “Playing at games is such a

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rush,” said Wyatt Fulbright ‘20. “The days are long and tiring. But when you’re playing in the stands or out on the field, there’s just nothing else like it.” For others, there are once-in-a-lifetime experiences that change the way they see the world and themselves. Or in the case of junior Avery Narron ‘21, twice-in-a-lifetime. “I played my first game with the Marching Band inside of Bank of America Stadium [home of the Carolina Panthers],” said Narron, who also performed on TIAA Bank Field, home of the Jacksonville Jaguars, during the 2018 Gator Bowl. “That was insane and very, very memorable. I never ever imagined I would perform in an NFL stadium. Now I’ve performed in two.” Over the summer, members of the band traveled to France to participate in events commemorating the 75th anniversary of D-Day. Alyssa McInnis ‘22 said, “I was at home when I found out about the France trip. I was so excited that I immediately ran to tell my parents. They told me to sign up because those chances come once in a lifetime.” While in France, the band performed underneath the Eiffel Tower in Paris, on the beach in Le Havre, and at the American World War II memorial at Colleville-sur-Mer in Normandy. “It was such an honor,” said McInnis. Such invitations to participate in significant events on the global stage underscore the respect and prominence that the Marching Band has earned. It’s not the first time the band has garnered international recognition. It has previously played for United States presidents, performed in the Rose Bowl, the annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in Dublin, Ireland, and marched through the streets of Madrid, Spain in 2014. What’s next for the Power Sound of the South? “More, a lot more” says Garcia. “We want the band to continue growing, while honoring the rich tradition set by many generations of marching alumni.” To do that, the band needs the support of band alumni and the entire Wolfpack community. As the band grows and works hard to provide an unforgettable experience to NC State fans, the costs associated with maintaining its equipment also increase. New and repaired instruments will help the band look and sound its best for each performance. The yearly expenses of taking the

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band on the road to represent NC State grow with each season. “The Athletic Bands Endowment was established to provide that regular support that we need to have the strong program the fans expect and the students deserve,” says Garcia. “Growing the endowment will help make us bigger and better.” 

JOIN US NOVEMBER 8-9 FOR THE NC STATE MARCHING BAND REUNION! Activities Include: •  Homecoming parade watch party •  Reunion tailgate party •  Halftime performance with the NC State Marching Band Visit go.ncsu.edu/bandreunion to register and stay up-to-date on reunion activities.

SUPPORT THE POWER SOUND OF THE SOUTH Make a gift to the Athletic Bands Endowment. Individual support will help the NC State Marching Band continue its more than century-long trajectory of steady improvement in size, musicianship, and performance quality. Gifts to the Athletic Bands Endowment will be invested and used for the ensemble’s needs that are not otherwise covered from other funding sources. Since 2003, over 470 gifts have been made to the fund and it has grown to over $235,000. Growing this endowment will ensure the band is well-funded, now and in the future. To learn more about giving to the Athletic Bands Endowment or to make a gift, visit go.ncsu.edu/ bandreunion.


DINING GUIDE TALLEY STUDENT UNION Floor 1 Starbucks Floor 2 Jason’s Deli Los Lobos Mexican Grill One Earth World Cuisine Port City Java Red Sky Pizza Company Talley Market (Howling Cow & Yates Mill Bakery) Tuffy’s Diner Floor 3 1887 Bistro

FIVE POINTS AREA Bloomsbury Bistro 509 W Whitaker Mill Rd 919.834.9011 Glenwood Grill 2603 Glenwood Ave 919.782.3102 Hayes Barton Cafe and Dessertery   2000 Fairview Rd 919.856.8551

NEAR CAMPUS

DOWNTOWN

David’s Dumpling & Noodle Bar 1900 Hillsborough St 919.239.4536

Bida Manda 222 S Blount St 919.829.9999

Poole’s Diner 426 S McDowell St 919.832.4477

Brewery Bhavana 218 S Blount St 919.829.9998

The Raleigh Times Bar 14 E Hargett St 919.833.0999

Capital Club 16 16 W Martin St 919.747.9345

The Remedy Diner 927 W Morgan St 919.803.4556

Death & Taxes 105 W Hargett St 984.242.0218

Sitti 137 S Wilmington St 919.239.4070

Humble Pie 317 S Harrington St 919.829.9222

Taverna Agora 326 Hillsborough St 919.881.8333

Irregardless Café 901 W Morgan St 919.833.8898

Trophy Brewing Company 827 W Morgan St 919.803.4849

Gonza Tacos y Tequila 2100 Hillsborough St 919.268.8965 Kabob and Curry 2418 Hillsborough St 919.977.6974 Liquid State 1908 Hillsborough St 984.200.6184 Mitch’s Tavern 2426 Hillsborough St 919.821.7771 Players Retreat 105 Oberlin Rd 919.755.9589

CAMERON VILLAGE Cameron Bar & Grill 2018 Clark Ave 919.755.2231 Cantina 18 433 Daniels St 919.835.9911

Hereghty 2603 Glenwood Ave 919.787.3995

Piccola Italia 423 Woodburn Rd 919.833.6888

Lilly’s Pizza 1813 Glenwood Ave 919.833.0226

Soca 2130 Cameron St 919.322.0440

Mandolin 2519 Fairview Rd 919.322.0365

Tazza Kitchen 432 Woodburn Rd 919.835.9463

NOFO @ the Pig 2014 Fairview Rd 919.821.1240

Tupelo Honey 425 Oberlin Rd 919.723.9353

The Point at Glenwood 1626 Glenwood Ave 919.755.1007

Village Draft House 428 Daniels St 919.833.1373

The Third Place 1811 Glenwood Ave 919.834.6566

DRIVE THE ARTS FORWARD

Support arts advocacy with your license plate.

www.TheCreativeState.org


DONOR SPOTLIGHT

PHOTO BY COLIN BEAMER

ticket prices are reasonable, and parking is easy and free in the evenings. With six visual and performing arts programs to choose from, I can’t imagine not finding an event or experience to enjoy.

HOW DID YOU BECOME INVOLVED WITH ARTS NC STATE? My husband and

Q&A WITH LINDA SATTERFIELD Linda Satterfield’s home is filled with paintings, sculpture, and crafts, mostly by North Carolina artists, including her husband Oliver White. A longtime supporter of the arts in the community, Linda previously served on the board of CAM Raleigh. In 2016, she joined the Friends of Arts NC State (FANS) Board of Advisors following many years of supporting NC State’s visual and performing arts programs. Since then Linda has increased her giving level and become a passionate advocate for Arts NC State.

WHY DOES ARTS NC STATE MATTER? In my opinion, Arts NC State is one of the most undiscovered and underrated arts organizations in the Triangle. That is why I support Arts NC State financially and why I am honored to serve on the Friends of Arts NC State Board of Advisors. The quality of the programming is outstanding, the programming is diverse,

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I first learned about Arts NC State through a friend, Mike Davis. Mike was serving on the FANS board at the time, and he invited us to an NC State LIVE performance. After that, we were big fans.

HOW DO YOU DEFINE YOUR ROLE AS A FRIENDS OF ARTS NC STATE BOARD MEMBER, WHICH CALLS FOR LEADERSHIP AS BOTH AN ADVOCATE AND A DONOR? Being a good volunteer means introducing the organization to others. I know alumni of NC State who are unaware of Arts NC State. My job is to encourage them to be more aware and to come see what is going on. I support Arts NC State financially through a monthly contribution to the Arts NC State Enhancement Fund, the greatest needs fund for Arts NC State. I trust Rich Holly, Executive Director for the Arts, and the program directors implicitly. I am confident that my money is well-spent. Being involved with the programs has given me so much enjoyment. I encourage everyone to join me in enjoying and supporting Arts NC State.

JOIN THE TRIBUTE THE RANDY FOY MUSIC SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENT An anonymous gift leads to a lasting tribute to Randy Foy, NC State’s former Director of Orchestral Studies, who passed away in 2018. Dr. Randolph Foy was a passionate educator, a gifted musician, and a valued friend and mentor. From 1995 until 2013, Foy led two student and community musician groups for the NC State Department of Music: the Raleigh Civic Symphony (RCS) and the Raleigh Civic Chamber Orchestra (RCCO). Randy brought artistry and community to the lives of innumerable students and community members. In 2019, a retired NC State professor anonymously established the Randy Foy Music Scholarship Endowment, which will provide a cash award to an exceptional student or students participating in the RCS and/or the RCCO. This endowment honors Randy and serves as lasting tribute to a man who touched the lives of so many members of the NC State community. To make a gift to the Foy Scholarship Endowment, visit go.ncsu.edu/randyfoy. Dr. Foy was both a wonderful conductor and a good friend. When I think of Dr. Foy, I always first think of his smile. He was an incredibly warm, kind, and welcoming person, with a delightful sense of humor. His enthusiasm was contagious. All it took was one of his smiles to get the entire orchestra to rise to the challenge. Dr. Foy was a truly extraordinary person, and I count myself fortunate to have worked with him. – Joan Blazich, musician and community member


DONORS 2018 - 2019 We are grateful to our donors for their generous support. Individuals listed below have contributed cash gifts of $1,000 or more to Arts NC State between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019. Donors who have pledged their support will be listed when their gifts are received. The Honor Roll is one way we choose to recognize those who have contributed to and invested in the future of the arts at NC State University. To view a full list of 2018-2019 donors, or to learn more about giving to Arts NC State, visit support.arts.ncsu.edu.   NC

State Faculty/Staff   *deceased

LEADER ($20,000 & above)

PATRON ($1,000-$2,499)

Anonymous Robert Black & Ormond Sanderson Bill Gardner & Miriam Bailey Gardner Roxanne Hicklin

Todd & Whitney Adams John & Sabra Andrews Laura Armstrong Bart & Sue Bielawski Diane Boone Henry & Sory Bowers David & Shawn Brewster Wade & Brenda Brickhouse Gene Brown & Penelope Gallins William Ellenson & Kathy Brown Doug & Mary Jane Bryant Frank Konhaus & Ellen Cassilly Peter & Patti Celestini Tim & Carroll Clancy John Coggin Dan & Fairley Cook Robert Cooper & Sharon Perry Terry & Nancy Cox Martha & Gregory Crampton Steve & Janet Darnell Paul Streib & Susan Daughtridge Jaye Day-Trotter Charlie & JoAnne Dickinson Lynn & Faye Eury Elizabeth Fentress Annabelle Fetterman* Greg & Julie Florin Allin & Barbara Foulkrod Roland & Jill Gammon Andrew & Debra Gardner Gary & Julie Greene Robert & Linda Grew Kyle Held & Jennifer Doorey Mike Holland

VISIONARY ($10,000-$19,999) Steve & Charlotte Wainwright BENEFACTOR ($5,000-$9,999) Tom Cabaniss William & Melanie Knight Neill McLeod Michael  Stoskopf & Suzanne  Kennedy Stoskopf Judi & David Wilkinson Douglas Witcher Randy  & Susan Woodson CONNOISSEUR ($2,500-$4,999) Bruce  & Kelly Branson Jeffery Beam & Stanley Finch Bob & Mickie Masini, in memory of Toni Christine Masini Gordon & Pat Neville Tom & Judy Stafford Jim & Sterling Wheless

Rich  & Jeanne Holly Hal & Patsy Hopfenberg Jason Horne & Eva  Feucht Billy Warden & Lucy Inman Chris Leazer & Heath Ramsey Jason & Lina Lemons Roger  Manley & Theodora Brack Charlotte Martin Alex Miller Daniel & Elizabeth Page John & Lynette Parker Jim & Anne Peden Nicole  Peterson Wade & Kathy Reece Thomas & Lauren Ryan Joe Sanders & Diane Ocilka Sanders Bill Savage & Mary Losik Roby  & Amber Sawyers Thomas Sayre & Joan Ellen Deck Linh & Mette Schladweiler Kay Schoellhorn Bing Sizemore Jennette Skinner Tom Lee & Hiller  Spires Brad & Anna Sullivan Becky Thompson Jim & Cathy Ward Lane & Linda Wharton Oliver White & Linda Satterfield Larry & Judith Wilson Charles Winton Harry & Dawn Wolfe George & Reba Worsley Smedes & Rosemary York Eddie & Jane Youngblood Henry & Martha Zaytoun

While we make every effort to be accurate and thorough, it is possible to accidentally omit or misspell a name. Please contact Michael Auchter at 919.515.6160 or mrauchte@ncsu.edu with any additions or corrections.

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CORPORATIONS & FOUNDATIONS

We express our sincere gratitude to following corporations and foundations that support Arts NC State through one-time and multi-year cash gifts, grant awards and in-kind gifts. 1789 Questers Alpha Psi Omega Chapter American Online Giving Foundation Arts Wake Forest Bailey Endowment Bank of America Foundation Boeing Company Campbell Rentals Centro Mexican Restaurant Chamber Music Raleigh Coman Publishing Company Cree LED Lighting Solutions Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation Duke Energy Foundation Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Fox Family Foundation Frameworks Gallery and Frame Design GE Foundation Genworth Financial

Holt Brothers Foundation IBM Corporation Intel Foundation Kabuto Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar Lakeshore Raleigh The Lundy Fetterman Family Foundation Marcotte Family Foundation Metropolitan Life Foundation Microsoft Corporation National Christian Foundation National Coatings National Power Corporation Netflix New England Foundation for the Arts Norfolk Southern Corporation North Carolina State University Woman's Club North Shore 2441 Oakleaf Reading Club

Plant City Animal Hospital PNC George Smedes Poyner Foundation Raleigh Golden Years Association Schneider Electric Schwab Charitable Fund Sir Walter Cabinet Smart Choice Stained Glass Center State Employees Combined Campaign Synchrony Financial T. Rowe Price Program for Charitable Giving The Warner Fund Triangle Gourd Patch Guild Verizon Foundation Wells Fargo Foundation White Oak Properties Windgate Charitable Foundation Winston-Salem Foundation

R. STANHOPE PULLEN SOCIETY

The R. Stanhope Pullen Society was created in 1993 and recognizes those who invest in the future of the university through deferred gifts such as charitable remainder trusts, gift annuities, life insurance and will bequests. Arts NC State would like to recognize Pullen Society members who have designated support to our arts programs. Dorothy Adams J. Norwood* & Valeria* Adams Thomas & Virginia Avery Robert Black & J. Ormond Sanderson Jr. C. Wade & Brenda Brickhouse Joan DeBruin Mike & Terry Davis Linda & Charles* Edwards Ronald Ellis Jr. Norman* & Gilda Greenberg Nancy Gregg*

FRIENDS OF ARTS NC STATE 2019-2020 Board of Advisors

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Glenn Harman Michael Holland Ginger & Freddy Horton Jr. Ame & Jack Hunter Jr. Bernard & Patricia Hyman Louise Johanson John & Jane Kanipe Jr. Martha Keravuori Peggy Jo Kirby* James* & Eileen Lecce Sheila Lund* N. Alexander Miller III

Officers Tara Owens, Chair Dan Cook, Chair Elect Ex-Officio Charles Phaneuf, President, Friends of the Gregg Rich Holly, Executive Director for the Arts Jill Orr, Director of Development Michael Auchter, Development Associate

Wendy & Charles Musser Paul & Rebecca Nagy Mac & Lindsay Newsom Sharon Perry & Robert Cooper Lew & Billie Rentel Anita Baker Sherman Banks* & Louise* Talley Eric & Lisa Terwilliger Caroline Hickman Vaughan David & Judi Wilkinson *deceased

Members Bruce Branson John Coggin Dare Coulter Joan Ellen Deck Roxanne Hicklin Jason Horne Mary Anne Howard Bernard Hyman Jason Lemons Ken Maruyama Sharon Perry

Diane Ocilka Sanders Linda Satterfield Becky Thompson Linda Wharton Suzanne Whitmeyer Rahul Bhat, Student Representative Alex Obiol, Student Senate Representative


SCHOLARSHIPS & ENDOWMENTS Named Scholarships & Endowments may be established with a minimum commitment of $50,000 and may honor or memorialize an individual or family while supporting arts initiatives such as student scholarships, programmatic support, and collections.

ABB Inc. Arts Outreach Endowment Judy C. Abee Marching Band Endowment Patricia H. Adams Scholarship Arts NC State Endowment Athletic Bands Endowment Thomas W. and Virginia P. Avery Instrumental Music Endowment Donald & Maryann Bitzer Theatre Achievement Awards Endowment Robert Keith Black & J. Ormond Sanderson, Jr. Endowment Carey H. Bostian Music Endowment Henry & Sory Bowers Arts Endowment Brenda & E. Wade Brickhouse Fine Craft Collection Endowment Bruce T. Brown Marching Band Endowment Charlotte V. Brown Museum Endowment Raymond A. Bryan, Jr. Jazz Endowment Dr. Eloise A. Cofer Arts Endowment Margaret Price Corcoran Marching Band Scholarship Curtis R. Craver Clarinet Scholarship Mildred J. Davis Museum Endowment Ronald G. Ellis & Earl Lynn Roberson Scholarship Annabelle Lundy Fetterman Symphony Concertmaster Endowment Fox Family Foundation Crafts Center Endowment Randy Foy Music Scholarship Endowment Friends of the Gallery Miriam Bailey Gardner Music Scholarship Endowment

Dr. Norman Greenberg Brass Quintet Endowment Gregg Museum Collection Endowment John N. & Nancy C. Gregg Museum Endowment Dewey M. Griffith Marching Band Endowment Harry M. Habets Music Scholarship Endowment Harry M. Habets Music Technology Endowment Dr. Frank M. Hammond Endowment for Musicianship & Outstanding Leadership Robin Harris Dance Program Endowment Roxanne Hicklin Visual Artist Award Endowment Horton Fellowship Endowment Fund Amelia E. Hunter Choral Leadership Endowment ITG Norma Ausley Memorial Endowment Jerry & Nina Jackson Endowment for Outdoor Programming The Suzanne Kennedy-Stoskopf Endowment for Creativity in the Performing Arts Kutschinski-Fulghum Music Scholarship Endowment The Lattice Endowment for the Performing Arts James & Eileen Lecce Ethnic Art Collection Endowment Sheila Margaret Lund Endowment Jim Marchman Marching Band Endowment Toni Christine Masini Memorial Marching Band Scholarship Endowment John C. McIlwee Theatre Endowment John Menapace Photography Endowment Sharon Herr Moore NC State LIVE Endowment

Mu Beta Psi Honorary Music Scholarship NC State LIVE Endowment NCSU Pipes and Drums Scholarship NCSU Theatre Endowment Barbara G. & Hayne Palmour III Museum Endowment Pearsall-Wilkinson Scholarship Endowment James M. Poyner Visiting Artist Endowment Kimberly Titmus Przybyl Music Endowment Lew & Billie Rentel Arts NC State Endowed Scholarship Lew & Billie Rentel Museum Enhancement Endowment Lew & Billie Rentel Thompson Building Endowment Stephen P. Reynolds Scholarship Endowment Alby Rose Marching Band Scholarship Marc & Anita Baker Sherman Music Endowment Stafford Endowment for Arts NC State Student Travel Banks & Louise Talley Arts Endowment Banks C. Talley Jr. Arts Endowment for the Frank Thompson Building Brita M. Tate Memorial Endowment Martha Emerson Upchurch Performing Arts Endowment Randall & Susan Ward Arts NC State Scholarship Randall & Susan Ward Museum Endowment Wells Fargo Endowment for Excellence in Visual and Performing Arts Mary Lib Wood Endowment for the Visual and Performing Arts

arts.ncsu.edu

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O

IN PRAISE OF WHAT IS HIDDEN

Y

OU CAN’T SEE IT. It’s high up over the stage, out of sight to the audience. But the fly system has a critical role in making theatrical magic happen. Since Stewart Theatre opened in 1972, students and staff have manually raised and lowered scenery, lights and curtains above the stage. Relying on a centuriesold technology, the counterweight line-set system allowed for a single operator to move a literal ton of equipment. This past May, work began to remove the 18 aging manual linesets and install 25 fully motorized hoists, giving us the ability to program the movement of flown scenery and controlling when and how fast it moves. These computercontrolled hoists are safer and the addition of more line-sets means room for more beautiful scenery. The new work required the installation of a grid to provide a walking surface 55 feet above the stage floor. A tension grid was chosen for this purpose for its light and strong construction. However, it is not for the faint of heart. A tension grid is built from a thin wire mesh, the only thing between you and 55 feet of space above the stage floor. Though you may never see the system behind the curtains, you’ll be able to catch all the magic it will enable for years to come. Just like the backstage crews, we can’t wait for you not to see this amazing new addition to Stewart Theatre.

Enjoy a way-up-high video tour of the new fly system over the stage of Stewart Theatre! go.ncsu.edu/FlySystem PHOTO BY JOSHUA REAVES

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901 W Morgan St irregardless.com 919.833.8898

901 W Morgan St irregardlessmusic.com/calendar Live Music Every Night

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To plan your experience, visit irregardless.com/reservations


Feeding Creativity in Raleigh Using an innovative pay-what-you-can model, NC State alumna Maggie Kane feeds the downtown Raleigh community, body and soul, at her restaurant A Place at the Table. She says the range of her classroom and volunteer experiences at NC State led her to create her own business and give back. At NC State, we help students uncover their potential and bring big ideas to life. Join us.

135+

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Invested in NC State Startups Through the Wolfpack Investor Network

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Profile for Arts NC State

#creativeSTATE  

The Fall 2019 issue of #creativeSTATE, the official magazine of Arts NC State, the visual and performing arts programs of NC State Universit...

#creativeSTATE  

The Fall 2019 issue of #creativeSTATE, the official magazine of Arts NC State, the visual and performing arts programs of NC State Universit...

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