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UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

Empowered lives. Resilient nations.

ART

Articulation of Territorial Networks for Sustainable Human Development

2014 IN REVIEW


UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

Empowered lives. Resilient nations.

ART

Articulation of Territorial Networks for Sustainable Human Development

2014 IN REVIEW


ACRONYMS ADF

Assemblée des Départments de France (French Departments’ Assembly)

Local Economic Development Agency

French Agency for Development

LGLD

Local Governance and Local Development

ART

Articulation of Territorial Networks for Sustainable Human Development

LHDP

Local Human Development Programme (Cuba)

Network of Local Economic Development Agencies in Colombia

LHSP Lebanese Host Communities Support Project

AULEDA Local Economic Development Agency in Vlora (Albania) BERA

Bureau for External Relations and Advocacy

BPPS Bureau for Policy and Programme Support CO CSO COSDEPRO

Country Office Civil Society Organization Council for the Sectorial Coordination of Productive Development

LRG

Local and Regional Government

MDG Millennium Development Goal MRR

Maps of Risks and Resources

MAPS Mainstreaming, Acceleration and Policy Support MDPyEP Ministry of Productive Development and Plural Economy NCC ORU FOGAR

National Coordination Committee Organization of Regions United

DC

Decentralized Cooperation

EC

European Commission

EU

European Union

FP

Framework Programme

SDG Sustainable Development Goal

Global Taskforce of Local and Regional Governments for Post-2015 Agenda towards Habitat III

SHD Sustainable Human Development

GTF

GWS Global Water Solidarity GPDEC ILDS

Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation Integrated Local Development System

I-STEPS UNDP ART Innovation in Sustainable Territorial Partnerships

ART - 2014 in Review

Local Economic Development

AFD

ADELCO

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LED LEDA

PADIT

Articulation Platform for Territorial Comprehensive Sustainable Development

SP Strategic Plan

SSTC

South-South and Triangular Cooperation

UCLG

United Cities and Local Governments

UNDG

United Nations Development Group

UN-Habitat United Nations Human Settlements Programme UNDP

United Nations Development Programme


INDEX 7

Forewords

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The ART Global Initiative in motion

12

Localizing the post-2015 agenda and the SDGs

16

Italy hosts the final high level dialogue on Localizing the Post-2015 Agenda

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The world that El Salvador wants

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A global alliance to promote LRG’s role in development

19

Burundi: on the forefront of the dialogues on localization

20

France: constructing a post-2015 programme for economic and social inclusion

21

Portugal contributes to the new universal agenda

22

The European Union and Territorial Development Articulating

25

Integrated Local Development Systems

26

Bolivia: multilevel articulation for productive development

27

Cuba: the articulated platform for territorial comprehensive sustainable development

28

Promoting integrated development through a territorial and multilevel governance approach in Ecuador

29

Gabon: supporting local authorities in the decentralization process

30

I-STEPs

31

Lebanon: bringing communities together to address local priorities and needs

32

Local Economic Development Agencies

36

Global Water Solidarity

37

ART Worldwide

43

ART in Numbers

44

The Way Forward: 2015

46

Partners

48

Aditional information ART - 2014 in Review

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6

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FOREWORDS The ART (Articulation of Territorial Networks for Sustainable Human Development) Initiative was launched in 2005 to support the implementation of UNDP’s mandate on local governance and local development, by harnessing the potential of territorial partnerships. The Initiative has since facilitated integrated local development processes in 22 countries across four continents to help meet territories’ specific needs and priorities, thereby reinforcing the role of local and regional governments and local stakeholders as important development actors and partners. The Initiative has also developed a solid knowledge base on innovative territorial practices, and established a platform for strategic and structured dialogue between UNDP, international associations of local and regional governments, decentralized cooperation partners and the multilateral system, to help promote territorial partnerships at regional and global levels. The ART Initiative supports the implementation of UNDP’s corporate strategy on Local Governance and Local Development (LGLD), calling for a harmonized approach to face today’s development challenges, particularly at the local level. It is founded on the premise that territorial partnerships are essential to achieving sustainable human development at the local level by facilitating the alignment of decentralized cooperation with locally and nationally owned territorial development processes. In this regard, the ART Initiative embodies the “partnership component” of the Local Governance and Local Development (LGLD) Strategy of UNDP, fostering innovative cooperation modalities such as decentralized, South-South and triangular cooperation at the territorial level.

In 2014, the UN worked intensely with national and local partners to define the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and facilitated global dialogues on their implementation, including a High-Level Dialogue on Localizing the Post2015 Agenda. ART played a crucial role in cofacilitating these dialogues on localizing the post-2015 agenda, ensuring that local voices and aspirations are well reflected in the global debate on the “Future We Want”. Local and regional governments will play an essential role in promoting multi-stakeholder approaches in pursuit of inclusive sustainable development in their territories. UNDP will continue to be at the forefront of the SDG agenda by facilitating the landing of the new sustainable development goals at the local level, and by continuing to be a partner of choice for territorial development and decentralized cooperation.

Patrick Keuleers

Director/Chief of Profession Governance and Peacebuilding Bureau for Policy and Programme Support United Nations Development Programme

Nick René Hartmann

Director of Partnerships Group Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy United Nations Development Programme

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In recent years, Brazil has adopted policies to stimulate development and distribution of income that, beyond their more specific goals, generate positive effects on the wider economy. However, to further those achievements and sustain a long-term economic growth, local strategies that address the specificities of each territory are also necessary. Micro and small companies and individual entrepreneurs represent an important strength for their territories. Local development depends on decentralization policies with the joint participation of the government, private enterprises and the third sector aimed at strengthening tools for the local economic development industry and fostering entrepreneurial culture to reinforce supply chains and establish a solid foundation for social, cultural and environmental innovation processes. In this context, the Brazilian Support Service for Micro and Small Enterprises (Sebrae) has developed a series of initiatives aimed mainly at strengthening territorial governance and cooperation between economic players. The goal of this strategy is to increase the systemic competitiveness of Brazilian territories, while generating more profits for small business. Among the different actions undertaken, stands out the work done together with the municipal entities with whom we conducted the biannual Encounter of Municipalities with Sustainable Development (EMDS) attended, in its last edition, by more than 9000 people to discuss topics such as government procurement, formalization, green economy, reducing bureaucracy and productive inclusion, among others. Sebrae also works to strengthen the networks of local actors, through trainings, customized materials, exchange of best practices and encouraging entrepreneurship. It is worth highlighting the benchmarking promoted by the Mayor Entrepreneur Award, which identifies innovative practices to support small businesses and promote local development. The institution makes efforts to rationalize the processes of opening, closing and licensing of small businesses too, by supporting the development of 8

ART - 2014 in Review

technological solutions as well as training of public managers and boards of trade. It is also important to mention the work done under the Leader project, which aims to strengthen regional governance through technical support and training in planning, management and teamwork, helping to increase confidence among local leaders, reducing transaction costs and converging interests and efforts for the development of the region. Sebrae is also seeking to further promote knowledge sharing, joint projects and technology transfer initiatives with other countries. In this sense, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has been an important partner thanks to its expertise in the territorial economic development field. With initiatives such as the Articulation of Territorial Networks (ART Initiative), it has been advocating and seeking to disseminate successful practices between governments and organizations around the world, collaborating over the years at local, national and global level with a number of Latin American and African countries. The alliance between the two institutions, consolidated in the co-organization of the World Forum of Local Economic Development, has generated an unprecedented and global dialogue around LED as well as proposals for a lasting global coordination mechanism, which could make a tangible contribution to tackling the current challenges related to the implementation of the new SDGs. In this regard, UNDP and Sebrae seek to amplify and consolidate a network of partners, who can contribute to the elaboration of a dedicated sustainable agenda for a development model that is increasingly socially just and economically prosperous, with a prominent role for small business.

Bruno Quick

Manager of Public Policy and Territorial Development Unit Brazilian Support Service for Micro and Small Enterprises


The UNDP ART 2014 Review presents the leading results of the Initiative’s contribution to national policies on local development through its participation in the ongoing global development discussions. The year has been decisive for the definition of the post-2015 framework and for the global reflection on the necessary means for the successful implementation of the new agenda’s goals and targets. The ART Initiative has played an active role in this process, as reflected in this Review. Work in the territories, meanwhile, has continued unabated and has generated concrete results, as shown in many examples throughout this report. Indeed, along with the intensity and focus of the Initiative’s efforts in the dialogues surrounding the post-2015 development agenda and related processes, the Initiative continued generating, consolidating and exchanging practices and experiences in the territories, while helping their voices and perspectives to be heard in the national and international debates on the future development architecture. ART contributed to shaping and facilitating innovative and efficient mechanisms to articulate local, national and international development actors, mostly to help them harmonize their actions in support of local governance and local development processes. To achieve this, the Initiative has continued proposing specific instruments that meet local needs and priorities while aligning with the national and local development strategies. The year 2014 has also been one of movement, as the Initiative’s International Coordination shifted its quarters from Geneva to Brussels to facilitate its interaction with the various development partners and representations of European territories headquartered in Brussels and with major international development players such as the European Commission (EC). The move was also carried out in view of the complementarity between the EC’s Strategy on Local Authorities and UNDP’s strategy on LGLD.

Altogether, ART’s actions have contributed to UNDP’s corporate efforts in support of integrated local development processes. Finally, UNDP ART is looking forward to the launch, in 2015, of the Hub for territorial partnerships within UNDP in Brussels. The Hub’s objective is to capitalize on the Initiative’s relational capital with LRGs, their networks and associations and with other DC partners, in order to further expand and harness the potential of territorial partnerships in support of local development processes. To do so, the Hub will establish efficient and tested mechanisms that facilitate and support territorial partnerships in collaboration with UNDP Country Offices. We expect the Hub to be used by a large alliance of development partners who promote LGLD and hope that it will therefore contribute to the successful implementation of the new SDGs at the local level.

Giovanni Camilleri

ART Initiative Coordinator Brussels Representation Office United Nations Development Programme

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THE ART GLOBAL INITIATIVE In the last years, the UN has facilitated an unprecedented open and inclusive process aimed at engaging citizens from around the world in the definition of the new global agenda for development, taking on board the aspirations of people and their demands to be an active part of such process, not only in the design of the development agenda but also in its implementation. The effective implementation of this new agenda and its impact on people’s quality of life will depend on several factors, among which is the role of the local level and its interaction with the national and global dimensions. In this respect, ART’s focus is to contribute to the transformative shifts needed to advance SHD and a life of dignity for all. Launched by UNDP in 2005 to support countries in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) locally, the UNDP ART Initiative aims at advancing SHD at the local level in its economic, social and environmental dimensions, through a holistic territorial approach to development that takes into account the territory’s voice, national priorities and global development trends. Through innovative Decentralized, South-South and Triangular cooperation partnership modalities, the Initiative offers specific instruments to reinforce the impact and effectiveness of development cooperation, facilitating the joint work of multiple development actors under a common strategy.

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With its approach and modus operandi, the ART Initiative has created specific instruments that facilitate implementing the territorial approach and that have been captured by the territorial practices of different regional areas and diverse socioeconomic contexts. The Initiative has contributed to pushing forward several MDGs by strengthening the capacities of local institutions and development actors, focusing on Local Economic Development (LED) and fostering a wider and more coordinated coalition of development partners working with the common purpose of bettering people’s lives. LED, in particular, is a concrete example of how integrated development can be successfully implemented at the local level, as underlined in the discussions held in the World Forums on LED in Seville (Spain, 2011) and Foz do Iguaçu (Seville, 2013)1. The Turin Forum, to be held in October 2015, will offer an opportunity to further discuss how LED can contribute to address the challenges of the new development framework. As an in-house Initiative, ART’s integrated development approach has been progressively mainstreamed within UNDP’s LGLD strategy and programmes at corporate and country levels; from within, ART has informed this strategy and contributed to formulating integrated LGLD projects.


THE TERRITORIAL APPROACH TO DEVELOPMENT Adressing the hindrances to development requires implementing and contextualizing solutions that make the territory the starting point of all interventions: its endogenous potential, identity and needs are taken

into account through inclusive and participatory processes that result in integrated, cross-sector and multidisciplinary interventions. In line with this approach, all the proposed integrated territorial development

Strong from its experience in 22 countries, the ART Initiative is well placed to play a pivotal role in bringing the implementation of the new development framework and its objectives to the local level, that is in localizing the new development agenda and implementing the future SDGs at the local level. Indeed, all of ART’s initiatives are carried out under a local perspective that is aligned to national development strategies and needs on the ground, promoting links between local, national and international levels, while keeping the focus on the territory, promoting the role of LRGs as strategic development actors in the countries and facilitating their participation in global development debates. The year 2014 allowed consolidating the strategic alliance with international associations of LRGs. Throughout 2014, UNDP through the ART Initiative, together with UN-Habitat on behalf of the UNDG and the Global Taskforce of Local and Regional Governments for the Post-2015 Development Agenda towards HABITAT III (GTF), have co-led the UNDG-mandated “Dialogue on the Localization of the Post-2015 Development Agenda” 2. The dialogues on localizing the agenda have been carried out in 13 countries across all continents, in addition to events organized at global and regional levels. These dialogues have led to a number of concrete recommendations to implement the post-2015 goals at the local

strategies focus on the “place” or “territory”, in the design of crosssectorial develpment policies, where the territory is starting and end line of the process.

level and contributed to the Secretary General’s Synthesis Report, presented to the United Nations General Assembly in December and used as the basis for the final inter-governmental negotiations3. Lastly, with the support of several UNDP Country Offices (COs), in 2014 the ART Initiative has made strides in establishing Integrated Systems for Local Development based on the territorial approach and multi-actor and multilevel governance systems. Various countries have promoted territorial platforms, encouraging a comprehensive approach to local development from within the territory and facilitating the inclusion of a wide range of local governance stakeholders. They aim at allowing the transition from fragmented and project-led initiatives to harmonized and inclusive processes that stem from the territory and are locally owned, while they also contribute to applying a framework of mutual accountability. These platforms are potentially strategic for UNDP because they can strengthen its stance towards territorial development, an element that will be key to the successful implementation of the post-2015 agenda at the local level.

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LOCALIZING THE POST-2015 AGENDA AND THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS While until late 2013 the development debate mostly focused on aid and development effectiveness and on how to achieve the MDGs, in the wake of the 2015 target year of the MDGs the international development community is confronted with the need to agree on a new development framework to face the challenges ahead and benefit from the opportunities and gains generated in the previous years. Certainly, the world’s The High Level Panel of Eminent efforts to attain the MDGs have Persons Report5 has determined achieved tangible results that that the five main transformative were unthinkable two decades shifts of the post-2015 agenda are: ago: “many MDG targets [are] already met on reducing poverty, • Leave no one behind increasing access to improved • Put sustainable development drinking water sources, improving at the core the lives of slum dwellers and • Transform economies for jobs achieving gender parity in primary school”4 and many other and inclusive growth targets are within reach by 2015. • Build peace and effective, However, the MDGs also had open and accountable shortcomings that need to be institutions for all addressed in light of the new • Forge a new global development challenges and the partnership unmet targets: this is what the current post-2015 discussions are all about. The debates have therefore centered on designing a new development

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architecture that builds upon what has been achieved and takes stock of shortcomings, while involving the highest possible number of stakeholders to secure ownership. The UN, through the UNDG and all the agencies the latter encompasses, is playing a significant role in the definition process of the post-2015 development agenda. It is contributing to consensus building among Member States on the most meaningful issues that need to be addressed and facilitating an inclusive and open discussion involving all relevant stakeholders. In this sense, despite their limitations, the MDGs certainly showed the importance of the local level —in particular when it comes to the LRGs’ pivotal role in defining and delivering development goals— and how local stakeholders relate to each other. This is a link the ART Initiative knows well, as a result of its decade-long experience in 22 countries —and dozens of territories— in multilevel, multi-actor, multi-sectoral territorial development. For the first time, a major policy process in the UN is being informed by a far-reaching global consultation. Loud and clear, people have expressed their wish to see the “what and how” changed in relation to how development is addressed and brought about: people want to be engaged and they have sent an unmistakably

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


Defining the post-2015 SDGs is an ongoing, long and complex process that started in Rio+20. The post-2015 new development framework is intended as a response to today’s hurdles to development such as poverty, climate change, inequalities, vulnerability and exclusion, and economic, social and environmental challenges. Its overarching guiding principle is that of ending poverty

through an ambitious and transformative agenda that has goals and targets defined and owned by the countries and that are applied universally. In a nutshell, the process has consisted of the establishment of the UN System Task Team, an Open Working Group that subsequently proposed the future SDGs*) and the High Level Panel of Eminent Persons. There was a set of

strong signal in this respect. While the results of the discussions on the nature and areas that the future SDGs should tackle enjoy a fair degree of consensus, the process of prioritizing needs and finding adequate implementation mechanisms at the local, national and global levels is still largely in the making. There is widespread agreement, though, that the agenda is and will be universal, as attested by the unprecedented high number of participants in the first round of dialogues and consultations: the MyWorld website was viewed 4 million times, 7.3 million people expressed their priorities for the future and People’s Voices Data Mining Tool aggregated more than 1 million quantitative contributions. Countries (that is, both National and Regional and Local Governments) have played a role in defining the agenda and the development goals for the next 15 years, contributing to making the process an open and inclusive one. Many countries have shown a strong commitment and a record-high involvement, evidenced by the nearly 100 national dialogues —and 11 thematic consultations— that took place in the in the first round of discussions in 2012-2013 and led to defining “The World we Want”6. This yearlong round focused on the “what” (what is to be included in the agenda?); it was followed in 2014 by a second set of consultations centered on the

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals

11 global thematic consultations and national consultations in 88 countries, facilitated by the UNDG. The UN Task Team comprises over 60 agencies, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

*https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/owg.html

“how” (how will the agenda be implemented?), organized around six main areas: strengthening capacities and building effective institutions, localizing the agenda, participatory monitoring and accountability, engaging with the private sector, partnerships with civil society and culture and development 7. The dialogues have made clear that a structured dialogue to build an effective partnership in development is still needed. Moreover, the pivotal role of LRGs and the territories in this process, now largely established, has continued to gain traction and significance. Undeniably, the involvement of LRGs as full-fledged partners of this transformative process is needed to achieve development results, democratize the development effectiveness agenda and promote inclusive ownership. In 2014, UNDP and UN Human Settlements Programme Habitat (UN-Habitat) on behalf of UNDG, and the GTF, have co-led the dialogue on the “Localization is understood localization of the post-2015 as taking into account subagenda. An Advisory Committee national contexts, challenges and was established to guide of opportunities and governments, consultations on the localization at all stages of the development of the post-2015 process of the post-2015 agenda”8 and to encourage local and global ownership by promoting

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The event’s key messages can be summarized as follows: the effective implementation of the Post-2015 Agenda will require the localization of the global agenda and a broad-based ownership, commitment and accountability at the local level. This, however, can only be achieved if national and local governments commit to support the

localization of the agenda and if civil society, the private sector and other local stakeholders are involved in the process. Local and regional governments are to play a critical role in promoting inclusive sustainable development at local levels. To do so, national governments should provide appropriate legal frameworks and institutional and financial capacities

a broader acceptance and legitimacy of the consultations’ outcomes. This is where UNDP, through ART, was able to consolidate and use its partnership base with a diverse range of public and private institutions, including representatives from youth and women organizations, to promote the implementation of the post-2015 agenda at the local level. “The Final High Level Dialogue on the localization of the post-2015 development agenda”9 held in Turin in October 201410 and hosted by the Municipality of Turin and the Government of Italy, was the last meeting on this thematic area. Over 86 representatives of national, regional and local governments, UN agencies, The consultations on the postinternational institutions, civil 2015 development agenda have society organizations (including predominated the development women, youth and slum landscape’s dialogues, with a dwellers), the private sector, particular emphasis, in 2014, academia, foundations and on the means to implement development partners from more the future development goals than 30 countries participated. and the necessity of achieving It provided an opportunity to them on the local level, where capture the countries’ knowhow and to systemize the development makes a difference in feedback of the national, people’s lives (also referred to as regional and global dialogues localization) celebrated throughout the year,

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to ensure that local and regional governments can carry out their role in promoting local development and mobilizing local stakeholders. An integrated multilevel and multistakeholder approach will be necessary to ensure the participation and inclusion of all actors.

with their outcomes and key messages, in order to shape the next development framework. Participants agreed that the SDGs should respond to local contexts, needs and concerns. Representatives of the various countries and institutions agreed to continue advocating for the full involvement of LRGs and local stakeholders in the development and implementation of the development agenda to build real ownership, particularly now that the next phase of intergovernmental negotiations has started. The recommendations and findings are reflected in the “Turin Communiqué”11, which has been upheld by several Member States and submitted to the Secretary General. Overall, the results and conclusions of the dialogues on “localizing the agenda” have contributed to the Secretary General’s Synthesis Report, “The Road to Dignity by 2030”, which channels the results of the global conversations and intergovernmental processes that are contributing to build the future development agenda and SDGs, and establishes the ground work for the final round of inter-governmental negotiations. Not coincidentally, the Synthesis Report includes a clear reference to the importance of the local level in achieving and sustaining development results, for “people [are] at the center” of the transformative agenda in the making.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


KEY MESSAGES OF THE DIALOGUES ON LOCALIZATION12 Local and Regional Governments (LRGs) are critical for promoting inclusive sustainable development within their territories, and as such for the implementation of the post 2015 agenda. Effective local governance can ensure the inclusion of a diversity of local stakeholders, thereby creating broad-based ownership, commitment and accountability. An integrated multilevel and multi-stakeholder approach is needed to promote transformative agendas at the local level. Strong national commitment to provide adequate legal frameworks and institutional and financial capacity to local governments is required.

Looking ahead, ART, as UNDP’s entry point for territorial partnerships and with its links to localizing the post-2015 development framework, can also contribute to expanding UNDP’s base of partners and to tapping into new technical and financial resources, both of which being critical elements for the success of localization. Ultimately, it is localization that will help ensure that diversity is embraced —therefore leading to broad-based ownership, commitment and accountability— and that the new agenda is translated into national and local links and partnerships, whereby people’s concerns and needs are both a steppingstone and a cornerstone of the new SDGs.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals

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ITALY HOSTS THE FINAL HIGH LEVEL DIALOGUE ON LOCALIZING THE POST-2015 AGENDA In the context of the second round of targeted consultations, Italy, together with Ecuador and Ghana, volunteered to co-host the dialogues on “localizing the agenda”, championing the efforts towards localization —understood in the framework of the increasing role of LRGs and local actors (CSOs, the private sector and others) in implementing the new SDGs. Italy hosted the dialogues in this area of the consultations and the closing High Level Dialogue, as this thematic is well known to the country. Indeed, Italy boasts an established trajectory in promoting the localization of development under a territorial approach as an added value that generates dialogue between the territories and allows sharing knowledge, experience and innovations between countries of the North and the South. It is no coincidence that Italy has historically been a strong supporter of UNDP’s ART Initiative, the territorial approach to development and innovative cooperation modalities such as Decentralized Cooperation (DC),

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whose results, lessons learned and networks have been capitalized in the dialogues on the “localizing the post2015 agenda”. Italy offered its previous experience in localizing of the MDGs to the discussion on how to better implement and localize the SDGs. It is also playing a pivotal role in ensuring that localization is included in the ongoing discussions as a crucial element for the success of the SDGs.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


THE WORLD THAT EL SALVADOR WANTS At the request of the National Government of El Salvador, UNDP, through ART, has been supporting participation platforms called “System of Actors for Development”. These platforms, established to enhance multi-sectoral coordination, have carried out participatory strategic planning exercises to define the development plans of their territories, promoting the integration of the territorial priorities in the national and local development policies. Right from the start, the platforms expressed their interest in participating in the consultation process to define the SDGs and to make their vision of global development known at the international level. Local authorities, with the support of the National Government and UNDP ART and in coordination with the UN Millennium Campaign, organized several workshops to contribute to the debate under the motto of “El Salvador We Want”13 . The keen interest shown by local actors and the strategic nature of the proposals put forward in the workshops make El Salvador a prime example that illustrates how the post-2015 process can be localized, contributing to its inclusiveness, representativeness and adaptability to local and national contexts. The two-year process involved thousands of people from various social groups — with a special focus on traditionally excluded ones — sectors and geographical areas, who voiced their opinions as to the key issues that need to be addressed in order to reach their vision of the country they want to build in the next decades. The consultative process sought to establish the “what to do, and how to do it” at the territorial level, through an inclusive and multilevel participation that allowed a thorough reflection on the country’s vision for its future. The process’ workings: in the first phase, more than 4,500 people participated in defining the world they want for themselves and their children; the focus subsequently concentrated at the local level, with the participation of local stakeholders, particularly local governments, who debated on how all elements of society can contribute to the post-2015 objectives. In the second phase, over 300 leaders representing 120 institutions and organizations were incorporated to the

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals

debate. Owing to their inclusiveness, the workshops became a forum for El Salvador has shown that it is dialogue between various economic committed to taking the lead in and social sectors, including vulner- a process of social and economic able conditions. The objectives of transformation focused on reducing the workshops centered on raising awareness on the importance of poverty, inequality and social injustice. participating in the construction of a new global agenda, on making the The number of participants in the consultation future SDGs the new cornerstone process in El Salvador speaks for the process’ for territorial human development representativeness and for the momentous in El Salvador, on including tradiefforts that have been made by the Government tionally marginalized groups and and UNDP through ART to reach the highest on raising awareness of people’s number of stakeholders and associations and shared responsibility in constructing make it truly participative: the future they envision. Interviews and workshops were held in seven 31 local governments provinces and included six univer29 social sectors sities including the University of 19 national government institutions El Salvador. In addition, opinion polls 16 academic institutions were carried out, making the final 15 private sector institutions consultations’ report a highly repre6 public sector institutions sentative one. 3 municipal organizations Throughout the consultations, 1 international organization participants highlighted the need for more structural coordination, cultural awareness and free-flowing communication and knowledge sharing. They also underscored that any workable goals would have to be consistent with El Salvador’s reality. They also noted that the process should enhance coordination between local and national institutions, together with civil society and other development agents. The results and proposals were presented to departmental representatives of municipalities, considered the main drivers of public policy at the local level.

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ART IN FOCUS A GLOBAL ALLIANCE TO PROMOTE LRG’S ROLE IN DEVELOPMENT UNDP believes that people’s participation in the design and implementation of public policies at the national and international levels is a key driver of democracy and development. It also acknowledges that the level of government closest to citizens is the local level, as it allows for participatory approaches to development that better respond to people’s needs and aspirations. Therefore, UNDP is keen to continue pushing for the global and undisputed acknowledgement of the key role of LRGs in effective development cooperation and in the localization of the post-2015 agenda. In this regard, UNDP is well aware that it is necessary to carry out a structural change of the prevailing development approach to ensure the success of the new development architecture and wishes to contribute to this transformative shift hand in hand with its partner organizations to increase the efficiency, sustainability and impact of this change. UNDP, through ART, has therefore significantly reinforced its cooperation and links with local governments, their networks and associations, namely with the network of United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG), the Organization of Regions United (ORU FOGAR) and with the umbrella organization GTF14. Because the new development Overall, the dialogues have contributed agenda “in the making” will be universal, transformative and into forging a strategic global coalition clusive, it will provide LRGs with a of partners that includes UCLG, ORU unique opportunity to influence and FOGAR, GTF and UN Agencies. This act upon development objectives. network of committed partners who Clearly, LRGs are uniquely placed to put people at the center of the deshare common goals and visions is an velopment agenda and act as levers important strategic and operational of change: they can act locally to resource for the implementation of the address local challenges, boosting future SDGs. any global efforts in this direction. However, to further the LRG’s contributions it is essential to increase This ongoing dialogue and increasingly —quantitatively and qualitatively— solid partnership should continue their participation in international unabated in the implementation of the debates, and to harness the unique local perspectives and resources. future SDGs at the local level.

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UNDP ART and its partners can actively and concretely contribute in this regard, considering they have long supported LRGs in their legitimate quest to assume a greater role in international policy discussions. Their increasingly pivotal role was reflected, for instance, in the LRG’s participation in the Steering Committee of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC); as a result, the GTF of LRGs for the post-2015 Agenda towards Habitat III is now an official member of the Steering Committee of the GPEDC15. Along this line, the GTF co-led, with UN Habitat and UNDP, the dialogues on “localizing the agenda”. In this context, in cooperation with UNDP, ORU FOGAR organized a dedicated focus session16 on effective development cooperation, LED and innovative cooperation modalities such as DC and South-South and Triangular Cooperation (SSTC) in the Mexico High Level Meeting of the GPEDC in June 201417 . This meeting provided the opportunity to present evidence on how these different innovative cooperation mechanisms and approaches can advance effective development cooperation at the local level and how LRGs can contribute to transformative partnerships from the bottom up. Throughout these years, ART has actively advocated for joint work with LRGs as development actors and partners; their input has fed into and influenced international development policy debates, therefore increasing the pertinence and local ownership of UNDP’s policies at the local level. To encourage a common vision for the future, UNDP will establish an Advisory Committee (AC) of LRGs to allow for a more structured and strategic exchange and high-level discussions between UNDP and the main LRGs and their associations. ART is committed to further deepen and expand these international alliances with the post-2015 toolkit “towards a localization process for SDGs”, which will be the transmission belt allowing for more impact of international cooperation in the countries and at the local level. The toolkit, probably co-developed by UNDP, GTF and UN Habitat, is expected to provide guidance for development policy review, with a particular focus on localizing the SDGs, action taking, adapting, learning and improving results.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


BURUNDI: ON THE FOREFRONT OF THE DIALOGUES ON LOCALIZATION The ART Initiative has been assisting the CO in elaborating the new PACTE programme in support of the implementation of the national policy on decentralization and local economic development. This Programme focuses on strengthening the active role of local governments in economic and social development, applying a territorial approach to conflict prevention and peace building. UNDP Burundi developed the P6 approach (an evolution of the 3x6 approach, which was a starting point, postconflict path towards sustainable development18) in order to ensure the harmonious reintegration of people affected by the conflict while laying the foundations for integrated local development processes. ART supported the CO in establishing territorial partnerships such as with the German region of Baden Württemberg and the French region of Pays de la Loire. In 2015, the ART Initiative will continue supporting the LED component of the programme by mobilizing LED-specific partners and expertise and linking the country to relevant international policy dialogues such as the Third World Forum of LED to be hosted by Turin (Italy) in October 2015. Burundi has been on the forefront of the dialogues on localizing the post-2015 agenda: As part of the consultation processes aimed at determining the priority areas for the new development framework, Burundi held an extensive round of consultations that resulted in a thorough and comprehensive report detailing the country’s aspirations for the years to come in relation to several development areas, prioritized and analyzed locally19. The consultations were held in the framework of the newly launched “Framework Programme PACTE for Human Development in Burundi”, a timely agreement between the Government of Burundi and UNDP that builds upon and contextualizes the mechanisms, tools and methodology used by the UNDP ART Initiative. Equipped with these instruments, PACTE therefore became the natural platform to conduct the consultations facilitated by the United Nations Country Team and UNDP; it endowed the dialogues with broad, participatory and bottom-up features, well evidenced in the country’s final report on the consultations. The dialogues were organized by UNDP with the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning and the General Directorate of National planning. They revolved

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals

around five major thematic areas linked to the five main transformative shifts of the post-2015 agenda and focused on the need for: better governance; sustainable development; better infrastructures (particularly in the energy sector); and developing institutional capacities. Subsequently, participants defined a set of intermediate objectives, specific to Burundi’s context and needs, which should be attained to reach inclusive development: ensuring basic primary education for all, promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment, ensuring a sustainable environment and access to drinking water and fighting HIV, malaria and other illnesses. Overall, the process was characterized by the strong involvement of local authorities, regional and governmental bodies, civil society actors and the private sector in defining the priorities and objectives of the post2015 agenda, therefore making the consultative process highly representative and participative. Thanks to the collaboration between UNDP and the Ministry of Finance and Development Planning, objectives were localized and took into account the current challenges and progress made in Burundi. Indeed, there were recommendations for each of the thematic areas prioritized in the country, allowing for the design of a detailed and realistic plan to reach each objective, while putting people and their well-being at the heart of development concerns and aspirations.

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FRANCE: CONSTRUCTING A POST-2015 PROGRAMME FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL INCLUSION A participatory and collaborative process of dialogue and analysis aimed at upholding the commitment of territorial collectivities to international development culminated with the launch of a study on the international cooperation interventions carried out by French collectivities, from a perspective of social and economic inclusion20. The Assemblée des Départements de France (ADF – Assembly of the French Departments), with the support of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Delegation for the international actions of territorial collectivities within the French Agency for Development (AFD), presented the study, which took 18 months to complete. Other ADF partners such as UNDP, Coordination Sud, Agence Nouvelle des Solidarités Actives and F3E21 also contributed. The main objectives of this analysis were to contribute to the The study’s standpoint is akin to the French position on the definition one long-advocated by the UNDP ART of the post-2015 development Initiative, which calls for replacing the agenda and the SDGs, to reiterate and consolidate the commitment of “donor-beneficiary” dynamics by one territorial collectivities to cooperation of dialogue and mutually enriching at the European and international relationships between territories. levels in the field of socioeconomic inclusion, and to give the collectivities and their partners a clearer vision and added capacity in formulating and carrying out projects in this area. The study contributed to the dialogue process on localizing the post-2015 agenda as it was presented in Turin’s Final High Level Dialogue on the localization of the post2015 Development Agenda (October 2014)22 and in the International Solidarity Assises organized by the ADF in Carcassone (France, November 2014)23. Both events triggered a lively debate on the study’s main findings and positioning, contributing to enrich the dialogues on the post-2015 framework and the future development objectives. The study underscored the paradigmatic shift that has taken place in the philosophy of development cooperation, as it has transitioned from “aid to development” to “alliances and partnerships” between territories from around the world to better face common challenges with concerted solutions.

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In this sense, it is worth highlighting that the study underpinned this shift, as it found that projects of sustainable and inclusive local development have an impact on the practices of social and economic inclusion in both territories, leading to reciprocal benefits for societies on both ends of the development spectrum. Last, and in line with the trends detected around the world through the consultations, the study reiterated that it is essential to understand the contexts and specificities of each partner country while building on the complementarity of actors in the territories. Only this way can cooperation between territories contribute to supporting the emergence of an inclusive and sustainable society. In partnership with UNDP, a working group “to push forward the economic and social inclusion globally” will be created to develop contextualized tools that ensure the implementation of the study’s recommendations in the framework of the localization of the SDGs and to implement these tools in pilot initiatives in different countries.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


PORTUGAL CONTRIBUTES TO THE NEW UNIVERSAL AGENDA The process of defining the post-2015 development agenda is expected to result in a shared vision of the road that will lead the world to sustainable human development for all by 2030. Whether from the North or the South, developed or developing countries recognize more than ever that they face common challenges and that these are better addressed collectively. The agenda and the SDGs will therefore be a global call for action by and for all. A telling example of the universality, pertinence and relevance of the process, regardless of the country’s development stage, is the consultation that took place in Portugal24. The dialogue on the localization of the post-2015 development agenda was organized by a group of Portuguese CSOs and Camões, an Institute for Cooperation and Language in charge of coordinating the Portuguese position on the post-2015 agenda, with the support of the United Nations Regional Information Centre and the co-leaders of the localization dialogues, UNDP, UN Habitat and the GTF. The process consisted of five regional workshops in different cities, an online survey, a national final event and a radio programme. While the discussions evidenced the limitations of the MDGs in terms of socialization and participation, they also celebrated the opportunity offered by the post-2015 process, for people’s voices are now being heard and taken into account. Participants reiterated that it is essential that States commit themselves to implement the new SDGs and to lead and own the process, while ensuring that articulation between the local, regional and national levels takes place, to achieve more sustainable, equitable and balanced development objectives. As elsewhere around the world, participants emphasized that the elements that will most likely determine the success of the agenda are participation, inclusion, ownership and alignment to the country’s priorities and specificities.

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ART IN FOCUS THE EUROPEAN UNION AND TERRITORIAL DEVELOPMENT In 2014, the UNDP and the European Union (EU) celebrated their ten years of partnership, officially initiated with the “Strategic Partnership Agreement” in 2004, with the publication of an authoritative report on the collaboration’s rationale, results and lessons learned25. The report highlights the importance of this partnership in supporting the achievement of key development objectives and shows how converging visions and approaches, put to work together, can yield concrete results that make a difference on the ground. Joint work in over 115 countries in the world has translated into hundreds of projects and, generally, a more harmonized, efficient and effective development cooperation. It is in this mutually enriching and positive framework that UNDP and the EU have recently engaged in a reflection on how to best complement each other in a thematic area where they both converge and have a solid track record: the local level, with a particular focus on the key role of LRGs in development, as partners and actors. Indeed, in the last years, the EU has carried out a substantive structured dialogue on the role of the local level as a “development enabler”. This process has led to a new understanding of the territorial approach to development and of the importance of LRGs, particularly in relation to the post-2015 agenda implementation, as evidenced in the communication on “Global Partnership

for Poverty Eradication and Sustainable Development after 2015”. In this document, the EU clearly positions the subnational level as key to addressing the fundamental challenges of the future. Similarly, UNDP’s LGLD Strategy recognizes that LRGs are essential to promoting and implementing LGLD policies, and that decentralization, effective governance and a territorial approach to development are the props of MDG achievement — and, as of 2015, of SDG implementation at the local level. In this sense, the EU and UNDP’s views on LGLD fully converge as they both acknowledge that only when territorial actors work together in the definition, planning and implementation of development strategies do they make a difference, triggering change in people’s lives and well-being and ensuring the balance between socioeconomic growth and environmental quality. Reflecting the growing synergies in the area of local development in general and the dialogue on localizing the post-2015 agenda in particular, the European Commission organized a dialogue on the post-2015 development agenda in the framework of the “Policy Forum on Development” (Lima, Peru, 2014), involving UNDP through ART, the GTF and UN Habitat. The event aimed at capitalizing on the similar strategies and approaches, with a specific focus on SDG implementation

The EU communication “Empowering local authorities in partner countries for enhanced governance and more effective development outcomes” and subsequent implementing decision “Civil Society and Local Authorities” In this communication and subsequent implementing decision, the EU has clearly stated that it is necessary to empower LRGs in order to enhance governance and obtain more effective development outcomes. It is only through empowerment that the development potential of LRGs can be “unlocked”, as they are the closest institutions to citizens and the best catalysts of the needed transforma-

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tional shifts that will contribute to achieving the development objectives of the future. Good governance is the second prerequisite: the EU “wants to promote the role of Local Authorities and policy and decision-makers, in favor of transparent and accountable policy making and service delivery at the local level”; LRGs and their associations need to be involved in programming national and lo-

cal priorities. It is in this framework that the EU wishes to promote a territorial approach to development since the latter, by definition, is tailored to the territory’s characteristics and needs and is based on a dynamic, bottom-up long-term process with a multi-stakeholder, multilevel approach.

Localizing The Post-2015 Agenda And The Sustainable Development Goals


ART IN FOCUS

at the local level and at determining which concrete mechanisms, means and proposals can promote cooperation between subnational authorities. Not surprisingly, participants pointed to the need to recognize LRGs as key actors and to the importance of using the DC modality to implement the future post-2015 development agenda at the local level. Lastly, the Committee of the Regions and UNDP through ART organized an encounter in Brussels (July 2014) to contribute to identifying how the post-2015 process can be translated at the territorial level while taking into account the expected universal character of the future development objectives. The consultation also sought to stimulate national and territorial dialogues as to the means of implementing the new development agenda. Many ongoing collaborations on local development issues in various countries across the globe attest that the partnership between UNDP and the EU on local level development could be furthered, paving the way to a more solid, efficient and results-oriented SDG implementation.

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INTEGRATED LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS In the countries, the ART Initiative has contributed to create, develop or reinforce local and national development networks and has enhanced UNDP’s position vis-à-vis the local and national governments as a knowledgeable partner when it comes to sustainable human development at the local level. UNDP’s Integrated Local Development Systems (ILDS) are the natural continuum of the ART Initiative’s approach, methodology and tools, and of the positive results and impact these have generated. The conditions to create ILDSs in countries such as Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Lebanon and Mauritania have gradually emerged thanks to the increased ownership of UNDP ART’s territorial approach and methodology by the local and national governments. They also respond to the need to maximize the impact and coherence of development interventions in the territories, especially in relation to LGLD strategies. In particular, Integrated Local Development Systems allow strengthening and articulating UNDP’s territorial interventions by facilitating coordination within UNDP and with other UN agencies in the formulation of pertinent solutions to territorial demands. This process is carried out in a crosscutting, multidisciplinary way that includes planning, implementation and review.

Integrated Local Development Systems

INTEGRATED LOCAL DEVELOPMENT SYSTEMS IN A NUTSHELL What are they? ILDSs are a space where the territory’s development stakeholders discuss the territory’s development needs, assets, challenges and priorities; organize local demands; orient the available resources (human, natural, financial and technical); and jointly manage the processes that will allow for the achievement of the established development goals. They are the synthesis and catalyst of development actors and processes in the territory. Who takes part? ILDSs are composed of local authorities, the decentralized and deconcentrated Government services, civil society, representatives of the private and public sectors, and other institutions that contribute to local development. Women and youth associations, minorities and marginalized groups are also part of such ILDSs. How do they operate? UNDP facilitates the interaction between the different stakeholders with the aim of strengthening key local institutions and promoting a common vision and strategic initiatives within the territories. Multilevel governance mechanisms ensure vertical links and coordination between different levels of government. ILDSs are based on the territorial approach and methodology and aim at promoting integrated, multi actor territorial development processes.

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BOLIVIA: MULTILEVEL ARTICULATION FOR PRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT In Bolivia, UNDP supports democratic governance, poverty reduction, equity and inclusion, environmental rights and productive development. Since 2008, the UNDP ART Initiative has contributed to strengthening articulation and coordination between different development actors through its concertation instruments. Specifically, in the area of productive economic development, the articulation framework proposed by ART (i.e. between the national, departmental and municipal levels) has supported a multilevel coordination process involving the National Government and the autonomous governments in order to: i) promote mechanisms and tools that enhance the quality and quantity of social expenditure, ii) strengthen public policies to generate decent employment, and iii) improve public investment in productive activities. In Bolivia, the instruments proposed by UNDP through ART have facilitated the creation of a Council for the Sectorial Coordination of Productive Development (COSDEPRO —“Consejo de Coordinación Sectorial de Desarrollo Productivo”)26 , under the drive and leadership of MDPyEP (Ministry of Productive Development and Plural Economy), aimed at enabling the articulation of policies, plans, programmes and projects in productive development between the Autonomous Territorial Entities and the central Government. To do so, COSDEPRO seeks to harmonize the plans and policies of the various levels of government in order to increase investment in productive development, maximize the efficiency and impact of territorial management, empower the territories, develop technical capacities and support the implementation of the framework law on autonomies. Embodied in the partnership between the MDPyEP and UNDP ART, COSDEPRO’s modus operandi allows the two levels of inter-

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vention, local and departmental, to feed into each other and jointly articulate policies and systemize information, generating dynamic economies in the territories through a strategic vision that enhances territorial alliances, public investment and synergy with the various actors. COSDEPRO’s philosophy reflects well UNDP’s longstanding stance that objectives ought to be attained in an integral and strategic manner, rather than through isolated, sector-specific or one-off interventions. COSDEPRO’s consensus building vocation has established it as a concertation body where actors can decide together on the strategic choices for the territory, for instance on the investments needed in a given area, whereby each department responds to the idiosyncrasies of its territory. In turn, this has led to an accrued sense of ownership by local actors, as they feel part of their territory’s strategic orientations, increasing, by the same token, the sustainability of interventions and policies. This high level of ownership is indispensable, for a complex articulation body such as COSDEPRO’s requires a high level of leadership and decision-making legitimacy. COSDEPRO’s results and achievements are sizeable: it has facilitated articulation between seven Governorates and among 136 municipal autonomous governments, 42 strategic projects have been prioritized, 21.012 families have benefited from its projects, investment in productive development has increased by USD 13 million and 798 persons have been capacitated. Moreover, COSDEPRO has made a concrete contribution to ownership, alignment and harmonization between the central Government, the departments and municipalities, facilitating coordinated decisions, avoiding duplication and maximizing impact. It constitutes an example of multilevel governance, having become a valuable planning tool for the territory: it is sustainable and locally owned, it has the potential of improving the pertinence and quality of international cooperation interventions, and it can be replicated to other countries in the region.

Integrated Local Development Systems


CUBA: THE ARTICULATED PLATFORM FOR TERRITORIAL COMPREHENSIVE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT In Cuba, the oldest of all ART Programmes, the LHDP (Local Human Development Programme, 1999 - 2011) has paved the way for the establishment of a new Articulated Platform for Territorial Comprehensive Sustainable Development in Cuba (PADIT). PADIT was launched in May 2014 by the Cuban Government through the Ministry of Exterior Commerce and Foreign Investment, the National Institute of Physical Planning, the Ministry of Economy and Planning and the UNDP CO in partnership with UNDP ART, to support transformative shifts in national priority areas. PADIT is a multi-donor initiative supported by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. The new PADIT responds to the Government’s will to “promote multilateral cooperation, especially with UN System agencies, so that Cuba can have access to financial resources and new technologies, in accordance with national development priorities”. PADIT builds on and takes stock of the experience of UNDP and local actors in local development, in particular through the wealth of best practices, lessons learned, knowledge and results generated throughout the years by the LHDP and planning processes. Indeed, UNDP has facilitated the acquisition of first-hand experience and know-how in dealing with territorial development challenges, strengthening local government management and proposing the appropriate tools and methodologies, subsequently adapted to local needs and specificities. The PADIT will favor articulation between national, provincial and local government levels, empower local authorities and enhance the performance of development actors, through the consolidation of ILDSs. It also aims at expanding the coordination between territories, introducing innovative approaches, promoting synergies with national policies and contributing to harmonize the actions of international cooperation actors. It seeks to achieve a gradual articulation between two goals: enhancing local governments’ capacities and articulation between provinces and municipalities on the one hand, and promoting sustainable economic growth and social development at the other, whereby youth and gender issues will be addressed in a crosscutting manner as key aspects of local development.

Integrated Local Development Systems

Specifically, the new platform will: Promote a local approach in the articulation and management processes of municipal and provincial governments to facilitate alignment with national policies and boost decentralization efforts. Strengthen relations between territories to scale up local development opportunities. Address the strategic and operational relations between governments and the productive and service sectors to facilitate horizontal articulation. Intensify dialogue with international cooperation actors to promote innovation and experience sharing, under South-South and Triangular cooperation modalities. Promote LED to strengthen local economic capacities by promoting dialogue and the use of the endogenous human, social and natural resources. Strong from its predecessor’s established networks and know-how, PADIT will also capitalize on transferring good practices from successful international cooperation programmes, which will provide the foundation for replicating them in other territories, eventually by other actors. It will also enable international cooperation partners to join forces in projects prioritized locally, the ultimate aim being to boost a comprehensive local development in the targeted areas —and elsewhere at a later stage— and to stimulate South-South cooperation. Finally, it is worth underlining that just like the LHDP, with the support of UNDP the new PADIT is owned, spearheaded and managed by the country’s government, with a strong focus on translating this leadership and ownership at the territorial level as well, since the platform is coordinated locally by the municipal and provincial governments. ART - 2014 in Review

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PROMOTING INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT THROUGH A TERRITORIAL AND MULTILEVEL GOVERNANCE APPROACH IN ECUADOR Ecuador was one of the first countries to establish an integrated local development system in 2013, as the Government took ownership of the ART methodology and instruments, acknowledging its tangible results at the national and territorial levels. Certainly, since the UNDP ART Initiative launched its Framework Programme in Ecuador back in 2007, activities have been mostly led by Ecuadorian actors (whether local, national, public or private), with the support of the UNDP CO and the UNDP ART Initiative. Today, the System operates within a political context whereby the National Government and the Decentralized Autonomous Governments (DAGs) focus on issues such as the transformation of the productive matrix and the effective localization of public policies and investments and the adequate management of international cooperation initiatives. In this context, UNDP Ecuador is internally structured as a territorial platform that facilitates working in the territories through integrated local development systems. Indeed, the systems count on the development networks created throughout the years to promote an integral, territorial and multilevel governance approach for UNDP’s SHD interventions, projects and programmes implemented in the territories. The territorial platform is therefore part of a vast network of programmes and thematic areas of local human development in the Latin American and Caribbean region; it also benefits from the more than 600 DC partners of the The territorial approach, methodology ART Initiative. and instruments promoted by ART As a natural extension and product of UNDP’s work in the country, are the methodological pillar of the the Integrated Local Development integrated local development system. Systems have generated concrete “multilevel” results: i. At the territorial level, the articulation and dialogue spaces (Territorial Working Groups) have been institutionalized in most territories through decrees, co-financing of operational costs, personnel seconding, and in general, adoption of the models of international cooperation management, articulation mechanisms and multilevel governance proposed by UNDP ART.

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ii. At the national level, the articulation of the decentralization and territorial development processes has been incorporated in public resolutions and the plan for the DAG’s capacity strengthening in managing international cooperation now includes the creation of participatory spaces to articulate territorial actors and the various levels of government. Last but not least, the working strategies of Technical Secretariat of International Cooperation at the territorial level now take root in the articulation of territorial actors and governmental levels. iii. At the international level, the system has been mainstreamed in UNDP’s territorial development approach and strategy, through a UNDP Territorial platform (see above). It will be used by UNDP Ecuador to channel its territorial interventions and articulation efforts at the local level, and will serve as a general framework for various projects implemented by UNDP in the territories. In light of this, the System follows three different working modalities, namely: i. Offering an integral support to territorial human development: that is, contributing to the coherence of actions in the territory, facilitating the coordination among these, reinforcing their territorial approach and the coordinated relationship between local actors and institutions. ii. Facilitating technical assistance and methodological transfer to other UNDP initiatives: that is, establishing the processes and multilevel governance mechanisms (articulation of actors and levels of government) and participatory planning and prioritization instruments and linking these exercises to public investment and international cooperation resources. iii. Contributing to carrying out projects or project components linked to Territorial Human Development. This integrated and multilevel approach allowed UNDP to consolidate its position in Ecuador as a key reference organization on issues related to SHD at the territorial level.

Integrated Local Development Systems


GABON: SUPPORTING LOCAL AUTHORITIES IN THE DECENTRALIZATION PROCESS Launched in 2006 to support the MDGs (with a focus on poverty reduction, health and education), the ART Gabon Programme is currently in its second phase. At the request of the government, the Programme now focuses on supporting the decentralization process as it builds on its track record in promoting horizontal – vertical links in the country. Authorities at all levels are working closely with the Programme to contribute to reinforcing decentralization and creating the necessary conditions for local development in the provinces. Following the Gabonese local elections of December 2013, many local collectivities elected new civil servants. However, the new officials expressed their need for a more in-depth knowledge of the fundamental aspects of decentralization, a necessary skill to better serve the population that elected them. It is in this context that the Gabonese Ministry in charge of decentralization called upon the UNDP ART GOLD Programme in Gabon to assist in building the capacities of the newly elected municipal representatives and of other actors involved in the country’s decentralization processes and in deconcentrated territorial administration. Throughout 2014, several training rounds took place in the provinces of Ogooué, Haut-Ogooué, MoyenOgooué and Woleu-Ntem, involving a total of 473 elected officials, administrative authorities, civil society representatives and technical service officials, among which 105 were women. The main thematic area of the sessions, conducted with a participatory methodology that encouraged open dialogue and contributions, was on the workings of local authorities: decision-making processes, roles and functions of the various actors and institutional bodies and budget elaboration. The training sessions resulted in several positive outcomes and results, among which, better functioning of local authorities, a decrease in conflicts over competences and responsibilities within local collectivities and between decentralized and deconcentrated administrations, a better respect for legal deadlines in relation to budgeting and a higher involvement of the general population in the functioning of their local collectivities.

Integrated Local Development Systems

In view of the positive impact of the training sessions, the Government has requested UNDP to expand the training and territorial approach promoted by UNDP ART to all the provinces in Gabon in the course of 2015.

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I-STEPS Since 2013, the project “Innovation in Sustainable Territorial Partnerships” (I-STEPS) has become one of UNDP ART’s tools to contribute to harmonizing DC partners and advancing good governance and sustainable development at the local level. Furthermore, thanks to the innovative horizontal partnerships it fosters at the local level and its avantgarde nature, I-STEPS can contribute to the universality of the SDGs, as it builds on the complementarities between European LRGs and the partner countries’ LRGs. To achieve its objectives, the I-STEPS platform encourages dialogue between territories through the DC modality, to promote knowledge, expertise and innovation exchanges. It also seeks to maximize development cooperation effectiveness by harmonizing the participating European LRGs and ensuring their alignment with the partner countries’ territorial development systems. Lastly, it aims at strengthening the links between LRGs and the UN development system and at contributing to promoting their role within UN-led international policy dialogues. I-STEPS ultimately seeks to capitalize the best practices generated by the participating LRGs to inform national and global processes such as the discussions on implementation of the post-2015 agenda at the local level. It is an action-oriented initiative that, like many of its sister-initiatives promoted by UNDP ART, uses the operational, legal, methodological and administrative frameworks already established by UNDP in the countries. In 2014, I-STEPS concluded its pilot phase, focusing on identifying the priorities of the parties involved in order to match their needs with the resources available. In this context, formulation missions were carried out in Ecuador, Lebanon and Montenegro. As an outcome of these formulation missions, an Ecuadorian Delegation integrated by different authorities from the territories (Provinces of Carchi, Esmeraldas and Municipality of Cuenca) and national representatives undertook a knowledge sharing visit in Europe, hosted by Bilbao, Marseille, Milan and Barcelona. The territorial cooperation between counterparts from Ecuador and Europe aims at establishing long-lasting partnerships for the exchange of knowledge, innovation and best practices that can enrich

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the Ecuadorian local governance and local development processes through concrete strategies that articulate the local, national and global dimensions. Similarly, preparations have also been carried out for Lebanon and Montenegro to proceed with exchanges on thematic areas prioritized jointly.

Partners involved in I-STEPS Europe: Municipality of Barcelona Municipality of Bilbao Municipality of Milan Basque Country Association of Local Democracy Agencies (ALDA) Municipality and Province of Turin Region of Friuli-Venezia Giulia Lebanon: North Area (Akkar and Wadi Khaled cluster of 8 municipalities) Bekaa Area Mount Lebanon South Lebanon Montenegro: Municipality of Cetinje Municipality of Niksic Municipality of Mojkovac Municipality of Kolasin Municipality of Pljevlja Municipality of Kotor Ecuador: Province of Carchi Province of Esmeraldas City of Cuenca Colombia: Municipality of Medellin

Integrated Local Development Systems


LEBANON: BRINGING COMMUNITIES TOGETHER TO ADDRESS LOCAL PRIORITIES AND NEEDS The UNDP CO, together with the Ministry of Social Affairs, have long recognized the need for an instrument that brings communities together to determine their needs and assets and provides meaningful information that the various Ministries and donors can use to coordinate their actions at the local level. This need has become particularly acute with the recent flow of refugees from neighboring Syria. The Maps of Risks and Resources (MRR) proposed by UNDP’s ART and implemented as part of the Lebanese Host Communities Support project (LHSP), does just that, as a demand-driven immediate response to the crisis. Perhaps equally importantly, the MRR also contributes to reinforcing social cohesion through dialogue and negotiation among stakeholders, and to confidence building between citizens and the State. After a first pilot phase the National Government decided to mainstream the methodology, and to do so trained civil servants from all over the country to support the municipalities in the process. The process of building the MRRs reinforced articulation between national level policies, projects and programmes, and contributed to stabilization and development. Both are critical and needed outcomes at a time the country faces mounting challenges as a result of the influx of Syrian refugees fleeing their country’s political turmoil. Indeed, through local governance, the negotiations that took place under the municipalities’ leadership and How does an MRR work? The challenges identified through interviews and meetings are mapped. The geographical location of problems is pinpointed on satellite maps and combined with existing data through Geographic Information System mapping. The map covers issues such as the number of registered refugees, school and clinic locations, unemployment rates and others, collected from UNHCR, the Ministries of Education and Health and other relevant ministries and organizations. The end

Integrated Local Development Systems

with the National Government’s support have laid a first stone towards stabilization and development. Also, a climate of confidence in and accountability of the institutional framework was fostered, as well as well as a culture of citizenry The MRR gathers information at the engagement in general. Therefore, local level and compiles it into an the quality, effectiveness and integrated data set at the national efficiency of local administrations and service provision are enhanced level. in an integrated and sustainable way, linking the immediate response to the Syrian crisis to a resilience-based development approach. The MRR exercise was facilitated by the UNDP ART GOLD solid trajectory in Lebanon: the Programme, launched in 2007, is now an integrated component of UNDP’s Social and Local Development Programme. With an established track record of over eight years, ART GOLD Lebanon has facilitated dozens of DC partnerships, contributed to avoiding overlap and project fragmentation, and made a difference in the local communities’ daily lives. The work undertaken in the framework of the MRRs is systematized in the regional toolkit “Resilient municipalities: a resource for municipalities affected by the Syrian crisis”27, together with other best practices developed in the region to cope with the Syrian crisis at the local level.

map of needs and assets helps to show the links between the various factors and gives a visual image of the problems that residents in Lebanese communities face today. The MRR highlights the importance of recognizing the various challenges (e.g., waste collection, transportation and roads, education, health) and how these may weigh differently, even in the same locality. This methodology also reflects the importance of geographic space; even within the same municipality, residents in different areas

face different problems; it also emphasizes the importance of information sharing. In the case of the MRR, information sharing occurs at several levels: municipalities, donors and various government ministries. Even within a single municipality, it is important to provide residents, donors and the local government with a clear understanding of the needs faced by the community, and of the assets they can bring in.

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ART IN FOCUS LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AGENCIES The LED approach is considered a critical tool for the integrated implementation of the Post-2015 Development Agenda as it can harness the dynamism of social and economic actors of the territories, including the private sector, with the oversight of civil society. One such example is El Salvador, a country that has been experiencing an interesting development of local governance practices with a particular focus on LED issues. UNDP has offered its assistance to such effort through the UNDP ART Programme, based on the decision of the Technical Secretariat of the Presidency, to prioritize the marine and coastal strip of the country through the establishment of LEDAs in five port areas: La Unión, Usulután, La Paz, La Libertad and Sonsonate. It is in this context that in 2014 the LEDA of La Unión acquiesced to the request of new local actors to join the Agency; this LEDA has also been chosen by the Ministry of Economy to locally manage part of its public policies, through the Departmental Center for Small and Micro Enterprises of La Unión. Through this Center, over the last few years the LEDA has been offering assistance to hundreds of micro and small enterprises in the department of La Unión through entrepreneurial, credit and ICT assistance, with a particular attention to women who have been able to benefit from dedicated services; overall, 12 municipalities have benefited from its assistance. In addition, the LEDA of La Unión contributed to producing various knowledge products, among which a research on the impact of migration in the municipalities of Conchagua, Intipucá and El Carmen, and a mapping system of key actors in the municipalities of Conchagua, El Carmen, La Unión and Meanguera del Golfo. Perhaps most importantly, la Union’s LEDA supported several of the territory’s associations (in the agricultural and fishery sectors) in elaborating 11 projects for the “Productive Sector Funds” call for proposals launched by the Ministry of Economy. Most of these organizations did not have previous experience in writing project proposals, but thanks to

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the LEDA’s support all 11 proposals were approved and awarded a total of USD 145.469 in support of the territory’s development. This is a clear example of how national and local institutions can work together to stimulate the dynamics of territorial development. Recently, the LEDA of La Unión won an international call for proposals promoted by the Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation and the Inter-American Development Bank for knowledge management. It is now implementing a project on Migration and Development as part of the Joint Migration and Development Initiative carried out by UNDP and six other agencies: IOM, ILO, UNHCR, UNFPA, UN Women and UNITAR. This shows the growing confidence that local, national and international actors have in the LEDA of La Unión. Moreover, the LEDA has initiated four interinstitutional agreements, contributing to articulation among key development actors and between the private and public sectors. Although much ground remains to be covered, the LEDA of La Unión already offers the world a good example of how national decisions, combined with the determination of local actors and their commitment to local development and an targeted international assistance to the process, can contribute to improving efficient and efficacious local economic governance mechanisms. In Colombia, 11 LEDAs are dedicated to the promotion of productive value chains under a territorial development approach. These LEDAs, established at the beginning of the Colombia ART Programme more than a decade ago, were among the first entities to implement innovative approaches in territorial management, privileging participatory democracy, bottom-up processes and dialogue between and

Integrated Local Development Systems


ART IN FOCUS

Local Economic Development is internationally recognized as crucial to capitalize on endogenous resources and for job creation: it enhances access to work opportunities, especially for the most excluded areas and populations. In this sense, LED will be key to implement the future SDGs, which motto is to “leave no one behind”, with a main focus on poverty reduction. LED can make use of various tools at each level of implementation, from national policy planning to mechanisms that enhance dialogue and coordinated management between ac-

tors, service provision, investment and productive development, knowledge generation and innovation. Local Economic Development Agencies (LEDAs) are one of the key tools to promote, develop and implement LED, as they facilitate innovation and provide mechanisms for local and territorial actors to enhance their individual and collective economic potential. In conjunction with other LED tools, LEDAs can effectively promote and drive the development of society’s various groups and boost competitive and profitable businesses that

across sectors and development actors. The LEDA’s achievements were consolidated with the creation of a network for the Colombian LEDAs (ADELCO), established as a coordination platform on the national level to strengthen, support and position the LED processes in the country. ADELCO also seeks to influence public policies in support of LED models and to promote dialogue, reflection, experienceexchange and knowledge management as regards the fundamental LED elements in Colombia. In the last years a lot has been achieved in this respect, for example, ADELCO promoted the implementation of international cooperation programmes that eventually became the conceptual foundation of entrepreneurial development policies respectful of inclusion principles. Furthermore, the experiences and lessons learned by the LEDAs and ADELCO have been steadily contributing to the planning policies of the Department of National Development, while they have also contributed to incorporating LED elements in the departmental and municipal public policies. These achievements have been backed by UNDP, the EU, several line ministries, local communities and regional governments, making LEDAs valuable and legitimate contributors to Colombia’s future development, in particular regarding the ongoing peace process between the Government and the FARC. In this

Integrated Local Development Systems

contribute to create income-generating jobs and improve access to goods and services. They are a key component of LED strategies that aim at strengthening territorial economic development because they facilitate sustainable competitiveness, productive dynamism and socioeconomic inclusion using the territory’s endogenous potential. Because of all these characteristics, LEDAs are a specific, specialized tool that will be well placed to promote the future SDGs at the local level.

respect, ADELCO has taken part in several dialogue processes related to the historical conflict and the preparation for the post-conflict phase. During 2014, UNDP, ADLECO and Redprodepaz (a Colombian peace network) systemized the LED experiences and peacebuilding initiatives in Colombia, implementing a joint agenda with key actors in the Government to emphasize the importance of these tools in peacebuilding and in strengthening the rule of law. This process boosted the synergies between several models and visions for the country, particularly in relation to achieving a stable, permanent peace process where LED can play a vital role, in achieving peace and implementing development strategies in disadvantaged and remote areas. These experiences and lessons learned have become a significant and innovative international framework of reference for tackling Colombia’s complex socioeconomic characteristics and intricate political context. As such, it is foreseen that ADELCO will lead the Latin American Network of LEDAs; this will hopefully contribute to positioning LED as an instrument for peacebuilding at the territorial level within the new SDGs.

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ART IN FOCUS “AULEDA* promotes Integrated Territorial Development in 2014” *AULEDA is Albania’s LEDA: its aim is to sustain the social, economic, cultural and environmental development of the Vlora Region, with a territorial, human development approach.

INTERVIEW WITH MS. KOCI, AULEDA’S EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Ms. Mirela KOCI, an engineer with experience in teaching, project management and non-profit organizations, has been AULEDA’s executive director since 2010.

Since 2013, Albania has embarked in major political / administrative reforms, particularly in relation to decentralization and regional development processes. The Government elected in 2013 has taken major steps towards administrative-territorial reform, with the understanding that it is critical to improve institutional capacities to make them more responsive to development and decentralization challenges. Despite the challenges and uncertainties, the long established LEDAs in Albania have continued to deliver and to consolidate themselves as valuable instruments for the promotion of territorial development, dialogue between and across levels and for participatory decision-making. Q. What was AULEDA’s focus in 2014? A. AULEDA’s activity during 2014 focused on sustaining the social, economic, cultural and environmental development of Vlora region, articulating and enhancing its own resources along human development principles. Following feasibility studies for its development initiatives, AULEDA also focused on developing the local stakeholders’ capacities and skills in territorial management and the implementation of participatory methods in decision-making. Q. What kind of services did AULEDA provide? A. AULEDA remained committed to achieving results that directly benefit the territory’s population, with initiatives that sustain economic activities, produce a positive social impact and support a working model that promotes the professional inclusion of

34 ART - 2014 in Review

vulnerable groups. Services provided include mapping of local resources, supporting business planning and management, facilitating networking for enterprises and developing social economy models, with a focus on the priority sectors that contribute to regional development such as sustainable tourism, agro-food production, fishing and crafts. Q. What were its main contributions to territorial development? A. In 2014 AULEDA contributed to implementing various local and regional strategic priorities in Vlora and the surrounding localities, taking the Regional Strategic Plan of Vlora as the guiding document; it also provided support to public institutions and civil society in their efforts to reach integral local development. During 2014 AULEDA paid attention to integrating innovation in technology in its approach to territorial development. The intention was to enhance the involvement of regional public and private stakeholders in regional development processes. A number of initiatives it undertook constitute examples of good practices that define a replicable model of regional management. Q. In this context, how did AULEDA contribute to the local government’s development strategy? A. Thanks to our well-established relationship with the local government, AULEDA was able to contribute to the five priority areas of the strategy for regional development, that is, transparency and accountability, participatory public decision-making, increased and more equitable access to quality basic services, inclusive regional development for reducing disparities among municipalities and environmentally sustainable development. In addition, gender issues and capacity building are crosscutting priorities and principles that define AULEDA’s activities. Q. What elements best define how AULEDA works and how it reaches its objectives? A. In its efforts to support the decentralization of economic development decision-making and implementation, AULEDA acts as a forum for participatory dialogue on local economic development because it is an open space for decision-making that facilitates relations between public institutions and civil society.

Integrated Local Development Systems


ART IN FOCUS It also coordinates local economic development planning and implementation because it contributes to identify the territory’s priorities and provides technical assistance to local administrations for Strategic Planning. Moreover, it supports the development and sustainability of local enterprises, promotes the social inclusion of economically disadvantaged groups, raises environmental awareness among local economic development actors and facilitates the integration of local economic development strategies in national and international activities. All these elements allow AULEDA to reach its objectives and make a real difference in the territories. Q. What are the most important initiatives AULEDA has carried out in 2014? A. In 2014 AULEDA partnered with and received funding from EU agencies and the UNDP. Some of these initiatives are the IPATECH - Miniaturization technology: synergies of research and innovation to enhance the economic development of the Adriatic regions; SMART INNO - Smart Network and Sustainable Innovation Cluster to increase RDI Competitiveness of SMEs in the Adriatic region; Craft in action and SSIREC - Supporting social inclusion of Roma and Egyptian Communities in Vlora and Berat regions.

Dajabón’s LEDA has generated a tangible impact on the ground, such as improved relations between the Haitian and Dominican communities, the creation of six value chains, three cooperatives, several microentrepreneurial productive units and two rotational funds, among others.

In the Dominican Republic, several LEDAs were established with the support of UNDP through ART in support of sustainable and social local economic development. These LEDAs also aim at engaging with the National Government, establishing development cooperation links and mitigating the unequal development between the territories. For example, the LEDA in Dajabón was established in 2010, bringing together a high number of social, development and economic actors of the territory, including several productive sectors. The LEDA’s mandate is to reinforce and integrate the capacities of public, private and social actors in the Province of Dajabón, and to stimulate territorial economic development. Since its establishment, the Agency has catered for the needs of productive chains that were locally identified as priority areas through assistance, training, innovation, marketing, project management and support for public policies on LED.

Luis Domínguez Representative of Beekeepers UNDP ART has generated a lot of knowledge and ideas to tackle difficult situations. It helped us to work together with a long-term planning perspective. It also facilitated national and international partnerships: for instance, technical officers from Colombia now support us in management issues.

Integrated Local Development Systems

A few snapshots of what stakeholders think of Dajabón’s LEDA: Manuela Rodríguez Vice mayor and head of the dairy value chain Thanks to the LEDA, we realized that together we could achieve great things for our territory. We have learned that if one sector grows in a coordinated way, all the community will grow with it. Luis Reynoso President of Dajabon’s LEDA The Program motivated us through the Working Groups and offered us all the support we needed to prepare the first study on the territory’s potentialities. The creation of the LEDA has empowered the territory and its town halls.

Ana Carrasco, Entrepreneur UNDP ART taught us that it is important to know what we need; by bringing all institutions together, ART helped us to elaborate a common agenda.

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ART IN FOCUS GLOBAL WATER SOLIDARITY UNDP officially launched the Global Water Solidarity International Platform (GWS) during the World Water Forum held in Marseille in 2012 to support the achievement of the MDG target 7-C 28 through the promotion of decentralized cooperation partnerships in water and sanitation. Since then, GWS has evolved into a natural reference programme of the ART Initiative on issues related to water and sanitation, achieving tangible results in several countries. In 2014, UNDP’s Global Water Solidarity (GWS) consolidated its programming and advocacy efforts. As a promoter and facilitator of decentralized water solidarity, the Platform added five more countries to its projects’ portfolio: Benin, Guinea, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova and Nicaragua. Addressing local needs through new partnerships, GWS made sure that locally mobilized financial resources were directed at the most urgent water-related infrastructure and governance priorities. In particular, GWS facilitated a partnership between the City of Geneva and the Nisporeni region in Moldova (Local Solidarity Cooperation with Water and Sanitation Nisporeni district), which will be implemented by one of its members, the Solidarity Water Europe Moldova. This project seeks to improve the quality of life of the rural population in the Nisporeni district by providing access to improved sanitation conditions and by empowering the local population in water and sanitation management. In a similar vein, GWS facilitated a partnership between the agency Artois Picardie / Communauté d’Agglomération de Saint-Omer and the Issyk-Kul region in Kyrgyzstan, where the implementing GWS partner is Kyrgyz Alliance for Water and Sanitation. Given the strong interest by GWS members for proposed projects in Benin, Guinea and Nicaragua, it is foreseen that partners will be found for several of these projects in the coming months.

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In 2014, GWS fulfilled its advocacy mandate by representing its more than 100 members in several global events on water and sanitation or decentralized solidarity cooperation in general. Specifically, GWS successfully organized and convened widely attended panel discussions at several global and local summits, forums and fairs. GWS seized the opportunity to transmit the local voices on water and sanitation issues in the global SDG discussions. GWS also supported the post2015 debates on water and sanitation issues, raising awareness on the importance of addressing these as a goal in the future development agenda at Cités Unies France in Paris, World Water Week in Stockholm and International Solidarity Week in Strasbourg. Probably most importantly, to facilitate information exchange on water-related issues and contribute to building a community of practice, GWS launched a new web space in 2014. The website is hosted by the GWS leading Spanish member Alianza por el Agua (Zaragoza), and is accessible at: www.globalwatersolidarity.org. This new virtual space is structured around GWS’ network and collective experiences, with regularly updated information on water-related technical and governance issues, information on GWS’ programmes and an interactive map of its current projects.

Integrated Local Development Systems


ART WORLDWIDE Established at the request of Governments and contextualized to each local situation, in 2014 the ART Initiative was active in 22 countries, allowing multiple and different actors to improve impact and sustainability using a common framework. Many of the first-generation ART Programmes are now informing new UNDP and Government initiatives (e.g. Morocco and Lebanon). Two Governments requested the formulation of ART inspired programmes (Mexico and Paraguay) and ART’s expertise and methodologies are built into UNDP local governance and local development programmes. Following the life cycle of programmes (formulation, consolidation and ownership), a number of FPs concluded, while their outcomes now inform local and national development systems. In addition, the Initiative continues to facilitate networking for development through Decentralized, South-South and Triangular cooperation, promoting the added value of territorial partnerships and offering technical support on LGLD/LED issues.

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OPERATIONAL ART FRAMEWORK PROGRAMMES

UNDP ART GOLD ALBANIA

UNDP ART REDES COLOMBIA

UNDP ART ECUADOR

UNDP ART MAURITANIA

Programme phase

Starting date

Programme phase

Starting date

Programme phase

Starting date

Programme phase

Starting date

Ownership / Institutionalization

2005

Ownership / Institutionalization

2005

Ownership/ Institutionalization Sustainability/Transfer

2007

Consolidation

2010

Contacts

Contacts

Mr. Estevan Ikonomi Programme Officer ART GOLD 2 Albania estevan.ikonomi@undp.org

Mr. Alessandro Preti Development, Peace and Reconciliation Area Coordinator alessandro.preti@undp.org

Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/687 d3efe3da642359432b4e2041394ff http://www.al.undp.org/content/albania/en/ home/operations/projects/environment_and_ energy/art-gold-2-albania-programme-.html

Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ acd29c2e06a84f4d9cb600513dfb3aff

UNDP ART BOLIVIA

http://www.pnud.org.co/sitio.shtml?apc= aCa020031-&x=52378#.Uzwxe6iSwwo

Programme phase

Starting date

Consolidation

2008

Contacts

Mr. Enrique Gallicchio Chief Technical Advisor enrique.gallicchio@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/8f e697ddf70e4b7a92ffedfa17f8fa00 http://art.pnud.bo/

Ms Paloma Blanch Project Coordinator paloma.blanch@pnud.org.co

UNDP ART DOMINICAN REPUBLIC Programme phase

Starting date

Ownership / Institutionalization

2008

Contacts

Mr. Sidi Khalifa National Expert in Local Development sidi.khalifa@undp.org

Contacts

Mr. Sergio Novas Chief Technical Advisor sergio.novas@undp.org

Web links

Web links

https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ d2f26fa58abe4fc89befa830cc461e5b

https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/52f4 7b6bf70f468c8df9ca3935b0d178

http://www.pnud.mr/artgold/

http://www.undp.org.ec/art/frontEnd/main.php

UNDP ART NICARAGUA

UNDP ART EL SALVADOR Programme phase

Starting date

Ownership / Institutionalization

2010

Contacts

Mr. Massimo Fortunato Territorial Development Technical Advisor Massimo.fortunato@undp.org

Contacts

Web links

Ms. Anyarlene Bergés Peña Democratic Governance Officer anyarlene.berges@undp.org

https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ b59666f65f4f46bca96ce75f78045ddc

http://www.do.undp.org/content/dominican_ republic/es/home/operations/projects/ human_development/fomento-y-difusion-deldesarrollo-humano-en-republica-dominicana.html

http://www.sv.undp.org/

UNDP ART GABON Programme phase

Starting date

Ownership / Institutionalization

2006

Contacts

Mr. Mactar Fall Chief Technical Advisor ART Gabon Programme mactar.fall@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/3d5 73462b0a44dca84571f4cffe9beb5

38 ART - 2014 in Review

Starting date

Consolidation

2013

Contacts

Mr. Julio Portieles Chief Technical Advisor julio.portieles@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/752 51db9566547039fb877d5bef491d1 http://www.undp.org.ni/

Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ dce6c71372e346b5b55e942b7a18e150

Programme phase

http://www.ga.undp.org/content/gabon/fr/ home/operations/projects/poverty_reduction/ art-gold.html

UNDP ART URUGUAY Programme phase

Starting date

Ownership / Institutionalization

2011

Contacts

Ms. Virginia Varela Programme Analyst virginia.varela@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/83c 029e87f5343a3ae21eae6c2c64ec7 http://arturuguay.org.uy/


NEW ART FRAMEWORK PROGRAMMES

UNDP LGLD PROGRAMMES SUPPORTED BY ART

UNDP Community Recovery and Local Development BURUNDI

UNDP Social & Local Development Programme LEBANON

ART provided strategic, technical and partnershipbuilding support for the formulation and implementation of the Community Recovery and Human Development Programme at the local level. The Programme aims to develop an innovative approach by simultaneously working on community recovery / peacebuilding and sustainable local development. ART will specifically support the LED component of the programme.

UNDP’s support in the area of social and local development focuses on policy and operational support.

Programme phase

Starting date

Consolidation

2013

Contacts

Mr. Cristino Pedraza Chief Technical Advisor cristino.pedraza@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/0b2 9344eae7947b1808c39cd24d52f37 http://www.bi.undp.org

UNDP Articulated Platform for Territorial Comprehensive Sustainable Development in CUBA The ART Initiative supports territorial development in Cuba through aligning its partner networks with this initiative. Programme phase

Starting date

Launched

2014

Contacts

Ms. Matilde Fresa Chief Technical Advisor matilde.fresa@undp.org Mr. Ricardo Núñez Fernández National Programme Officer ART PDHL Cuba ricardo.nunez@undp.org

Programme phase

Consolidation Starting date

UNDOP Local Governance Programme MYANMAR In 2014, ART has supported UNDP Myanmar in strengthening local governments and LGLD processes; in 2015, it will support territorial planning processes and facilitate territorial partnerships. Programme phase

Starting date

Formulation

2014

Contacts

2014 Contacts

Ms. Marina Lo Giudice Chief Technical Advisor marina.logiudice@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/923 caeccb34740698a36f1077309c957

Mr. Chritian Hainzl Team leader Local Governance christian.hainzl@undp.org Web links http://www.mm.undp.org/content/myanmar/ en/home/operations/projects/poverty_ reduction/LocalGovernancePillar1.html

UNDP ART TUNISIA Programme phase

Starting date

Launched

2015

Contacts

Ms. Leonor C. López Vega Technical Advisor of the Programme in support of integrated and sustainable local development through articulated territorial platforms leonor.lopez.vega@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/6af3 b56c68614c35823e0b06c74cbc1d http://www.tn.undp.org/

http://www.lb.undp.org/content/lebanon/en/ home/ourwork/SocialAndLocalDevelopment/ overview.html

UNDP AGORA platform in support of local governance and local development within the perspective of an advanced regionalization in MOROCCO Programme phase

Starting date

Launched

2013

Contacts

Mr Bachir Mokrane Programme Advisor bachir.mokrane@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ f69f5289e8b04ae79c341e70582e366f http://www.ma.undp.org

Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/62b 3a8df7043431fa3a9e22a74be5b4e http://www.cu.undp.org/

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ART FRAMEWORK PROGRAMMES WITH COMPLETED OWNERSHIP PROCESSES

UNDP ART PDHL CUBA

UNDP ART GOLD KOSOVO

Starting date

Starting date

2004

2008

Contacts

Contacts

Mr. Ricardo Núñez Fernández National Programme Officer ART PDHL Cuba ricardo.nunez@undp.org

Ms. Steliana Nedera UNDP Deputy Resident Representative steliana.nedera@undp.org

Web links

Web links

https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/62b 3a8df7043431fa3a9e22a74be5b4e

https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/66c 74009158249c0a4f922a374aaebc4

http://www.cu.undp.org/content/cuba/ es/home/ourwork/humandevelopment/ Panorama.html

http://www.ks.undp.org

http://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/92c7 21d2fb7140ce83f1946adaf371e4

UNDP ART GOLD LEBANON

UNDP ART MOROCCO

Starting date

Starting date

Starting date

2007

2007

Contacts

2008

Contacts

Contacts

Mr. Rajendrakumar Ganesarajah Assistant Country Director Governance for Empowerment and Social Inclusion (GESI) rajendrakumar.ganesarajah@undp.org

UNDP ART INDONESIA

Contacts

Ms. Nurina Widagdo Team Leader - Head of Democratic Governance and Poverty Reduction Unit (DGPRU) nurina.widagdo@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/184 233ef793b47c4a5b726fbfa7188ac http://www.id.undp.org/

Ms. Marina Lo Giudice Chief Technical Advisor marina.logiudice@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/923 caeccb34740698a36f1077309c957 http://www.lb.undp.org/content/lebanon/en/ home/operations/projects/poverty_reduction/ support-to-economic-recovery--communitysecurity-and-social-cohe.html

UNDP ART MYDEL (EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, HONDURAS AND NICARAGUA) Starting date

2005 Contacts

Mr. Giovanni Camilleri International Coordinator giovanni.camilleri@undp.org Web links

Mr. Bachir Mokrane Programme Advisor bachir.mokrane@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ f69f5289e8b04ae79c341e70582e366f http://www.ma.undp.org

UNDP ART GOLD SENEGAL Srting date

2009 Contacts

Ms. Marame Leye-Lo Governance Programme Analyst rmareme.leye.lo@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/ d07eb42a035945c2a96e0634f416afe0 http://www.sn.undp.org/

40 ART - 2014 in Review

UNDP ART PAPDEL MOZAMBIQUE Srting date

2008 Contacts

Ms. Fatima Amade Programme Specialist fatima.amade@undp.org Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/3ba bca54b7bd4946b035081850d5dcb2

UNDP ART SRI LANKA Srting date

2006

Web links https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/22e 600b53ce348b6b8957ab350b2a3a9 http://www.lk.undp.org


Local Governance Programme MYANMAR

UNDP ART GOLD KOSOVO

UNDP ART DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

UNDP ART GOLD ALBANIA

UNDP Integrated Territorial Development Framework Programme CUBA

UNDP ART TUNISIA UNDP AGORA platform in support of local governance and local development within the perspective of an advanced regionalization in MOROCCO

UNDP ART NICARAGUA

UNDP Social & Local Development Programme LEBANON

UNDP ART MYDEL (EL SALVADOR, GUATEMALA, HONDURAS AND NICARAGUA) UNDP Community Recovery And Local Development BURUNDI

UNDP ART REDES COLOMBIA

UNDP ART EL SALVADOR UNDP ART ECUADOR

UNDP ART BOLIVIA

UNDP ART PAPDEL MOZAMBIQUE

UNDP ART GOLD SENEGAL

UNDP ART SRI LANKA

UNDP ART MAURITANIA UNDP ART URUGUAY

UNDP ART GABON

UNDP ART INSONESIA

Operational ART Framework Programmes

UNDP LGLD Programmes Supported by ART

New ART Framework Programmes

ART Framework Programmes with Completed Ownership Processes ART - 2014 in Review

41


42 ART - 2014 in Review


ART IN NUMBERS The 2014 total expenditures were funded with bilateral contributions, decentralized cooperation and Trust Fund extra-budgetary resources. Allocations/expenditures can be grouped in following categories: Coordination/Monitoring/ Evaluation (10%)

Capacity development (10%)

Development results (54%)

Policy/Support/Consolidation/ Ownership (17%)

Knowledge sharing (4%) New programmes (5%)

THE TRUST FUND FOR INNOVATIVE PARTNERSHIPS (ART INITIATIVE) There are two measures of Trust Fund operations: the annual cash flow operations and the accumulated balances at the UNDP CO programme implementation levels.

In addition to resources allocated by the UNDP Geneva Trust Fund, the Programmes successfully leveraged additional funding of USD 26,216,534 from the following sources:

The 2014 cash flow operations of the Trust Fund are a measure of income, internal transfers to the UNDP COs and expenditures in support of international/global/regional/countries’ new programme activities. In 2014, cash flow operations amounted to USD 5,145,637.

National Governments, European Commission, Decentralized Cooperation Actors, UNDP Country Offices, private sector bodies and civil society organizations.

ART - 2014 in Review

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THE WAY FORWARD 2015 Building on its results and taking stock of lessons learned, in 2015 the ART Initiative will continue promoting a territorial and holistic approach to development while addressing the unremitting new development challenges and seizing the many opportunities linked to the adoption of the new agenda.

Over the last decade, the development agenda has had to adapt to new global challenges and socioeconomic realities that call for innovative theoretical, operational and institutional arrangements and solutions. Simultaneously, many new development actors have rapidly acquired and consolidated a strategic role in the development arena, such as LRGs, private sector entities, the academia, civil society organizations and foundations. It is in this evolving and increasingly complex context that for over ten years now, the UNDP ART Initiative has been steadily contributing to achieving development objectives through the promotion of a territorial approach to development that meets local needs and priorities. In this respect, the Initiative translated the territorial approach into concrete field practices, achieving tangible results in 22 countries around the world, and contributed with concrete and tested input to the ongoing international development debates. The Initiative is committed to pursue this path, particularly since 2015 will be a pivotal year for development, as several key events will be celebrated throughout the year: the 3rd World Forum of LED, which will provide an opportunity to ponder on how to implement the new development agenda at the local level through LED strategies; the Third International Conference on Financing for Development (Addis Ababa); the United Nations Summit for the adoption of the post-2015 agenda (New York); and the United Nations Climate Change Conference COP21 (Paris), among others. All these

44 ART - 2014 in Review

events are expected to contribute to launching and establishing the new development agenda for the next 15 years. ART’s strategy for 2015 will involve harnessing the potential of territorial partnerships through modalities it has been successfully facilitating for years, such as DC and SSTC. This will stimulate transformative partnerships at the local level, therefore strengthening the potential and role of LRGs as development partners. To support these processes, a Hub for territorial partnerships will be set up to capitalize on the Initiative’s existing links to LRGs, their networks and associations and other DC partners. Establishing a corporate platform for territorial partnerships within UNDP will facilitate the alignment and commitment of decentralized and SSTC partners to the outcomes of the ongoing global processes. This will also allow DC partners to become an integral part of a broad and integrated programming mechanism that aligns its partners and initiatives with national and local priorities, in line with the future SDGs. Closely related to this core focus, the Initiative will target reinforcing the strategic relationship between UNDP and the main international LRG associations by establishing and facilitating an Advisory Committee to UNDP for LRGs (mainly through the LRGs’ international associations). UNDP has already acknowledged in several instances the increased political and development cooperation role of LRGs; the Advisory Committee hopes to move UNDP’s links with LRGs from rather ad-hoc meetings to continued and structured relationships at the senior management level. This will contribute to strengthening the voice of LRGs within UNDP, position UNDP’s LGLD strategy and programme and allow for the mobilization of partners and donors


for joint LGLD programming. This Advisory Committee will also allow UNDP to tap into the increasing political strength of LRGs at the international and national levels. In addition, the UNDP ART Initiative is determined to systematize knowledge and expertise and facilitate exchanges to strengthen the development capacities of LRGs and local governance institutions, because capacity gaps at the local level have been diagnosed as one of the main obstacles to SHD, hence also to SDGs’ implementation. Building on existing knowledge-sharing networks, the initiative will ensure that the existing pool of knowledge is expanded and better linked to concrete development initiatives and strategies, and that it is used to facilitate the links between different systems of knowledge. In this respect, the ART Initiative will be complementing UNDP’s strategic interventions and tools on capacity building at the local level, by gaining access to the experience and knowledge of decentralized partners’ local level practitioners, officials and experts. Last but not least, strengthening local governance is a key area of the Initiative’s strategic focuses; it will therefore emphasize on strengthening local capacities, ultimately aiming at facilitating the implementation of the future development agenda.

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BILATERAL PARTNERS Belgium Canada European Union: Committee of the Regions - European Commission France Italy Luxembourg Monaco Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey

Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) - York University - Université du Québec University of Cape Breton - University of Moncton CROATIA Region of Istria DENMARK Aalborg Municipality FRANCE Association Cuba Coopération - Assemblée des Départements de France (ADF) Association des Maires de France (AMF) - Association de solidarité avec le peuple Cubain France Cuba – Association des Régions de France (ARF) - Association Migration Solidarité et Échange pour le Développement (AMSED) - Association Terroirs et Cultures - Centre de Marseille pour l’Intégration en Méditerranée (CMI) Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM) - Cités Unies France (CUF) - Collectif Approche et Gouvernance Territoriale, Démocratie Participative et Citoyenneté (ANECR) - Comité d’Entreprise de la RATP Comité d’entreprise de France Telecom - Commune de Champs sur Marne - Conseil Général de l’Aude - Croix Rouge Française - Département de la Drôme - Entreprise SEMISE - Entreprise TOTAL - Faculté de Droit Aix Marseille - Financière OCEOR Fondation Air France - Fondation Mitterrand - Office de Coopération Economique pour le Méditerranée et l’Orient (OCEMO) - ONG Association Ville d’Aurillac - ONG Auvergne - ONG Secours Populaire - ONG Ville in Transition - Parc Naturel Régional du Lubéron- Province Pyrénées Atlantiques - Région de Champagne Ardennes - Région de Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur (PACA) – Région Pays de la Loire - Région RhôneAlpes - Réseau des Amis de Cienfuegos de la Région d’Auvergne - Réseau d’amis de Cienfuegos de la Région PACA (Association Cuba Coopération France) - SADEV 94 - Service de Coopération Culturelle (SCAC) - Servir les ambitions économiques et urbaines du Val-de-Marne - Syndicat Intercommunal d’Aménagement de Réseaux et de Cours d’Eau (SIARCE) - Ville de Cournon d’Auvergne - Ville de Fleury Mérogis - Ville de Marseille - Ville de Martigues- Ville de St. Denis GERMANY City of Freiburg - City of Stuttgart - Engagement Global - Stiftung EntwicklungsZusammenarbeit Baden-Württemberg (SEZ) ITALY ARCI International - ARCI Toscana - Armadilla Cooperativa - Associazione Comasca di Cooperazione Internazionale (ACCI)– Associazione Nazionale – CAP Holding – Cittadinanzattiva - Comune di Arezzo - Coordinamento Agende 21 Locali ItalianeComune di Bergamo - Comune di Brescia - Comuni d’Italia (ANCI) - Comune di Cecina - Comune di Como - Comune di Cremona - Comune di Firenze - Comune di FolignoComune di Genova - Comune di Grosseto - Comune di Lecco - Comune di Lodi - Comune di Livorno - Comune di Napoli - Comune di Mantova - Comune di Mazara del Vallo -Comune di Milano - Comune di Padova - Comune di Parma - Comune di Pavia - Comune di Prato - Comune di Siena - Comune di Spoleto - Comune di Torino - Comune di Varese - Comune di Venezia - Comune di Viareggio- Coordinamento Nazionale degli Enti Locali per la Pace e i Diritti Umani (CO.CO.PA.) - Emilia Romagna Valorazzione Economica Territorio (ERVET)- Fondo di Enti Locali per la Cooperazione Internazionale e lo Sviluppo Umano Sostenibile (FELCOS Umbria) - Fondazione Cariplo - Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena - Fondo Provinciale Milanese per la Cooperazione Internazionale (FPMCI) - Istituto Nazionale di Urbanistica (INU) Istituto Cooperazione Universitaria - Laziosanità (Agenzia Sanità Pubblica Regione

PART

DECENTRALIZED COOPERATION PARTNERS

International and regional networks: • Association of Local Democracy Agencies (ALDA) • Aqua Publica Europea (APE) • Arco Latino • Commonwealth Local Government Forum (CLGF) • European Association of Development Agencies (EURADA) • European Foundation Center • Global fund for cities development (FMDV) • International Links and Services for Local Development Agencies (ILS LEDA) • Local Government for Sustainability (ICLEI) • Mediterranean Coastal Cities Network (Medcities) • Medina - Mediterranean Network • Platforma • Regions United (ORU FOGAR) • SOLIDAR • United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) • Unión de Universidades de América Latina (UDUAL)

National and subnational networks: BELGIUM Association de la Ville et des Communes de la Région de Bruxelles Capitale (AVCB) - Association of Cities and Regions for Recycling and sustainable Resource management (ACR +) Association of Flemish Cities and Municipalities (VVSG) Commune de Forest - Municipalité de Bruxelles - Municipalité de Saint Trond (SintTruiden) - Ville d’Anvers BRAZIL ITAIPU Binacional - Parque Tecnológico Itaipu - Brazilian Service of support to micro and small enterprises (SEBRAE) CANADA Alternatives - Canadian Urban Institute (CUI) - CARE Canada - Confédération des Syndicats Nationaux (CSN) - Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) Fondation Insertech Angus - Municipality of Clarenville - Société de Coopération pour le Développement International (SOCODEVI) - Suncurrent Industries - The

46 ART - 2014 in Review


Lazio) - Medici Dirigenti, ANAAO - ONG Cospe - ONG Ricerca e Cooperazione - ONG VIS - Oxfam Italia - PEACE GAMES - Provincia di Alessandria - Provincia di Bergamo - Provincia di Ferrara - Provincia di Firenze - Provincia di La Spezia - Provincia di Lecce (Management Consortium of Torre Guaceto Park - Management Consortium of Coastal Dune Reserve) - Provincia di Pavia - Provincia di Sassari - Provincia di Siena - Progetto Sviluppo Liguria (PROSVIL) - Provincia di Torino - Provincia di Viterbo - Regione Abruzzo - Regione Emilia Romagna- Regione Friuli Venezia Giulia - Regione Lazio - Regione Liguria - Regione Lombardia - Regione Marche - Regione Puglia - Regione Toscana - Regione Sardegna - Regione Umbria - Regione Veneto – Sudest Donne - SudgestAid - UISP Cooperazione Sportiva Internazionale - Unione Province Lombarde (UPL) - Università degli Studi di Firenze - Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca - Università degli Studi Bocconi di Milano - Università IUAV di Venezia - Università degli Studi di Perugia - Università degli Studi di Pisa - Università degli Studi di Siena - Università degli Studi di Urbino - Osservatorio Interregionale di Cooperazione allo Sviluppo (OICS) - Water Right Foundation (WRF) - Politecnico di Torino - Coordinamento Universitario per la Cooperazione allo Sviluppo POLAND Region of Lower Silesia PORTUGAL Forum Nacional de Redes da Sociedade Civil PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO Les Amis du Liban SPAIN Agencia Andaluza de Cooperación Internacional - Agència Catalana de Cooperació al Desenvolupament (ACCD) - Agencia Extremeña de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo (AEXCID) - Agencia Vasca del Agua (URA) - Agencia Vasca de Cooperación para el Desarrollo/Gobierno Vasco - Asociación de Entidades Locales Vascas (Euskal Fondoa) - Ayuntamiento de Barcelona - Ayuntamiento de Bilbao Ayuntamiento de Córdoba - Ayuntamiento de Huelva - Ayuntamiento de Lasarte Oria - Ayuntamiento de Málaga - Ayuntamiento de Mallorca - Ayuntamiento de Prat de Llobregat - Ayuntamiento de Sabadell - Ayuntamiento de Sevilla - Ayuntamiento de Tarragona - Ayuntamiento de Terrassa - Ayuntamiento de Vic - Ayuntamiento de Vitoria - Gasteiz - BEAZ Bizkaia - Centro de Estudios y Documentación Internacionales de Barcelona (CIDOB) - Centro de Estudios Rurales y de Agricultura Internacional (CERAI) - Centre for Research on the Economies of the Mediterranean (CREMed) - Centro Superior de Hostelería de Galicia - Centro UNESCO de Cataluña (UNESCOCAT) – Conferencia de Rectores de las Universidades Españolas - CIC Batá - Confederación de Fondos de Cooperación y Solidaridad (CONFOCOS) - Diputación de Barcelona (DIBA) - Diputación de Cádiz - Diputación de Córdoba - Diputación de Granada - Diputación de Huelva - Diputación de Jaén - Diputación de Sevilla - European Institute of the Mediterranean (IEMED) – Exib Música - Federación de Empresas Valencianas de Economía Social (FEVES) - Fondo Andaluz de Municipios para la Solidaridad Internacional (FAMSI) - Fondo Cantabria Coopera - Fondo Extremeño de Cooperación al Desarrollo (FELCODE) - Fondo Galego de Cooperación e Solidarieda - Fons Valencià per la Solidaritat - Fundación Andaluza Fondo de Formación y Empleo (FAFFE) - Fons Català de Cooperació al Desenvolupament Fundación Centro de Iniciativas e Investigaciones Europeas en el Mediterráneo (CIREM) - Fundación CODESPA - Fundación Emilio Moro - Fundación ETEA para el Desarrollo y la Cooperación - Fundación KABKUH para el Desarrollo Sostenible

de la Gastronomía y Alimentación – Asociación Vasca de Agencias de Desarrollo (Garapen) - Generalitat Valenciana - Gobierno de Murcia - Govern de les Illes Balears - Instituto de Estudios sobre Desarrollo y Cooperación Internacional (HEGOA) - Instituto de Empleo y Desarrollo Socioeconómico y Tecnológico (IEDT) - Junta de Andalucía - ONG Global Humanitaria - ONG Paz y Desarrollo - Proyecto Local Barcelona – Tecnalia - Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona - Universidad de Cádiz - Universidad de Córdoba - Universidad de Granada - Universidad de Málaga - Universidad del País Vasco (EHU/UPV) -Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla SWITZERLAND Fondation Suisse Maroc pour le Développement Durable (FSMD) - University of Geneva THE NETHERLANDS Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) - Netherlands Development Organization (SNV) - The Hague Municipality UK British Council - Future in Our Hands (FIOH) - Save the Children

NERS

Multilateral organizations, including other UN Agencies: • Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) • Inter-American Development Bank - Multilateral Investment Fund (IADB – FOMIN) • International Labour Organization (ILO) • Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) • UN Millennium Campaign (UNMC) • United Nations Capital Development Fund (UNCDF) • United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) • United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA) • United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN Women) • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) • United Nations Human Settlement Programme (UN Habitat) • United Nations Millennium Development Goals Fund (UN MDG-Fund) • United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) • United Nations Regional Information Center (UNRIC) • United Nations Volunteers (UNV) • World Bank (WB) • World Food Programme (WFP) • World Health Organization (WHO)

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 1. https://issuu.com/artpublications/stacks/92c721d2fb7140ce83f1946ada f371e4

24. http://issuu.com/unricportugal/docs/final_report_public_consultation_on

2. https://www.worldwewant2015.org/localising2015 3. https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org/post2015/summit

26. http://art.pnud.bo/consejo-de-coordinacion-sectorial-de-desarrolloproductivo

4. http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/pdf/MDGReport2014_PR_Global_ English.pdf

27. http://www.arabstates.undp.org/content/dam/rbas/doc/SyriaResponse/ Compendium%20_Syri_resilience.pdf

5. http://www.un.org/sg/management/pdf/HLP_P2015_Report.pdf

28. MDG 7-C: To halve, by 2015, the proportion of the population without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation.

6. https://www.worldwewant2015.org/millionvoices

25. http://www.undp-eu-report.org/files/UNDP-EU-10-year-report.pdf

7. http://issuu.com/artpublications/docs/delivering_the_post-2015_ developmen 8. http://www.uclg.org/en/issues/localization-post-2015-agenda 9. http://www.undp.org/content/brussels/en/home/presscenter/ articles/2014/10/24/high-level-global-dialogue-on-localizing-the-post-2015agenda-/ 10. For the full Turin communique: http://issuu.com/artpublications/docs/ turin_communique_localizing_the_pos 11. http://www.lettera22.it/showart.php?id=12987&rubrica=9 12. http://www.undp.org/content/dam/undp/library/MDG/Post2015/UNDPMDG-Delivering-Post-2015-Report-2014.pdf 13. For the full report: https://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/463495 14. http://www.gtf2016.org/ 15. http://effectivecooperation.org/wordpress/about/steering-committee/ 16. http://effectivecooperation.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/ FocusSession8.pdf 17. http://effectivecooperation.org/wordpress/hlm2014/ http://www.bi.undp. org/content/dam/burundi/docs/Reductiondelapauvrete/UNDP-bi-3x6%20 Approach-eng.pdf 18. http://www.bi.undp.org/content/dam/burundi/docs/ Reductiondelapauvrete/UNDP-bi-3x6%20Approach-eng.pdf

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19. https://www.worldwewant2015.org/node/466209

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20. http://www.resacoop.org/sites/default/files/restitution_etude.pdf 21. F3E is a French network of associations dedicated to improving the impact and quality of international solidarity interventions. It stands for the words: evaluate, exchange and enlighten.

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22. http://www.gtf2016.org/#!Global-High-Level-Dialogue-on-Localizing-thePost2015-agenda/cjtl/A9BB4750-C7D5-4DC8-80FF-3895FF08A971 23. http://www.afccre.org/fr/actualites/assises-audoises-de-la-solidaritéinternationale-l’afccre-présente-le-nouveau-cadre-jurid#.VSzf-87lfzI

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ART – 2014 in Review Copyright © 2015 by the United Nations Development Programme All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without prior permission from UNDP. The designations of geographic entities in this book, and the presentation of the material herein, do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the publisher or the participating organizations concerning the legal status of any country, territory or area, or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Acknowledgements To the national and local governments, organizations, institutions, networks of civil society and local governments for their active commitment and support of the Sustainable Human Development processes carried out at the local, national and international levels. To the UNDP ART Initiative’s donors, for their contributions and support of the Initiative and of the Country Framework Programmes worldwide. To the UNDP Country teams, the Bureau of External Relations and Advocacy, the Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, the Regional Bureaus and Centers. To the United Nations agencies that collaborate with the ART Initiative: FAO, ILO, UNMC, UNCDF, UNICEF, UNDESA, UN WOMEN, UNHCR, UN HABITAT, UN MDG-FUND, UNFPA, UNRIC, UNV, WFP and WHO. Photo credits (by author and pages) Portugal's localization consultation organizing committee: 20, 21 ; Ulrike Meissner: 10, 11, 36, 42; UCLG: 15, 18; UN Bolivia: 24, 26, 32, 33, 37, 44, 45; UNDP Bolivia: 26; UNDP Brussels: 16, 22, 23, 30; UNDP Burundi: 19; UNDP Cameroon: front page; UNDP Cuba: 27; UNDP Colombia: 13; UNDP Ecuador: 28; UNDP El Salvador: front page, 4, 5, 6, 12, 15, 17, 35; UNDP Gabon: 29; UNDP GWS: 6; UNDP Lebanon: 6, 31; UNDP Mauritania: 34; UNDP New York: 6; UNDP Uruguay: 6.


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UNDP ART - 2014 in Review  

UNDP ART - 2014 in Review