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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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CONNECTING TERRITORIES FOR DEVELOPMENT EFFECTIVENESS In the present international climate, relations between the local, national and global levels are becoming increasingly important. It is also becoming evident how local development challenges require consistent and coordinated responses agreed upon through inclusive dialogue processes between the different levels. Against such a backdrop, UNDP launched a multilateral framework to foster dialogue through decentralized, triangular and south-south cooperation modalities and to support locallyowned governance and development strategies.

UNDP ART – Annual Report 2012 Connecting territories for development effectiveness

The results achieved by ART in 2012 further prove the assumption that greater synergies and coordination between the different stakeholders and levels is feasible and can accelerate the attainment of sustainable development objectives.

Copyright @ 2013 by the United Nations Development Programme Graphic Design: Alexander Ă…hnebrink Art Director: Luca Cipelletti Concept and Coordination: Marina Ponti Editing: Philip Gorman Printing: Grafiche Siz Palais des Nations CH-1211 Geneva 10, Switzerland

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

5 Foreword 6 Connecting 8 Territories 10 Development 12 Effectiveness 14

Highlights at the international level

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Map of Art Framework Programmes

Art Programmes 18 Albania 19 Bolivia 20 Central America 21 Colombia 22 Cuba 23 Dominican Republic 24 Ecuador 25 El Salvador 26 Kosovo 27 Gabon 28 Indonesia 29 Mauritania 30 Morocco 31 Mozambique 32 Senegal 33 Sri Lanka 34 Syria 35 Uruguay 36 Lebanon

FOREWORD

The ART Global Initiative has demonstrated that involving regional and local authorities in efforts to achieve sustainable human development is essential. It is at the subnational levels where many of the most important development results are being achieved through the concerted actions and commitment of local institutions and stakeholders, and with the support of – and in coordination with – national governments and international development partners, including decentralized cooperation actors. However, much too often, important results in one area go unnoticed and there are missed opportunities for development actors at the sub-national level to learn from each other and to feed their experiences into the global development debate. This is where the ART Global Initiative plays a unique role as a connector between stakeholders at all levels. The results achieved in 2012, as presented in the following pages, validate the initiative’s main assumption that “greater synergies and coordination between the different development actors and the different levels of governance accelerate the achievement of sustainable development objectives”. The report illustrates the results achieved through ART’s four-pronged strategy: 1) Connecting 2) Territories for 3) Development 4) Effectiveness. One example is the decision by the Colombian Government to implement the ART framework nationwide, initially rolled out in the department of Nariño. At the global level, ART is working to ensure that the recommendation from the Busan High Level Forum to implement aid effectiveness at the sub-national level is realized. For example, in Morocco, Local Strategic Guidelines were adopted to align development partners with locally owned strategies, and in Ecuador ART frameworks increased ownership and coordination at the local level. ART has documented best practices and concrete examples of the decisive contributions sub-national stakeholders are making, which were shared at the biennial high-level UN Development Cooperation Forum (DCF). Lessons learned through the initiative and best practices from 19 countries have also contributed significantly to UNDP’s new Local Governance and Local Development strategy, which emphasizes the importance of a multi-level, multi-sector and decentralized cooperation approach. Throughout 2012 ART continued to increase its support base: 36 partners joined the Initiative, including Local Governments from Turkey and Brazil, the city of Stuttgart in Germany, the region of North Denmark, the European network Arco Latino and ALDA (Association of Local Democracy Agencies). This is noteworthy in the current climate of fiscal austerity and highlights the initiative’s continued relevance. We look forward to continuing to expand this partnership in the years to come.

37 Acronyms 38 Acknowledgements 40

Budget and financial analysis

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Sigrid A. Kaag UN Assistant Secretary-General and Director Bureau for External Relations and Advocacy – UNDP Olav Kjørven UN Assistant Secretary-General and Director Bureau for Development Policy – UNDP

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WHY CONNECTING? Health, unemployment, poverty and climate change – to name but a few – are major issues of concern for citizens and their elected representatives in northern and southern societies alike. Due to their scope and complexity, these challenges require the consistent and coordinated actions of sub-national, national, regional and global institutions called upon to work out common ground through inclusive dialogue processes, as well as by interaction with the citizens and stakeholders (local, national and global). There is also increasing consensus on the need to involve local and sub-national governments in global development dialogues. As local and regional governments are physically closer to their citizens, their perspectives are key to the successful design and implementation of sustainable development plans in keeping with the principles of transparency, participation and accountability.

CONNECTING > HOW One of the most innovative features of ART is the successful dialogue between territories from the North and South on common challenges such as climate change, unemployment, poverty, migration and social exclusion. Although the main objective is to address mutual local development priorities, such interactions also improve local governance whilst making innovations and best practices – originating in universities, foundations, private sector bodies and civil society organizations – available to local stakeholders in other territories. It is important to highlight that these dialogues take place within the framework of decentralized, triangular and south-south cooperation initiatives involving 1,200 local authorities. In coordination with UCLG (United Cities and Local Governments) and FOGAR (Regions United), ART actively promotes decentralized, triangular and SouthSouth cooperation processes allowing sub-national governments and local partners to address common local challenges and discuss strategies to achieve sustainable human development objectives. In so doing, decentralized cooperation actors cooperate, exchange perspectives and join forces with their fellow partners whilst making full use of the relevant insights in addressing their own sustainable development challenges. The presence of UNDP in 177 countries – as well as its neutrality and sustainable development mandate – ensure that local objectives are consistent with those set at the national and global level. Furthermore, UNDP facilitates both the dialogues between territories and the roll-out of innovative decentralized, South-South and triangular cooperation mechanisms.

The ART strategy and its instruments are singularly focused on one aim: to foster interactions between citizens’ associations and local/territorial institutions to involve them in regional strategies, national plans and global objectives and – ultimately – improve people’s lives. In 2012, decentralized cooperation (DC) partners adopted UNDP/ART frameworks in 19 countries by sharing their wealth of expertise, know-how and best practices in support of territorial sustainable development.

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WHY TERRITORIES? There is growing awareness of – and support for – a territorial approach to development. Through this approach, development challenges are viewed via an integrated multi-stakeholder, multi-sectoral and multi-level ‘territorial lens’. Not only does this require capacity-building programmes designed to enable sub-national stakeholders to properly identify their own development priorities, but it also encourages national development policies and global debates to look through the same lens. This dynamic process strengthens interactions between economic actors, local institutions and civil society at large whilst capitalizing upon the know-how and resources of the territories. Potential benefits of the territorial approach include the prospect of integrating at the local level the three pillars of sustainable human development (environmental sustainability, inclusive growth and social cohesion) delivering quality public services tailored to citizens’ needs, empowering local stakeholders, and fine-tuning national decentralization and de-concentration policies.

TERRITORIES > HOW Territorial Working Groups (TWGs) include representatives from all areas of technical expertise active at the regional, provincial, district and/or departmental level while Local Working Groups (LWGs) operate at the municipal level. Through a forum for exchanges of opinions and experiences, they act as a ‘transmission belt’ between levels and across sectors affording coordination, consistent action and greater accountability. They also provide an entry-point for development partners to strengthen institutional capacities whilst promoting the social inclusion of minorities and marginalized groups. Local Strategic Guidelines (LSG) are identified through the above-mentioned processes. As LSGs reflect the contributions and priorities of civil society organizations, the private sector and local stakeholders, they can be used to consolidate plans developed within the territory and strengthen institutional expertise whilst promoting the social inclusion of minorities and marginalized groups. Local Strategic Guidelines are also crucial when drawing up Local Development Plans and aligning international cooperation partners with locally-owned strategies. National Coordination Committees (NCCs) are formed at the national level to facilitate the involvement of territorial stakeholders in national planning and legislative processes. For this purpose, their members encourage dialogue and interaction in order to integrate participatory local planning levels with national sectoral strategies. NCCs also promote leadership and ownership by sub-national stakeholders whilst ensuring ongoing support, dialogue and exchanges with the national and international level.

The word territory is often used to indicate a specific geographical area. However, UNDP ART regards it more holistically as a place where social and economic processes occur (metropolitan area, urban centre, municipality, province, region, etc.). By extension, territorial development can be seen as the sum of all social, cultural and economic activities taking place in a given territory, all of which foster its development while improving the quality of life of its inhabitants.

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WHY DEVELOPMENT? Allowing local communities to play a greater role when developing decentralization policies ensures greater impact, consistency and sustainability. Moreover, when local communities interact with national governments and international partners and obtain their support, they are in a position to leverage their own natural, historical, cultural, economic and human resources, and put in place effective policies to respond to the needs of their citizens.

DEVELOPMENT > HOW By contributing to the definition of UNDP’s Local Governance and Local Development strategy. The starting assumption underlying this strategy is the awareness that sub-national governments and social and economic stakeholders play a key role in all development actions and that decentralized cooperation makes an important contribution. The strategy aims to ensure that the three pillars of sustainable human development (environmental sustainability, inclusive growth and social cohesion) will be harmoniously combined in locally-framed strategies despite being governed by three separate government ministries at the national level. It envisages a multi-level approach to analysis, policy making, planning and implementation whilst aiming to create permanent links and foster interactions between local, national and global actors through innovative sub-national platforms. By supporting decentralization policies, which are critical building blocks for more inclusive, sustainable and equitable societies. By enhancing social cohesion, environmental sustainability and inclusive growth objectives. The Local Development Plans (LDPs) defined and agreed upon through participatory multi-actor and multi-sector dialogue processes deal with thematic areas spanning local governance, active citizenship, sustainable use of natural resources, water and sanitation, enhancement of the historical, architectural and cultural heritage, local economic development, local social services, women’s empowerment, vocational training, migration and youth policies.

Local Economic Development Agencies (LEDAs) are one of the most innovative instruments for: • generating employment • increasing access to credit • assessing economic potential e.g. local production chains • promoting national and international marketing strategies for local products. LEDAs promote inclusive growth, gender equality and the development of small- and medium-sized enterprises. Their aim is to boost endogenous resources and know-how by means of effective territorial strategies finetuned to specifically include social, economic and environmental factors. The positive assessment of this instrument has led to the creation of a Permanent Local Development Forum as a venue for on-going open dialogue and knowledge exchange. Each LEDA strategy is the result of an inclusive process which pays paramount attention to the needs and priorities of the most vulnerable and marginalized groups.

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WHY EFFECTIVENESS? The rapid diversification and multiplication of development cooperation stakeholders pose both opportunities and challenges. The fact that they mostly operate at the local level makes it necessary to align and harmonize development initiatives not only with local strategies, but also with the aims of diverse players operating at different levels. Moreover, in times of economic crisis and budgetary constraints, it becomes imperative to make the best possible use of the financial resources available.

EFFECTIVENESS > HOW ART brings a range of best practices to the debate on development effectiveness at the sub-national level. Compared to the traditional approach of working in silos/sectors or the implementation of countless small-scale projects, the territorial approach allows more effective interaction between development cooperation actors operating in the same geographical area. As a result, development interventions are implemented within the framework of integrated territorial plans, thus reducing fragmentation and increasing the impact and sustainability of all efforts geared towards achieving sustainable human development objectives. International Cooperation Guidelines (IGCs) play a bridging role between locallyowned development plans and development partners interested in supporting local development initiatives. IGCs ensure that all interventions are coordinated with – and supportive of – Integrated Local Planning Cycles. Furthermore, they guarantee that planning by sub-national governments is aligned with the financial contributions received from development partners. Local Planning Cycles (LPCs) are participatory ‘bottom-up’ processes through which local institutions strive to implement local development plans at the subnational level in full respect of the three pillars of sustainable human development, which at the national level fall within the responsibilities of three distinct Ministries.

The ART initiative has lent its support to governments and other partners engaged in designing and rolling out a tool to measure development effectiveness at the sub-national level. This Development Effectiveness Measuring Tool evaluates progress in five dimensions (alignment, harmonization, ownership, mutual accountability and resultsoriented management) and highlights the leveraging effect that the processes activated by ART can trigger at the sub-national level.

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HIGHLIGHTS AT THE INTERNATIONAL LEVEL Development effectiveness: in cooperation with National governments, United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) and FOGAR (Regions United), ART has supported the inclusion of the sub-national level in the post-Busan arrangements. As a follow-up action, ART and its partners disseminated a selection of ‘best practices’ at various important regional and global debates, including the UN Development Cooperation Forum held in New York in July 2012. Several meetings were organized, including the consultation on Decentralized Cooperation and Aid Effectiveness which was held in Barcelona in March to discuss the post-Busan arrangements with the active participation of National and decentralized cooperation actors. UN Conference on Sustainable Development: in the run up to the Rio+20 UN Conference, ART undertook multi-stakeholder consultations on sustainable human development at the sub-national level in various countries, including El Salvador (March 2012) and Mauritania (May 2012). In collaboration with UCLG and FOGAR, ART also participated in the debates and resolutions made during the UN Conference on Sustainable Development. ECOSOC Development Cooperation Forum (DCF): ART partnered with UNDESA (Department of Economic and Social Affairs) to ensure decentralized cooperation was included among the topics addressed at the July ECOSOC DCF meeting in New York. ART also organized a round table discussion and a separate side event resulting in decentralized cooperation being officially included in the DCF 2012-2014 strategy.

Global Water Solidarity (GWS): This initiative not only builds upon existing solutions and best practices, but also facilitates more effective participation by local actors in the planning, delivery and monitoring of water and sanitation management at the local and national level. ART and GWS increased their mutual cooperation in 2012: the former leveraged expertise and solutions from its partners, while the latter ensured greater integration between water-related activities and other important areas such as governance, gender, health, etc. Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI): In 2012, ART partnered with JMDI to increase countrylevel cooperation on migration policies at the territorial level with the overall aim of building upon the positive results achieved by both programmes at the sub-national level. This partnership also envisages joint activities at the global level, particularly when operated in tandem with decentralized cooperation actors and when related to global debates. Partnership with European stakeholders: in 2012, the ART unit in the Brussels UNDP Representation Office intensified dialogues with the European Union and with Local Authorities and Civil Society Organizations based in Brussels, focusing on local governance, local development and decentralized cooperation. The Local Authorities networks found it extremely useful to link up – through UNDP ART – with the multilateral system and with existing frameworks in partner countries in order to increase development effectiveness, improve coordination and support to locally-owned strategies, and above all to ensure greater sustainability and impact.

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External evaluation: a mid-term evaluation of the ART Initiative was carried out during the latter half of 2012. It highlighted how the mechanisms of the ART framework (including National, Territorial and Local Working Groups, International Cooperation Guidelines, Local Planning Cycles and Guidelines) have generated greater coordination, harmonization and alignment among development partners across the different levels (local, national and international). A copy of the relevant report is available at: http://erc.undp.org/ evaluationadmin/manageevaluation/ viewevaluationdetail.html?evalid=6672

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MAP OF ART FRAMEWORK PROGRAMMES

Latin America 1 Bolivia 2 Colombia 3 Cuba 4 El Salvador 5 Central America 6 Ecuador 7 Dominican Republic 8 Uruguay

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Africa 9 Gabon 10 Mauritania 11 Mozambique 12 Senegal

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Mediterranean 13 Morocco 14 Lebanon 15 Syria

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Balkans 16 Albania 17 Kosovo

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Asia 18 Indonesia 19 Sri Lanka

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ALBANIA

BALKANS

BOLIVIA

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1. Implementation of two Regional Strategic Plans. 2. Capacity-building activities with regional and local government units (LGUs) in Vlorë and Shkodra. 3. Two marketing strategies designed. 4. Set up of employment-generation schemes 5. Local innovations were promoted and replicated by means of a Catalogue of Innovations. 6. Architectural illuminations were installed in the historical City Hall building in Shkodra with a view to promote tourism. 7. An apartment block was completely refurbished in Puka (Shkodra region) to allow citizens greater access to local services . 8. The Ethnographic Museum in Vlorë was renovated to attract larger numbers of tourists. 9. The façade of the former Vlorë Prefecture was restored. 10. The defense walls of Vlorë were repaired and restored to encourage greater tourism activity. 11. The playground equipment in the children’s park in Himara town was fully refurbished. 12. The Marubi Virtual Museum was set up to promote cultural tourism in Shkodra. 13. Small-scale tourist resorts were set up in the mountainous areas in Shkodra to promote tourism and foster greater local economic development. 14. A Guarantee Fund was established to assist local community members in small-sized enterprise start-up and expansion schemes.

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The main focus of the ART programme here was to strengthen local planning activities, promote innovation, disseminate best practices and knowledge-sharing experiences and consolidate existing Local Economic Development Agencies (LEDAs). However, the programme also facilitated partnerships with decentralized cooperation stakeholders to give additional support to national and sub-national priorities. In so doing, it contributed to Albania’s reform agenda for integration into the European Union while at the same time aiming to achieve greater development effectiveness. Results at National level › Two regional strategic plans were drawn up to promote democratic governance and women’s empowerment, as well as provide support to the decentralization process underway. One plan was implemented in the Vlorë region and was known as “The Zero-Emission Territory”, while the other, “Towards the Sustainability of Tourism”, was implemented in the Shkodra region. › Improvements in local economic development through specially designed capacity-building activities in the LEDAs operating in Vlorë and Shkodra. › Local projects were scaled-up so they could be integrated into local and national policies, including replicating the ART approach in the Kukes region. › Greater – and improved - cooperation was achieved between civil society organizations and local authorities on the occasion of the debates entitled “The Future We Want” held in the run-up to the Rio+20 Conference. Results at Global level › Establishment of decentralized cooperation and South-South partnerships. › Albania’s national strategy on infant and maternal care were modified to include the best practices identified in ART programmes (e.g. the Mother Kangaroo method). › Cross-border cooperation between regions in Albania and Kosovo was improved.

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The ART programme set out in 2008 with two key priorities: local economic development and multi-level governance. By 2012, the scalingup exercise had extended throughout the Departments of La Paz, Oruro and Tarija, as well as Santa Cruz (Chiquitania-Pantanal region) and Potosi (Lípez region). Results at Local level › Set up a vocational training centre (max. capacity 300 participants) dealing with wood production methods. › Rolled out the “Livestock Improvement” project in the Ingavi province and in La Paz, involving over 1,158 indigenous families. › Facilitated the development of territorial marketing strategies by the Local Development Agency (LED) in La Paz. › Promoted coordination mechanisms between private and public stakeholders through the establishment of Working Groups in the Department of Oruro (PET-MAN Project). › Rolled out a pilot project on “Manufacturing Heritage and Citizenship” in the Department of Potosi in collaboration with the Ministry of Development and Economy working under the Semilla national programme. › Drew up socio-economic guidelines for the territory through the Second Integral Development Forum of Chiquitania-Pantanal. › Designed a Departmental Water Plan in Tarija ensuring the active participation of local stakeholders. › Drew up territorial plans in the departments of La Paz, Oruro and Tarija.

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1. Departmental Developmental Plan in La Paz. 2. Local Economic Development strategy in Tarija. 3. Territorial Economic Development Plan in Oruro. 4. Projects on wood production methods in La Paz. 5. Territorial marketing strategy in Oruro. 6. Mancomunidades project (PET-MAN) in Oruro. 7. Semilla Programme in Potosi. 8. Second Integral Development Forum of Chiquitania-Pantanal. 9. Departmental water plan in Tarija.

Results at National level › Compiled a database to improve coordination between national and territorial planning activities within the State Integrated Planning System (SPIE) promoted by the Ministry of Development Planning. › Provided institutional support to nine Development Sector Councils as part of the national policy on micro- and small-sized enterprises drawn up by the Ministry of Development and Economy. › Rolled out the Master’s Degree course on International Cooperation and Local Development with the Pablo de Olavide University of Seville.

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1. Developed training courses (graduate level) on political issues for women in the departments of Solola, San Marcos and Quetzaltenango (Guatemala). 2. Set up the territorial team of the Ministry of Economy (PROMIPYME) in the department of Chiquimula. CSEM-ADEL ASEDECHI made available educational and training services to local communities (Guatemala). 3. Strengthened the Network of Women Citizens through capacity-building activities in the areas of advocacy, leadership and partnership, as well as development and project management (El Salvador). 4. Promoted the CSEM model as a mechanism for women entrepreneurs with the National Commission for Micro- and Small-sized Enterprises (CONAMYPE) from the LEDA in Morazan (El Salvador). 5. Strengthened women’s committees within the Departmental Development Councils (Guatemala).

In 2012, the ART Central America regional programme implemented a very broad range of activities designed to achieve sustainable human development objectives, particularly those related to women’s empowerment and gender equality. Nicaragua › Obtained EU funding for the roll-out of several training courses in the National University of Leon for the local business community. Guatemala › Developed and rolled out training courses in business administration for women entrepreneurs. These were promoted by the Ministry of Economy of Guatemala (MINECO) to foster territorial networks of Small Business Development Centres (SBDC). Honduras › Set up the Business Development Centre for micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises in the Gulf of Fonseca (CDEMIPYME). This initiative was part of a broader public-private partnership with the LEDA in the Valle department in coordination with CARE, Oxfam, International Development Bank (IDB), SWISCONTAC and the national government. Guatemala › Finalized a research paper entitled “A theoretical and statistical approach to women entrepreneurs” in cooperation with the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor of the Economics Faculty of the University Francisco Marroquin. › Organized an event entitled “Women’s access to Financial Instruments: a key path for economic development in Guatemala”. This was a joint-initiative with UN Women, the World Bank, SEPREM and BCIE. Results at Global level › Set up service centres for women entrepreneurs in the Solola and Chiquimula departments (Guatemala), Morazán and Sonsonate (El Salvador), in the Valle department (Honduras) and León (Nicaragua). › Established 9 South-South cooperation partnerships between Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador and Nicaragua on women’s economic rights and in particular healthcare policy, entrepreneurship and microfinance and gender mainstreaming in public policies.

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According to the External Evaluation conducted in 2012, the ART programme in Colombia “set in motion remarkable peace-building activities through a territorial approach to development”. This territorial development strategy was implemented in the sub-region of Eastern Antioquia before being extended to the Departments of Meta, Huila and Cesar, as well as the region of Montes de Maria. Results at Local level › 10 regions implemented the “Rule of Law in Land Management and Rural Development” project with strategic support provided by the Network of Colombian Local Economic Development Agencies (ADELCO). This initiative comprised a series of communication activities, policy discussion debates and participatory processes. › An official observatory was set up to undertake ongoing peacebuilding assessments in the territories involved. › An innovative electoral strategy was designed and rolled out making full provision for gender equality and victims’ rights in the political platforms of 80% of the municipalities in eastern Antioquia. Results at National level › The ART Nariño Experience (2007-2012) was formally systemized as a best practice for international cooperation management by the Agency of the Presidency for International Cooperation of Colombia (APC). › A Memorandum of Understanding was drawn up between the Colombian Federation of Municipalities, APC and Jorge Tadeo Lozano University to establish a community of best practices on decentralized cooperation issues in Colombia. › A digital platform - www.cooperacioncolombia.co – was designed, created and promoted in order to provide local, national and international development stakeholders with ongoing capacity building activities. › ART NETWORKS were formally included in the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF).

1. Local planning cycles discussed and agreed at the local and regional level in Nariño and Antioquia and in the Department of Meta. 2. Specially designed tourist routes were launched in the High Ricaurte Province of Boyacá. 3. Projects were rolled out in 38 municipalities to provide houses and shelters to displaced and vulnerable families, to foster incomegenerating activities and to coordinate resettlements and land restitution initiatives at the departmental level. 4. Gender mainstreaming and women’s empowerment priorities were integrated into the local development plans of the 23 municipalities in Eastern Antioquia.

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CUBA

LATIN AMERICA

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› Strengthened institutional capacity in the areas of development planning and management. › Territorial development plans – and their dissemination – to national decision-makers and development partners operating at the local level. › Gender mainstreaming in municipal development plans. › Roll-out of training courses for local technical teams on the above issues in partnership with the provincial University. › Redevelopment of 4 sugar processing plants and subsequent transformation into local enterprises. Priorities were established according to the actual needs and potential of the territories and objectives framed within the national industrial reconversion strategy.

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DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

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The Cuba Local Level Human Development Programme (PDHL) was launched in 1999 to lend its support to government efforts in three strategically important areas, i.e. social services, local economic development, and decentralization & public administration. As several internal and external evaluations observed, the PDHL achieved tangible results in the above mentioned areas, including: (i) the establishment in 2002 of a credit fund for small- and medium-sized enterprises (FRIDEL) which became a reference point for the drafting of the first national policy on credit at local level in 2010, (ii) the creation of over 3,000 jobs through access-to-credit initiatives, (iii) the refurbishment of buildings in several historical town centres and their conversion into venues for social and commercial activities, (iv) the finalization of local development plans by 69 municipalities and 8 provinces, and (v) innovative solutions at the community level to improve integration of the elderly and of people with disabilities. Furthermore, many of the best practices generated by the programme in the 8 provinces involved were formally institutionalized by the Government in 2011. At the end of 2011, the Government and UNDP jointly launched a process to systemize all institutional innovations, reforms, mechanisms and best practices generated by the programme over the years in order to capitalize upon the expertise gained in local development issues. This formal ‘systemization’ was undertaken in 2012 by UNESCO’s Department for Human Development in Havana University in collaboration with UNDP’s Latin America Regional Service Centre and an international expert on evaluation. The results are to be presented in Havana in June 2013. This compilation of information is made available to national and local decision-makers and socio-economic stakeholders in order to strengthen institutional capacity and accelerate development processes. Moreover, the systemization process is also extremely important for the design of a new programme to lend support to the Government’s social and economic strategies in the areas of decentralization and local economic development. More concretely, some of the results obtained correspond to future priorities, including:

LATIN AMERICA

The second phase of the ART programme got underway in 2012, providing key support at the territorial level to the implementation stages of the National Development Strategy. The programme was rolled out as a joint venture with the Directorate-General for Territorial Development (DGODT) of the Ministry of Economy, Planning and Development (MEPYD) and prioritized: (i) territorial development strategies, (ii) territorial participation mechanisms, including development councils and inter-agency technical committees, and (iii) coordination mechanisms to align national policies and local policies. Results at Local level › Provided support to Local Development Plans (LDPs) drawn up by development partners. These comprised 23 European and Latin American decentralized cooperation stakeholders and 5 bilateral cooperation entities, i.e. Danish Development Cooperation (AECID), Italian Development Cooperation, Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Israeli Embassy. › Incorporated micro-credit and savings mechanisms into the local economic development strategies of four provinces.

1. Merging of national and local development strategies by strengthening technical management systems (e.g. Technical Committees) and territorial participation mechanisms (e.g. Development Councils) in six provinces (Dajabón, Elias Piña, Bahoruco, Independencia, Barahona and Monte Plata). 2. Establishment of micro-credit, savings and investment mechanisms as part of the local economic development strategies in four provinces. 3. Local Economic Development (LED) activities. There are 14 active savings and investment groups comprising a total of 398 members. 4. Aligning the sectoral policies of the Ministry of Economy, Development and Planning, the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Industry with the local priorities and needs. 5. Roll-out of a pilot scheme in Dajabon showcasing the results achieved by the local government in pursuing effective local economic development strategies in partnership with the private sector.

Results at National level › Followed through on the approval of a gender mainstreaming strategy in Local Economic Development (LED) in partnership with UNWOMEN, the Ministry of Women and the Ministry for Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises. › Coordinated the drafting of new legislation proposals on food security resulting from an inclusive participatory process at the local level with multi-stakeholders from the various territories, civil society organizations (in coordination with FAO, WFP and PAHO) and the Parliamentary Forum “Parliamentarians Against Hunger”.

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ECUADOR

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The main achievement of the ART programme in 2012 was the institutionalization of its multi-level and multi-actor processes by national and territorial stakeholders.

1. Set up of the agro-industrial eco-park. 2. Capacity-building activities addressing the decentralization needs of local governments. 3. Design and approval of territorial development plans by local governments. 4. Capacity-building activities specifically tailored for civil servants from local institutions. 5. Joint MDG-Fund Programme entitled “Youth, Employment and Migration”. 6. Strengthening of water governance mechanisms and capacities in the Municipalities of the Mancomunidad in the Cuenca of the Río Jubones. 7. Strengthening local institutional capacities when dealing with accessibility issues to local services in the historical centres. 8. Strengthening of local businesses in the area of tourism. 9. “Work for all” social inclusion programme. 10. Support provided to the livelihoods of farming communities. 11. Socio-economic support to small-sized businesses. 12. Strengthening of tourism opportunities at the community level. 13. Waste management initiative. 14. Institutionalization of the Territorial Working Groups.

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LATIN AMERICA

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

Results at Local level › Created a new range of financial services for young entrepreneurs resulting in 1,134 new businesses (570 of which were set up by women) and provided financial assistance to 1,479 young entrepreneurs. The ART Programme contributed to these achievements through the joint MDG Fund programme entitled “Youth, Employment and Migration” which was rolled out in the three provinces of Azuay, El Oro and Loja. › Developed a start-up business plan for an agro-industrial eco-park in the El Oro province. To identify the region’s economic potential, this initiative mobilized a very broad network of expertise, producing market analyses, putting forward organizational and management models and rolling out a marketing strategy to attract investment. › Institutionalized multi-level and multi-actor governance mechanisms in the areas of territorial planning and management in 3 Provinces and 1 Canton. Results at National level › Designed and rolled out a tool to measure development cooperation effectiveness at the local level in partnership with the Ecuadorian Secretary for International Cooperation (SETECI) and the national associations representing the three sub-national levels (provincial, municipal and rural). This tool was applied to all 24 provinces throughout the country and measured the five aid effectiveness principles (ownership, alignment, harmonization, coordination and scaling-up) in each province. It also evaluated the role of decentralized governments in managing international cooperation. › Launched the ART methodology in the context of the YasuníITT Initiative (Aguarico canton) following the specific request of the Government.

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LATIN AMERICA

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Since its launch in 2010, the ART programme has proved a highly successful vehicle for capacity-building activities and for fostering multi-level, multi-sector and multi-actor processes in pilot territories. At the local level, it has also contributed to the implementation of national policies on various issues ranging from investment and economic development, to water management. In 2012, the Technical Secretariat of the Office of the President became the official counterpart of the ART programme and heralded the formal institutionalization of the programme. Results at Local level › The national policy on investment was implemented at the local level and 32 projects on local economic development were completed (jointly financed by the national and local governments). › Three LEDAs were established in the Departments of La Union, Morazan, Sonsonate. These services benefited some 3,820 people, 52% of whom were women. › Two social inclusion and equity centres were set up to provide women with a full range of business services within already existing LEDAs. It is worth bearing in mind that 45% of the organisations in LEDAs are managed by women. › Institutional capacity-building activities were rolled out in the areas of local planning and multi- level and multi-actor coordination in the Departments of Morazan, Usulutan and La Union.

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1. Local Economic Development projects financed by National Budget resources (17 in the Morazan Department in 13 municipalities, 8 projects in La Union in 8 municipalities and 7 projects in Usulutan in 5 municipalities). 2. Launch of LEDAs. 3. Capacity-building activities specifically tailored to women entrepreneurs. 4. Platforms for human development. 5. Replication of the LEDAs by the national Government as part of its national policy on coastlines.

Results at National level › LEDAs were integrated into the national economic development policy of the Ministry of Economy and of the Technical Secretariat of the Presidency. › The Government initiated the formal institutionalization process of the programme, thus confirming its full support to ART frameworks. › Knowledge-management activities were undertaken, local economic development strategies were drawn up and implemented, and LEDAs were formally set up. › National and territorial consultations on the post-2015 debate got underway with the participation of 1,785 people and 1,000,060 online contributions (43% of which came from women).

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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KOSOVO

BALKANS

GABON

AFRICA

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1. Restoration of the library in Bellobrad/Belobrad. 2. Construction of the school road in Blaç/Bljac. 3. Construction of the sports field in Bresanë/ Brodosavce. 4. Restoration of the primary school in Brod, including the installation of IT equipment and new biology / chemistry laboratories. 5. Construction of the sports field in Brrut/Brut. 6. Construction of the main road in the centre of Kuk/Kukovce village. 7. Professional sewing training course for women and girls and the construction of the school road and in Shajne/Šajnovce. 8. Repair of the water supply system in the village of Rapca/Rapçë. 9. Cleaning-up of the illegal dump site in Restelica/Restelicë and setting-up of a community waste collection service. 10. Construction of greenhouses for agricultural production in Zlipotok.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

The ART programme has been working in conjunction with UNDP on its project on the Conservation of Biodiversity and Sustainable Land Use Management in the Municipality of Dragash (UNDP Dragash project). During 2010-2011, the Programme was implemented in five of its villages, i.e. Bellobrad, Blaç, Brod, Brrut and Restelica. Five additional villages/communities (Bresane, Kuk, Shajne, Rapce, and Zlipotok) were selected in late 2011/early 2012 for inclusion in Phase II. Results at Local level › Creation of an integrated Council (Local Working Groups). Working groups comprising both women and men were established. › Elaboration of the Dragash Municipal Guidelines for International Cooperation (MGICs) . › Endorsement of the MGICs by the municipal government as its baseline for identifying priorities and channeling development initiatives from development partners already working in the territory. The MGICs complement the Municipal Development Plan (MDP) drawn up by each Kosovar municipality to foster interaction and coordination with the central government and to promote international cooperation at the local level. › 10 communities were added to the programme and 10 priority projects were identified and agreed upon by Local Working Groups before being approved by the Municipal Working Group. Results at National level › Central government in Prishtina, via the Secretary-General of the Ministry for Local Government Administrations (MLGA), expressed its satisfaction with the experience in Dragash, “one of the first early examples of participatory demand-driven cooperation in Kosovo”. This was expressed on several different occasions, including at meetings with UNDP ART held in Kosovo and meetings with Kosovar Mayors from other municipalities. › With the support of the ART Initiative and FELCOS Umbria, Dragash Municipality undertook its first explorative visit in 2012 to the Umbria region in Italy with the aim of identifying potential fields for future cooperation.

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2012 saw the transition of the ART programme from Phase I to Phase II and hence the necessity to complete all the activities planned. The high point of the year was the implementation of development effectiveness principles at the local level, and in particular those concerning participatory planning processes, consultations and annual planning cycles. It is important to underline that these had previously been implemented at the national level only because of the lack of adequate decentralization policies. Results at National level › Involvement of the National Directorates for Planning, Local Government, Local Action and Decentralization in the implementation and monitoring processes for the institutionalization of the programme. › Approval and clearance by both UNDP and the Gabon government of the Project Document for Phase II of the programme (20122015). It is important to highlight that the Government co-financed the ART programme. › Development of the LED (Local Economic Development) strategy at regional level within the framework of the national economic strategy of the Ministry of the Economy. › Greater coordination with the UNDAF (United Nations Development Assistance Framework).

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1. 5 local administrators created and institutionalized the planning processes. 2. 12 new local development plans were developed and approved. 3. Participatory processes involving over 300 local stakeholders resulting in the approval of 12 departmental guidelines. 4. Development of a participatory guideline document. 5. 15 projects implemented in the areas of health, education and income-generation. 6. Formal (legal) recognition of 20 community associations. 7. Finalization of two university agreements in the areas of capacity-building and microfinance and credit in support of initiatives already funded.

Results at National level › Dissemination of lessons-learned and best practices on the post2015 development framework on the occasion of the AFRICITES summit in Senegal. › Organization of a training session as part of the implementation of the Memorandum of South-South Cooperation between Mauritania, Senegal, Morocco and Gabon. › South-South Cooperation: Training courses for 30 people belonging to the GTP on multi-level and multi-actor processes by the ART Team in Morocco.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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INDONESIA

ASIA

MAURITANIA

AFRICA

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1. Re-launch of SPADU-KPLI (Integrated Secretariat for Development Cooperation) as an aid coordinating body. 2. Finalization of the Strategic Development Guidelines for SPADU-KPLI. 3. Capacity-building for SPADU-KPLI and Joint-Secretariats at district level in NTT on administration issues, e.g. external funding management and knowledge-sharing on the funding procedures of development partners. 4. Re-launch of the Gorontolo Provincial Working Groups (PWGs) as aid coordinating bodies. 5. Gorontalo Province as a local champion for the Indonesia South-South and Triangular Cooperation initiative (2011-2025). 6. Sub-national and territorial perspectives are included in the national development plans on South-South Partnerships.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

The ART Indonesia programme is an excellent example of how the approach and methodology it promotes can be successfully incorporated into UNDP programmes on local governance and on local economic development. During 2012, participatory territorial processes (Working Groups), aid coordination mechanisms and Local Economic Development instruments were all fully integrated with the various UNDP programmes already operating there. The Government identified the Gorontalo Province (where the ART programme had been promoting South-South cooperation with Sri-Lanka since 2010-11) as a pilot for its South-South and Triangular Cooperation initiative (2011-2025). This decision will add a sub-national/territorial perspective to the design of national development plans and at the same time foster a greater number of South-South partnerships. Results at Local level › Strengthened aid coordination mechanisms in two provinces, East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) and Gorontalo, in line with Indonesia’s commitment to the principles of development cooperation effectiveness. The programme provided support to local governments and their aid coordination units, as well as to the finalization of the Strategic Development Guidelines (SPADU-KPLI) in East Nusa Tenggara. It also supported the provincial-level Working Group in Gorontalo. SPADUKPLI and Joint Secretariats at district level in NTT were trained on how to coordinate and manage external funding and they benefited greatly from the expertise provided by staff from the Ministry of Home Affairs and the National Planning Agency (BAPPENAS). Participants learnt a range of new administration skills, whilst becoming familiar with development partners’ funding procedures.

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The ART programme in Mauritania lent its full support to government efforts in the areas of decentralization and local development. Results at Local level › Two projects implemented in partnership with the ‘Small Grants Programme’ (solar platform and the preservation of the marine areas of Gadel and Twila). › Acces to sanitation services improved in the Kiffa area. › Gender analysis and assessments carried out. Results at National level › Support provided to the national strategy against poverty in the Brakna and Assaba regions. › The Mauritanian Network of Local Elected Women of Africa (REFELA) was launched. › Territorial consultations were carried out in preparation for the National Report on Sustainable Development. › Support provided to the public administration modernisation efforts through the creation of the very first virtual platforms, both of which were designed to improve communication between civil servants, citizens and civil society organizations. › Support given to the first National Livestock Fair.

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1. Strengthening local capacities for governance. 2. Strengthening the institutional capacity of the Brakna and Assaba regions. 3. Development of the Regional Plans Against Poverty. 4. Finalization of the International Cooperation Guidelines. 5. Impact assessment projects. 6. Participatory assessments on Gender and MDG’s in the Brakna and Assaba regions. 7. Regional workshops (Brakna Assaba Gorgol and Guidimakha) and support to the drafting of the National Report on Sustainable Development. 8. Regional Workshop in Kiffa and support to the drafting of the National Livestock Policy. 9. Workshop on Healthcare Services in the municipality of Kiffa. 10. Set-up and launch of the Mauritanian Network of Local Elected Women (REFELA).

Results at Global level › South-South and Triangular cooperation partnerships (Mauritania, Morocco and Spain) to modernize Chefchaouen’s local administration. › Training courses organized on local leadership and on development cooperation effectiveness. › Participation at the sixth edition of the Summit of AFRICITES in Dakar.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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MOROCCO

MEDITERRANEAN

AFRICA

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1. Support to the implementation of the Network of Strategic Cities (SVR). 2. Support to the establishment of the Network of Fortified Medinas (RMF). 3. Implementation of Commission Parity and Equal Opportunities in Rural Municipalities of the Tangier - Tetouan (Regional Initiative). 4. Promotion of the local economy through capacity-building and income-generating activities in the Province of Fahs Anjra (PESAGR). 5. Local Level Capacity Development (Berkane Jerada Taouirt and Figuig). 6. Modernization of local administrations and ICT (Oujda and Nador). 7. Renewable energy: photovoltaic station (CR Isly, Oujda). 8. Implementation of the Communal Development Plans (35 000 inhabitants: Oujda Berkane Taouirt El Aioun, Jerada, Beni Ensar).

In 2012, the ART programme made great efforts to ensure that subnational governments had ownership of the consensus building, multi-level and multi-sector processes that had been in place there since 2007. Results at Local level › 14 projects in the areas of good governance, environment protection, local economic development, women’s empowerment and capacity building at the local level. › Set up of the Foundation of the Eastern Region for Decentralized Cooperation (FROCOD) to coordinate decentralized cooperation partners in the field and to support regional development plans. › Launch of a local platform comprising local institutions and civil society organizations in the Municipality of Chaouen to assist in the design and implementation of the municipality development plan. Results at National level › Institutionalization of the multi-level and multi-sector coordination and planning mechanisms introduced by the programme. › Scaling-up of local projects and their institutionalization within local and national policies, e.g. the Ecole Chantier which was set up to provide young people with training on restoration techniques and traditional trades. It is hoped that this will be replicated in other regions by the national Government. › Roll-out of the second edition of the national training of trainers on decentralization and on decentralized cooperation. › The financial sustainability of the ART programme has been achieved. Results at Global level › 35 partnerships established in the field of knowledge sharing. › South-South partnerships established (Morocco, Mauritania, Senegal and Gabon) on local economic development, local planning, traditional trades and beekeeping.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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The ART Local Economic Development Process Support Programme in Mozambique (ART PAPDEL) is a joint initiative between the Government and UNDP Mozambique, it started in 2009 under the responsibility and leadership of the National Directorate of Rural Development. The UNDP’s ART PAPDEL distinguishes itself by focusing on local economic development (LED) strategies and processes to eradicate poverty and empower local communities, particularly youth and women. The Programme is a working tool for UNDP for the coordination and implementation of local development through a territorial approach, and is identified in both the UNDAF 2012-2015 and UNDP’s Country Programme Strategy 20012-2015. Results at Local level › Contribution to the Development Observatories at the Provincial level, which are the result of a joint initiative of civil society organizations and UNDP. › Development of gender strategies and methodologies and their inclusion in the local economic development plans. › 35 LED Local Working Groups created and strengthened in 7 Provinces. The main result of this participative territorial planning has been the elaboration of 35 documents of distrital territorial potentialities included in the Strategic District Plans. Results at National level › Set up of a national platform for knowledge-sharing among LEDAs and creation of a national network of LEDAs (REDEL) which is the only one of its kind in Africa. › Financial contribution of $200,000 from the Mozambique government for ART activities on local economic development. Results at Global level › South-South and Triangular cooperation partnerships (Italy-BulgariaMozambique-Spain) to support non-state actors and local authorities’ education bodies and schools. › Participation in the sixth edition of the Summit of AFRICITES in Dakar.

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1. 3 chapters on Local Economic Development incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Maputo. 2. 4 chapters on Local Economic Development incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Gaza. 3. 10 Local Economic Development chapters incorporated for the first time in the District Plans in the Province of Inhambane. 4. 8 Local Economic Development chapters incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Nampula. 5. 4 Local Economic Development chapters incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Cabo Delgado. 6. 5 Local Economic Development chapters incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Niassa. 7. 1 Local Economic Development chapter incorporated for the first time in the District Plans of the Province of Sofala. 8. Set up of the new Tourist Office of Ilha de Mozambique, inaugurated by the President of the municipality of Ilha de Mozambique and the Coordinator of the Spanish Development Cooperation. 9/10/11/12/13. Territorial marketing strategies disseminated at district level. 14/15/16/17/18. Advocacy activities (also through the dissemination of a magazine) on basic social services and local economic development at provincial level. 19/20/21/22/23/24. Advocacy activities (also through the dissemination of a magazine) on local economic development and LEDAs.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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SENEGAL

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AFRICA

SRI LANKA

ASIA

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1. Development and formal institutionalization of a Regional Development Plan (RDP) in the Louga and Ziguinchor regions, as well as over 50 Local Development Plans (LDPs). 2. Set up of the Local Development House as a forum for consultations, dialogue and cooperation between representatives of local authorities, decentralized services, national and international development actors and the private sector. 3. Creation of Community Interest Groups (ICGs) by Presidential Decree. 4. In the Kebemer Department of the Louga region, more than 7,000 people gained access to clean water thanks to a project funded by the Regional and Provincial Authorities of Lombardy (Italy).

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

2012 witnessed considerable transformations in Senegal following the election of both the new president and the new government, both of which led to major political shifts and a radical re-structuring of the public administration system. The subsequent abolishment of the Directorate for Decentralized Cooperation and the reassignment of its tasks to a different Ministry impacted not only UNDP, but also the ART SENEGAL initiative. The ART team immediately entered into discussions with its new interlocutors on Phase II of the programme and ensured most of the activities planned were concluded by the end of 2012, scheduling others for finalization in early 2013. Further negotiations will be concluded during 2013 as local governments and development partners have already given assurances of their political commitment to the initiative. Results at Local level › International Strategic Guidelines (ISGs) were finalized for the Louga and Ziguinchor regions as a result of an inclusive and multistakeholder participatory process. These were also disseminated at national and international level, e.g. during the AFRICITE Summit in November 2012. › A Local Development House was established in partnership with the Balearic Regional Government in Spain. This was designed to provide a forum for consultations to improve territorial governance and align key stakeholders from the public / private sector and from civil society. The initiative also fostered institutional capacity-building for local government officials working in the areas of decentralization and de-concentration. › A clean water scheme was set up in Kab Guye thanks to the successful partnership established between the Louga Regional Authorities and the Regional and Provincial Authorities of Lombardy (Italy). The project was completed within the agreed-upon timeframe and capacity-building activities were also rolled out in cooperation with water management experts at territorial level from Lombardy.

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The ART programme was rolled out in 2006, several months after the devastating tsunami struck the coastal areas, and very quickly proved a highly effective platform to coordinate Decentralized Cooperation partners’ humanitarian interventions. The programme was formally closed in 2012 once processes such as Territorial and Local Working Groups, Local Economic Development Agencies, etc. and other mechanisms had been incorporated into provincial and local government procedures, especially those designed to foster greater coordination between development partners and locally owned sub-national strategies. The Ruhuna Economic Development Agency (RUEDA) continues to receive support from sub-national authorities as well as other key stakeholders, including Ruhuna University, the Chamber of Commerce and UNDP. Results › Towards the end of 2012, the principal stakeholders began working on a comprehensive, multi-level and multi-actor strategy to extend these processes throughout the southern province to ensure that the three pillars of sustainable development (social cohesion, environmental sustainability and inclusive growth) were integrated at the sub-national level.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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SYRIA

MEDITERRANEAN

URUGUAY

LATIN AMERICA

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The outbreak of conflict in Syria has had a major impact in both social and economic terms. Consequently, any development initiatives already underway have been replaced by humanitarian actions. Thus, the ART Syria programme has been integrated into the humanitarian strategy of both UNDP and the broader UN Working Group on Humanitarian Assistance. Results at Local level › Design and roll-out of an initiative for coordinating humanitarian activities. › Provision of a complete range of key social services (in line with UNDP’s global humanitarian strategy). › Provision of psycho-social services (with special focus on women and children) to local families. › Roll-out of training courses for basic healthcare workers.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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Throughout 2012, the ART programme concentrated its focus on local economic development activities in order to align development partners’ interventions and national priorities with departmental and local development plans. To maximise results, the programme significantly scaled up multi-level and multi-actor processes by institutionalizing ART’s consensus-building and coordination instruments. Results at Local level › Territorial guidelines discussed and agreed upon within the context of ART multi-level and multi-actor processes. › Successful implementation of two local economic programmes in Colonia, “Salto Emprende” and “Casa de las Emprendedoras”, both of which focused on the productivity, profitability, competitiveness and sustainability of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises (MIPYMES). › Social innovation in the area of social and gender inclusion at local level together with the National Agency for Research and Innovation (ANII), ADEL and the Municipality of Juan Lacaze, Colonia. › Strategic Plan of the Artigas Department in coordination with OPP’s “Uruguay Integra” programme.

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1. “Salto Emprende” and “Casa de las Emprendedoras” programmes in Colonia. 2. Joint initiatives with the Ministry of Energy, Industry and Mining (MIEM), the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MTSS) and OPP’s microfinance programme to promote productivity and competitiveness of micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises in the territories of Artigas, Salto and Colonia. 3. Coordination strategy among the 10 ADEL created by the ART programme and the national government. 4. Strengthening of local capacities in the area of local economic development and competitiveness. 5. Successful implementation of the territorial guidelines agreed upon in the territories of Artigas.

Results at National level › Provided support to the Inter-Institutional Platform of Local Development though capacity-building activities, some of which also included the ART methodology and its multi-level multi-actor processes. › Ensured a gender perspective was included for the first time in the latest economic development study carried out by the Ministries of Labour and Social Affairs in collaboration with the University of Uruguay (UDELAR), i.e. identify employment policies resulting in women’s empowerment. › Organized an international seminar on “Technology and Local Development in the Information Society” in collaboration with the General Secretariat for Latin America.

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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LEBANON

ACRONYMS

MEDITERRANEAN

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1. Akkar/North Lebanon: Youth capacity and mobilization. Halba/North Lebanon: Refurbishment of the municipal theatre. 2. Btedai/Bekaa: Development of a water irrigation network. Eastern Baalbeck/Bekaa: construction of a children’s park. 3. Nabi Chit/Bekaa: construction and furbishing of a children’s park. 4. BSS/Baabda: Pilot programme in Primary Healthcare Centres. BSS/Baabda: Integrated approach concept on oral health. Furn El Chebbak/Baabda: Household survey BSS/Baabda: Establishment of El Choir Sahel Metn Al Janoubi by students from different cultural backgrounds. BSS/Baabda: Support to the ALEDA. 5. Nabatieh: Municipal waste management support with a septic truck. 6. Rachaya Al Foukhar/Nabatieh: Vocational training in pottery production. 7. Yater/Nabatieh: Establishment of a public library.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012

The ART programme was launched in 2007 in North Lebanon, South Lebanon, Bekaa and the southern suburbs of Beirut, four areas characterized by high poverty rates and severe socio-economic problems. In 2012, ART successfully set up Local Economic Development Agencies (LEDAs) in each, provided training courses on local democratic governance for over 900 members of newly-elected local authorities, organized capacity-building activities for around 2,000 local beekeepers in the field of disease control and management, and rolled out a clean water advocacy campaign on TV, radio and printed media. Results at Local level › Ensured greater accessibility to local social services in all of the four areas, as well as improved coverage and quality. › Set up primary healthcare facilities in the southern suburbs of Beirut. › LEDA’s in North Lebanon and in the southern suburbs of Beirut developed business plans, carried out market research and offered a wide range of employment services. › Contributed to improving food safety & quality control measures by organizing capacity-building activities with the Lebanese Agriculture Research Institution (LARI). › Provided greater access to public libraries in the area of South Lebanon. Results at National level › 15 partnerships were established with decentralized cooperation stakeholders to strengthen local institutional capacity in the following areas: • Local Economic Development / Primary Healthcare • Education • Local Governance • Social Development (youth training courses & youth mobilization) • Agriculture. These activities not only improved the capacities of local authorities, but also enabled them to innovate their approach to management, planning and territorial marketing.

ART

Articulation of Territorial Networks for Sustainable Human Development

CDP

Communal Development Plan

CPD

Country Programme Document

CO

Country Office

CPAP

Country Programme Action Plan

CSO

Civil Society Organization

CTT

Communal Technical Team

DC

Decentralized Cooperation

DP

Development Partner

IGC

International Cooperation Guidelines

ICT

Information and Communication Technology

LDP

Local Development Plan

LED

Local Economic Development

LEDA

Local Economic Development Agency

LPC

Local Planning Cycle

LRG

Local Regional Government

LWG

Local Working Group

MDG’s

Millennium Development Goals

NCC

National Coordinating Committee

PWG

Provincial Working Group

PDHL

Local Human Development Programme

RIDA

Regional Integrated Development Agency

SHD

Sustainable Human Development

TWG

Territorial Working Group

UCLG

United Cities and Local Governments

UNDAF

United Nations Development Assistance Framework

UNDP

United Nations Development Programme

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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The UNDP/ART Initiative is grateful for the support and field coordination it received from donors, decentralized cooperation partners, sub-national stakeholders, UNDP Country Offices, UN agencies, civil society organizations and private sector bodies throughout 2012. Without this, it could not have achieved such significant results worldwide at the global, national and sub-national levels as illustrated in this Annual Report. In particular, UNDP/ART wishes to gratefully acknowledge:

INTERNATIONAL PARTNERS

NATIONAL PARTNERS

ALDA (Association of Local Democracy Agencies) Arco Latino / Regions United - FOGAR / Medcities Mediterranean Coastal Cities Network / European Association of Development Agencies (EURADA) / United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG) / Medina: Mediterranean Network / Commonwealth Local Government Forum (CLGF) / Local Government for Sustainability (ICLEI) / Committee of the Regions

BELGIUM

ITALY

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Association de la Ville et des Communes de la Région de Bruxelles Capitale (AVCB) - Association of Flemish Cities and Municipalities (VVSG) - Commune de Forest - Municipalité de Bruxelles - Municipalité de Saint Trond (SintTruiden) - Ville d’Anvers

DONORS

CANADA

Associazione Nazionale Comuni d’Italia (ANCI) - ARCI International - ARCI Toscana - Armadilla Cooperativa - Associazione Comasca di Cooperazione Internazionale (ACCI) - Cittadinanzattiva - Comune di Arezzo - Comune di Bergamo - Comune di Brescia - Comune di Cecina - Comune di Como - Comune di Cremona - Comune di Firenze - Comune di Foligno- Comune di Genova - Comune di Grosseto - Comune di Lecco - Comune di Napoli - Comune di Lodi - Comune di Livorno - Comune di Mantova - Comune di Mazara del Vallo -Comune di Milano - Comune di Padova - Comune di Parma - Comune di Pavia - Comune di Prato - Comune di Siena - Comune di Spoleto - Comune di Varese - Comune di Venezia - Comune di Viareggio - Coordinamento Nazionale degli Enti Locali per la Pace e i Diritti Umani (CO.CO.PA.) - FELCOS Umbria (Fondo di Enti Locali per la Cooperazione Internazionale e lo Sviluppo Umano Sostenibile) - Fondazione Monte dei Paschi di Siena - INU (Istituto Nazionale di Urbanistica) - Fondo Provinciale Milanese per la Cooperazione Internazionale (FPMCI) - Istituto Cooperazione Universitaria - Laziosanità (Agenzia Sanità Pubblica Regione Lazio) - Medici Dirigenti/ANAAO - ONG Cospe - ONG Ricerca e Cooperazione - ONG VIS - Oxfam Italia - PEACE GAMES - UISP Cooperazione Sportiva Internazionale - Provincia di Alessandria - Provincia di Bergamo Provincia di Ferrara - Provincia di Firenze - Provincia di La Spezia - Provincia di Lecce (Management Consortium of Torre Guaceto Park - Management Consortium of Coastal Dune Reserve) - Provincia di Pavia - Provincia di Sassari - Provincia di Siena - Progetto Sviluppo Liguria (PROSVIL) - Provincia di Torino Provincia di Viterbo - Regione Abruzzo - Regione Friuli Venezia Giulia - Regione Lazio - Regione Liguria - Regione Lombardia - Regione Marche - Regione Puglia - Regione Toscana - Regione Sardegna - Regione Umbria - Regione Veneto Sudest Donne - SudgestAid - Unione Province Lombarde (UPL) - Università degli Studi di Firenze - Università degli Studi di Milano Bicocca - Università degli Studi Bocconi di Milano - Università IUVAV di Venezia - Università degli studi di Perugia - Università degli studi di Pisa - Università degli studi di Siena Università degli Studi di Urbino - Osservatorio Interregionale di Cooperazione allo Sviluppo (OICS) - Water Foundation

Ayuntamiento de Bilbao - Ayuntamiento de Córdoba - Ayuntamiento de Huelva - Ayuntamiento de Lasarte Oria - Ayuntamiento de Málaga - Ayuntamiento de Mallorca - Ayuntamiento de Prat de Llobregat - Ayuntamiento de Sabadell - Ayuntamiento de Sevilla - Ayuntamiento de Vic - Ayuntamiento de Vitoria - Gasteiz - Diputación de Huelva - Ayuntamiento de Terrassa - BEAZ Bizkaia - Centro de Estudios y Documentación Internacionales de Barcelona (CIDOB) - Centro de Estudios Rurales y de Agricultura Internacional (CERAI) - Centro Superior de Hostelería de Galicia - Centro UNESCO de Cataluña (UNESCOCAT) - Centre for Research on the Economies of the Mediterranean (CREMed) - CIC Batá - Confederación de Fondos de Cooperación y Solidaridad (CONFOCOS) - Diputación de Granada - Diputación de Córdoba - Diputación de Barcelona (DIBA) - Diputación de Cádiz - Diputación de Jaén - Diputación de Sevilla European Institute of the Mediterranean (IEMED) - Federación de Empresas Valencianas de Economía Social (FEVES) - Fondo Andaluz de Municipios para la Solidaridad Internacional (FAMSI) - Fons Català de Cooperació al Desenvolupament - Fondo Cantabria Coopera - Fondo Extremeño de Cooperación al Desarrollo (FELCODE) - Fondo Galego de Cooperación e Solidarieda - Fons Valencià per la Solidaritat - Fundación Andaluza Fondo de Formación y Empleo (FAFFE) - Fundación Centro de Iniciativas e Investigaciones Europeas en el Mediterráneo (CIREM) - Fundación CODESPA Fundación Emilio Moro - Fundación ETEA para el Desarrollo y la Cooperación - Fundación KABKUH para el Desarrollo Sostenible de la Gastronomía y Alimentación - Generalitat Valenciana - Govern de les Illes Balears - Gobierno de Murcia - Junta de Andalucía - Instituto de Estudios sobre Desarrollo y Cooperación Internacional (HEGOA) - Instituto de Empleo y Desarrollo Socioeconómico y Tecnológico (IEDT) - Ayuntamiento de Tarragona - ONG Global Humanitaria - ONG Paz y Desarrollo - Proyecto Local Barcelona Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona - Universidad de Cádiz - Universidad de Córdoba - Universidad de Granada - Universidad de Málaga - Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla - Tecnalia

GOVERNMENT OF BELGIUM GOVERNMENT OF CANADA GOVERNMENT OF FRANCE GOVERNMENT OF ITALY GOVERNMENT OF SPAIN GOVERNMENT OF SWEDEN GOVERNMENT OF SWITZERLAND PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS EUROPEAN COMMISSION FAO PAHO (PAN AMERICAN HEALTH ORGANIZATION) UN HABITAT UN MDG-FUND UN MILLENNIUM CAMPAIGN UN WOMEN UNCDF UNDESA UNFPA UNHCR UNICEF WFP WHO WORLD BANK

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BRAZIL ITAIPU Binacional - Parque Tecnológico Itaipu - SEBRAE The Brazilian Service of support to micro and small enterprises.

Canadian Urban Institute (CUI) - CARE Canada - Confédération des Syndicats Nationaux (CSN) - Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) - Fondation SOCODEVI (Société de Coopération pour le Développement International) NGO Alternatives - INSERTECH ANGUS - Municipality of Clarenville - University of Cape Breton - Suncurrent Industries - The Global Peace and Security Fund (GPSF) - York University - Université du Québec - University of Moncton

FRANCE Agence Française de Développement (AFD) - Association Cuba Coopération - Association de solidarité avec le peuple Cubain France Cuba - Association Migration Solidarité et Echange pour le Développement (AMSED) - Association Terroirs et Cultures - Centre International de Hautes Etudes Agronomiques Méditerranéennes (CIHEAM) - Centre de Marseille pour l’Intégration en Méditerranée (CMI) - Cités Unies France - Collectif Approche et Gouvernance Territoriale, Démocratie Participative et Citoyenneté (ANECR) - Comité d’Entreprise de la RATP - Comité d’entreprise de France Telecom - Commune de Champs sur Marne - Conseil Général de l’Aude - Croix Rouge Française Délégation pour l’action extérieure des collectivités territoriales (DAECT) du Ministère français des Affaires étrangères et européennes - Département de la Drôme - Entreprise SEMISE - Entreprise TOTAL - Fondation Air France Financière OCEOR - Fondation Mitterrand - Réseau des Amis de Cienfuegos de la Région d’Auvergne - Association Cuba Coopération France- Faculté de Droit Aix Marseille - ONG Association Ville d’Aurillac - ONG Auvergne - ONG Secours Populaire - ONG Ville in Transition - Province Pyrénées Atlantiques - Région de Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur (PACA) - Région de Champagne ArdennesParc Naturel Régional du Lubéron - Réseau d’amis de Cienfuegos de la Région PACA (Association Cuba Coopération France) - Région Rhône-Alpes - Servir les ambitions économiques et urbaines du Val-de-Marne - (SADEV 94) - Service de Coopération Culturelle (SCAC) - Syndicat Intercommunal d’Aménagement de Réseaux et de Cours d’Eau (SIARCE) - Ville de Fleury Merogis - Ville de Cournon d’Auvergne - Ville de Marseille - Ville de Martigues- Ville de St. Denis

PRINCIPALITY OF MONACO

SWITZERLAND Amis du Liban

Fondation Suisse Maroc pour le Développement Durable (FSMD) - University of Geneva

SPAIN

THE NETHERLANDS

Agencia Andaluza de Cooperación Internacional - Agència Catalana de Cooperació al Desenvolupament (ACCD) - Agencia Extremeña de Cooperación Internacional para el Desarrollo (AEXCID) - Agencia Vasca del Agua (URA) Agencia Vasca de Cooperación para el Desarrollo/Gobierno Vasco - Asociación de Entidades Locales Vascas (Euskal Fondoa) - Ayuntamiento de Barcelona -

Association of Netherlands Municipalities (VNG) - Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV)

UK Save the Children - Future in Our Hands (FIOH)

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BUDGET & FINANCIAL ANALYSIS LEVERAGING EFFECT

FUNDS DISTRIBUTION

Between 2006 and 2012, over USD 182 million was channelled through the UNDP/ART Initiative to promote a territorial approach within sustainable development strategies. The budget table outlines the different contribution sources. It is important to underscore that out of the USD 182 million, USD 98 million were disbursed directly to the UNDP ART Trust Fund while the remaining USD 84 million were leveraged from the following sources:

The UNDP ART Trust Fund supports sustainable development strategies at the local level by means of earmarked financial contributions from bilateral donors. The Trust Fund also manages co-financing contributions from Decentralized Cooperation partners and networks. It is worth highlighting that 81% of the contributions received through the Trust Fund were invested in locally-owned development interventions addressing issues such as local governance, local economic development (LED), capacity development of public institutions, human rights, women’s empowerment, cultural heritage, environmental protection, natural resource management, basic delivery of social services, urban planning, disaster-preparedness, job creation and youth employment and training opportunities. In order to have greater impact and achieve better results, the UNDP ART Initiative gives special importance to its delivery rate (currently 93%) as well as to on-going monitoring and evaluation activities.

3% Private Sector / CSOs

7% European Commission 8% National and local Governments in partner countries

45% Trust Fund

9% Capacity Building activities / Knowledge management / Monitoring / Documentation

20% Bilateral donors

5% UN synergies at country level

11% Decentralized Cooperation partners and networks

Trust Fund

$ 81,881,142

Decentralized Cooperation partners and networks

$ 20,777,757

UN synergies at country level

$ 9,665,436

Bilateral donors

$ 36,900,000

National and local Governments in partner countries

$ 14,478,890

European Commission

$ 12,110,263

Private Sector/CSOs

$ 6,307,149

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10% Global activities / Decentralized / Triangular / South-South cooperation / Partnerships

ANNUAL REPORT 2012

81% Funds for activities at the country level

$ 182,120,637

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LINKS https://www.facebook.com/pages/UNDP-ART-Initiative https://twitter.com/UNDP_ART http://web.undp.org/geneva/ART http://www.arturuguay.org http://www.undp.org.ec/art/frontEnd/main.php http://www.pnud.mr/artgold http://www.ilsleda.org/home http://www.undp.org http://ec.europa.eu/index_en.htm http://www.endpoverty2015.org http://www.fao.org http://www.mdgfund.org http://www.paho.org http://www.unhabitat.org http://www.uncdf.org http://www.un.org/desa http://www.unfpa.org http://www.unhcr.org http://www.unicef.org http://www.unwomen.org http://www.wfp.org http://www.who.org http://www.worldbank.org

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ANNUAL REPORT 2012 http://web.undp.org/geneva/ART


Annual Report 2012