Issuu on Google+

February 2015

Elodie Abergel, United Nation without "s", 2012 from the Capharna端m series


Peripheral Peripheral ARTeries A

R

T

R

E

V

I

E

W

February 2015

22

4

Elodie Abergel The focal point of Abergel's art is the territory she works within, the borders of which house her energy, whether they are visible or not. To convey this focus to her audience, she uses materials found in her surroundings, transforming them through different mediums as a function of her expression.

Is art computable? Or is a random, unpredictable, and non-compressible phenomenon? Will art survive in the post-human era of thinking machines? Will it be possible to comprehend the meaning of art by artificial creatures? What the origin of the work of art is going to be for them?

Stacie Birky Greene

42

60

"Nature has always been the central focus of my work. I find myself drawn to its many parallels of form and texture, and its paradoxical strength and fragility. The former is a lens through which I draw together elements that appear in disparate environments – such as coral and cacti – as a means of making unexpected connections."

Krsto Borozan

Przemyslaw Sanecki

Tarrvi Laamann Tarrvi Laamann justifies the use of the woodcut technique as follows: “You never know what the result will be, because wood plays tricks like crazy. OK, if I worked with a smooth oak board, the result would be more predictable.

94

76

"I use photography as a means of self expression.Through it, I try to express my interpretation and understanding of the world around me. On that way, my camera helps me to open an unexplored world.Conceptual photography is something that interest me the most, and greatest inspiration I find in nature and people"

Kristopher Dolphin I believe one of the single, most crucial elements to filmmaking is story.It’s the heart of the film’s body. A peak into the soul that drove us to bring it to life.A vital source of the audience's fascination.The evidence of the film's effect on others.

II


Tiff Graham

126

108

Tiff Graham's Her artwork is often a diversion and catharsis from her back pain; as well as a way to present her field research on festive events/foodways/folk beliefs/material culture. She is inspired by artists whose work suggests a narrative, or a curious humorous interpretation of the world.

Tonya Amyrin Rice

"My drawings, copper plate, and linocut prints areabout creating images of a world where slaverywould not have existed in West Africa. My researchhas revealed that Africa has a rich history ofproducing works on paper and my work will continuethis tradition adding an Afrofuturism twist to theprints. "

138

158

Borja Rodriguez I am energized by the diversity of human expression thatcontinuously activates our vast communication networks. I

I grew up in eastern Pennsylvania surrounded bytrees and constant rain. I currently live in LA, California surrounded by mountains and dry air. Ihave a B.S. from La Salle University. Working asa scientist greatly compliments my art;showcasing my analytical nature with regards tocompartmentalization or experimenting withcolors.

David Wilde

Andie Jairam

amawed by the scale and varied histories of the built environmentand urban infrastructure.

170

184

The process of creating and the presentation of art is a fundamental blessing and encouragement for human society that arises from the artists' ability to open to the primal elements of life's appearances. Feeling the heart of events and finding the freedom to express that in media and terms beyond the distortions of ego is a liberating thing that wakes people up to the natural benevolent vividness of circumstances.

Erin O’Malley “With digital macro photography I have been exploring the interaction of light with transparent and reflective surfaces. I consider my photography a series of experiments, a process of trial and error that builds upon past succes-ses through the manipulation of variables”

In order to submit your artworks to our art review please contact peripheral_arteries@dr.com http://peripheralarteries.yolasite.com/submit-your-artworks.php

III


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel (France / Israel) an artist's statement

The young Franco-Israeli artist Elodie Abergel has been part of the “contextual art” movement for several years, coupling her artistic work with her associative commitment to “Zellige ParisJerusalem”, where she is both the founder and coordinator. After her studies in Fine Arts in Nantes, she moved to Jerusalem to pursue her work on what she calls the "Territories of Sharing" (“Territoires de Partages”)*. Through her artistic vision and works, she has developed the concept of “art of the present moment”, offering up a humanistic yet poetic and critical view of politics in the Middle East. She identifies herself as a committed activist and sees this land as an open workshop. By immersing herself in the heart of the Israeli and Palestinian culture, she has developed an art which is participatory and engaging. The focal point of her art is the territory she works within, the borders of which house her energy, whether they are visible or not. To convey this focus to her audience, she uses materials found in her surroundings, transforming them through different mediums (photography, installations, video, performance...) as a function of her expression. In her work, she also focuses on "repetition" to highlight the absurdity of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Elodie Abergel

* A concept born in 2005, consisting of an art installation where individuals from different religious and cultural associations can interact. Traces of these exchanges are re-transcribed into new forms, creating a new territory, giving rise to the final project. The “Shared Territories” (“Territoires de Partages, T.D.P.”) are what Nicolas Bourriaud calls “relational aesthetics”.


United Nation without "s", 2012 from the Capharna端m series

2

Color prints on matte paper and chairs 4 x (80x100cm)


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

An interview with

Elodie Abergel Hello Elodie, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork? Moreover, do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

For me, a work of art is the aesthetic expression of a sensibility that a person is compelled to produce, to express what he feels at a given point in time in a given environment. It is what is left behind within the artist of a lived reality and what is perceived by the artist. It can be said that it is a physical, artistic interpretation of a subjective reading of the world.€ What gives a work of art its contemporariness in my opinion, is the freedom with which materials are used, not because they necessarily represent the world, but because they give the works of art relevance today, it gives it a presence.€ For me, contemporary art is at once opposed to classical forms of art as well as it is an abstraction from it. Therefore traditional and modern art forms are not a dichotomy rather the latter stems from more traditional art since all these works of the past are embedded in us and inspire us to create today. The framework of classical art was first limiting for contemporary artists, but as the canvass was wiped clean over time, it gave way to contemporary expressions, yet influences of its predecessor still remain.€ Would you like to tell our readers something about your background? You have a solid formal training and you hold a French Art

Elodie Abergel

School Degree that you received from the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Nantes: moreover, you have been later granted with the Nars International Residency, in New York City. How have these experiences influenced your evolution as an artist and impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks?

After attending the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, where I got a solid training in various techniques, I learned to take every artistic and human experience to be a source of creativity. In Nantes, I learned to follow my own evolution through the creative process to the end under the watchful eyes of visionary teachers.€ It is actually in this spirit that I decided to uproot myself and settle in Jerusalem to


Elodie Abergel

United Nation without "s", 2012 from the Capharnaüm series Color prints on matte paper and chairs 4 x (80x100cm)

continue my work on the “Territoires De Partage"* (Territories of Sharing) which I began during my studies. Inspired by this teaching, I developed my own artistic practices using various mediums such as paints, collages, photography and video etc., however it is especially being immersed in a new environment that was the fundamental component of my creativity, which is evident in the artwork grouped under the heading of €“Capharnaüm”.€ Importantly the artist residency in Nars New York was very exciting for me due in part to the presence of other artists from different countries as well as in the meeting of several important actors in the world of

contemporary art. Showing my work to these professionals was a very rewarding experience, I was able to take in their feedback which ultimately encouraged me to continue with my personal development.

* A concept born in 2005, consisting of an art installation where individuals from different religious and cultural associations can interact. Traces of these exchanges are re-transcribed into new forms, creating a new territory, giving rise to the final project. The “Shared Territories” (“Territoires de Partages, T.D.P.”) are what Nicolas Bourriaud calls “relational


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

The process of creation is a long-term endeavour, a kind of birth if you will. Most of the time, ideas overwhelm and assail me; they crowd my mind but only after a period in which I myself no longer know if I will ever make sense of them. When these ideas take over, I turn to my sister, Deborah with whom I have been collaborating for many years. During our many conversations I clarify what I wish to do and how I want to achieve it, I start looking for what I need. Often it is when looking for something or discovering a new material that new ideas pop up.€ While it is unclear to me how this creative process is triggered in me specifically, or if it just snaps into place, it definitely takes on a life on its own, when reality sets back in, it comes together almost organically.€ Using various techniques for me is a way to tame an idea. The different technical aspects, the time of preparation and creation vary greatly for each work of art. Now let's focus on your art production: I would like to start with Capharnaüm, a project that you have deliberately conceived as a humane but ironic take on Jerusalem and that that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article. And would suggest to visit http://www.elodieabergel.com in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these stimulating project? What was your initial inspiration?

For works that I have grouped under the title “Capharnaüm” (a word mainly used in French to

Little Finger, 2013 Collages, composite materials

describe a chaotic place containing many disparate objects), I was inspired by my experiences as a French native living in Jerusalem. €During my first years in Israel, I was surprised by many things which seemed so different compared to the image I had in my mind before arriving. Rather than giving in to the tragedy around, which is what often happens in this part of the world, I made it a point in my work to denounce with humour, the absurdity of certain situations and use them as inspiration. Capharnaüm is strictly connected to establish a deep, intense involvement with your audience, both on an intellectual aspect and I daresay - on a physical one. Moreover, there always seems to be a sense of narrative in your images: humour plays a crucial role in these works and I would go as far as to state of your work stem from the belief that the world is full of humor that is both intentional and accidental, a mixture of chance and choice... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do


Elodie Abergel

Peripheral ARTeries

Little Finger, 2013 Collages, composite materials

you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

weapon to “exist in the world”.€It is this ammunition that allows me to create.

Experience and knowledge are inseparable components of the self, so for me, the answer is that the creative process is born from the artist's experience. In my own case, all of my works are a reflection of me and my experiences. It is just like a dream which is a mixture of experiences and their subjective interpretation. €In my opinion, imagination serves as both an escape from reality and a

Every moment is lived subjectively, so for an artist during the process of creation, this means his very state of mind becomes a part of his work. Experiences are necessarily filtered through the self which means they are an indirect interpretation of the artist's lived experiences. Importantly, personal history, family and culture play a role in influencing the artist's perception of the world around.


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Elodie Abergel Dolphin

Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm


Kristopher Elodie Abergel Dolphin

Peripheral ARTeries Peripheral Peripheral ARTeries ARTeries

United Nation without "s", 2012 from the Capharna端m series Color prints on matte paper and chairs 4 x (80x100cm)


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

Migra-Sion, 2013 Color prints on matte paper 110 x 140 cm

Another interesting work of yours that has particularly impacted on me and on which I would like to spend some words is entitled Aliyah-Therapy: where you explorate the relationship between ancestral Judaism and French secularism. As you have remarked, this experience has allowed you to seek out new shared territories within yourself: this aspect of your work has suggested me the concept that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

There is a parallel for me between artists and psychoanalysts, both look deep inside

themselves, although one creates and the other accompanies his patient on his journey, both give their counterparts freedom. The artist takes what’s inside to create works of art which are essentially physical representations of his subjectivity, to reveal himself to the audience. Some of these representations are graphic while others are but memories; both however are the means by which we share our own realities with the world. As artists, we sublimate our truths and bring them forth to give them greater meaning.€ In “Allya-therapy” I contemplated to what extent this artwork, which had been in the making since my arrival in Israel, needed time to materialize; I was overcome with these thoughts.€You are a committed activist and


Elodie Abergel

Peripheral ARTeries

Migra-Sion, 2013 Color prints on matte paper 110 x 140 cm

-as you have remarked once- you see Middle East as an open workshop: I definitively love the way your works are capable of achieving such effective socio political criticism... By the way, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit na誰f, I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society?

I would like to believe in the utopian idea that art can change people's behaviour! If only I could inspire some to open their minds and to

look at things with a new perspective, to share with others from a place of universality, it would be a step in the right direction. It would need to be accessible to all at the outset however. It has happened to me in the past to be shocked by certain works such as those of Ai Wei Wei or Micea Cantor for example. These have opened my eyes to a different way of thinking however to say that they have changed my way of being would not likely be true. Then again, if our way of thinking is challenged and our thoughts precede our actions, those too might one day be changed. Though, change is undoubtedly unconscious, the paths changes follow are Svetlin Velchev, profoundly idiosyncratic and subjective, such photographer Theo van Prooijen that no "rule" so-to-speak can be established. Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral Peripheral ARTeries ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

Isola-Sion, 2013 Color prints on matte paper 110 x 140 cm


Elodie Abergel

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

Birds of a feather, from Capharna端m, 2012

Nevertheless, I was able to observe, through the activities I carried out with the Paris-Jerusalem Zellige association that some barriers could be overcome between people and that some prejudices would be broken under the "weight" of artistic exchanges. In fact, I set up installations in which works of art were conceived through exchanges between Israelis and Palestinians and I was able to see real moments of shared humanity throughout their collaboration. I would love to someday say that these little things will lead to lasting peace. In any case, works created by the collaborated efforts I led with this association as well as those of my own have raised questions in the minds of their audience. The shock they've inspired in the viewing public bring light to the socio-political issues of this land so often fraught with partisan misunderstandings. This is why I would love to

have my work seen by a wider audience, to continue challenging prejudices. I consider myself to be an "artivist", which is an artist committed to humanitarian pursuits, I try to share an alternative view of the world through my art. The ability to read the world with sensitivity should make of us artists the mediators between a too-often violent reality and a childlike imagination which dwells in us all. And I couldn't do without mentioning your recent Lilith, an intense work which investigates about the role of women in a world dictated by men for men, explorating the female dimension without straying into an abstract debates about feminism. I notice that multidisciplinary is a crucial feature of your approach: you art work combines


Elodie Abergel

photography, mixed media and performance.... do you think that crossing the borders of different techinques in order to realize such synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

Peripheral ARTeries

ambivalence for which the best way to express has not yet become clear. This work in progress undoubtedly calls for the use of many artistic mediums.

As I explained earlier, when I work on a theme, I choose the technique based on what I want to express. Juggling between different mediums grants me a broader range of action which allows me to explore different facets of my theme.€ Regarding Lilith, the theme comes from an intensely personal contemplation as a woman in Middle Eastern society where very archaic and very modern representations of women exist side by side. I think the contrast inherent in my theme brings out in me tremendous

R-evolution, 2014

Svetlin Velchev,

photographer Stamps on Canvas (168 x 500 Theo cm) van Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Elodie Abergel

A sequence of stills from Capture d’écran

During these years your works hav been internationally exhibited and you recently had the solo Israeli-Palestinian Creations, at Zographos Cultural Center in Paris. It is equally important to mention that you have been awarded with the Artslant Prize in 2013 and that you are the Founder, Coordinator and Artistic Director - Paris-Jerusalem Zellige. It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if the expectation of a positive feedback could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think

to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

It is always very interesting for an artist to see his work leave the studio to be exhibited and see the true impact of the work and how they are actually received by the public.€ Concerning prizes or accolades, admittedly, these are important, not so much for myself despite the fact that it is rewarding but rather because through these I gain exposure as an artist and can reach a larger audience. These represent recognition and validation for me and my work as much as it surprises me when my works are selected to receive awards. I think


Elodie Abergel

however these are most valuable to me because they open more doors for me to the “jungle” of contemporary art, as it were.€ Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Elodie. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

What’s next for me? This is a question I cannot really answer; I am actually in the middle of two, rather three cities: Jerusalem, New York and Paris. I am currently living in a sort of transient state in Paris working on “Lilith” and “The American Dream” anxiously awaiting new opportunities of residency abroad. I'll be going

Peripheral ARTeries

back home, to the fountainhead of my creativity, for a short while where I 'll no doubt be led off once again to new places by new inspirations. It is my hope though, that I find myself back in my new country, Israel, where there is most assuredly much left for me to create. I'd also like to take advantage of my extended stay this time around in Europe to expand my audience through exhibitions and networking in the world of contemporary art.€ An interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator.

Svetlin Velchev,

peripheral_arteries@dr.com

photographer Theo van Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki Is art computable? Or is a random, unpredictable, and non-compressible phenomenon? Will art survive in the posthuman era of thinking machines? Will it be possible to comprehend the meaning of art by artificial creatures? What the origin of the work of art is going to be for them? ""The Source of the Work of Art", 2014 Computer programs, 2-channel projection + stereo sound. link: http://youtu.be/7xcXPjtoxX0?list=UUFkJrou yjfJ32ptCKsaiS6g Description: The axis of the work is a hermeneutics machine of Martin Heidegger's "Der Ursprung des Kunstwerkes". The essay is deconstructed by an expert system with the aid of a deep learning and auto-encoders technology. The screen no.1 presents a gravity drift in a semantic space -- words are scattered according to features found by the machine. The screen no.2 displays a dynamic text generated in real-time by an artificial neural net. The logic of the text is rooted in the screen no.1. The accompanying sound comes from the synchronization of consecutively emerging words of the text with a sonification of their representations in n-dimensional vector space.

Przemyslaw Sanecki


Peripheral ARTeries

untitled live-coding, 2012, Pawilon Nowa Gazownia, Poznan

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

An interview with

Przemyslaw Sanecki The very first feeling I got when I had the chance to get to know Przemyslaw Sanecki's works, is that Art and Technology are not separated at all, and that it's always possible to go beyond any artificial boundary that limits the intrinsic continuity between Art and Technology. Sanecki shows how this symbiosis is not only possible, but at a certain point unavoidable and it's with a real pleasure that I would like to introduce our readers to his stimulating works. Hello Przemyslaw, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: to start this interview, would you like to tell us something about your background? You have a solid multidisciplinary training, and you hold a MA in Fine Arts that you received from the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw and a Ph.D. in Fine Arts at University of Arts in Poznan: how much have these experiences impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks and on your evolution as an artist?

Przemyslaw Sanecki: Hi. To be honest I don't know what is an advantage of holding a university degree in a day-to-day art practise. Of course, art is not a science and shouldn't fall under the same didactic regime but art is taught and I spent some time in a knowledge industry. Ph.D. is, in some way, a by-product of my short carrier at an university. I have to admit that I enjoyed teaching. And there is an interesting story related to that time. I was entrusted with a subject I had to invent. Consequently, I had started to conduct a small didactic experiment at University of Art in Poznan, the biggest art college in Poland. I wrote a first manual in Polish for a creative coding with Processing IDE but I realised very quickly that I'm a very bad teacher. I don't

Przemyslaw Sanecki

mean by that a lack of tutor skills. I felt rather irresistible pressure that I should sabotage the way in which art is taught. Owing to trust of my employer and novelty of a subject I'd been relishing practically no restrains in doing this. By the way, students of fine arts art not particularly interested in learning programming languages. They are too emotional and there is too many temptation and danger in their fresh adulthood. So, they let me spoil themselves with mush-up of what I was dabbling in that time: Artificial Intelligence, Algorithmic Information Theory, Symbolic Logic, and Crypto-Anarchy. I think most students thought that I went crazy, but this is perceived rather as a virtue in artistic circles but if you want to survive in academia, it is inevitable to do Ph.D..


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

"The Source of the Work of Art", computation based installation, 2014, visualization, screen 2

So I did. Paradoxically, I resigned shortly afterwards. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

P.S.: When working with computability and you attempt to create art-machines with state-ofthe-art algorithms, it is important to end up at some point with something which you could er, 2011) actually see in a motion. I don't mean exactly proper functionality but some materialistic

minimum – a computation has to be conducted. You can think of it in more abstract way, as a kind of artistic principle. Writing code is an enjoyable but arduous job, especially if you are attached to a specific style and you have to implement most of algorithms on your own. However, the most time consuming and challenging is research. I dug through so many fields during work on “The Source of The Work of Art” that enumerating them could be difficult now. Probably due to fact that I'm particularly careless about names and borders of disciplines. Now, I've been working on new project for around half a year and I'm still not able to say when I'm going to start implementation work.


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

untitled, performance, 2012, Poznan, Poland

But I think your question is also about what in general artistic labour means to me. This greatly determines what kind of artist I am. To start with, I made my début in 1999 with performance during which I was sleeping in a gallery. I didn't even called this a performance but rather an appearance. I didn't know at that time that an appearance, as a form of artistic act, had a precedence in Polish conceptual art. An appearance as a disobedience – refusal of doing a performance. I’m mentioning this because during my twenties I was almost exclusively occupied with a performance at a junction of a body-art and relational aesthetics. This is a label which art

people in Poland have stuck on me even though now I hardly do performances. But this is partially true. I am still a performer but what I was doing more than a decade I should rather call a white strike than something else. I resisted to delegate me to a vague symbolic function of an art priest. During my performances I was pulling spectators from their site to mine. Literally, I very often violated a person immunity, by dragging, pushing, touching. Either I didn’t allow making a documentation – partially because of its potential use as an evidence in a court but mainly because those performances weren't to watch from a safe perspective of an art lover.


live-coding, 2012, Poznan, Poland


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

I was never prepared for next performance. I knew that every consecutive performance would be unpredictable and exhausting experience also for me. So, I rather expected others to be prepared at least likewise. A responsibility was on both sides and every preparations in separation were futile or even detrimental to my practice. This is a myth that the work of art is an effect of convict's work. It is never like this. The work of art is always an accident. I should rather call it a random event. This randomness makes tremendous difference between sweat houses and artist studios. For most people it is hard to belief that not hard work in conjunction with mystical talent but a fortune is a rule of art. I think that this is a main reason why a general public has problem in grasping what is art about nowadays. We are not forced to use such an emotional rhetoric. I was serious when I told you that I'm still a performer, although now I'm codding technologically advanced art objects. But it shouldn’t sound as contradiction any more in context of Emil Post's “Finite Combinatory Processes – Formulation 1” from 1936. In this paper Post describes the kind of a game in which a person roams through passages of a building of undefined size. By doing so the character is able to solve all solvable, even inconceivably complex mathematical problems. This sounds like one of the Borges's fantasies but in fact this is a description of the way in which all computations are conducted nowadays. Post invented a formal system which today we call the universal Turing-Post machine. All computers are based upon his fairy tale, not only in a metaphorical way. So, now I am rather a performer in this “Postian” sense. I can say that I chose to work with state-of-the-art algorithms also because algorithms are a labour in the most abstract way, alchemically distilled. And writing software is a labour twofold. If it is done subversively it is like a double negation – doing by not doing. Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm Now let's focus on your artistic production: I would start from The Source of the Work of Art,


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

noise concert 2012, Wroclaw, Poland


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

an extremely interesting work of yours that I would suggest to our readers to get to know directly at http://youtu.be/7xcXPjtoxX0?list=UUFkJrouyj fJ32ptCKsaiS6g in order to get a wider idea of it. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this interesting project? What was your initial inspiration?

P.S.: From the technical point of view this work is easy to describe. The Source of the Work of Art is a language model based on Martin Heidegger's essays, particularly The Origin of the Work of Art (Der Ursprung des Kunswerkes).I must confess that I am not a big fan of his work and this is a kind of shame for European philosophy that he is a flagship figure of the anti-platonic tradition. But still he is worth reading. I placed Heidegger's writing in a centre of my interest for at least two reasons. Firstly, because of the role the work of art plays in his epistemology. Secondly, its connections with technology. But I should mention that I started working on this project after a lecture of Alain Badiou's “Handbook of Inaesthetics”. Badiou establishes in this book three schemas for ordering a relationship of the work of art with truth. Heidegger appeared in the text as a representative of the romantic scheme, which seems for artists much more satisfying than other two – didactic and classical one. At least for an artist who thinks that art has its own unique truth. I used to think myself in this way. It always seemed to me that art had something to do with truth. Obviously, at a purely materialistic level, an artistic artefact must be genuine product of art. But it seems intuitively plausible that it is also a genuine source of epistemological insight, which, by the way, makes a white cube such a valuable place. Badiou addressed this problem and demonstrated how art is hijacked by truth owned by mystics, politicians, psychoanalysts, and other experts. He proposed the fourth way

"The Source of the Work of Art", computation based instal

which brings truth back to artists. But this made me suspicious and I started wondering why artists need an another philosopher to do so. I was fathoming out this epistemological context for some time when I had found Alfred Tarski's book from 1933, titled “The concept of truth in formalized languages”. What I read convinced me that truth belongs entirely to the language. Art's problem with true comes from the belief that art is a language and a work of art is a special kind of sentence. But art in not a language as food is not air, even though they both enter your body through your mouth. Of course, I use a language to make art but only


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

lation, 2014, project room preview, screen 1

because it is such a useful tool. I also use a chair and coffee but nobody will tell me that making art is using a language while sitting and drinking coffee. This is a silly example but shows how we evaluate a language and how easily forget about everything else. Every and each work of art is unique and it is impossible to substitute one for another as you can do with sentences with the same meaning. It is so because the work of art doesn't fall under subject-object dichotomy. It is not a representation. It is not a medium carrying message that we can pass further by translating it into another language. The only true I can agree with is that art is making art and

everything that helps you in doing so is equally important. But what is making art? What Heidegger wrote about art might be helpful, if you strip off his professional obsession of truth. I don't even need to use his word any more. Making art is simply pushing human world outside the border of predictability and control. In my work I wanted to connect these thoughts with the problem of computability. The Source of the Work of Art is a kind of a sci-fi work but it touches problems that we have already tackled today. The central idea is as follows. If the reality


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

is computable, it would be indistinguishable from its own simulation. Computability is a term from theoretical computer science but it is widely used in the meta-theoretical reflection about foundations of science. So, if the reality is computable it is feasible to encode its laws (the scientific laws of nature) in programs and run simulation, which will be qualitatively and practically the same as the original. The work of art is a part of reality, then there should be the law, the only formula of art as its source. But I do not belief in this. It is a matter of time when intelligent machines will start doing their own hermeneutics of human heritage, including art. And because of their mechanistic origin I'm wondering how they will behave. I hope that their intelligence will be completely different from ours and they will surpass our notion of reality. To construct a model I used algorithms which recently caught attention of the biggest players in IT. Deep learning is a black box technology that allows companies like Facebook or Google to maintain and expand their domination. Actually, they bought the biggest names in the field. This is not a general artificial intelligence, agents have no autonomy and have many flaws but imitate many tasks which we perceive as intelligence demanding. I wanted my model to be at least in harmony with Zeitgeist. What has particularly impressed me of your investigation about the emerging of language is the way you have been capable of bringing a new level of significance to a concept, recontextualizing the ideas behind it: and I would go as far as to state that in a certain sense your works force the viewers' perception in order to challenge the common way to perceive not only the outside world, but our inner dimension... By the way, I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected

"The Source of the Work of Art", computation based install

sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

P.S.: In broader sense by knowledge I understand something formulated in a language just enough transparently that it can be used to point someone in the same direction. Consequently, you can share a similar point of view or argue reasonably about differences. I agree with you that we live in encrypted word but not necessarily because the reality is encrypted by itself. Our explanations make it so. They make a world “ghostly�. Words are like ghosts – at least they don't live their lives for


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

ation, 2014, detail, screen 2

someone who doesn't speak the same language. Of course, someone can say that we are able to translate from, for example, English to Chinese without lost in a general meaning. It works indeed and that's cool. But, it means at most that we are not totally insane. And this is in fact a definition of sanity – to belief in the same ideas up to this point that they become objective. But it doesn't make a ghost world more real. I do art because I am not satisfied with this degree of reality we normally accept to save our sanity. A role of an artist is not prophetic but rather a heretic one. This is a beauty of art that people

gather in a gallery but it is hard to find two people who agree on the same work of art. Art differentiates people, it keeps them at their points of view. If someone judges this as antisocial behaviour, he is probably right but for me so called 'social' is nothing more than an imposition of the same ideas on others. Of course, I have my own ideas but I don't want to stuff my work with them. I want people to watch and make them curious. Whatever happens, happens for something unknown and this is in some sense perfect recontextualization.


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

A couple of questions are recurring in your investigation: "will it be possible to comprehend the meaning of art by artificial creatures? What the origin of the work of art is going to be for them?" Although I'm aware that this might sound a rather naif, these lines have reminded me one of my teens reads, the well-known Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick... If you ask me, I think that the capability of comprehending a work of Art is an epiphenomenon of the cultural stage of whom run against a painting, as well as an installation or an act : in this sense I would state that if machines will reach a stage of evolution, they will be able to recognize maybe in an unexpected and pheraps peculiar way- that there is Art beneath a Work... I don't know if an Android would dream of an electric Caravaggio, but I'm quite sure that a new way of comprehension will be reached by an high level of evolution...

P.S.: I read this book in my teens as well. By the way, I read a lot of sci-fi books commuting to school. Demand for thinking machines comes from a very daunting insight that we have approached limits of our biological development. Much more justified by the culture is the creation of the artificial slave than the enhancement of our cognitive capabilities through chemical or mechanical means. That's the main reason why we want to equip them with brains similar to ours. We hope that we will able to control them in the same way as we control each other. But this is na誰ve to think that intelligence is exclusive to human and every species has to pass through human stage to reach the supremacy. This assumption makes us belief that we are going to share some subset of our concepts with super-intelligence. In my opinion, this inner world that consist of mental representations has nothing to do with intelligence. For example, I do not doubt that plants are intelligent but at

untitled, sunrise ultrasonic landscape, 2008, Oborniki Sl,

the same time I'm not able to imagine what kind of so called inner life they should possess. I want to stress that the work of art is not a representation. It doesn't follow rules of inference either. You can imagine a piece of art in your mind, but this is always unpredictable event and somehow strange to your mind. That's why people need to make art accessible through our senses. We need more and more works of art, not axioms of art.


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

I'm always delighted to come across an interesting example of how Art and Technology can establish an effective symbiosis, as in the aforesaid The Source of Art Work, so I would like to use this occasions to ask what's your point about this fruitful contamination... By the way, I'm sort of convinced that new media art will definitely fill any remaining dichotomy between these apparently different disciplines: and I will dare to say that Art and Technology are going to assimilate one to each other... what's your point about this?

Poland

As art slips from a mental mediation, if we want to create someone who overcomes us, we have to realize right now that this creature will not be just faster and better us but someone who we will not be able to understand at all. I can only speculate whether our art will be junk of impractical matter or just on the contrary – a human signature dish that makes us worth keeping alive. Maybe because I have a scientific background,

P.S.: It is more common to bind art with science. But the goal of the latter is to compress the reality to few concise formulas. Art goes in an opposite direction – its sole aim is to diversify the reality. Artist feels this contradiction not long after he/she starts to flirt with science. Science is collective and coordinated effort. On the contrary, art derives from the in-coordination of an individual. A mistake is not a failure but a tailoredto-fit condition which makes artistic effort fruitful. The most frequently, a collaboration between an artist and scientists ends up in a situation in where an artist is forced to provide an illustration to some scientific claims. Using Badiou's words, art is easily consumed by a didactic schema in the art and science framework. I'm not trying to convince you that it is not possible to bind art and science. I'm rather trying to say that this is as difficult as being right and wrong at the same time. Quite the contrary, art and technology just tidily fit together. First of all, an artist is τεχνητές – a technologist. But he transcends technology in the same way as a worker transcends labour in Ernst Jünger's “Der Arbeiter”. Technology becomes his form of life. This approach could be very useful in terms of the emancipation of art. Post-Duchampian artist didn't want to be stupid like a painter. He tended to blur a border between an artist and intellectual. In my opinion, this is a debacle. An artist in not an intellectual and there in nothing to be ashamed


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

untitled, performance, 2008, Lodz, Poland

of. At some point technology will be indistinguishable from magic, for good and evil. And this is great news for someone who dreams of being beyond of the good and evil. Another interesting work that has particularly impressed me and on which I would like to spend some words is entitled “Pawilon Nowa Gazownia live-coding�: I definitely love the way, by heightening the tension between reality and perception, this work explores the concept of language and of direct experience... so I would take this occasion to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely

indispensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

P.S.: It depends what we mean by a creative process. In the context of what I said about an unpredictability, it should be perceived as something that facilitates the lost of control. I mean a lost of control restrained by a personality. Without this restriction it becomes just a crash. As an artist I am against art as a language. But this doesn't stop me from using linguistic tools in making art. Coding is for me a new literary


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

untitled, performance, 2008, Lodz, Poland

genre. How it differs from classical literary practise speaks for time we live in. I used to think of the ambiguity of a natural language as a source of poetry. Now I think that the greatest poets use language to the utmost of its literalness. A poet uses words like impulses to stimulate the brain from the inside. It seems to many that people who listen to poetry are like dreamers. But I think opposite, they have just woken up. There is nothing more seductive than an everyday life. Common belief is that art is about an illusion, but if we take an etymology of 'art' we would see that it means 'just now' in Greek. Art is an anti-illusion. Already Aristotle in

his Poetics commented that poets use a language differently for tragedy than Herodotus for his chronicles and we all know to what extend historiography is a subject of manipulation. I think sometimes that an artist is someone who is internally forced to do everything wrong. In a positive sense. Multidisciplinarity is a crucial aspect of your art practice and I think it's important to remark that you are an active noise musician a well. While crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a symbiosis between different


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

P.S.: In a noise music you work with audibility rather than something commonly related to musical regime. I am a fine artist and this is a part of my wider practice but I don't like loading a white cube with a sound. It sometimes works but I have no much respect to so called sound art. I prefer playing in clubs where people can stay sharp or get intoxicated without being too much exposed, being too much restraint by a high culture. I'm from a rave culture. That's why for me is more than a convenience to be called a noise musician. I do rather loud things that go on in time. I could argue that these are sculptures made of vibrant air but those are just words. I like working with a sound because of its formal purity but things like a rhythm, a harmony, a melody don't mean to me too much. I work with mathematical functions, my expectations and my maturity as a listener. Most musicians get very emotional when playing. I work with a code, very formally but ecstatic at the same time. I extensively use statistics in parametrizing compositions. In fact I developed an open source external for Pure Data which makes it more convenient. But I spend most of the time listening and waiting to be surprised. I like what Leibniz said about a pleasure of listening that this is essentially a pleasure of counting. For me, to count is to expect and I play with this. I want something that is not mediated by expectations. I want to stop counting and find a formal, in the sense of a structure, proof of being here and now. I seek for a pleasure and a noise is a great path to achieve this. Your works are intrinsically connected with the chance of creating a deep interaction with your viewers, urging them to follow your process and pushing them to not play as a passive audience... By the way, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit naĂŻf, I have to admit that I'm sort of convinced that Art -especially nowadays- could play an effective

role in sociopolitical questions: not only just by offering to people a generic platform for expression... I would go as far as to state that Art could even steer people's behaviour... what's your point about this? Does it sound a bit exaggerated?

P.S.: I don't think so. You can encounter forms of art which resemble a direct action from the world of a political activism. Although there is a high risk for artists of being ill-used by some casual rhetoric. Badiou called it a didactic scheme. I was a big fan of a relational aesthetic. Nicolas Bourriaud's writings influenced me greatly during my master studies at the beginning of 00's. Generally speaking, I was interested in the way how interpersonal relationships are transformed into their aesthetic counterparts – how evil becomes ugly and so on. This suited my own performer program, if I had one. I wanted to help people and this trend in art is called art of good deeds in Poland. I don't think that this is a correct political program for artists. This kind of art is extremely popular among state art agencies and NGOs. I think that this is a forgery. Instead, I have a great respect to Jacques Rancière. He connected aesthetics with a notion of a regime. He made a point saying that for an artist a distribution of sensible is the only option for a commitment in politics. It only looks innocent. Real politics begins when you incite a conflict between what people see and what they want to watch. I did once a performance in a municipal art gallery during which I sniffed a line of amphetamine bought at the black market for money exclusively from my royalty paid me in advance by the host (https://vimeo.com/5215422). The gallery denounced me as a criminal. In consequence, the curator was interrogated by the police and I was questioned by a prosecutor. I paid for this performance with a ban in all art institutions financed from public money not only in my family city. Wasn't it political?


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

untitled, performance, 2008, Lublin, Poland


Peripheral ARTeries

Przemyslaw Sanecki

Now, as usual, I would pose you some questions about your relation with your audience. During your career your works have been extensively exhibited in several occasions... It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or just the expectation of positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

P.S.: When I was doing performances, feedback was indispensable, tangible and what really mattered – performance is all about feedback, it is made of feedback. In some sense it hasn't changed. As I see, an artist is just another social agent trying to survive in an environment and maximise his/her rewards which is feedback, nothing more than feedback. This is a point of view of reinforcement learning and it is a quite useful approximation of so called Cartesian subjectivism. What distinguishes artists from the rest of society is a special kind of economics. By economics I mean not only its materialistic aspect but also symbolic one, in which objects in circulation are ideas. Art is not about money but about making things which are radically unique and unquotable. I must admit that a genuine relationship between business and art is not only possible but also inevitable. The work of art is a perfect asset because its intrinsic freedom from contradiction between a use value and exchange value. Nowadays, this kind of cumulative “wisdom”, described by Heidegger in “Der Ursprung des Kunstwerkes”is affordable only for rich people. I think that it has always been like that. You can perceive it as a curse of art but instead of blaming artists for the way they make a living from their work, we should change the way in which the idea of private property is valued. We tend to contrast business sponsorship with state patronage. But a state is not a public – it is

"geometrical sections", performance, 2011, Wroclaw, Pola

not a republic any more. I doubt it has ever been. A state is a beast, it is a Leviathan which gets sick if there is no war for too long. It is getting more and more obvious in our austerity times. If a state pays you it doesn't pay for nothing. There is nothing evil in locating a surplus from a private sector into works of art. This lack of contradiction I mentioned above makes it the lesser evil. Drastically lesser than, let say, food speculations in unregulated financial markets, these all speculations on crude material or a mortgage bubble.


Przemyslaw Sanecki

Peripheral ARTeries

nd

Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Przemyslaw. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects. How do you see your work evolving?

P.S.: I've been working on a work of art which, strictly speaking, accumulates the capital by doing algorithmic trading. The working title is “The Work of Art who wants to be made of technetium”. Technetium is the most precious metal and the first artificial element produced by human, hence its name from the Greek τεχνητός. Still, there is a lot of research and

coding, a long run project to be done. I think of this project as a pretty Faustian one. I should rather say a trans-human Faustian – I'm mixing an artificial intelligence with greediness and other odious forces. It terrifies me but a human race being stuck in this stage of its development terrifies me much more. As a species we have no choice other than go far beyond our limits.

An interview by Dario Rutigliano, curator peripheral_arteries@dr.com


Peripheral ARTeries

(USA) An artist's statement

Nature has always been the central focus of my work. I find myself drawn to its many parallels of form and texture, and its paradoxical strength and fragility. The former is a lens through which I draw together elements that appear in disparate environments – such as coral and cacti – as a means of making unexpected connections. Here, the artwork acts as common ground. One often finds that removing a plant or other aspect of nature from its usual context requires the viewer to consider it anew, thus many of my pieces are about the experience of reconsidering. Paradoxes have a somewhat broader place in creating a framework for my project, although they too direct my eye to certain details. A tree’s roots breaking through a sidewalk or flowers emerging from cracked concrete – these are evidence of the persistence and power of nature in the face of man–made constraints. However; as I contemplate a place for my art I am compelled by nature’s fragility, particularly as habitat destruction and environmental disasters take a broader and irrevocable toll on the natural world. This has an impact on the subject matter I choose, such as my current work cataloguing endangered birds, insects, and flowers. It also affects my use of media. A recent installation project consisted of 1,000 origami cranes made using junk mail that had been delivered to my home. The project is, among other things, a commentary on waste. Stacie Birky Greene


Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail)

Emblem Fish Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen mixed media on wood,Media, 23 X 24 cm Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

An interview with

Stacie Birky Greene Hello Stacie, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? I sometimes wonder if there is still a dichotomy between Tradition and Contemporariness...

My attitudes about art are not doctrinaire — although I have clear notions regarding what sorts of directions my projects should take I don’t prescribe boundaries for other artists or their work. Of course, art is a visual form of expression, a means of conveying an emotion, concept, or idea that goes beyond words, giving a way for people to think and see in a different way. Similarly, I try to avoid making requirements for what might qualify as “contemporary.”

Stacie Birky Greene

on the way you currently produce your artworks?

One can use conventional or traditional means in a critical or ironic way and the piece can feel very contemporary, indeed. There are many traditions, of course. As for the sort of forms that the Western canon take, they are circumscribed by their own historical contexts.

Certainly studying art history along with my years of painting and drawing lessons were invaluable to my development. My time in Italy (which was all too brief) was particularly inspiring on many levels, but most importantly it was in Italy that I began experimenting with mixed media using found objects. I was staying in the Pensione Sorelle Bandini and there was a morning market in the Piazza Santo Spirito below. At the end of the day the fruit venders would leave their empty wooden crates behind. I started gathering some of them and using them along with other discarded and broken objects as drawing surfaces or to create assemblages. I continue to work in a similar manner today.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have a solid formal training: you hold a B.A. in Art Studio and B.A. in Art History, that you received from the University of Kentucky. Moreover, I think it's important to mention that you had the chance to spend a semester in Florence, where you studied Art History and Drawing. How did these interesting experiences impact on your development as an artist and

3


Stacie Birky Greene

Peripheral ARTeries

Video Still from Scene II: Pas de deux à travers le jardin de sculpture, A theatrical work for two violins by composer Adam Greene. The work includes resonant sculptures and projections by Stacie Birky Greene and features violinists János Negyesy and Päivikki Nykter. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

and what I feel will work best for the piece. I do spend a lot of time thinking about, researching and gathering materials and images for each project. For example, my current series of drawing endangered and extinct birds began with a period of approximately 6 months researching and gathering images. After I completed the initial list of endangered birds (unfortunately, this list is constantly growing), I thought about the implications of the project

My work is project based. Each series has its own process, depending on the subject matter

The Dance 4


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

both for their beauty and their fragility. It is this latter point that invokes the series title. Species of plants and animals are disappearing at an alarming rate, some evidently with human activity at least partly to blame. Eventually, perhaps only these emblems will remain. (here we have reserved space for Emblem Fish, Emblem Cactus, Emblem Prickly Pear and Emblem Growth)

Emblem Garden mixed media on wood, 31 X 30 cm

itself, particularly regarding ecology, extinction, pollution, and decay. I chose materials that were intended to reflect these topics: ‘junk’ mail — unwanted, otherwise discarded advertisements and solicitations. Thus, “Junk” mail became my surface of choice, recycled into paper. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from your Emblem series that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest to our readers to visit your website directly at http://www.staciebirkygreene.com in order to get a wider idea of your artistic production... In the meanwhile, would you like to tell us something about the genesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

Emblems is a continuing series of small works (none larger than 35 cm) focusing on the natural world. I am drawn to these subjects

One of the features of the works from this series that has mostly struck on me is the dynamicity, the sense of movement that you have been capable of impressing on your works... and I have highly appreciated the nuance of intense tones which creates an interesting symbiosis rather than a contrast between such so many different tones, a feature that I can recognize also in your dyptich Kelp, which I have to admit is one of my favourite pieces of your mixed media works... by the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

I have been fascinated by morphology in nature for a long time. I am particularly drawn to visual analogs that span disparate environments. Some of the lines that recur (veins, rivers, vines) suggest movement. Kelp is about the parallels I see between the desert and the ocean. The images and the color palettes are drawn from both environments. I find myself drawn to earth tones and frequently use them in my work. I let each piece lead me. Another interesting works of yours that has particularly impacted on me and on which I would like to spend some words are entitled Sub-Historic and Flowers and Vines I have highly appreciated the way your approach investigates the concept of landscape, challenging the viewer's perception, establishing a deep involvement with the viewers, both on an intellectual aspect and - I daresay- on a physical one... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indispensable


Stacie Birky Greene

Emblem Cactus, mixed media on wood, 29 X 34 cm

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

Stacie Kristopher Birky Dolphin Greene

Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm


Stacie Kristopher Birky Greene Dolphin

Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

Flowers and Vines, mixed media on canvas, 29 X 67 cm

part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

What I’ve been doing has been obliquely related to landscape. Rather than depicting broad vistas or terrains I tend to recontextualize various objects (again, exploiting this idea of visual analogs). If one’s work is about critique of a process or technique, or experimentation, then perhaps

personal experience becomes less crucial to the work. In my own case, the work is about expressing a particular point of view and is therefore entirely dependent on personal experience, even if it resides in the imagination. The theme of environment plays a crucial role both in your imagery and your approach: I definitely love the way you effectively explore nature’s fragility: by the way, many contemporary landscape artists as the


Stacie Birky Greene

Peripheral ARTeries

to range from wonder at the physical world, awe at its capacity to persevere, and sadness over signs of its decay. The execution is probably too subtle to be considered activist, but perhaps it might inspire awareness and debate.

photographer Edward Burtynsky or Michael Light have some form of environmental or political message in their photographs. Do you consider that your images are political in this way or do you seek to maintain a neutral approach?

The images are certainly political insofar as they depend upon environmental issues. The primary intent, however, is expression of a feeling, a point of view, a sensation. This tends

Gold, (background detail) Desert Rain, mixed media on wood, 122 X 61 cm Mixed Media on canvas, 2012 Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

Morning Cactus, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm 7


Stacie Birky Greene

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Captions

Stacie Birky Greene

6

Terra Incognito (detail), upholstery foam, fax ribbon, and junk mail, installation: size variable

And I couldn't do without mentioning Terra Incognita, which you have defined as a metaphor for the viewer to rethink what a park is - is it really known or is it unknown... I would daresay that the way you re-contextualize unwanted materials, eloquently succeed in conveying the feeling of natural harmony which unexpectely springs from: moreover, I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the landscape suggested by this stimulating series: it has suggested me the concept that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live

in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

I don’t think we are always completely aware of the spaces we traverse. “Terra Incognita” represents a San Diego area park perhaps after human disappearance. What are the salient structures? What remains of our interventions? It could be the most whimsical post-apocalyptic piece ever made.


Stacie Birky Greene

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background detail) Terra Incognito, upholstery foam, fax ribbon, and junk mail, installation: size variable Mixed Media on canvas, 2012 Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

Kelp, mixed media on canvas, 32 X 91 cm


Stacie Birky Greene, seated with piece, Extinct: Dusky Seaside Sparrow, during 15 Minutes of Fame at San Diego Museum of Art, Part of an istallation/performance by Lauren Carrera and Prudence Horne


Peripheral ARTeries

Stacie Birky Greene

Phase one of Tree of knowledge, mosaic mural, on San Miguel School, Lemon Grove, CA

Multidisciplinarity is a crucial feature of your artistic approach: you produce Drawing, Mixed Media Paintings as well as Installations and extremely interesting performances as Scene II: Pas de deux Ă  travers,le jardin de sculpture. I have appreciated the effective synergy that you create between different materials and techniques: while crossing the borders of different techniques have you ever happened to realize that such synergy is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

Analogy requires two distinct categories to function, so it only follows that I would often choose approaches and materials that might not be commonly associated with one another. It has been important for me to explore different media as a means of testing how I can be both flexible and precise in the application of my artistic vision. During your over 15 years career your works have been exhibited in several occasions, both locally and internationally: what impressions did you receive from these wonderful experiences? By the way, it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards

are capable of supporting an artist: I sometimes wonder if the expectation of a positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

I’ve been very fortunate to show my work in a variety of spaces, both conventional (galleries, museums) and unconventional (such as pop-up galleries). I work to make images that are subtle enough to provoke a variety of responses from viewers, so it is extremely interesting to be present while people register their interpretations. However, I have never created work that anticipates the preferences of a particular audience. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Stacie. My last question deals with your future plans: anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I will continue on the path I am on currently. I am working on a mosaic mural and hope to continue to create more public art in conjunction with growing my current body of work.


Stacie Birky Greene

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background detail) Summer and Spring of 365 Mementos Mixed Media on canvas, 2012 Business & Pleasure 7 Mixedsize Media, 2011 mixed media, installation: variable

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann (Estonia) an artist's statement

Tarrvi Laamann justifies the use of the woodcut technique as follows: “You never know what the result will be, because wood plays tricks like crazy. OK, if I worked with a smooth oak board, the result would be more predictable. But I work with plywood. This is what makes it interesting, because there are many elements – I have the feeling that I haven’t even made it, but God or someone else has put stupid ideas into my head and then the woodcut adds its own quirks. I like that. One can’t really control it, just like life.” Tarrvi Laamann’s pictures are influenced by reggae and its homeland Estonia. Trips to the “colored worlds” have added bright colors, smells, tastes, warmth, rhythms and a feeling that you are on vacation. All this radiance and colorfulness results in a beauty that is more spiritual than decorative. Laamann’s works are positive and happy; it’s his way of improving the world. Tarrvi Laamann (b. 1973) studied printmaking at the Estonian Academy of Arts, graduated the master’s program in 2000, and has been a member of the Estonian Artists’ Association since 1994. From September 1998, Laamann has been known for organizing the Bashment events introducing reggae culture at Estonian and foreign stages.


Abstract Disks III (2014, oil, canvas, 190x148cm)

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann

An interview with

Tarrvi Laamann Hello Tarrvi, and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, what could be the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art?

I was born in 1973 Soviet Estonia, and by now I have lived half of my life in an isolated society and the other half in free/independent one … So, half of my life I have been dreaming about travelling and freedom and the second half I have actually travelled as a free man. On my travels I have realised that the work of Art may not be universal at certain time and place it may not have the same effect, as for the people in other time and place. This means that for me a piece of Contemporary Art can be any object that „speaks“ – aesthetic, technically skilful and made from materials of good quality (suitable for specific object, specific time and place). Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and you graduated the master’s program of printmaking at the Estonian Academy of Arts: I would like to ask you how much this experience has impacted on your artistic approach and on your evolution as an artist.

Similar to others, I think, my evolution as an artist began from very early childhood. As a kid I used to scribble and draw on any possible surface/place. Later on, I developed a more systematic way – I had a sketchbook, the line of paintings and the mountain of graphic images. Four bachelor years and two years of master’s program („Minimum and Maximum“) in Estonian Academy of Arts have definitely had an impact on my artist life. I also happen to be a great music lover and since 1998, together with my friends J.O.C, Ringo Ringvee and Dice Rudy, we run a musical event called „Bashment“ (at least once a month) and a weekly radio program „Bashment FM” on Public Broadcasting. Whenever listening to the music or

Tarrvi Laamann @ Boheem (by Anu Hamm


er, 2011)

Tarrvi Laamann

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann

Abstract Disks I (2014, oil, canvas, 420x148cm)

people’s thoughts, whenever observing the life as it is, I start to see images in front of my eyes. I look, listen, breathe and perceive everything around me and then visualize it through the art. It is like trying to capture a feeling, a mood or a thought… Would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

of the sketch on the wood, like a positive. Then, cutting first plate…and after that cutting second the object into the wood in the same way. After that I shall print on the same paper with the first plate and then with the second plate. As a result I get a piece where the present and the past co-exist (the first plate print as past and the second as present) and it is possible that there is also a third party involved in the „game“ i.e. past, present, future. Sometimes an abstract graphic piece or combination or „remix“ of the pieces is created by printing out the different plates.

In the beginning, there is just an idea! Followed by the sketch! Long time goes for drawing fragments

Now let's focus on your artistic production: I would start from your Abstract Disks, an


Tarrvi Laamann

extremely interesting series that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article, and I would suggest them to visit your website directly at http://laamann.ee in order to get a wider idea of your artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this project?

As I am a big fan of reggae music and culture, I decided to write a sort of popular-scientific book „My Jamaica“ (2013, Petrone Print) illustrated by my own woodcut works inspired by the country itself. From this collection I created four abstract pieces from several plates and with different shades of colour: “Abstract Under Sea”, “Abstract

Peripheral ARTeries

Record Shop”, “Abstract Jamaican Colours”. “Abstract Akee-n-Saltfish” and “Abstract Jerk Chicken”. Further I cropped (down to) the three, trying to find/pick the best moments and created the disks… I painted those three as big oil paintings on the canvas: “Abstract Disks 1”, “Abstract Disks 2“ and “Abstract Disks 3”. Today the paintings are permanently exposed in Tartu Observatory in Tõravere (www.to.ee/eng) since the State bought them in the course of public procurement. Apparently the cosmic powers are always involved! Either from the closer look or from the distance, life seems to resemble to a round disk/circle. Sometimes there are many circles in the bunch and sometimes the circles


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

Kristopher Tarrvi Laamann Dolphin

Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm

Abstract Disks II (2014, oil, canvas, 266x148cm)


Kristopher Tarrvi Laamann Dolphin

Peripheral ARTeries Peripheral Peripheral ARTeries ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann

F13 (2014, woodcutprint, oil, canvas, 44x44cm)

are on top of each other. Life can be yellow, black or colourless and the same goes with the space around us.

Another interesting works of yours that have particularly impacted on me and on which I would like to spend some words are entitled


Tarrvi Laamann

Peripheral ARTeries

F14 (2014, woodcutprint, oil, canvas, 44x44cm)

F3 (2014, woodcutprint, oil, canvas, 44x44cm)

F0 and F1... I appreciate the way your abstract manipulation of shapes and colors is capable of bringing a new level of significance to the context... By the way, I can recognize that one of the possible ideas underlying this work is to unfold a compositional potential in the seemingly random structure of the space we live in... Even though I am aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I am wondering if one of the hidden aims of Art could be to search the missing significance to a non-place... I am sort of convinced that some information and ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... What is your point about this?

patterns and regularities… And by going even farther into the distance it seems like one fractal with the range of Fibonacci. Life in its essence is perfectly abstract, fascinating and very unexpected creation of work with its substantial faces. In my creations I try to lay it on twodimensional surfaces - canvas, paper or other material.

To my mind, life is an abstract phenomenon, whereas from the closer look, all the aspects of life are chaotic but from the distance we discover

I have highly appreciated the nuance of intense tones which in the diptych Mushroom Mush R, Mushroom Mush R creates an interesting synergy rather than a contrast between such bright tones and communicate a beauty that is more spiritual than decorative... by the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

The choice of „palette“ usually sustains the views from certain time and place. It is actually complicated, since the colours are always changing – due to the ray of light, due to the viewer or time/place.


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

Kristopher Tarrvi Laamann Dolphin

Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm

Mushroom Mush B (2014, mokuhanga on Awagami, 40x40cm)


Kristopher Tarrvi Laamann Dolphin

Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

Mushroom Mush R (2014, mokuhanga on Awagami, 40x40cm)


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann

4D Green Start (2013, mokuhanga rmx, 40x40cm)

Multidisciplinary is a crucial feature of your approach: I have appreciated the way you combine woodcut, which is the oldest of printmaking techniques with a distinctive contemporary feeling. Do you think that

crossing the borders of different techinques in order to realize such synergy is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

It would not be wise if we did not learn from our past,


Tarrvi Laamann

Peripheral ARTeries

Spirals On Gold (2013, mokuhanga rmx, 40x40cm)

otherwise we would miss the future and eventually the present. The only way is to use traditional and contemporary techniques, so that a brand new piece of art could be created in new time and place.

By the way, do you think that there's a dichotomy between Tradition and Contemporariness?


Peripheral ARTeries

Tarrvi Laamann

No. In my opinion there is no such clash between traditional (old school) and contemporary art. I think that art is timeless. Perhaps, this dichotomy is seen/felt more by the people who are not at home with art in general. What has mostly impacted on me of your portraits is the way these unique artworks are capable of establishing a deep, intense involvement... So I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process both for creating a piece and in order to "enjoy" it... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

My creative process has been always and very directly tied with my personal life experiences. I would like to ask you about your relationship with your audience: it goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if the expectation of a positive feedback could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

I would answer to this question from a philosophical point of view. A wise man once said: „Self-praise (self-validation) is too much of an important matter, it should not be left to others to take care about“. Nevertheless, feedback for me is very important -this is why I organize exhibitions and workshops. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Tarrvi. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

In the short-run I plan more to discover and work with the ancient patterns, abstractivity and fractals. This anticipates more of travelling of course, and then… we’ll see where the art and life shall take us … Thank you for looking, exploring and reading! Check out my stuff here: www.laamann.ee

An interview by Peripheral ARTeries Sub-Historic, mixed media on wood, 61 X 122 cm peripheral_arteries@dr.com


Peripheral ARTeries

"I use photography as a means of self expression. Through it, I try to express my interpretation and understanding of the world around me. On that way, my camera helps me to open an unexplored world. Conceptual photography is something that interest me the most, and greatest inspiration I find in nature and people"


Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media,shadow 2011 Burned

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

An interview with

Krsto Borozan What has mostly impacted on me of Krsto Borozan's conceptual photography, is the way his approach is capable of to conveying messages with a deep level of meaning, and with a little use of manipulation: extracting the living force out of an image, snatching the spirit of a concept, instead of juxtaposing it on a preexisting image... the strenght of his approach is the effective simplicity, with which he accomplish the difficult task of leading us to rethink about way we perceive the outside world... so it's with great pleasure that I'm going to introduce our readers to his impressive works. Hello Krsto, and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries: to start this interview, would you like to tell us something about your background? You have been actively involved in photography for several years: are there any experiences that have particularly impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks and on your evolution as an artist? Krsto Borozan

First of all, best regards for you and your readers, and thank you for the opportunity to present my work in your magazine. About my past with photography, I can say that it spontaneous became my main hobby, after I got from my brother on gift Nikon D5000 which, though it isn’t a professional camera, my knowledge of DSLR equipment I gained on it. My style of photography wasn’t influenced by any previous experience. Everyone sees the world around on its own way, and mine is defined precisely by my own experience of things around, and I think that, to me personally, it is hard to put into words

everything that I see in my photos. That part I am leaving to viewers to create their own unique experience of what they see in photos. My evolution as an artist, even I don’t see myself as an artist, I guess is still ongoing. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before


Krsto Borozan

Peripheral ARTeries

Passes

and during the process of creating a piece?

I never make some special preparations and settings for shooting, I always decide on set which is the right place for photography and the desired light and the angle from which the work should appear – I use what the ambient gives me in that specific moment. I do not have at disposal the supporting equipment, such as expensive lenses or reflectors, so I am trying to get the best from the setting itself.

Now let's focus on your artistic production: I would start from Interflow and Microcosm, an interesting work that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest to our readers to visit your website directly at http://www.krstoborozan.portfoliobox.me in order to get a wider idea of your recent artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of these interesting pieces? What was your initial inspiration?

“Interflow” was created during the holiday on

The Dance


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

Microcosm

the river in the late evening, and the light of a neighboring houses on the other side of the river, was the perfect setup for a photo. As for the photo “Microcosm�, it is the part of a series of photographs of the same name, created in my

Art academy on fire

backyard next to the old storage, in whose corner was formed by cobwebs, dead insects and leaves, the shaped form of what could be interpreted as a world itself in its process of life and death.


Krsto Borozan

I have been impressed with the way your stimulating investigation about the theme of environment in your Nature and Landscape series: I daresay that in a certain sense your

Peripheral ARTeries

thought-provoking exploration leads the viewer to rethink the idea of the environment, which is Gold, definetely not just the (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) background where we spend out lives. Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

Skadar lake 7


Krsto Borozan

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

Corridor

Africa

By the way, I'm sort of convinced that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist, and especially of a photographer, could be to show those unexpected sides of Nature that our everyday routine hides us... what's your point about this?

the right moment to perpetuate what is in front of the camera. The relationship between man and nature, and man towards nature, is important part of some of my photos from series “Nature and landscape�.

Landscape photography has always been inspiring for me. I try to catch on these photos

The daily routine of man often pulls him from deeper interpretation of nature, and photography is the medium through which this relationship may become deeper, thus it is a


Krsto Borozan

Peripheral ARTeries

Canvas

fixed medium which directs human attention on

I think that the landscape photography is

that one segment that author wants to show.

reminder of environment in which we live, and

By the way, many contemporary landscape photographers such as Michael Light or Edward Burtynsky have some form of environmental or political message in their photographs. Do you consider that your images are political in this way or do you seek to maintain a neutral approach?

that it should be preserved in its original form without the influence of human factor. I try to present my landscape photography on that way, and the political factor as such isn’t primarily represented in them.

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail)

Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Power of nature 7


8


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

Third eye

Third eye

Another interesting works of yours that have particularly impacted on me and on which I would like to spoend some words are from your People & portraits series. As you have remarked once, you draw great inspiration from nature and people and your works often refer to what I dare to define our immanent reality... so I would take this occasion to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

portraits�, I think that the personal experience of people around you, defines the outcome environment in which we want to show them, so the creative process is defined by your own experience of their character, which in photography I try to emphasize.

As for my works from series “People &

On one hand, every author in his work brings his own personal experience that makes him distinctive from others, and on the other hand, every art contains that general, collective experience which in some way shapes the


Krsto Borozan

Peripheral ARTeries

Spiritual healing

personal one. Thus, one experience affects the other, and by their combination we come to that specific author aesthetic. In these last years we have seen a great usage of digital technology, in order to achieve outcomes that was hard to get with traditional techniques: do your think that an excess of such techniques could lead to a betrayal of reality?

As for the reality in digital photography, it is still present, regardless of the growing photo

manipulation in software. It is just a matter of what you want at that point – to capture the scene as it is, or creatively deviate from the rules of reality, although it is often the hardest part of the job to record the thing you see exactly on the way it is. By the way, manipulation in photography is not new, but digital technology has extended the range of possibilities and the line between straight and manipulated photographs is Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) increasingly blurry. Do you think people’s perceptions what a Mixed Media onof canvas, 2012 photographer Theo van Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

photograph is are changing as a result?

Personally, I most appreciate “dry photo”, which is already at the very beginning exactly the thing that photographer wanted to show. I understand that to people is sometimes difficult to distinguish between treated and untreated photos, and that, in accordance to that, people’s perception of what is photography is changing, but I guess that’s still kind of evolution in photography, which according to some is going to better or worse – It remains to see. All in all, that is also a matter of taste. Your works are intrinsically connected with the chance of creating a deep interaction with your viewers, urging them to follow your process and pushing them to not play as a passive audience... By the way, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I have to admit that I'm sort of convinced that Art -especially nowadays- could play an effective role in sociopolitical questions: not only just by offering to people a generic platform for expression... I would go as far as to state that Art could even steer people's behaviour... what's your point about this? Does it sound a bit exaggerated?

I think that it isn’t an exaggeration to say that art is a kind of revolution, and it is widely known that various types of art exerted influence on the individuals and also on the masses. That has happened throughout history, and that is happening now, largely thanks to the new media and the arts which are caused by the digital revolution – such as, for example, photography and film. Now, as usual, I would pose you some questions about your relation with your audience. During your career your works have been exhibited in several occasions and you recently participated to OUTSIDEr in Strasbourg... It goes without saying that postivie feedbacks are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if the


Krsto Borozan

Peripheral ARTeries

Blue velvet

8


Peripheral ARTeries

Krsto Borozan

expectation of positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Honestly, I couldn’t still clearly define the relationship between the audience and the author from my own experience, given that I have only recently started to exhibit my works and present them to the wider audience. Certainly, the positive feedback from audience can make a positive influence on the willingness for the further work, but I think that it shouldn’t affect the process of work and author’s specific approach. As for the business in the field of photography, I still haven’t ventured into that field. Photography in my country is something that is mostly seen from the commercial side and used for such purposes, while the awareness of photography as an art is still underdeveloped. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Krsto. Finally, would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects. How do you see your work evolving?

Thank you for the interview. As for my vision of the future, to me everything is still uncertain because you never know what’s going to happen tomorrow, but what I know is that I will continue to work and continue to make photos.

An interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator. peripheral_arteries@dr.com


Krsto Borozan

Peripheral ARTeries

White shapes


Peripheral ARTeries

(USA)

an artist's statement

I believe one of the single, most crucial elements to filmmaking is story. It’s the heart of the film’s body. A peak into the soul that drove us to bring it to life. A vital source of the audience's fascination. The evidence of the film's effect on others. You have to feel connected to it. It has to excite you and drive you to help give it life. With "Sunset Rising” the story was inspired by diving into “worst case scenarios” and facing a truly terrifying, realistic possibility for our society.

Kristopher Dolphin


Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

An interview with

Kristopher Dolphin Hello Kristopher, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. To start this interview would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any particular experiences that have influenced you and has impacted on the way you produce your films?

Thank you for having me. Definitely. I remember visiting a family friend when I was around seven, and wandering outside, then around the block and behold… a film set. It was a USC thesis project. The scene was with a little girl, who was actually around my age. Her character had run away from home and at this point in the film was starting to feel homesick. I remember watching her perform, and do the scene over and over again. Different angles and all. The director and crew invited me to watch from their monitors. It was the first time I connected a person performing and the artistry that went behind capturing their performance, so we believed it was real. However all seven year old me saw at the time were lights, cameras and fun. By the way, I have read that your love for movies started when you were just 8 years old, when you saw the well-known blockbuster... Who among international artists and experimental filmmakers influenced your work?

Ah yes, it was Terminator 2. My mom owned a clothing store and a few stores down was Frank’s TVs. I would wander in there from time to time. They were always great to me. The owner, Frank had just got the LaserDisc of Terminator 2: Judgment Day. I was glued to the screen. I even remember not wanting to go pee, cause I’d miss parts of it. It made me feel scared, fascinated and

Kristopher Dolphin

alive. As far international artists/filmmakers that have influenced me, there are many. Francois Truffaut, Bernardo Bertolucci, Ingmar Bergman, Alfred Hitchcock, Alejandro González Iñárritu, Pedro Almadevor, Jean-Pierre Jeunet,Federico Fellini, Elia Kazan, Charlie Chaplin. ….. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your works? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a film?

Sure, I always try to keep the audience in mind. First thing I usually try to contemplate is, will this be worth their time. I appreciate every second a viewer gives me. Time is precious, so before I do anything I try to always keep that in mind. As far


Kristopher Dolphin

Peripheral ARTeries

A still from Sunset Rising: Chapter 0.5 - The Deliverer

as technical aspects, I try and figure out what’s the best and most efficient way of accomplishing our goal. For preparation, it’s just until it feels right. Make sure all our ’t’s’ are crossed and ‘i’s’ dotted. Now let's focus on your films: I would start from Sunset Rising: Chapter 0.5 - The Deliverer an interesting work that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest them to visit https://itunes.apple.com/us/movie/sunsetrising-chapter-0.5/id688032959?ls=1 In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this interesting project? What was your initial inspiration?

Worst case scenarios, I’d have to say. I remember

walking by a bank and there was a line out the door. I thought what if all that, meaning the reliability of our financial infrastructure, went away. What would be the result of a domino effect, deteriorating inside one of the strongest economies on the planet. That thought gave birth to focus on the process that could occur if greed ruled. Taking able bodied people from all walks of life, regardless of religion, gender, race, or religion to be used as forced labor to help keep afloat companies who still had business in foreign markets after the downfall here. I never mention a specific country, although we can assume it’s here in the states, because I wanted an audience member from anywhere to believe it.

The Dance


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

One of the features that has mostly impacted on me of Sunset Rising is the your use of close-ups reminding us of Krzysztof Kieslowski films... Moreover, since the first time I happened to watch this film I had impression that your use of saturated colors is not merely aimed at achieving extremely refined composition: your cinematography seems to be deeply influenced by the emotional potential of the colors: could you better explain this aspect of your animation style?

Thank you. Well, I was very fortunate to have the extremely talented Patrick Sean Kennedy as my cinematographer. We winged a lot of things, but focused on how each shot would feel from the viewers perspective. There’s a shot of Robert (Yellow Shirt) when a pivotal moment occurs for his character. There is a close up that gives us a moment to take in what he’s feeling as he watches his actions/choices manifest. There’s a light behind his head, giving slight glow into the lens. I thought it would help add a heaviness to the moment. Things like that, we knew needed to be absorbed without losing the pace or feel of the film. It just takes questioning everything constantly. It’s fun, though. The characters of this of this extremely engaging film have the same mission, to stay alive and stay free... In particular, I have highly appreciated the way your honest storytelling goes beyond the usual stereotypes about "what an hero is": in the mid of the story, one of the protagonists remarks that the mask has to stay up because a face should not be a symbol of freedom, since freedom should be a right for everyone... this corageous narrative choice is in countertrend to what we are used to see in our theatres from immemorial times, where the hero has the face of Mel Gibson or Kevin Costner: the real hero of your engaging film is the idea of freedom... would you like to tell us

readers the matters that has lead you to this choice?

Thank you. I think if you look at freedom fighters throughout history, going back to Moses they understood what they were fighting for was bigger than them. They saw the bigger picture. I


Kristopher Dolphin

thought the Sunset Warrior should have the understanding that she or he is a vessel being used to bring forth a greater good. They should understand they are not the greater good themselves or that it does not reside in them, but in everyone.

Peripheral ARTeries

As you have remarked once, one of the single, most crucial elements to filmmaking is story: and I would underline that a particular importance of the story is the end of it and it's not unusual that the end of a film is the Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) starting point of the making of it... did you Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

7


Kristopher Dolphin

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

did you have clear in mind the final shots of Sunset Rising when you conceived it?

Yes, I always thought we were building something with the plot and we needed to continue to grow it. I wanted the audience to get the feeling that this was going to get bigger in the sense that this is something that is going to take us farther than the finish line here. I would go as far as to state that, In a certain sense, Sunset Rising forces the viewer to face a truly terrifying but realistic possibility for our society: I can recognize an effective, deep social criticism. Not to mention that Art has been often subjugated by Politics and I sometimes wonder if Art in a certain sense degrades itself when serving to political scopes... at the same time, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I'm sort of convinced that Art these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion, but I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art and especially Cinema can steer people's behavior... what's your point about this?

I would say that my point is to tell a good story, and make good cinema. If it scares someone, I guess I did my job. I think good cinema should stick with you for a while after you watch it. It’s not something that is politically motivated or bias to one type of person. It’s a cinematic theory on “what if.” It’ should be fun, entertaining. Another interesting work from your early ones is entitled Reunion and is available at https://vimeo.com/3537623: I daresay that direct experience is one of your main sources for inspiration: so, I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

It definitely be an advantage to have direct experience at times. I think more than

anything, connecting to the material is critical. I was 19 when I did the Reunion, and the characters were in their mid to late 30’s. I didn’t have the life experience they had, and I didn’t really understand HIV/AIDS. I connected to the story because of the motivation by Tom and Bob (main characters) to keep the spirit of their


Kristopher Dolphin

Peripheral ARTeries

expectation of positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience?

group alive. I thought it was admirable and touching what the bond of friendship can bring. It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting the creative process of an artist: I was just wondering if an award -or just the

I think that when you make a film, you have to Gold, Svetlin detail) keep your audience in mind all(background the time.Velchev, Their Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

7


Kristopher Dolphin

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Kristopher Dolphin

feedback is critical. When I win an award for my work or compliments because people enjoy it, I think that means you attempted to stay true to what you were trying to accomplish. I don’t think filmmaking can be a selfish process, where just one person is shoving expectations to the screen. It’s an effort for the public. I think it's important to remark that Sunset Rising: Chapter 0.5 - The Deliverer has received worldwide distribution and within three days of it's release on iTunes, the film made the 'All Time Best Seller' list for Short Films on iTunes... I sometimes wonder if it could ever exist a genuine relationship between business and Art...

Thank you. I believe it can, as long as you are doing art for the right reasons. You have to love it, you have to feel it, you have to believe in it. I believe that’s a recipe for success. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Kristopher. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

It’s a pleasure. Thank you. Well, right now I’m in pre-production on my first full length, a crime/drama/thriller “Run For Roxanne.” Then I do a romantic/drama “Kissed By A Woman.” Then I have a studio project coming up that I’m not allowed to say much about, but it’ll be fun. I’m fortunate to be working with producer Sharry Flaherty on a few projects, including “Run For Roxanne.” She’s very driven, committed and just a great person all around. An interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator. peripheral_arteries@dr.com


Kristopher Dolphin

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

(USA) an artist's statement

Tiff Graham (Ti Gra) is a visual artist/ethnographer/cultural specialist whose art work combines photography, digital illustration, mixed media, and videography. Her artwork is often a diversion and catharsis from her back pain; as well as a way to present her field research on festive events/foodways/folk beliefs/material culture. She is inspired by artists whose work suggests a narrative, or a curious humorous interpretation of the world. Various traditional folk art aesthetics influence her work too. Professionally, Ti Gra teaches at Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, California creating courses that emphasize ethnographic fieldwork, cultural critique, visual media, and technology.


Peripheral ARTeries

Doo Dah Parade Politician

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

An interview with

Tiff Graham Hello Tiff, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual ice breaker question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be the features that mark the contemporariness of an artwork? Do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Thank you for interviewing me. Let me start with my way too formal answer. In school I learned about lower case art and upper case Art. This classification basically placed some artforms in a category of so called sophisticated art, such as museum art or classical music, while other popular culture artforms consumed by the masses were lower case art. I’m just mentioning this not because I follow this reasoning, but it does suggest different qualities and perceptions of art. And I am interested in all the different ways people can think about art.

Paolo and Tiff Working

Personally, I feel art is a window to the person who is making it and it’s a form of individual expression. Art can reveal a thought, belief, need, influence, or even time period in the person’s life. Children, adults, and even animals have created artwork with their hands, toes, and paws. Of course, some artwork is better and more complex in idea and/or technique; yet I’m kind of that softy who thinks, yeh, it’s all a work of art. A few people might stop reading about my work now, but I’m kind of in that state of mind at this point in my life. I find it’s hard to say what is or isn’t art. I mean a few years ago, I attended a massive graffiti show called “Art in the Streets” at the Geffen Contemporary in L.A. Now graffiti is classified as an upper case Art. It’s confusing to

know what’s the current stance of the artworld toward creative expressions. I guess I want to give the right answer and appeal to everyone’s feelings toward art, but it’s not possible. So the mark of contemporariness in my opinion, can be the ability to accept new things as a work of art. Warhol made a soup can with label a piece of art and Duchamp labeled a urinal art, so it seems anything could have the potential to be art if society or an individual wants to call it art. Also some things not deemed art in the past could eventually be labeled art when their usefulness is lost and they’re only purpose is decorative. Maybe this is the case with

3


Tiff Graham this experience impact on your evolution as an artist and on the way you currently produce your artworks?

My path to a doctorate at UCLA and the creation of various artistic projects are all associated with my need for distraction from chronic back pain from 1999 to present. I have to give this kind of long backstory so you know I’m a tough cookie and not just saying this. I’ve heard it many times that everyone has back problems. I wanted to believe this too and pretend it wasn’t hurting me, so I didn’t tell people about it. I just rerouted what I did and how I acted so I wouldn’t appear weak and a complainer. I had my career path set in the sciences with video and art as side hobbies. Unfortunately while working as a federal investigator/inspector for the U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Health and Safety Administration I repeatedly hurt my back, then had herniated disk surgery, and eventually had to leave my job with occupational disability status. I moved from my Rhode Island job to my parents in Tennessee. It was difficult. I felt as if I lost my identity as this independent outdoors girl who biked to work, visited factories and work sites by day, and danced or camped on the weekends. I had lots of super 8mm and digital videos that I had made with friends in Rhode Island, and editing that became my initial distraction from pain. I just couldn’t make sense why the pain didn’t disappear so I turned fully to artmaking and applying to graduate schools while living with my parents. It was depressing not just with the pain, but the lack of results with yoga, physical therapy, water therapy, massage, pills, meditation, acupuncture, and homeopathic remedies/practices/rituals/spells. I missed my friends and work in Rhode Island, so I began creating art for them so they wouldn’t forget me. I made these odd things called “muffwigs” that covered a certain body area and were funny and personal. Even so, I felt mentally/physically beat down. I had the best bluegrass music and musician friends in Tennessee to keep me feeling alive, but pain was all consuming at

traditional art that now sits on a display shelf versus used in some ritual. Actually this reasoning makes me think how everything overlaps. For example, contemporary art can be labeled traditional art after some time. Then it can cycle around and the traditional art when modernized can eventually reflect a type of contemporary art aesthetic. Ooh, the circle of life of everything! Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have formal training and you hold a Ph.D of Culture and Performance that you received from the University of California Los Angeles: how did

4


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

times. I read the Csikszentmihalyi book about “flow” and other books about fighting back pain that suggested complete absorption/immersion in some activity. I immersed myself in my art process. So back to UCLA. In 2002, I was accepted to the UCLA School of Public Health graduate school and two years later I transferred to the UCLA Department of World Arts and Cultures. By chance, I had heard Dr. Michael Owen Jones of the Department of World Arts and Cultures speak at an Alternative Medicine conference. He spoke about Latino Botanicas and traditional medicine. For four long years I had been exploring his subject along with other alternative health approaches to back pain. I was making a documentary about folk medicine in Tijuana Mexico and Los Angeles for a medical anthropology class when I sought him out on campus. He suggested I switch graduate departments. It was the best thing for me ever and it enabled me to pursue a more creative path fulltime. In my new UCLA department, I met an interesting, creative, international group of students, and had opportunities to take ethnographic cultural studies courses, curate an exhibit, make event posters, video edit performances, and assistant teach folklore and video production courses. Although I fought chronic pain, I lost myself in the cultural subjects and felt freed from the seriousness of my pain. I even chose a different dissertation topic, which initially was traditional medicine based. I didn’t think about why the topic change then, but I believe with hindsight that I chose festivals for my dissertation because I desperately needed that Victor Turner liminal fun and laughter space where things can be inverted, turned around, and viewed differently from everyday life. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

Doo Dah Parade M

(background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Doo DahGold, Parade Men of Leisure Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

Baile Folklorico de Mexico Dress

Bolivian girls in Caporal Dress

mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

professor has been a place where I’ve built my techniques and understanding of the art world. My technical process for the festival dog artwork involves, first, photographing and videotaping the festival experience. At the festive events, I talk to people and often ask permission to take their pictures since it can be intrusive. Parades are easier since everyone is on public display. I try to video too since it enables more spontaneous movements and I can revisit the sounds of the event. Sometimes, my body gives

Okay, the business of my art process. I study and learn techniques mainly by reading artbooks, magazines, visiting art spaces, watching online instructions, talking to people, other artists, Otis students, and taking Otis continuing education classes. UCLA was a place that built my confidence to research topics and Otis College of Art and Design in LA where I am a part-time

7


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

Cambodian New Years Day Wearing Sampot

Dia de Los Muertos Hollywood Forever Cemetery Couple

out and I leave early, but I try to be a trooper and capture all aspects of the event.

with colors, etc. Then I go through a huge archive of pictures of Paolo, my miniature poodle. I have taken pictures of him for 5 years. He allows me to play with his ears and hair, so there are a variety of poses. I select a few images of him then incorporate them into the festival image.

Next, once home or in the car I upload the footage in Aperture software or in folders on my computer. I later sort through images looking for colorful imagery and something culturally specific. Out of a 75 images I might have 1 to 5 images that will work for me. Using Adobe Photoshop, Final Cut Pro, and/or Modul 8 software, I’ll manipulate an image, removing background, repositioning the person, playing

When working on the background area, I look for festival images that can reflect that particular

8


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

Etoufee Festival Queen Breaux Bridge Louisiana

Beijing China Art Troupe Parading

activity of the festival. I digitally paint that image with different types of brushes and filters, dragging the scenery and people so it blends shades of color and tones to create a pseudo festival aura. Texturizing the images with watercolor, oil, cloth, and other mixed textures provides an interesting layered effect. It can take a few days to play with these filters, brushes, colors, and subject positions to feel that the composition is right.

papers, though I’ve recently been working with metal. Also my newest component of the artwork is electronic but it’s still in it’s early phase involving Adafruit and Sparkfun electronic products, such as Arduino microprocessors, conductive sewing materials, and button sensors.

My last step is to make prints on different

Now let's focus on your art production: the interesting series that our readers have already started to admire in these pages documents actual festivals and parades


Tiff Graham

LA Chinese New Year - horse, man, and dog

where festival dogs are further blended into the image to draw attention to things that comfort us: would you tell us something about the genesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

Making my festival dogs is therapeutic in a few ways. I really never realized a dog could be a catharsis against back pain but when I pet him and think of him, he melts some of it. I use to knit for distraction from pain too but now I pet him and draw, paint, and digitally rework photos

Peripheral ARTeries

LA Chinese New Year -- horse, woman, dog

of him into festivals. So making these festival dogs happened after I finished my UCLA Ph.D dissertation on festivals in December 2009. I had spent years conducting field research attending festivals mainly in the lower Mississippi River Delta country of the U.S. No one cared to read my research or view the festival pictures/video interviews, and of course I understood that. It’s an academic project with a dissertation filled with theory and a dry writing Velchev, style. Yet, I felt my ethnographicSvetlin fieldwork photographer Theo van Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

shouldn’t simply end up only on library shelves. While recovering from another back surgery, I noticed Paolo, my dog, giving me his prison stare or what we now call “puppy trance,” and I just laughed and thought wouldn’t it be cool to add him to my festival pictures. There were so many cultural traditions, costumes, foodways, and customs at festivals that fascinated me and maybe a dog head on the bodies would finally get people’s attention. I emailed a few Chinese New Year Parade beauty queen dogs to some friends, showed my parents, and everyone seemed to like them. It was the confirmation I needed to proceed with this crazy idea that was more “family friendly” than my “muffwigs.” So present day I continue to document festivals and parades in California and elsewhere when I physically can. Also I’ve developed an appreciation for other dog themed artwork, like George Rodrigue’s Blue Dog, William Wiggins Weimaraners dogs, and Lara Jo Regan’s Mr. Winkle. One of the features of your works that has mostly impacted on me is the way you mix traditional folk art aesthetics with a marked contemporary feeling: do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Well, I think there is a connection, a duality, between tradition and contemporariness in my art work. The cultural images I feature are rooted in tradition, whether its baile folklórico de México dresses or charro suits, or Turkish tantuni or Greek loukoumades food. Though, how I visually interpret them is definitely contemporary as I rework them in a digital format. My aesthetic seems to always be influenced by artists who demonstrate traditional art techniques and equally by artists who create electronic installations and experimental video art. I know they sound very different artforms, but the two work together for me. For my traditional art inspirations, I can’t help but always refer back to Frida Kahlo who painted work that reflected her pain and visions quite

vividly. Also the folk art exhibits and art books from the Fowler Museum at UCLA are forever in my head. They have had amazing exhibits that blew my mind not just because of the colors or subject, but also because of the associated cultural meaning and sense of lived-ness and authenticity linked to every piece. I am still dreaming about the exhibits on Sufi arts of Senegal, Haitian political and mystical artwork of Edouard Duval-Carrie, Latino popular religious art related to Botanicas and orishas, Mamai wata water spirits, Carnival celebrations around the world, Korean funerary figures, various textile exhibits, and most recently a collection of saints and martyr figures artwork related to the Americas. Traditional folk arts are alive to me and oddly for some reason I feel a lot of contemporary experimental video art and electronic light installations are alive too with their ephemeral and unpredictable qualities. I know this sounds probably absurd to someone who might not see these characteristics and see no connection between traditional arts and the watching of an abstract video artpiece that incorporates a glitched rainbow of analog squares with say a silhouette of an object. Or even think that a bright yellow light like in “the weather project” installation by Olafur Eliasson’s could be associated with a piece of folk art. But for me, they are both meaningful in a way and representative of human life and interpretation. I think there is this kind of cerebral hidden message in the electronically powered works, as similarly there is in the folk art. So when I create my festival dogs, I’m blending an aesthetic that is part electronics and traditional arts. There always seems to be a sense of narrative in your images: humour plays a crucial role in these works and I would go as far as to state of your work stem from the belief that the world is full of humor that is both intentional and accidental, a mixture of chance and choice... so I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

Japanese Kimono Girls on Phone


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

Greek Festival Loukoumades

Anatolian Festival Soldiers

indispensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

needs shape my creative process. I do want to be considered a serious academic researcher, yet there is a pretentiousness that I can’t pull off. I have a Southern accent that doesn’t sound completely intellectual and I don’t always filter what I say. More importantly I feel I fail socially when I bore a person. I am imaginative, but I need real experiences to motivate me. Probably that is the reason I pursue ethnographic fieldwork. I need to see with my eyes and have all my senses triggered. The hands-on

From early childhood I loved movies and television shows such as Mel Brooks’ movies, Monty Python, Benny Hill, and Saturday Night Live. Family and friends shared this fondness for the bizarre. Likely my offbeat humor is a direct result. I love to laugh and find the twisted, offbeat side of things. These experiences and


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

St. Patrick’s Day Bagpiper Boys


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

experiences of a festival or adventure into other cultures are my food for thought. I’ll attach my T.E.N.S. unit to my back or a pain patch, and maybe take a pill then get out there and smell, taste, touch, hear, and see the wild world of people. I don’t know what will happen or how long I’ll last, but it’s always exciting and challenging to me. Multidisciplinary is a crucial feature of your approach: your art work combines photography, digital illustration, mixed media, and videography.... do you think that crossing the borders of different techniques in order to realize such synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

For me yes, I’m not satisfied with one modality for anything. It’s why I like the ocean so much, it’s never ending to my eyes. I like space that stretches out so I don’t feel cramped mentally or physically. I enjoy experimenting because it offers unknown and unexpected results. These are all reasons why I have to approach my art with multiple tools. Having mastery over one artform would be great, but it’s just not me. I take chances and fail, but it’s my way of doing things. I’m a curious person. Even recently, I’ve found I’m not satisfied with simply creating a picture, I need to make my festival dogs more interactive by adding a portable unit with a microprocessor, speakers, and buttons that a viewer can push to hear programmed festival sounds, cultural facts, and dog barks. I daresay that the humour that pervades your works succeed in achieving a subtle but effective socio political criticism... By the way, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit naïf, I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in

our society?

Propaganda art has often steered people’s behavior so I do think art has the potential to inform, guide, or mislead. It’s not an exaggeration that art can be persuasive. Artists have the ability to make a statement with their subject and style choices. I taught courses titled “Media Arts” and “Text and Image” which both addressed how artwork can manipulate the viewer to think about something in a particular way. Whether the artist chooses to say something through inclusion or exclusion of something is very interesting to me. Probably it’s why I like satire, which is prevalent in a lot of Carnival festival parades. A Carnival parade float, meant for entertainment, can also represent a biting political message such as neglect of environmental issues or some other topical issue. This type of humorous commentary can be very effective in shaping public opinion or thoughts. This is one reason why I love attending the Pasadena Doo Dah Parade near L.A. organized by the Light Bringer Project. People show up with the craziest and most interesting ideas on parade display. Some parade entries are ridiculously funny, like the year Pluto was declassified as a planet and its supporters came out. And I can’t forget the South Pasadena Sperm Bank group squeezing lotion on the crowds. Then there are the groups with more serious commentary, such as the marchers drawing attention to the Hong Kong protests situation. I do think visual artists have the soapbox opportunity if they want it. Am I using my visual art for this purpose, yes, kind of. I want people to learn about community festivals and cultures. When I presented my festival research and imagery in an academic ethnographic photograph format, it didn’t attract the attention or the laughs. Now it does. Besides producing your stimulating artworks, you have also gained a wide experience as a teacher, you are currently a teacher at Otis


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

Thai Songkran Parade


Peripheral ARTeries

Tiff Graham

College of Art and Design, Los Angeles, California creating courses that emphasize ethnographic fieldwork, cultural critique, visual media, and technology: have you ever happened to draw inspiration from the works of your students? By the way, I sometimes I wonder if a certain kind of formal training could even stifle a young artist's creativity... what's your point?

I make my art for friends and if other people like them, it’s surprising and rewarding to me. I do wish for future larger audiences who could appreciate the cultural aspects as well as my humor. Moreover, it would be fantastic if I could make a living as an artist, but being a part time college professor in the U.S. and pursuing my art as a hobby and for pain relief will have to do.

I never imagined myself as a teacher yet here I am teaching and I enjoy it. Students offer me perspectives as all people do, and I soak up what I can learn from them. Teaching at a small art school has been different than teaching at a large multidisciplinary university like UCLA. These are future art professionals who seem to know what they want as they build their portfolios toward career jobs in the creative fields. It’s thrilling for me to think how lucky they are to be in art school. They are developing practical skills while pursuing mastery of creative professions in fine arts, toy design, digital media, architecture, etc. They aren’t meandering through many years of life to get to art like I did.

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Tiff. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

What an honor and opportunity to talk about my artwork and background. I’m recovering from yet another back surgery so I have plenty of time reimagining all these festivals I’ve documented in the past years. Once I’m more pain tolerant I’ll get out and photograph other festive events. Currently my “St. Pat’s Bagpiper Boys” picture is in a group show “Fresh 2014” at the South Bay Contemporary Art Gallery in Rolling Hills Estates near L.A.

Teaching at this art school, meeting artists, being in the loop of the artworld, and using the facilities has made me a better artist. It showed me how artmaking can be a profession not just a hobby. Art school can provide the foundation for an artist and then I think it’s up to him or her to have the experiences that make their art individualistic.

My future plans entail maintaining a busy schedule with multiple project ideas. I would like to exhibit my large collection of metal festival dogs as an interactive electronic art installation project and continue to create various themed festival dogs. Also I need to work on my other pain art made with pills glued on glassware and acrylic painted pain thoughts on Plexiglas. Plus I have a variety of projects in process that include recycled tennis balls reworked as a disco ball charades games, food art performance course prep, and always my “muffwig” artwork. Obviously, my mind is definitely working faster than what my body will allow, but it’s all part of the process that I revel in.

It goes without saying that feedbacks and especially awards are capable of supporting an artist: I was just wondering if the expectation of a positive feedback could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Thank you again. I really enjoyed this opportunity to share my thoughts and festival dogs.

Yes, it’s true, I can feel encouraged or discouraged when certain people close to me don’t like my work. It’s always a risk but the positive feedback is a great incentive to keep working.

An interview by Dario Rutigliano, Curator. peripheral_arteries@dr.com

17


Tiff Graham

Peripheral ARTeries

Turkish Tantuni Chef

18


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam (USA) an artist's statement

My drawings, copper plate, and linocut prints are about creating images of a world where slavery would not have existed in West Africa. My research has revealed that Africa has a rich history of producing works on paper and my work will continue this tradition adding an Afrofuturism twist to the prints. Afrofuturism is defined as speculative fiction that treats African American themes and addresses an enhanced future where people of color live in a technology intensive world. In Black Future, Amir Dex changes slavery and makes Africa one of the biggest technological places for Africans to live. In the year 2035, Amir stumbles upon a tribal book while working on an African American History paper. Inside there is a page marked “incantation spell for returning to the past”. He reads the spell and is thrown back to 1526 where he is able to prevent slavery from happening in Africa. By doing so, he allows Africa to become an intellectual powerhouse where technology and art have combined and created a hybrid between futuristic and primitive themes. While being in futuristic Africa, Amir Dex learns about his history and becomes one with Africa. To assist him in his work, he creates a robot named Zeek who can change and transform into anything Amir needs. Through Amir’s efforts of changing the past Africa has become a technological continent

Andie Jairam


Jen Dex 11 by 17 in., Charcoal Drawing

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam

An interview with

Andie Jairam What in your opinion defines a work of Art? By the way, what could be in your opinion the features that mark an artwork as a piece of Contemporary Art?

Personally, a work of art by my definition focuses primarily on visual, technical, and emotional presence created using various forms of art such as printmaking, drawing, painting, and visual/recording media. The artwork my generation is creating can be defined as Contemporary Art which is being produced only at the present time period along with incorporating new advancements in technology which create new art tools that help artist combine different art disciplines. The creation of combing different art disciplines can open up new ways to see and study art. For example, my artwork deals with the fusion of Printmaking and Drawing, an innovative technique.

Andie Jairam

Would you like to tell us something about your background? You have a solid formal training and you hold a BA Cum Laude in Studio Art, from Morehouse College, Atlanta. How did this experience influence your development as an artist and on the way your currently produce your artworks? By the way, during these years your earned experience as a teacher and you currently teach Printmaking and Basic Design, so I would take this occasion to ask your point about formal training: I sometimes wonder if a certain kind of training could even stifle a young artists creativity‌

generation of artist. Different African American artists such as Sanford Greene, John Jennings, and Sara Golish have influenced my artwork. I try to create images that are complex but, visually appealing to the eye that can invoke emotional reactions from my audience. As a teaching assistant, I feel my creativity as well as my approach to creating my artwork changes and grows depending on my piece. The students I teach in Printmaking and Drawing always inspire me to adapt and learn more art disciplines to add to my work in order discover never approached combinations and techniques.

At Morehouse College I have learned the importance of knowing your history as an African American man. Learning where my ancestors came from and create my own history because African history needs to be rewritten for the next

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell our readers something about your process and 3


Andie Jairam

Amir Dex 11 by 17 in., Charcoal Drawing

4


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam

King Portrait, 12 by 17 in., Lithography Print set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on in your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in

before and during the process of creating a piece?

I enjoy working in the studio because I can just


Andie Jairam

Peripheral ARTeries

Rise of Anansi, 4 ft by 4 ft., Woodcut

focus on my work and concepts and enjoy a sense of peace creating artwork. It takes many hours of work and preparation before I start an artwork. That’s why I focus a lot on measuring and perspective, to make sure everything lines

up in my art piece like I want it to. My process in creating a piece starts with making a series of sketches and thumbnails and taking (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Doo DahGold, Parade Menrough of Leisure reference photos. From there I begin, drawing. After I finish the rough drawing, I 2012 Mixed Media on van canvas, photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam wider idea of your artistic production... In the meanwhile, would you like to tell us something about the genesis of this stimulating piece? What was your initial inspiration?

My inspiration behind Jen Dex came from someone special in my life. This person in the picture is the artistic motivational force behind some of my artworks shown. I used brown conte in her eyes and in her necklace to represent Africa’s natural environment to use resources Mother Nature provides to create artwork. I use compressed Charcoal in her hair, face and shirt to represent new artistic resources artist use today. The drawing was initially crafted to represent the strength of African American women and why they are the genesis of life itself. Art could play a role in socio political issues: I think that Art could even steer people’s behavior… I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it’s an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society? Artist have the ability to visually create work that can move and strengthen a community, which can visually break down any barriers, we as a people are going through. A great example of this is a well-known printmaking artist by the name of Barbara Jones-Hogu and her piece titled Unite. This screen print uses limited colors and bold lettering to print her message “Unite” to make a meaningful impression on the audience. The word “Unite” repeats in different colors and various forms above the figures with their fist held high to show the unity of black people. The black figures below with cream and brown colored faces are bound together by their black shirts to form unity. The rows of tight fists and brown faces in profile form an abstract pattern atop a black mass. Jones-Hogu’s inspiration originates from the Black Power struggle of fighting political, race and equal rights issues that arose in the 1960’s.

Tech-Flow, 12 by 17 in., Lithography Print

combine different art disciplines until certain effects are created. My last step, is including Printmaking and Drawing into my rough drawing completing the finished polished piece. Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Jen Dex that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest to our readers to visit your website directly at http://www.andiejairam.com in order to get a 7


Andie Jairam

Peripheral ARTeries

King Playing, 8 by 11 in., Etching 8


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam

Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

A creative process should not be disconnected from direct experience because it is beneficial for the artist in creating unique and dynamic artwork that their audiences will love. The creative process for artist is something acquired by growing up within an artistic environment. I believe that experience comes into the picture when an artist desires to develop skills in order to start their art career and create a cohesive body of artwork. However, without being self taught or going to art training schools an artist will not be able to be successful in the art world. While crossing the borders of different artistic fields have you ever happened to realize that a synergy between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts? Monkey, 3 by 5 in., Relief Cut

I feel when you are trying to achieve a specific result for Printmaking and Drawing you will approach it numerous ways till you find a result that equals out to form a synergy in your artwork. This unique synergy comes by combining different artistic disciplines. That does not mean it will work with every artistic discipline that an individual could combine but, with experimentation comes new and creative results. ( I agree, to publish "4 by 4 Woodcut Print done by Professor Hickey, Andie Jairam, Lekeitha Hudson, and Andrece Brady). Do you think there’s a still a contrast between Tradition and Contemporariness in Art? I sometimes wonder if Contemporariness might be considered just the continuation of the Past, but often it is a rebellion against it…

I don’t think that there is a noticeable contrast between Traditional and Contemporariness because with art the Old Masters taught us skills that are now passed down from generation and this causes us to reinvent the

art wheel and put a twist using resources the Old Masters did not have access to and make new forms of Contemporary Art. This new Contemporary art brings admiration and honor to Old Master artists similar to Leonardo di Vinci, Stefano di Giovanni, Rembrandt, Albrecht Durer, and Francisco Goya. I sometimes wonder if the expectation of a positive feedback- could even influence the process of an artist… By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience?

As an artist positive and negative feedback is important because negative feedback helps artist create artwork on a higher level. We use this feedback to correct and fix any issues in our artwork and take classes to make our technical approach and skills stronger. Artists make artwork for ourselves and when audiences see it they may or may not like it


Andie Jairam

Peripheral ARTeries

(background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Doo DahGold, Parade Men of Leisure

One with Africa, 9 byMedia 11 Theo in.,on Etching Mixed canvas, 2012 photographer van Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Andie Jairam

Afro-City 8 by 11 in., Relief Cut

teenagers and adults. I want to give the future generation a chance to become inspired by my stories as well as hopefully encouraging them to create their own narratives by using their imagination. In today’s society, imagination has become a powerful force when combined with art.

but, it will not change how artists like myself create artwork. Would you like to tell us readers something about your future projects? How do you see your work evolving?

I plan to travel the world to work with some of the best Printmakers and Illustrators that the art world has to offer. I feel by having this exposure will be beneficial for me in order to create more fusions of different art disciplines and have a multitude of unique work. My artwork is centered upon a narrative. I plan on creating more narratives for example dealing with Leonardo da Vinci having a black apprentice who finishes where the great artist stopped that will be published into graphic novels for both

Revolving Robot 5 by 7 in., Etching

7


Andie Jairam

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

(USA)

an artist's statement

I grew up in eastern Pennsylvania surrounded by trees and constant rain. I currently live in LA, California surrounded by mountains and dry air. I have a B.S. from La Salle University. Working as a scientist greatly compliments my art; showcasing my analytical nature with regards to compartmentalization or experimenting with colors. The exploration of scientific technique has resulted in very different paintings.

Tonya Amyrin Rice

Tonya concerns human interaction and behavior; from experiences often considered mundane to the remarkable. What draws her to such interactions are the fundamental understanding that existence is finite, the human experience is finite. The exploration of such themes also extends to the comprehension of time. Time can disctate a large portion of interaction as well as behavior whether it is through conscientious observation or subtle variations undetected. These responsed are the culmination of intrinsic structure that remains fleeting yet simultaneosly fixed; fleeting in time and fixed in existence. Her work focuses on bringing these moments to cogizance.

Girl with Umbrella


Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

An interview with

Tonya Amyrin Rice Hello Tonya, and a warm welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. To start this interview, would you like to tell us something about your background? You hold B.S. from La Salle University and you currently work as a scientist: how does this experience impact on the way you produce your artworks? By the way, since I have a scientific backgound, I cannot do without asking if you think that nowadays there still exists a dichotomy between Art and Science...

I think the information and techniques learned as a chemist have lent universal use in my life. In terms of my art process, precise practice has demonstrated the greatest influence particularly concerning my pencil drawings. Less to do with specific technique and more with conceptual theory, my drawings exhibit a great attention to detail that I would have to attribute to years spent in a lab agonizing over minute factors while attempting to keep the larger concept in mind. In addressing your question regarding the dichotomy between art and science, I can't help but quote Albert Einstein; "After a certain high level of technical skill is achieved, science and art tend to coalesce in esthetics, plasticity, and form. The greatest scientists are always artists as well." Creativity and innovative thinking go hand in hand. Both pursue progress, the difference is the application which results in unique outcomes that appear unrelated but the source is the same and it is an essential source for all fields looking to develop. Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set

Tonya Amyrin Rice

up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

When coming up with new ideas, I tend to have better results when not focusing on the immediate issue; where I am concerned, brainstorming does not have a consistently productive record. When drawing I focus on the details, mainly the patterns I want to use in order to set a background. The background is where I most often begin my drawing. When painting I am concerned more with colors and composition as the imagery is drawn from the physical world. I am admittedly very impatient when it comes to creating pieces and have the tendency to start working before an idea is fully formed which can then lead to trouble (perhaps another investigation into this "brainstorming" could be beneficial). The creation of a piece takes a good deal longer than it's conception but is ultimately dependent on the piece itself.


JesĂşs Manuel Moreno

Girl on Cliff

The Dance


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from your Pencil series that our readers have already started to admire in the introductory pages of this article: and I would suggest to visit your website directly at http://www.tonya-amyrin-rice.com in order to get a wider idea of your current artistic production. In the meanwhile, would you tell us something about the genesis of this project? What was your initial inspiration?

My pencil drawings serve to tell a story in a manner more detailed and rich than any words I can write. The words seem to act as a secondary source of information. My initial inspiration would have to be storytelling and doing so the only way I know how, through the use of images. I can notice that you dedicate a particular care to the background, which doesn't play the role of a mere backdrop of what "happens" in the work. This aspect of your work has suggested me the concept that some informations & ideas are hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a way- to decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

I think one of the main goals of an artist (at least for myself) is to explore oneself with the goal of expression. There is such a prominent idea of self-discovery that I think artists often stumble upon revealing truths whether it be internal or external.

Swings


Carlos Agamez

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

Lion Tamer 7


Tonya Amyrin Rice

8

Peripheral ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

Stay

I daresay that your works from your Series A deal with an investigation about the concept of human experience, in a sense that goes beyond the mere idea of emotional involvement: I would go as far as to state that you explorate the implication of experience itself, the impossibility of a description that could be prescind from everyday life which plays the role of a inertial system of reference... So I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience from real world is an absolutely

indespensable part of a creative process... Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

I think that personal experience is indispensable because it is the way that we as humans interact with the world. I wouldn't know where to begin separating myself from the art I create but it is an interesting question that brings with it many points of discussion. How do we begin to assess the feelings of others; can we in all actuality understand one another entirely


Tonya Amyrin Rice

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

Show


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

Run

Stacie Kristopher Birky Dolphin Greene


Stacie Kristopher Birky Greene Dolphin

Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

The visual features of these stimulating pieces communicates intimacy and seem far from being "contaminated" by a certain kind of imagery that nowadays deeply pervade visual arts... would you tell our readers something about the imagery from which you draw inspiration?

I like the interaction between human and nature (as most do). I enjoy creating shapes with the human body and watching it interact with its surroundings. At times I am almost more concerned with the interfacing shapes and what they can convey. Another interesting pieces of yours that have impressed on me and on which I would like to spend some words are from you Series B, as the interesting I'll never see this face again and Your love is not protection: I have been struck with the intensly thoughtful nuances of red that suggest me a sense of dramatic -and I would daresay "oniric"- luminosity that seems to flow out of your canvas... it communicates such a tactile sensation as in another work entitled #4 that I have admit is one of my favourite piece of this series... to by the way, any comments on your choice of "palette" and how it has changed over time?

My pencil drawings are grayscale exclusively so when painting with oil or acrylic I like to use vibrant colors, experimenting with the numerous possibilities. I think my paintings are still in a state of trial and investigation so my palette is constantly changing. At this time I think it is difficult for me to settle on a particular path. Although I'm aware that this might sound a bit na誰f, I would like to remark that the first impression that I have received when I started to admire your work concerned with the perception of time: moreover, I have highly appreciated your multidisciplinary approach, which is a crucial aspect of your art practice: while crossing the borders of different artistic fields and using different

Walk

techniques have you ever happened to realize that a symbiosis between different disciplines is the only way to achieve some results, to express some concepts?

Using multiple disciplines has resulted in works I do not think I could have achieved otherwise. I think the interaction has provided me with more possibilities.

Hold


Tonya Amyrin Rice

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries

A Small Road

Stacie Kristopher Birky Dolphin Greene


Stacie Kristopher Birky Greene Dolphin

Peripheral PeripheralARTeries ARTeries


The Barren Forrest


Peripheral ARTeries

Tonya Amyrin Rice

Still Life It goes without saying that feedbacks are capable of providing an artist of an important moral support, which is not indespensable, but that can stimulate to keep on with Art: I was just wondering if the expectation of positive feedback could even influence the process of an artist... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience?

Thanks a lot for your time and your thoughts, Tonya. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

I think that the expectation has the potential to affect an artist negatively if it is the ultimate goal when creating work. It has the possibility of influencing and even changing the subject of

In early January I will be showcasing some of my pencil drawings at ARTEscape in Sonoma, CA. Some of my paintings will also be included in Smashed Cake Magazine.

interest. Feedback is important but I think that when it is the main focus of the artist, the work that he or she creates cannot be genuine.


Tonya Amyrin Rice

Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail)

Untitled

Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

(Spain)

an artist's statement

"My work is fundamentally concerned with the complex relationship between society and its technologies. Since the early years of the new century we have seen a series of generalized dynamic mass participation and interaction around a myriad of social networks, blogs and large groups of file repositories shared by millions of people dayly. As an artist it didn't take me long to begin exploring in a critical way these new social dynamics and the technologies that made them possible, making them my new reference contexts and performance of my creative research. I am energized by the diversity of human expression that continuously activates our vast communication networks. I am awed by the scale and varied histories of the built environment and urban infrastructure. As technologists make daily promises to improve our lives by uniting these physical and digital worlds, I attempt to make work that examines the practical implications of our increasingly networked lifestyles. Primary to this task is an exploration of the ways we imagine and represent ourselves before (potentially massive) audiences and the ways we navigate and abide in public space. Today's perception of the world and ourselves increasingly corresponds with the technological devices perception. A new form of intercepts identification generated by their own ability to observe and transform us, we are never the same in front of a camera. In my work i approach a discussion of the relationship between art, new tecnologĂ­es and Internet especially over the last decade. More specifically, my field of study is composed by art forms that either have made Internet and technology it's specific policy context, their field of it's main reflection subject. " Borja RodrĂ­guez


Peripheral ARTeries

Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

An interview with

Borja RodrĂ­guez Hello Borja, and welcome to Peripheral ARTeries. I would start this interview with my usual introductory question: what in your opinion defines a work of Art? Moreover, what could be the features that mark an artworks as a piece of Contemporary Art? By the way, do you think that there's a dichotomy between tradition and contemporariness?

Art provides us with experiences that would hardly be possible elsewhere. It makes us think, question our place in the world, our realationship with others, we face things that usually go unnoticed. It could even be that makes us better beings, although we know sometimes art and barbarism go hand in hand. We must be aware that this is true only for a few. For the vast majority, art, which is exhibited in museums, biennials and galleries, is alien and does not serve anything at all.

Borja RodrĂ­guez

The classics can help to understand us an how we ended up here in all this mess but what is essential is elsewhere. We are naked to our unravelling present

learned alone and never thought my work would arouse interest. Never thought of a career, as they say. I worked and worked. For several years, i destroyed everything. And yet sometimes I think I should have followed destroying it! But creation is obsession, its like love, you can't do anything against it.

Would you like to tell us something about your background? Are there any experiences that particularly impacted on the way you currently produce your artworks?

Being from a coast village in a island, where there were no museums, galleries or libreries. If you wanted to go the cinema you better had someone with a car. But i have paper, the school pencils, the CD of my older brother, and Internet since an early age.

Before starting to elaborate about your production, would you like to tell to our readers something about your process and set up for making your artworks? In particular, what technical aspects do you mainly focus on your work? And how much preparation and time do you put in before and during the process of creating a piece?

Another clearly experiencie would be not having studied academically anything about the arts. I

It's like a little spark in your brain and when there is

3


Borja RodrĂ­guez

Peripheral ARTeries

A still from Shake it!

nothing left to burn you have to set yourself on fire. Then the only thing left is to find the correct medium for it with the few resources you got. Will it be a video? A poem? A code? A paintin? A letter to your father? The medium is the message. But what incites the first spark? I do not know. An image leads to another, suggests another. Poets help me to go further, no doubt. I like the atmosphere in which they immersed me. Sometimes just a word or a frame and i pluck.

out if you let them pass one night. And of course with time there comes some kind of profesionalization of the habit in some sort of level, no matter how chaotic or "damned artist" you cling to be. In my case i could seem to invest a lot in preparation and in being assured i control any aspect but truly a prefer to left room to accidents, to the external forces have their feast. There is a terrific palindrome: In girum imus nocte et consumimur igni

About how much preparation... i have no model of it, some ideas need to simmer other could burn

Now let's focus on your art production: I would start from Hey Guys, an extremely interesting

The Dance 4


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

Hey Guys, 2010 A synopsis From the infinite number of possible reasons of why a person decides to start a blog, the most basic of all is, he wants to be heard. An intense desire to record what one thinks and lives, and share it. Declarations to a potentially global audience from domestic privacy settings. There is always a certain voyeurism about the opinion of another. On one hand, sites like You Tube promise a participatory and democratizing platform that responds to human desire to be heard. On the other, the very mass of public speaking makes it impossible to meet the individual voices . 11 Hey guys" is a video made up of 100 youtubebloggers videos of crying women who decided to recorded it as a natural consequence of the statement made or the unique action in the video. Within the feminist claim policy is frequent a criticism of the widespread notion of women as a messenger, even as the message itself, as an intermediate point between man and himself. So the video poses a radical identification strategy by overexposure of concepts of it. In a time when computers and the Internet are accompanying our most intimate activities and sex no longer shocked, the jog and crying still hold the rank of taboo and authenticity.


Carlos Agamez

project that our readers have already started to get to know in the introductory pages of this article: would you tell us something about the genesis of this works?

Peripheral ARTeries

and finding patterns of behavior both by those who were shot as who where claiming the show as well In a world of total disorientation in social, Gold, Svetlin Velchev, detail) political and ethical orders, the(background emergence of the

The spark came snooping videoblogs on youtube

Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011

2


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

number of web services that present works which are accessible for immediate feedback on a wide scale and attract massive attention. Their authors rarely claim them being the works of art or seek a legitimacy from the artworld, even they often act anonymously... maybe that the challenge could be to rethink individual authorship so that it is no longer synonymous with capitalism but rather with what Guattari calls ‘resingularisation’, an individual or collective struggle against homogenisation of institutional domains... what's your take about this?

phenomenon blog was probably the clearest back to the "I" and the subjectivity in the field of media, the return to a certain "egology". In reality, people and concrete lives, to the uniqueness of someone by name, with biography. A surge of strong and specific identity in a time that Omar Castillo calls "Era of Promiscuity", social habit that manifests as a new images consumption. A consumption post-AIDS, postlatex, post-screens, post-cybersex. In promiscuity no lies because the truth is not promising.

The postmodern identity is understood as independent sub pastiche of partial identities that are to be constructed and connected to provide a sense of coherence. The "multiple I" was also theorized as a dialogic I, in which the individual aspects of each are the voices of an internal dialogue.

By the way, I have been impressed with the way the aforesaid work -as well as another piece of yours entitled Why - has been in a certain sense inspired with the chance that web gives us to develop such an augmented reality... If we look at the online ecosystem, we are stricken by an enormously great

7


Borja RodrĂ­guez

Theory supported by the predominantly textual nature of the Internet during the early nineties where human interactions were heavily based on specific forms of fluidity and lightness of language as those providing chats. Independent of any necessary commitment to its subject, which is supposed to represent, no one would actually be beyond a nickname or an avatar in the network.

Peripheral ARTeries

In the early works of net art, what we can see is the "I" as a result of extreme contingency of communicative situations online. And maybe then file the explanation of why the best artistic events focused on the issue of identity in the first stage were treated primarily with regard to rethink what has been lost in it, abandoned by it. Artists today are oriented towards the analysis of new dynamic business based on the use of the seductive mergers between emancipatory and egalitarian factors that promises electronic connectivity and factors authoritarian ideology of self-consumption system-network. These junctions between freedom and domination are effective in an age in which the objective of the hegemonic forms of power is not the suppression of subjectivity but the ability to regulate it. In social networks you are asked to show their most private and intimate side to share their choices and preferences, giving its opinion, to do

Internet made possible the momentary dissolution of identity load to what we are or think we are, that responsibility for oneself that all endure in real space. The individual had finally have the opportunity, through the connection, interact socially without exposure or risk emotionally. The subject is revealed only in speech acts, generating a communicative interaction contacts almost always devoid of any commitment or any claim to truth or authenticity.

8


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

Hey Guys, 2010 A synopsis Phantasy that come up from the philosophical legacy of Ayn Rand developed in the forties and fifties known as objectivism and whose main outreach work, "The Fountainhead", borrowed the language of architecture . Objectivism, an egothistic ethical system which denies altruism and any kind of collectivism . Represents itself as a laissez-faire capitalism with a strong individualism and a cheap sparkling touch of romanticism : great men and women, bounded to no other shaping the world for better. Rand's philosophy declined in the period of the postwar era but far away from disappearing resurfaced with greater force in the early nineties. According to the Congress Library one of his books, "Atlas Shrugged", was the second most influential book in the United States, second only to the Bible. And the group most influenced by his epic heroism and morality based on selfishness were the entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley . Creators of computers, biotechnology, software , Internet and digital networks. Much of them named their companies and even their children based on her life and work . Set up reading groups to spread her ideas and above all the saw themselves as randiand heroes.


Carlos Agamez

Another interesting work of yours that has highly impressed me and on which I would like to spend some words is The Fountanhead: in particular, I would like to stop for a moment to consider the "function" of the simple geometry suggested by your work:

Peripheral ARTeries

most of the times it doesn't seem to be just a passive background and one of the features that has mostly impacted on me is the way you have been capable of re-contextualizing the idea of environment itself... I'm sort of Gold, (background Svetlin Velchev, detail) convinced that some informations & ideas are Mixed Media on van canvas, 2012 photographer Theo Prooijen Business & Pleasure 7 Mixed Media, 2011


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

hidden, or even "encrypted" in the environment we live in, so we need -in a wayto decipher them. Maybe that one of the roles of an artist could be to reveal unexpected sides of Nature, especially of our inner Nature... what's your point about this?

The communication to which allude mass media theorists is one-way channel: it is resolved in the effort of power to organize and control the passive isolation of individuals with diffuse incitement and relentlessly from"leaders" of any kind. This systematic expropriation of intersubjective communication, the colonization of everyday life through an authoritarian mediation is not a necessary consequence of technical development, the current law is that all consume the maximum amount of anything; including anything worthy of the old culture, completely separate from its original meaning.

Bureaucratic current neo-capitalist society tends to take over the space in a totalitarian manner. Its core mission is to isolate individuals in the family unit, reducing their chances of action to a choice between a small number of preset behaviors and integrate them into pseudocommunities, as the factory, the block or the holiday village, letting its control and manipulation. If living means be anywhere as in the home, in the present conditions nobody really lives but is inhabited. The first step towards emancipation is releasing an instinct for building our own life now repressed.

The struggle of the subjective against that which erodes extends the boundaries of the old class struggle, renewing and sharpening. We want nothing of a world in which the guarantee that will not starve is paid to the risk of dying of boredom.

11


Borja RodrĂ­guez

And I couldn't do without mentioning Shake it! that is one of my favourite pieces of yours: in particular I have appreciated the way you have been capable of manipulating a concept dealing with the absence of the concept itself and I have to admit that I find this absolutely fascinating... Moreover, although I'm aware that this might sound a bit naif, I'm sort of convinced that Art in these days could play an effective role not only making aware public opinion about socio political issues: I would go as far as to say that nowadays Art can even steer people's behavior... I would take this chance to ask your point about this. Do you think that it's an exaggeration? And what could be in your opinion the role that an artist could play in our society?

Peripheral ARTeries

child requires born. The child is not born for society but society seizes him. Is born to be born. The artwork also born to be born, imposes its author, demands to be disregarding or without wondering whether or not required by society. This does not prevent society to take over the work of art, and although it is true that you can use whatever remains standing the fact that the artwork can fulfill a social function or not. Art consecuences are to wonder about our place in the world and our relationship with others. That which is not stirred becomes corrupted. There are knowledges and practices that are ends in themselves and precisely because its free and selfless nature, away from any commercial and practical link, can exert a fundamental role in cultivating the spirit, in the civil and cultural development of mankind.

The artwork does not ask to come into the world. Or rather, using a Ionesco's reflection, the artwork requires born in the same way that the

Your works are strictly connected to establish

12


Peripheral ARTeries

Borja RodrĂ­guez

a deep, intense involvement with your audience, both on an intellectual aspect and I daresay - on a physical one. So I would like to ask you if in your opinion personal experience is an absolutely indespensable part of a creative process both for creating a piece and in order to "enjoy" it...Do you think that a creative process could be disconnected from direct experience?

deep synergy that you are capable of establishing between traditional techniques and digital technologies ... so I would like to use this occasions to ask what's your point about he contamination between Art and Science... By the way, I'm sort of convinced that new media art will definitely fill the dichotomy between art and technology and I will dare to say that Art and Technology are going to assimilate one to each other... what's your point about this?

We would live in the age of mechanical reproduction but for now any time there is a reaction of any kind, being primitive impulse or rationalized decision, it is influenced by direct experience in some short of level. And there is where part of the beauty relies, on the different direct experiences of all of us. Godard says it is not about showing real things, but to show how things are truly. Art must not pursue a personal puzzle that only the artist can resolve. Duchamp has been converted in the easy alibi to slide down the slope of the indulgent irony. Neither art must be an entertainment show, with no mark, no weight. If you cannot be yourself in a unique way, why continue?

Contamination implies that there was an ideal and pure state and therefore to be preserve against malicious agents, i don't believe in it. I'll use an appellant example, if i may: you don't have to have any sympathy to Leonardo da Vinci but you cannot denie his influence in art and science. I see it as a whole, I see holistically. I like the symbiosis rather than convergence or the match because I think they are always working together. Knowing today possibilities of science from the point of view of art allows us to think in otherways, but also sometime arts' way of thinking trigger questions, raise expectations and science is driven to generate a new protocol or research from it.

Maybe because I have myself a scientific background, a feature of your art practice that has particularly impacted on me is the

11


Borja RodrĂ­guez

During these years your creations have been shown in several occasions, in many different countries and I think it's important to remark your recent participation to the VII Bang Barcelona Videoart Festival... It goes without saying that positive feedbacks are capable of supporting an artist: I sometimes happen to wonder if the expectation of a positive feedback could even influence the process of an artist, especially when the creations itself is tied to the involvement of the audience... By the way, how much important is for you the feedback of your audience? Do you ever think to whom will enjoy your Art when you conceive your pieces?

Peripheral ARTeries

different agents that participate in it. Saying so i expect and hope that if i work hard and elaborate a fine piece there would be others who will enjoy and wonder with it as i have with other people works. Thanks a lot for your time and for sharing your thoughts, Borja. My last question deals with your future plans: what's next for you? Anything coming up for you professionally that you would like readers to be aware of?

Right now i'm finishing a videoinstallation about life as an spectacle and our efforts on everyday evasion in which i'm using videogames aesthetics. A project i have been working on more than a year. At the same time i'm preparing a series of video encounters about digital art/culture issues, following the video "Love the noise: Speaking of the works Hey Guys and Why", a video resumme of a lecture at the II X0y1 International Seminar.Digital Art and Industry: Approaches from gender and cyberspace (2014 - Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo) because investigations are meant to be share.

Depending on what are you trying to accomplished with your work you will take more closely the feedback and opinions of others and which kind of others: the audience,the critics, the media, your family. Would you give more importance what a galerist says about your desires over the opinion of your lover? I do what i do as a responsable act to myself as human being. What really interests me is not the business but the work and alas not in the

12


Peripheral ARTeries Art Review February 2015