Page 1

SH LI G EN N IO RS

VE

Mestieri dArte Design

RED GOLD

Liverino’s matchless cribs carved in coral in the shadow of Mt. Vesuvius

GERMANY

Montblanc’s gold nibs are created for an all-round sensorial experience

ITALY

Over 200 fine furniture miniatures on show in Milan between past and present

PORTUGAL

Linen, silk, organdy and cotton reveal the secrets of Madeira’s embroideries


116 P. 9 THE ANTIDOTE TO CONSUMERISM INSTEAD OF HOARDING OBJECTS, WE SHOULD LEARN HOW TO SELECT THEM, GUIDED BY THE PRINCIPLE OF QUALITY

Quality is the unit of measure of beauty, the expression of the taste of the person pursuing it, and which masterful craftsmanship sublimates. Quality is the evidence, the final result. It is in the hands of the craftsman who shapes the raw material with passion and attention, above all to detail. Quality has nothing to do with the cost, but with the very idea of an object, which manifests itself in the predisposition to perform a function better and for a longer stretch of time. Today, escaping the compulsiveness of consumerism is an arduous task. In this age of insatiable appetites, what counts are the thousands (or millions) of followers, and the number of superfluous jackets, boats, cars, motorbikes and houses we own. But this is not what the world needs. The world needs to return to the essential: less but better. Which does not mean that we should lock ourselves away in a hermitage, but rather that we should express in full our individual personalities and judgement. After all, it is by using them, and not simply by buying them, that we truly make things our own. In order for us to want to use and keep these objects, they must prove to be useful. Usability and reliability thus shift an object’s role from competition to satisfaction, and the subject’s relationship with it from the desire to possess to the desire to do better. So in the end, despite many misleading inputs, we manage to recognise that, in fact, quality lies in the predisposition to perform a function better and for a longer stretch of time. The circle is closed. But geometry can also help us explain the fundamental relationship that Quality establishes with our Emotions, what I call the “QE” factor. It originates in the Ethical culture ingrained in the base angle of a triangle. This Ethical culture determines and creates the base angle on the opposite side, which represents Aesthetics. Thus we can say that Aesthetics is the consequence of Ethics. Both, together, elevate the spirit of life towards the “QE” vertex of the triangle. The path leading to this vertex involves us all, and it depends on our social status. To escape from hoarding we must learn to choose, respecting our economic means. It is better to have just one pair of good quality shoes in the wardrobe, rather than ten shoddily made pairs. Those who cannot afford a tailored suit can nevertheless present themselves to the world appropriately dressed by approaching businesses more in line with the size of their wallets. We have said that quality is the unit of measure of beauty, and this unit of measure is universal. Although Italy boasts a vast heritage of craftsmanship and creativity, it is interesting to discover the

fine manual skills of Switzerland and other European countries. The marvellous cribs entirely carved in coral in Torre del Greco speak the same language as the coloured Bohemian crystal glass from the Moser glassworks. The embroidered linen from the Portuguese island of Madeira expresses the same mastery as the precious yarns created by Lineapiù Italia. After all, Bruno Munari taught us that in order to design an object it is necessary to study the behaviour of individuals, their rituals and habits. Only then can we hope to speak the universal language that always thrives on quality.

Coast, are purchased by US tourists…), is increasingly influenced by these organised flows. This kind of tourism does not allow any transformation, updating or improvement of the product, since visitors are looking for objects that they were already determined to acquire before setting out on their trip. So farewell to all the attempts made by keen designers, animators, artists and experts to start from the tradition in order to renew it, driven by the noble intent to make these traditional productions evolve towards new markets for the cultural and productive wellbeing of our artisans!

P. 14 WHEN TOURISM KILLS CRAFTSMANSHIP

PP. 16-18 ON EQUAL TERMS

SOUVENIRS PENALISE OUR TRADITIONAL CRAFTS, STIFLING THE EVOLUTION OF TRADITIONAL PRODUCTIONS

Intellectuals and politicians, but also the man in the street, have long been repeating that Italy could live and flourish by investing in its most precious jewels: tourism and cultural heritage. In fact, visitors to the “Belpaese” are increasing day by day and everybody knows that tourists and travellers love to bring evidence of their experience back home: the souvenir! The souvenir is capable of evoking a place, a moment or a work of art. These small, inexpensive objects, which we “must” buy in order to substantiate our visit, represent the best way to support the costs of running cultural sites, from the world’s greatest museums and galleries (the Metropolitan museum in New York, the Louvre in Paris, the National Gallery in London…), to holy sites and up to the remotest ethnographic museums. Similarly, this practice is widespread also in our own vast territory, so rich in artworks and monuments, unfortunately giving rise to two constantly growing negative phenomena. The first concerns the endless amount of horrible, rather banal objects, which for several decades have been produced outside of Italy, very often by Chinese manufacturers. Not only are these objects devoid of any value, either in concrete terms or in their relevance. Above all, they do not enrich our small or large enterprises. In other words, these objects engage neither our creative talent nor our know-how. The second is associated with mass tourism, which has long penalised our artisan sector. By now we are all aware that, when travelling from the place of origin to every cultural destination, the average tourist has a clear idea right from departure of what he or she will visit and, consequently, purchase. Therefore, all traditional craftsmanship, which in recent decades has survived through tourism (the ceramics of Caltagirone, for example, are appreciated above all by German tourists, while those of Vietri sul Mare, on the Amalfi

DESIGN HAS ALLOWED ART AND CRAFT TO ENGAGE IN A DIALOGUE ON A COMMON GROUND

“That is the difference between a mechanic and an artist; he (the mechanic) cannot conceive as an artist.” The words of Jacob Epstein, pronounced in the trial initiated by Brancusi against the US customs authorities, which in 1926 had refused to classify his “Bird in Space” as a work of art, reiterate ancient beliefs. In the beginning, it was the Platonic framework that defined a bed as an idea, an object of craftsmanship and an image, but in combining the two extremes, the idea and the image, in the name of thought and creativity, the object itself was the simple result of the humble work of a carpenter. In the end, it was Kant’s notion of “disinterest” that closed the matter, despite the subtle distinction suggested by Luigi Pareyson, who attributed an aesthetic value to both the “work of the humblest worker” and to “the masterpiece of the most skilled craftsman”, but only so long as their works proved to be “redeemed by their extrinsic and mechanical applicability, and inventively incorporated into the individual rules of a work of art”. History has obsessively rewritten the ancient distinctions between art and craft, but in this way it has failed to unravel a knot that has become increasingly tangled over time. Today, however, Brancusi’s indignation makes us smile. After the furniture designed by the Futurists, and their artistic counterpart in the interiors of Pop Art, the carefully marked boundaries between these cultural sectors have dissolved. Design has been a determinant factor in the process, having heedlessly overturned this canonical opposition, replacing it with the blurred concepts of “project” and “function”. This notion has eventually run aground in the shallows of an increasingly refined technology, which has reduced the “making” of the artist and the craftsman to a single calculated and stable sequence. The results are there for all to see: the Venice Biennale often presents itself as a design show, while the Compasso d’Oro flaunts its artistic connotation. Should a nonwatered-down version of the history of this process ever be written, it will inevitably have


117

English version

subject”. It is precisely with regards to those different fruitions and interpretations that craftsmanship and design lay claim - each in their own way - to their sacred rights, which actually increase with the cultural regression of art. The dominance of “taste” appears exactly where craftsmanship and design challenge each other on an unknown terrain, from which they nonetheless draw the energy of their existence. In this bitter confrontation, the vital humus of desires, expectations, elaborate diagrams of the choices of their recipients (public, users, clients, consumers) form a single scenario onto which they project their changing physiognomy, assimilating society’s trends and dreams. The depths of these emotions converge into their aesthetic nature: their adherence to the body of the subject, their complete lack of intentionality, their non-cognitive value, even their refusal to identify themselves in a feeling, is what makes “taste” an aesthetic element that is active but basically anarchic, and which governs our choices, including that of objects. This indecipherable word, this “stone guest”, which nonetheless contains the secret of the form of all things, provides the bond and the ground where craftsmanship and design can confront themselves not in the name of a personal poetics, but rather of the wide and manifold universe of a community that welcomes them and justifies them. Remo Cantoni’s considerations come to mind: investigating the themes of anthropological philosophy, he drew everyone’s attention to a “stratified and multifaceted” world, capable of taking into account “the problematic and multidimensional nature of man”. This is where we have to start to face the challenges of a time that is here today, and not tomorrow.

the project. In fact, part of the proceeds will be devoted to social projects intended to give higher visibility to the many unknown artisans who work for major brands and, at the same time, sustain the tradition of ancient crafts. To this end, a percentage of the sales will be donated to the Cologni Foundation for the Métiers d’Art to finance a number of apprenticeships. The Crafted Society collection is conceived and designed by Lise Bonnet, the brand’s creative director and Martin Johnston’s partner in work and in life. Together they are celebrating the launch of their online platform dedicated to clothing items exclusively Made in Italy: sneakers, jeans, cashmere scarves, shoes and hats. The sneakers are handmade by IFG of Corridonia, run by Mario Grassetti and his son Giacomo, which supplies some of the world’s leading luxury houses. Specialised textile company Berto, situated in Veneto, supplies Crafted Society’s denim, which is tailored into perfect jeans by Laboratorio IMjiT35020, in Due Carrare. Silk and cashmere scarves are embellished by the creative imagination of artist Roger Selden and finished in Prato by the master artisans of Lanificio Arca, founded by Cino Cini. Panama hats are made by the Sorbatti factory in Montappone, in the Marche region, the Italian capital of hats. The bags are made by Pelletterie Ales in Tolentino. Crafted Society sells exclusively on its e-commerce platform. craftedsociety.com 23

ALBUM 1

THE IRISH HANDMADE GLASS COMPANY Waterford (Irlanda) Henrietta street 11 Waterford è un’antica cittadina irlandese fondata dai Vichinghi nell’VIII secolo, sull’estuario del fiume Suir. La sua fama è dovuta alla lavorazione del cristallo che ancora oggi costituisce una delle grandi attrattive della città. Degna rappresentante di questa antica tradizione manifatturiera è la Irish Handmade Glass Company, fondata da un gruppo di maestri vetrai nel 2009. I nomi di questi straordinari artigiani sono Richard Rowe, Derek

Smith, Danny Murphy e Tony Hayes. Tutti loro hanno imparato come apprendisti a 15 anni, seguendo le orme dei loro padri. E da allora non hanno mai smesso di affinare le loro tecniche. Seguendo la tradizione dei maestri artigiani delle botteghe di un tempo, questi eccellenti vetrai hanno deciso di istituire all’interno della vetreria dei corsi di perfezionamento professionale per trasmettere il loro sapere alle nuove generazioni. Negli ampi locali della loro sede, la Kite Design, vengono eseguite tutte le fasi della lavorazione del vetro. theirishhandmadeglasscompany.com

PP. 20|27 ALBUM

2

PATRICK DAMIAENS Maaseik (Belgio), Aan de Lievenheer 5 Patrick Damiaens è un ebanista fiammingo che scolpisce secondo la tecnica di Liegi, una raffinata procedura messa a punto nel ’700 e utilizzata per impreziosire cassettoni, armadi, sedie, pannelli per i signori di quel tempo. Dal 1992, data di apertura del suo atelier di Maaseik, in Belgio, la sua sfida quotidiana è rendere ogni pezzo unico e dargli una storia. Damiaens utilizza sequenze di lavoro predefinite: prima prepara uno schizzo con una matita rossa, che in seguito ricopia su un foglio di carta da lucido; poi trasferisce i motivi ornamentali da lui creati su essenze pregiate, riportando ogni particolare con una punta a tracciare. Imprime così sui pannelli di legno foglie, fiori, frutti, bacche, strumenti musicali, putti, riccioli ispirati a modelli settecenteschi, stemmi nobiliari. Per «sgrossare» il legno e preparare la superficie per le fasi successive si serve di una fresatrice verticale. Munito poi di sgorbie, lime e strumenti sottilissimi, scolpisce ogni dettaglio fino a ottenere il risultato desiderato. Le sue sculture vengono spesso paragonate a dei pizzi in legno. Come quelle del suo maestro ideale, l’ebanista del ’700

3

Grinling Gibbons, noto per le cascate di fiori e di frutta che decoravano mobili, pareti e camini, e che lo resero famoso. Oltre a creare decori ex novo, Patrick Damiaens è un abile restauratore che lavora anche per i musei e per le fiere di antiquariato. Propone anche corsi di formazione a chi desidera apprendere questo raffinato mestiere che, come sostiene lui, «non ti lascia mai il tempo per annoiarti, perché ogni progetto è unico, diverso, e ha la sua storia». patrickdamiaens.be 3

20

di Stefania Montani

ALBUM

CRAFTED SOCIETY Crafted Society è un progetto nato nella primavera 2017 da Martin Johnston, un imprenditore inglese con esperienza nel mondo della moda, con l’intento di promuovere l’artigianato italiano di eccellenza, e supportare le scuole di formazione professionale. Partendo da tre principi per lui fondamentali, qualità-tradizione-responsabilità sociale, Johnston ha coniato il suo motto «Luxury for good», riferendosi non solo al «fatto bene» che è componente essenziale delle creazioni artigianali, ma anche allo scopo etico e sociale del progetto. Parte delle somme ricavate, infatti, è destinata a progetti sociali volti a dare visibilità ai tanti artigiani sconosciuti che lavorano per grandi marchi e a mantenere viva la tradizione degli antichi mestieri. A tal proposito, infatti, una percentuale delle vendite sarà donata alla Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte per finanziare alcuni tirocini formativi. A concepire e disegnare la collezione Crafted Society è Lise Bonnet, direttore creativo del brand, compagna nel lavoro e nella vita di Martin Johnston. Insieme festeggiano il debutto sulla loro piattaforma di sneaker, jeans, sciarpe in cashmere, scarpe e cappelli: tutti capi di abbigliamento esclusivamente made in Italy. Le sneaker sono realizzate a mano dalla Ifg di Corridonia, guidata da Mario Grassetti, che con il figlio Giacomo rifornisce alcune delle più importanti case di lusso nel mondo. Il denim per i jeans, invece, viene prodotto da artigiani veneti specializzati. Partner del brand è l’industria tessile Berto. Lo sviluppo sartoriale è affidato al Laboratorio IMjiT35020 di Due Carrare. Le calzature sono realizzate dalle Pelletterie Ales di Tolentino. Ci sono poi le sciarpe in seta e cashmere impreziosite dall’estro creativo dell’artista Roger Selden. A rifinire l’opera sono i maestri artigiani del Lanificio Arca di Prato, fondata da Cino Cini. Ci sono infine i cappelli Panama della fabbrica Sorbatti di Montappone, nelle Marche, capitale italiana del cappello. Vendite su piattaforma e-commerce. craftedsociety.com

CRAFTED SOCIETY

The Crafted Society project was launched in the spring of 2017 by Martin Johnston, an English entrepreneur with a long experience in the world of fashion. It promotes outstanding Italian craftsmanship and, at the same time, supports professional training schools. Johnston’s guiding principles – quality, tradition and social responsibility – have coined Crafted Society’s motto “Luxury for good”, which refers not only to the quality of being “well made” (an essential feature of handcrafted products), but also to the ethical and social purpose of

1

2

PHILIPPE DEBEERST

to take into account the confusion: not in the sense of the casual eruption of creative energies, as used to be the case a long time before, but only as the vacuum of ideas through which it has unknowingly sailed. Yet if we read this story with eyes that are sensitive to nuances, a light - timid and flickering, but nonetheless fixed like a polar star - will illuminate our understanding. It has nothing to do with the dispute between art and craft, over which a pretentious controversy has been raging for centuries, but a comparison between craftsmanship and design, whose historical and social roots sink into a rough terrain, not devoid of sudden openings and associations. Common to both is, first of all, the concept of “function”, which defines the utilitarian quality of any object, be it a Biedermeier secretaire or a Sambonet fish tray, and to that of “form”, which represents an added value for both, and in which the aesthetic qualities of the object are reflected, from a Morris chair to a Pesce armchair. Things, however, become more complicated when it comes to the manufacturing process. Not so much because of the old question of whether an object is machine or hand made, but rather because it calls into play its “repeatability”, which distinguishes a “unique piece” from an industrially made object that can be reproduced an infinite number of times. Whether we like it or not, the problem concerns the formal aspect of the object: in the first case, its beauty lies in the craftsmanship that goes into the article, while in the case of machine-made items or, more precisely, design objects, its beauty lies entirely in the design. However, the issue, which in art would attribute the status of masterpiece to a “one-ofa-kind” piece and condemn its copy as a fake, emerges in another aspect. Indeed, it shows itself in a different light simply by overturning it, raising the social question in place of that of a pure aesthetic enjoyment. It then becomes easy to see how the concept of “unrepeatability” takes a negative connotation when applied to the level of a social ethic, while the idea of a widely shared aesthetic takes on an undisputed legitimacy. While the personalised object made by a craftsman is penalised by its uniqueness, design gets rid of this limitation in the name of social equality, at the same time paying the cost of a “commonplace aesthetic” or, if we prefer, a standardised aesthetic. Yet craftsmanship and design meet and confront each other on equal terms in the field of “taste”. The term is an old one, rendered obsolete by the history of art. Hegel looked at it with suspicion. It dominated aesthetics until the 19th century, when one of Baudelaire’s careless characters lost his halo in a muddy alley in Paris. Today we contemplate its “deconstruction”, and Gillo Dorfles has long acknowledged that there is no absolute value in art, but only “different ways of fruition and interpretation, corresponding to the different personalities of those who observe the work of art, which can vary with time, psychological situation and even the sensorial nature of the

ATELIER DE L’ALLIANCE Saint-Just-et-Vacquières (Francia) Le mas Champion Sara Bran è una straordinaria orafa, che dopo anni di studio e di pratica ha messo a punto l’innovativa tecnica «dentelle sur or» per realizzare monili che sembrano leggerissimi pizzi. Il suo studio e la sua ricerca sono stati premiati dai tanti riconoscimenti che l’hanno vista vincitrice del Grand

Prix de la Création 2011, finalista al Prix Liliane Bettencourt pour l’Intelligence de la Main, oltre che ospite nelle esposizioni di gioielli in alcuni musei e gallerie d’arte. I materiali da lei lavorati sono l’argento e l’oro a 18 carati, spesso impreziositi da diamanti e pietre importanti. Nel suo Atelier de l’Alliance, a Saint-Just-et-Vacquières (poco lontano da Avignone), Sara crea i suoi gioielli seguendo la tradizione orafa in tutti i procedimenti. La «dentelle sur or» è la parte innovativa del suo saper fare artigianale, che consiste nell’incidere una o più superfici, sovrapponendo le trame, creando dei movimenti con le diverse facce, completando la superficie con l’aggiunta di perle o pietre preziose. La padronanza dei gesti le consente di incidere a mano libera i suoi impalpabili pizzi. Il Museo delle arti decorative di Lisbona la ospita regolarmente mettendole a disposizione i documenti sugli antichi pizzi portoghesi. sarabran.fr

THE IRISH HANDMADE GLASS COMPANY Waterford, 11 Henrietta Street (Ireland)

Waterford is an ancient Irish city founded in the 8th century by the Vikings on the estuary of the River Suir. It is famous for its glassworks, to this day one of the major attractions of the city. The Irish Handmade Glass Company is the worthy representative of this ancient manufacturing heritage. The glassworks were founded in 2009 by an extraordinary group of master glassmakers who started their training at the age of 15, following in their fathers’ footsteps. In keeping with the tradition of workshops of the past, these outstanding master craftsmen have established advanced training courses inside the glassworks in order to pass on their know-how. All the phases of the creation of glass are carried out in the spacious premises of their headquarters, Kite Design. theirishhandmadeglasscompany.com


118 PATRICK DAMIAENS Maaseik, Aan de Lievenheer 5 (Belgium)

Flemish cabinetmaker Patrick Damiaens employs the Liège-style woodcarving technique, a sophisticated procedure perfected in the 18th century to embellish chests, wardrobes, chairs and panels for the gentry of that time. Since 1992, the year he opened his studio in Maaseik, Belgium, his daily challenge has been to make each object unique and with its own history. Damiaens follows a predefined procedure: he begins by making a rough sketch using a red pencil, then the design is redrawn on tracing paper and transferred onto high quality natural woods using a scriber. The wood surrounding the design is removed by means of a router, thus creating a suitable surface for carving. In the modelling phase, Damiaens uses chisels, gouges and files to carve every detail of the design, until he achieves the desired result. On his wood panels he creates leaves, flowers, fruits, berries, musical instruments, putti, spirals inspired by 18th-century models and coats of arms. His ornamental sculptures are often compared to the wooden lace made by his ideal master, 18th-century cabinetmaker Grinling Gibbons, renown for the cascades of flowers and fruit that decorated his furniture, wall panels and fireplaces. In addition to creating new decorations, Patrick Damiaens is a skilled restorer who works for museums and antique fairs. He also offers training courses to those wishing to learn this refined craft, which, as he affirms, “is never tedious, because each project is unique, different and with its own history.” patrickdamiaens.be

ATELIER DE L’ALLIANCE Saint-Just-et-Vacquières

Le Mas Champion (France) Sara Bran is an extraordinary goldsmith, who perfected the innovative dentelle sur or technique to create jewels that look like light lace. Her atelier and her research have been recognised with a number of awards: she won the Grand Prix de la Création 2011, she was finalist in the Prix Liliane Bettencourt Pour l’Intelligence de la Main, and her works have been showcased in the jewellery exhibitions of a number of museums and art galleries. She employs silver and 18-carat gold, often embellished with diamonds and precious stones. In her Atelier de l’Alliance, situated in Saint-Just-et-Vacquieres (near Avignon), Sara Bran creates jewellery following traditional goldsmithing procedures. Her gold lacework represents the innovative side of her handcrafting know-how, which consists in engraving one or more surfaces, superimposing the patterns and creating movements with the various faces, with pearls or precious stones to complete the decoration. Her mastery enables her to skilfully engrave her impalpable lace pieces by hand. She regularly visits the Museum of Decorative Arts in Lisbon to consult documents on antique Portuguese lacework. sarabran.fr

25

ALBUM 4

GALÉRIE KREO Parigi, rue Dauphine 31 Kreo è una delle più importanti gallerie francesi di design: l’ha aperta nel 1999 Didier Krzentowski che insieme alla moglie Clémence ha destinato il suo spazio nel XIII arrondissement al design e alla sperimentazione. Di qui sono passati tanti mostri sacri quali Ron Arad, Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Pierre Charpin, Naoto Fukasawa, Jaime Hayon, Konstantin Grcic, Hella Jongerius, Alessandro Mendini, Jasper Morrison, Marc Newson, Martin Szekely, Studio Wieki Somers, Ettore Sottsass, i fratelli Campana... Racconta Clémence Krzentowski: «Ci siamo conosciuti circa 30 anni fa e quello che maggiormente mi colpì di Didier fu la curiosità per tutte le cose, il suo desiderio di studiare e approfondire, la sua perenne caccia al tesoro che l’ha portato a scoprire tanti nuovi talenti». E Didier conferma: «Quando vedo un pezzo diverso dal solito, inusuale, mi incuriosisco. È come ascoltare una nuova storia...». Instancabili collezionisti e ricercatori di nuove soluzioni soprattutto nel campo dell’illuminazione, i coniugi Krzentowski nel 2008 hanno trasferito la loro galleria Kreo in rue Dauphine, nel cuore di Saint-Germain-des-Prés, a Parigi. Ma Kreo è molto più di uno spazio espositivo, è anche un laboratorio o meglio una fucina di idee e progetti che vengono realizzati dai designer contemporanei più innovativi, in edizione limitata e in esclusiva per Kreo. La galleria ha aperto da qualche anno un secondo avamposto a Londra, nel quartiere Mayfair. Oltre a presentare collezioni di design contemporaneo, è il punto di riferimento per le lampade francesi e italiane dagli anni 40 agli anni 80, periodo del quale Didier Krzentowski è grande esperto. Ha pubblicato due libri sulle luci dagli anni 50 a oggi, The complete designers’ lights, ognuno dei quali raccoglie 800 modelli di lampade. galeriekreo.com PÂTISSERIE DOLCETTI Ginevra, place du Bourg-de-Four 9 Una grande passione per la pasticceria tenuta nel cassetto. Poi il cambio di vita a 35 anni, il trasferimento

4

con la famiglia a Ginevra, la sfida: ricominciare a studiare per diventare mâitre pâtissier, frequentando corsi, master e facendo apprendistato con uno dei migliori chef pasticcieri francesi, mâitre Brocard. Oggi si può dire che Stefania Braggiotti è riuscita a dare vita al suo sogno: da cinque anni è nata Dolcetti - Pâtisserie Fine Italienne, un laboratorio artigianale che ogni giorno sforna dolci prelibati seguendo le ricette della tradizione regionale italiana e svizzera e consegnandoli a domicilio. I suoi clienti sono sia privati sia ristoranti oppure caffetterie. «La mia forza consiste nell’utilizzare materie prime di alta gamma, in parte provenienti dall’Italia, come farina, grano cotto, ricotta, frutta candita, e in parte dalla Svizzera, come latte, burro o cioc-

colato. Tra i miei dolci più richiesti c’è la pastiera napoletana, la cassata, lo strudel, il babà. Ma soprattutto la pasticceria mignon e i cannoli che realizzo con una sfoglia sottilissima e riempio al momento della consegna, affinché rimanga croccante». Le ordinazioni si possono effettuare online, 48 ore prima della consegna. patisserie-dolcetti.ch 5

R.T. RESTAURO TESSILE Albinea (Reggio Emilia) via Monterampino 17 Sulle pendici dell’Appennino emiliano, in una vecchia casa colonica ristrutturata, c’è uno dei più rinomati laboratori di restauro tessile d’Italia. Lo hanno aperto quasi 25 anni fa Angela Lusvarghi, Ivana Micheletti e Cristina Lusvarghi, cui

si è aggiunta in un secondo tempo Stellina Cherubini che, appassionate del loro lavoro, fanno veri miracoli portando a nuova vita ogni genere di tessuto antico. Dagli abiti del ’700 (calzature comprese) alle tappezzerie, dagli arazzi del ’500 ai pizzi e ai merletti. Il loro quartiere generale è un ex fienile ristrutturato: sul soppalco vengono tinti i filati e le sete, mentre al piano terra avvengono le varie fasi delle ricostruzioni manuali ad ago. Per il lavaggio c’è anche un’ampia vasca dotata di ponteggio mobile per spostare gli arazzi più grandi. Se invece il tessuto necessita di un trattamento a secco, vengono utilizzati solventi organici, che evaporano lasciando i colori inalterati. Per riposizionare la trama e l’ordito, dopo il trattamento a vapore, si stendono i tessuti sopra tavoli di cristallo. Le metodologie applicate ai restauri rispondono sempre ai criteri di reversibilità, di intrusione minima e di rispetto di ogni dato storico, artistico e sartoriale dell’opera originale. Tra i numerosi lavori eseguiti c’è il restauro di 40 abiti femminili e maschili e di vari accessori databili tra il 1795 e 1815 per l’esposizione Napoleone e l’impero della moda (2010) alla Triennale di Milano, il restauro del sipario del Teatro Ariosto di Reggio Emilia, il restauro degli abiti appartenuti a Benedetto XI, esposti prima al Quirinale e, fino al mese scorso, al Mao di Torino. restaurotessile.it

5

6

RAFA PÉREZ Haro (Spagna), Breton Herreros 17 Molti in Spagna, suo Paese natale, lo indicano come l’erede di Gaudí, per il carattere forte e originale delle sue opere. Confessa con semplicità il talentuoso Rafa, che ha ricevuto il premio speciale Fondazione Cologni in occasione del concorso «Open to art» organizzato dalla Galleria Officine Saffi di Milano: «I miei lavori a volte sorprendono anche me! Io utilizzo in genere impasti di argilla con caolino, ovvero porcellana, che mescolo e combino insieme all’argilla più scura, a volte arricchita da minerali, prima di

6

cuocere il tutto nel forno ad alta temperatura. L’argilla scura tende a espandersi, creando degli avvallamenti che sembrano crateri vulcanici e assumendo delle conformazioni che spesso vanno oltre la mia immaginazione, anche se sono io che predispongo gli strati e le forme. Questo è il fascino di trattare dei materiali così ricchi di proprietà e di componenti». Le sue straordinarie forme sono il frutto di un lungo processo di sperimentazione fatto con vari materiali attraverso gli anni. Nel suo laboratorio, Pérez lavora l’argilla a lastra, la stende col mattarello, sovrappone altri strati sottili variando la combinazione degli impasti, li taglia con la taglierina, arrotola le strisce di impasto come fossero nastri, poi li assembla conferendo alla composizione la forma finale desiderata, che spesso completa con colori. Una delle sue opere più importanti, Evoluzione del cilindro, è stata recentemente presentata al Museo nazionale della ceramica González Martí di Valencia accanto alle opere di alcuni dei più grandi artisti creatori di ceramica quali Antonio Gaudí, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Eduardo Chillida, Antoni Tapies e Miquel Barceló. Peréz ha ricevuto importanti premi in Francia, Portogallo, Spagna, Danimarca. rafaperez.es

GALÉRIE KREO Paris, rue Dauphine 31 (France)

Kreo is one of the most important French design galleries, opened in 1999 by Didier Krzentowski. Together with his wife Clémence, they have dedicated their gallery to design and experimentation. Ron Arad, Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Pierre Charpin, Naoto Fukasawa, Jaime Hayon, Konstantin Grcic, Hella Jongerius, Alessandro Mendini, Jasper Morrison, Marc Newson, Martin Szekely, Studio Wieki Somers, Ettore Sottsass and the Campana Brothers have all collaborated with Galérie Kreo. Clémence Krzentowski tells us: “We met around 30 years ago and what struck me most about Didier was his curiosity: he was endlessly hunting for treasures, which is how he discovered so many new talents.” Didier himself confirms: “When I see a piece that is out of the ordinary, it makes me curious. It’s like listening to a new story…” Kreo is also a laboratory, or rather a hotbed of ideas and projects that are created, in limited edition and exclusively for Kreo, by the most innovative contemporary designers. A few years ago, Galérie Kreo opened a second outpost in London’s Mayfair. In addition to contemporary design collections, the gallery is considered a point of reference for French and Italian lights from the 1940s to the 1980s. It has published “The complete designers’ lights”, two volumes on lights from the 1950s until the present day, each of which contains 800 models of lamps. galeriekreo.com

PÂTISSERIE DOLCETTI Geneva, place du Bourg-de-Four 9 (Switzerland)

She kept her great passion for cakes and pastries in a drawer for years. Then, at the age of 35, her life changed: her family moved to Geneva and she took up the challenge to resume studies and become Mâitre pâtissier. She attended courses, master classes and served an apprenticeship with Mâitre Brocard, one of the best French pastry chefs. Five years ago, Stefania Braggiotti succeeded in giving life to her dream and opened an artisan laboratory that produces delicious fresh cakes and pastries, following the traditional regional recipes of Italy and Switzerland. Her products are delivered daily to private customers, restaurants and cafés. “My strength lies in using high-quality ingredients: flour, cooked wheat, ricotta and candied fruit from Italy; milk, butter and chocolate from Switzerland.

Among my most requested cakes and pastries are pastiera napoletana, cassata, strudel and babà. But above all small pastry and cannoli, which I make with a very thin puff pastry and fill at the time of delivery, so that they don’t lose their crispness.” Online orders are accepted up to 48 hours before delivery. patisserie-dolcetti.ch

R.T. RESTAURO TESSILE Albinea, via Monterampino 17 (Italy)

An old restructured farmhouse on the slopes of the Emilian Apennines houses one of the most renowned textile restoration workshops in Italy. Angela Lusvarghi, Ivana Micheletti and Cristina Lusvarghi, later joined by Stellina Cherubini, opened it nearly 25 years ago to bring all kinds of antique fabrics to new life. The headquarters are in a restructured barn: yarns and silks are dyed on the upper floor, while the ground floor is used for the manual restoration of textiles. The methodologies followed by R.T. Restauro Tessile always meet the criteria of reversibility, minimal interference and respect for every historical, artistic and sartorial detail of the original work. Among the numerous achievements of this outstanding workshop are the restoration of 40 items of women’s and men’s clothing and accessories dating from 1795 to 1815 for the exhibition “Napoleon & the Empire of Fashion”, held in 2010 at the Milan Triennale; the renovation of the curtain of the Teatro Ariosto in Reggio Emilia; the restoration of clothes belonging to Benedict XI, exhibited first at the Quirinale in Rome then and at the MAO in Turin. restaurotessile.it

RAFA PÉREZ Haro, Breton Herreros 17 (Spain)

In Spain, he is widely considered the heir to Gaudí on account of the strong, original character of his works. The talented Rafa received the special Cologni Foundation award in the “Open to art” competition organised by the Galleria Officine Saffi in Milan. “At times my works surprise me too!” he candidly declares. “I generally use clay impastos with kaolin, which I mix with darker clay, sometimes enriched with minerals, before firing it in the kiln at a high temperature. The dark clay tends to expand, creating depressions that look like volcanic craters and taking on structures that often go beyond my imagination, even though I am the one who layers and shapes the clay. That is the fascinating thing about handling materials that are so rich in properties and components.” His extraordinary sculptures are the result of a long process of experimentation with various materials over the years. One of his most important works, “Evolution of the cylinder”, was recently presented at the González Martí National Museum of Ceramics in Valencia alongside works by some of the greatest ceramic artists. Peréz has received important awards in France, Portugal, Spain and Denmark. rafaperez.es


English version

8

7

7

ALAN DODD Londra tel. +44 (0)7788 151248 Grande studioso di arte, storia e pittura, Alan Dodd è uno straordinario artista in grado di dipingere decori parietali e vedute in perfetto stile con gli ambienti delle case. La sua bravura è testimoniata dal suo curriculum: basti dire che tra i dipinti murali da lui creati ci sono cinque grandi «capricci» realizzati per la Painted Room del Victoria & Albert Museum, commissionati da Sir Roy Strong nel 1986; dei pannelli architetturali ispirati a Piranesi per le decorazioni dell’Alexandra Palace; il soffitto pompeiano della New Picture Room al Sir John Soane Museum di Londra, che trae spunto da disegni inediti del 1890. Mentre a Spencer House ha ripreso la decorazione della balaustra trompe-l’œil sulla settecentesca scala progettata dall’architetto Vardy. Spaziando dagli sfondi barocchi a quelli neoclassici, dai soffitti pompeiani alle chinoiserie, Dodd riesce a conferire carattere e omogeneità a ogni ambiente (nella foto, il soffitto di una sala da pranzo a Gerrards Cross). Mai banale, sempre in linea con lo stile della casa da decorare, utilizza tempere, pigmenti, oli, terre, a seconda delle superfici e degli effetti voluti. La sua versatilità gli consente di spaziare dai trompe-l’œil paesaggistici ai decori orientali, fino ai cieli con voli di rondini. Notevoli sono anche i suoi

finti marmi realizzati in più tonalità di colore per le zoccolature delle scale, rifiniti a cera. Munito di colori e pennelli, Alan Dodd fa interventi sia su porte e pareti di appartamenti sia su facciate e scaloni di palazzi, alberghi o musei. Spesso si occupa di scenografia e realizza gli sfondi e i costumi per le opere liriche e teatrali. Un artista a tutto tondo. I suoi clienti sono ormai internazionali, non solo in Inghilterra e in Europa ma anche negli Stati Uniti. www.alandodd.co.uk

ANTONELLA ZUNINO REGGIO Milano, via Lanzone 13 Prima una prestigiosa carriera come pr di Roberta di Camerino, poi di Gian Marco Venturi, Dolce & Gabbana, Cesare Paciotti; oggi artista-artigiana che crea, dipinge, personalizza borse, portafogli, scarpe e cappelli. Stiamo parlando di Antonella Zunino Reggio, vulcanica ed elegantissima signora, che da poco tempo ha deciso di mettere in pratica il suo diploma artistico rimasto a lungo nel cassetto allestendo un laboratorio artigianale tutto suo. Qui, munita di colori acrilici, oli, pennelli e tanta fantasia, crea decori per impreziosire accessori da donna e da uomo. Sono tutti dipinti da lei a mano libera, con tratti decisi e poi sfumati, secondo gli effetti che desidera ottenere. Le sue borse, le pochette e i portafogli sono realizzati in ecopelle, materiale che si presta a diversi tipi di lavorazione: liscio, martellato, tipo saffiano. A seconda della superficie che decora, la creativa signora stende i colori con diversi strati, sovrappone le tonalità, poi attende che si solidifichino per aggiungere sfumature, ombreggiature, piccoli particolari. Decora anche i cappelli di paglia. antonella.zuninoreggio@gmail.com

8

10

9

9

ARGENTIERE PAGLIAI Firenze, borgo San Jacopo 41r I Pagliai sono un’eccellenza italiana: basti pensare che il Mescitoio del Tritone, una straordinaria brocca-scultura in argento a forma di pesce realizzata dal nonno dell’attuale proprietario, è esposto in una vetrina del Museo degli argenti di Firenze. Una storia di tradizione e di amore per il mestiere tramandata di padre in figlio e che continua ai nostri giorni grazie a Paolo Pagliai, la moglie Raffaella e la figlia Stefania negli affascinanti locali di Borgo San Jacopo. Si utilizzano ancora gli strumenti del padre Orlando, creati appositamente per lui. Questi attrezzi, oltre alla sua profonda conoscenza degli stili, delle leghe, dei procedimenti

ARTE DEL FERRO Opera (Milano), via Trebbia 11/19 Luciano Gorlaghetti è un artigiano, figlio e nipote d’arte, che lavora il ferro fin da ragazzino. La sua fucina, all’interno di un grande capannone a Opera, è affollata da un’infinità di strumenti: incudini di varie dimensioni, trafilatrici, centinaia di pezzi che vanno dai martelli alle pinze alle forge, persino dei minuscoli attrezzi per lavorare i gioielli. Sullo sfondo un grande camino per il fuoco. «Partendo da un disegno», spiega Gorlaghetti, «posso realizzare complementi di arredo di ogni tipo. Qualunque idea può prendere forma nella mia fucina». Lungo le pareti ci sono campioni di vario tipo alternati a oggetti pronti per la consegna. «Sono entrato in bottega giovanissimo e, grazie ai preziosi insegnamenti di mio padre, ho sviluppato un’esperienza che oggi mi permette anche di effettuare restauri su ferri battuti antichi». I suoi interventi sono difficili da distinguere dalle parti originali, per la precisione con cui realizza gli ornati in tutti gli stili. «Una delle commissioni più particolari che ho ricevuto recentemente», confessa Gorlaghetti con giustificato orgoglio, «è una serie di lampioni di grandi dimensioni destinati alla città di San Pietroburgo». L’abile fabbro ha forgiato nella sua fucina anche la grande statua del Sole della piazza del paese, simbolo di Opera. artedelferrocmgl.jimdo.com

del passato, consentono a Paolo di essere uno straordinario restauratore e incisore. «Una specialità del mio laboratorio consiste nel ricreare posateria antica non più in produzione. Abbiamo realizzato anche una copia delle iniziali in argento con corona provenienti da un antico armadio di Paolina Bonaparte Borghese e delle ventole per lucerne del ’700 andate perdute». argentierepagliai.it

10

ALAN DODD London, +44 (0) 7788 151248 (United Kingdom)

A major expert in art, history and painting, Alan Dodd is an extraordinary artist capable of painting wall decorations and landscapes that are perfectly in style with the setting of the home. Among his mural paintings are five large capricci created for the Painted Room at the Victoria & Albert Museum, commissioned by Sir Roy Strong in 1986. Other works include architectural panels inspired by Piranesi for the decorations of Alexandra Palace and the Pompeian ceiling for the New Picture Room at Sir John Soane’s Museum in London, based on unexecuted drawings from 1890. At Spencer House he recreated the trompe-l’œil on an 18th-century staircase designed by architect Vardy. Never banal, Dodd succeeds in conferring character and homogeneity to every environment, with styles that range from Baroque to NeoClassical, from Pompeian to Chinoiserie. He uses tempera, pigments, oils, earth, depending on the surface and the desired effect. Also of considerable interest is his wax-finished faux marble, created in a variety of colour tones for the wainscoting on staircases. www.alandodd.co.uk

ANTONELLA ZUNINO REGGIO Milan, via Lanzone 13 (Italy) After a prestigious career as PR for Roberta di Camerino, Gian Marco Venturi, Dolce & Gabbana and Cesare Paciotti, today Antonella Zunino Reggio has turned into an artistartisan who creates, paints and personalises handbags, wallets, shoes and hats. A dynamic and remarkably elegant lady, Zunino Reggio recently decided to put to use her art school diploma, which had been lying at the bottom of a drawer for years. She set up her own workshop where, equipped with acrylic colours, oils, brushes and plenty of imagination, she creates decorations for women’s and men’s accessories. She paints her designs with clearcut and shaded brushstrokes, according to the effect she wishes to achieve. Her handbags, clutches and wallets are made in eco-leather, a material that lends itself to various types of finishings: smooth, hammered and saffiano type. Depending on the surface she is decorating, this creative lady skilfully overlaps the layers of paint, adding tones, shadings and little details once the paint is completely dry. She also decorates straw hats. antonella.zuninoreggio@gmail.com

ARTE DEL FERRO Opera, via Trebbia 11/19 (Italy)

Luciano Gorlaghetti was born in a family of blacksmiths. His forge is located at Opera, in a vast warehouse crowded with countless tools: anvils, wire-drawing machines, hammers, pliers, forges and tiny utensils normally used for jewellery. In the background is a big chimney for the fire. “Any idea can take shape in my forge,” says Gorlaghetti. The walls are lined with samples of various objects ready for delivery. “I began my training in the workshop when I was very young and, thanks to the precious teachings of my father, I have gained an experience that enables me to restore antique wrought iron.” On account of his precision in creating decorations in all styles, it is hard to distinguish his repairs from the original parts. “One of the most special commissions I’ve received,” reveals Gorlaghetti, “is a series of large-scale lamp-posts I recently made for the city of St. Petersburg.” The skilled blacksmith also forged the large statue of the Sun, the symbol of Opera, that rises in the town square. artedelferrocmgl.jimdo.com

ARGENTIERE PAGLIAI Florence, borgo San Jacopo 41r (Italy)

Argentiere Pagliai is one of Italy’s outstanding silversmithing workshops. The “Mescitoio del Tritone”, an extraordinary fish-shaped silver pitcher-sculpture created by the current owner’s grandfather, is exhibited at the Silver Museum in Florence. The family’s tradition and passion for silversmithing has been handed down from father to son, and it continues to this day thanks to Paolo Pagliai, his wife Raffaella and their daughter Stefania. Dishes, trays, glasses, silverware, solid silver table boxes and customtailored objects are created in the workshop’s fascinating premises in Borgo San Jacopo, under the ribbed vaults of an ancient medieval building. Pagliai still uses his father Orlando’s tools: files, bows, polishing wheels, burnishers, chisels, hammers of various types, together with the tools created especially for him. These tools, coupled with his deep knowledge of styles, alloys and traditional procedures, enable him to perform extraordinary restoration works, as well as fine engravings. “My workshop is specialised in the reproduction of antique cutlery that is no longer in production and in the restoration of objects damaged by time.” In addition to the fish-shaped pitcher, Argentiere Pagliai treasure other historical and unique pieces: “We reproduced the silver initials with crown from an antique wardrobe that belonged to Paolina Bonaparte Borghese and the shades for some 18th-century oil lamps because the original ones had gone missing… It’s impossible to tell the difference!” he adds with justified pride. Among the latest creations of this workshop of wonders are copper jugs and frames with applications of animals engraved in silver. The atelier also offers antique and one-of-a-kind items, made in silver and Sheffield plate. The workshop’s international clientele has grown by word of mouth. argentierepagliai.it

PP. 28|33 A CORAL MANGER 28

Lavorazioni di stile

natività

29

CORALLINA I noti personaggi della tradizione napoletana si uniscono a quelli biblici nei presepi di Liverino, realizzati interamente a mano utilizzando l’«oro rosso». Espressione più alta di un sapere artigianale inimitabile di Federica Cavriana

All’ombra del Vesuvio, tra il vulcano e il mare, si trova il comune di Torre del Greco: 30 km quadrati diventati, storicamente, patria del corallo. Da qui una volta partivano le «coralline», barche per la pesca dell’«oro rosso», e fin dal XV secolo qui si compra, si vende, si lavora e si colleziona questo straordinario materiale organico. La famiglia Liverino, che possiede il più importante Museo del corallo al mondo proprio in questa cittadina, ben conosce la storia di questa materia e dell’arte antica che la accompagna. Enzo Liverino, attuale titolare, s’innamora di questo mondo sin da ragazzo, quando nella bottega dei suoi avi sviluppa un’ammirazione profonda per il lavoro degli incisori impiegati dal padre, le cui opere esprimono una bellezza poetica e una maestria che resterà sempre impressa nella sua memoria. Sono gli stessi tagliatori che pian piano gli insegnano a riconoscere il valore di ogni pezzo già nella fase del taglio, che rivela i potenziali usi o le eventuali imperfezioni. Sarà poi il decennio passato tra Napoli e Taiwan a perfezionare

Realizzato con coralli del Pacifico e corallo rosso del Mediterraneo, questo esemplare di presepe napoletano creato da Liverino è composto da un mosaico di centinaia di piccole tessere giustapposte. Per ultimare una natività come questa, con una base di 18x38 cm, e un’altezza di 26 cm, i maestri incisori impiegano circa un anno di lavoro (storeliverino.com). CARLO FALANGA

27

ALBUM

119

MINGLING TRADITIONAL CHARACTERS AND BIBLICAL FIGURES, LIVERINO’S NATIVITY SCENES ARE THE HIGHEST EXPRESSION OF A UNIQUE CRAFTSMANSHIP

In the shadow of Mount Vesuvius, between the volcano and the sea, lies the municipality of Torre del Greco: 30 square kilometres that are the historical home of coral. This is the town from where the Coralline boats set off, hunting for the so-called “red gold”, and where this extraordinary organic material has been bought, sold, worked and collected since the 15th century. The Liverino family, which owns the most important Coral Museum in the world, is an authority in the history of this material and the ancient art that characterises it. Enzo Liverino, the current owner, fell in love with coral as a boy, when he developed a deep admiration for the work of the engravers in his father’s workshop: he never forgot the poetic beauty and mastery expressed in their work. These artisans gradually taught him how to recognise the value of each piece at the cutting stage, which reveals potential uses and imperfections. He perfected his knowledge of coral in the decade he passed between Naples and Taiwan, and became a connoisseur. Meanwhile, in 1986, his father Basilio fulfilled a lifetime dream: to exhibit the beauties treasured in the family collection, the coral works from Asia, the Mediterranean, Sciacca, Trapani, Naples, China and Japan that had been acquired over the years by his great-grandfather and founder Basilio, his grandfather Vincenzo, his father Basilio, his son Vincenzo (called Enzo, the current owner), and those that his grandson Basilio will eventually add to the collection. This is how the Coral Museum was born. His desire to preserve these memorabilia and unique works for the benefit of visitors was such that the exhibition spaces, entirely carved in the rock, are designed to withstand even the event of a sudden eruption of Mount Vesuvius, of the kind that devastated the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, the ruins of which are only 5 kilometres away. By booking a visit to the collection, which showcases artworks from the 16th century onwards, it is possible to immerse oneself in the history of coral and understand how it is worked, from when the raw coral is selected, thoroughly washed and analysed to decide its use depending on the shape of


120 PP. 34|37 SIGNS BEFORE DESIGNS 34

Icone del design

35

l’inventore

DI SEGNI Prima di progettare un oggetto occorre studiare il comportamento dell’individuo, i suoi rituali, le sue abitudini. Bruno Munari è stato un artista totale che ci ha aiutato a capire, a usare, a valorizzare

In Emiliasdfasdf questa pagina, sBus la dendanti famosa lampada diorerumet Falkland essedis delcumque 1964, prodotta id moloreda comnisquam Danese, realizzata voloria con una quam maglia quae tubolare volum velche maios si snoda et autempo e prende ratur? forma Um lungo ditatem anelli faccus di alluminio. di d erum A fianco, quamuna incti «Forchetta tecer oriatiae parlante», et aceped gioco quis di invenzione dolenditatia divolupti Munari, sincima che sapeva gnimi, trovare odi aut l’inconsueto assitasi ipiet, nell’ordinario; AAo culparci qui trasforma officiendiauna conseque forchetta dus insiti una occ mano.

COURTESY CORRAIN

di Ugo La Pietra

COURTESY DANESE

the coral branch. The coral is then cut and divided by size, colour and quality. Then it can be rounded, pierced for threading, or it can be carved with a burin, according to the engraver’s fancy. Each phase is carefully carried out to avoid any waste: even the smallest parts are used to make tiny beads or decorative elements, while coral powder is useful for polishing. Enzo Liverino’s deep respect for this organic matter and love for his profession have led him to become President of the Cibjo Coral Commission and FAO consultant on world coral fishing. Liverino is also a member of the Club degli Orafi Italia, of Assogemme, a board member of Federpietre, head of the ICAA’s pearls, coral and cameos commission, and the contact for coral and cameos of the Istituto Gemmologico Italiano and of the Gemmological Institute in Bangkok. Active since 1894, the family business has always been inspired by a continuous modernisation process, particularly in the creation of jewels, which maintain a precious tradition that is deeply rooted in the territory but is constantly renewed by contemporary designs. The Liverino workshop honours the history of Torre del Greco also in the production of charming sculptures, such as nativity scenes entirely carved in coral. Some truly unique works emerge from the encounter of Campania’s excellences: Liverino’s nativity scenes are made in a way that faithfully follows the techniques used in the 18th century to make original Neapolitan cribs. The classic sacred and profane scenes, dotted with clay and wood statues dressed in more or less dazzling fabrics – of the kind that we are accustomed to see in the now famous Neapolitan workshops of Via San Gregorio Armeno – are made entirely in coral: not only the Holy Family, but even the woodcutter, the bagpiper, the dogs, hens, geese and rabbits are made in the precious shades of the “red gold” harvested in the depths of the sea. Also the setting of these highly detailed works is carved in coral of various species: from the Pacific, which is lightest in colour, to the Corallium Rubrum of the Mediterranean Sea. Small tesserae are used to form a mosaic covering the entire work with extraordinary mimetic effects: the porosity and colour of baked bricks, the grain of gravel, the rose nuances of Candoglia marble in the reproduction of classic architectural elements, while by matching red and almost white corals the artisan outlines a ladder, or a fine chequerboard floor. The traditional Neapolitan characters mingle with biblical figures, completely engraved by hand, often created from sections of the same coral branch, in which the carver’s and engraver’s expert eye have identified the forms that they then patiently bring out from the material. It can take up to one year to make a nativity scene, which is one of the most demanding and exclusive productions of the Liverino artisans, as well as the highest expression of an inimitable artisanal knowledge.

Quando Bruno Munari ritornava dai suoi viaggi in Giappone, oltre ad alimentare la sua passione per i bonsai, raccontava ai giovani designer italiani: «Sapete che la metà della popolazione mondiale non usa il letto?!». Gli orientali, infatti, dormono su una stuoia che al mattino riavvolgono e posizionano in un angolo della stanza, per poi srotolarla la sera prima di coricarsi. In questa frase è racchiuso uno dei tanti insegnamenti che ci ha lasciato il grande maestro Bruno Munari (1907-98), che ci dice che prima di progettare un oggetto occorre studiare il comportamento dell’individuo, i suoi rituali, le sue abitudini. Al contrario di ciò che spesso avviene nelle nostre università dove l’insegnamento invita lo studente a progettare partendo dalla tipologia di un oggetto, quella consolidata nel tempo. Il lavoro creativo di Bruno Munari ci ha lasciato tantissimi strumenti per decodificare, per capire, per conoscere: credo sia proprio questo il ruolo più importante che dobbiamo attribuirgli. Per costruire questi strumenti, Munari non rispettava nessuna regola disciplinare: di fatto ha sempre usa-

BRUNO MUNARI TAUGHT US THAT IN ORDER TO CONCEIVE AN OBJECT IT IS NECESSARY TO STUDY THE BEHAVIOUR OF INDIVIDUALS, THEIR RITUALS AND HABITS

When Bruno Munari returned from his travels to Japan, which fuelled his passion for bonsai, he used to tell young Italian designers: “Did you know that half of the world’s population doesn’t sleep in a bed?!” Indeed, people in Japan sleep on a mat, which they roll up in the morning and keep in a corner of the room, and then unfold it in the evening before settling down for the night. This phrase encapsulates just one of the many teachings that the great master Bruno Munari has left us, and it tells us that before designing an object, it is important to study the behaviour of individuals, their rituals and habits. Which is the opposite of what normally happens in our universities, where students are invited to design an object by starting from its classification. Bruno Munari’s creative work has left us many tools for decoding, for understanding, for knowing: I believe that this is the most important role we must attribute to him. To develop these tools, Munari did not follow any set rule: indeed, his models always went beyond the levels of intervention and the separations between disciplines. Because of their unpredictability, his researches open up new horizons and enable us to gain new meanings. To achieve this, Munari also created many objects whose true nature (their true function) is to “help us to understand, help us to use, help us to give value, help us to create”. “Help us to use”: like the Danese ashtray designed in 1951, which kept cigarette butts and ash out of sight. “Help us to give value”: like most of his objects, Munari’s 1964 “Falkland” tubular lamp responds to the requirements of simplicity, minimum storage bulk and low cost; designed with a large vertical structure with metal rings of different diameters, this lamp is foldable and lightweight, as well as easy to assemble. “Help us to create”: as with the “Abitacolo” metal furniture module of 1971, whose structure can be modified according to each young person’s creativity. “Help us to understand”: as demonstrated by his 1945 “Chair for short visits”, the

irregular design of which alludes to the fact that the concept of function does not always lie in its direct use, but it can also be found in its metaphorical use or, as in this case, in its impracticality. Gillo Dorfles has always underlined Munari’s playful and often ironic approach: his series of “Talking forks”, whose purpose was “to play with imagination”, is a perfect example of this attitude, which may be found in many small and large inventions and designs. Munari’s impracticable machines, his children’s books, his negative-positive paintings, his designs, travel sculptures, graphic design projects, educational games, tactile messages for the blind... Munari was a total artist, as he was recently defined by art historian Claudio Cerritelli, curator of a fine exhibition in Turin and of a great catalogue. A total artist who has tackled a huge amount of very different experiences. All this was possible thanks to his flexible way of thinking and of observing the objects that surround us, and to an openness of mind that was always ready to change, in order to learn something new.

PP. 38|41 A TIRELESS SPIRIT 38 Da secoli le donne di Nisa, piccolo borgo dell’Alto Alentejo, si ispirano alla natura per realizzare i loro preziosi «bordados», i sontuosi ricami che un tempo erano immancabili nei corredi nuziali. Dagli «alinhavados» (ricamo sfilato), al tombolo, alle coperte e agli scialli ricamati a punto catenella, alle applicazioni in feltro (sotto), di cui è specialista Dinis Pereira.

Craft tradizionale

39

ANIMA instancabile A 74 ANNI DINIS PEREIRA SI DEDICA ANCORA STRENUAMENTE ALLA SUA GRANDE PASSIONE: I RICAMI IN FELTRO CHE DA SECOLI CARATTERIZZANO I COSTUMI TIPICI DI NISA, PICCOLO BORGO PORTOGHESE

di Giovanna Marchello - foto di Susanna Pozzoli

DINIS PEREIRA IS ENGAGED IN THE PRESERVATION OF THE TRADITIONAL EMBROIDERIES OF NISA, IN PORTUGAL’S ALTO ALENTEJO

Dinis Pereira is a force of nature. At the age of 74 she is still dedicated body and soul to her great passion: the felt application embroideries that have characterised traditional folk costumes of Nisa, a small town in Portugal’s Alto Alentejo, throughout the centuries. In the past, all the women of Nisa knew how to make their precious bordados, the sumptuous embroideries that could never be missing in a young bride’s trousseau: drawn thread embroidery, bobbin lace, chain-stitch decorated felt blankets and woollen shawls, and the felt applications which are Dinis Pereira’s speciality. What makes Nisa embroidery unique is not just the techniques, but above all the subjects, which are always inspired by nature. In fact, the local flora is the starting point of every creation and each artisan develops her own language, which is always recognisable. Dinis Pereira’s style is characterised by the complexity of her designs, the exclusive use of wool felt, as the tradition requires,


English version PP. 42|47 TAKING UP THE GLOVE 42

43

Processi creativi

guanto SFIDA di

di Luca Maino

THOMASINE BARNEKOW È DIVENTATA UNA DESIGNER DI QUESTI ACCESSORI PER CASO. OGGI VENDE ED ESPONE IN TUTTO IL MONDO. VA ALLA RICERCA DEI MATERIALI MENO USUALI, PER DAR VITA A UN PRODOTTO CHE UNISCA ARTISTICITÀ E PORTABILITÀ. CHE NON SIA DI TENDENZA MA «PER SEMPRE»

L’INCONTRO DI DUE MONDI Nella pagina a fianco, un modello couture di Thomasine Barnekow che ricorda le forme del mare realizzato in collaborazione con l’artista Cécile Feilchenfeldt, appassionata di knitwear. I guanti firmati Thomasine Gloves si dividono in due linee, quella ready to wear e la couture.

BENJAMIN TAGUEMOUNT

and the variety of colours employed. Dinis Pereira was born into a very poor family and she had to raise a child on her own, but she managed to become independent by creating embroidered felt blankets, tablecloths, centrepieces and curtains that she sold to shops in Portugal, Italy and even further away, in the USA. When the market was at its peak, she employed around twenty craftswomen. When demand for this type of product collapsed, innovative and multifaceted Lisbon artist Joana Vasconcelos, whose visionary works incorporate Portugal’s traditional craftsmanship, appeared on Dinis Pereira’s horizon. “Being involved in Joana Vasconcelos’ creations was one of the reasons that gave me strength to continue,” explains Pereira. “It is a fantastic adventure and an opportunity to enter into new experiences with Nisa’s craftsmanship, in addition to the privilege of being put on display in the whole world.” Like Joana Vasconcelos, Dinis Pereira is personally committed to the preservation of a disappearing cultural heritage. She collaborates with the Museu do Bordado e do Barro, which was founded in 2009 by the Municipal Chamber of Nisa to protect and showcase the territory’s most beautiful embroideries and clays. In the course of time she has patiently collected thousands of designs on paper, some of which are more than one hundred years old, created by her fellow citizens for their felt application embroideries. Furthermore, each year in August Nisa celebrates its craftsmanship and gastronomy with a major fair, where Dinis Pereira displays her old and new works, because she likes to keep innovating. In the new workshop that the Municipal Chamber of Nisa provided her with, the tireless Dinis Pereira carries on her activity assisted by two skilled artisans and four apprentices. She has recently completed an important project for the Municipal Chamber of Lisbon, which consists of several panels measuring 5 metres by 4, onto which she has embroidered the symbol of the city in felt. They will be used to decorate the large windows of the town hall on festive days. Pereira is also working with a hat factory and a cork shoe factory (cork oaks are typical of the Alto Alentejo), which have asked her to develop some ornamental motifs inspired by Nisa’s decorations. Furthermore, she continues to create beautiful bags with felt applications designed by Kitty Oliveira, her great friend and mentor and since many years a close collaborator of Joana Vasconcelos. Dinis Pereira is one of the protagonists of the volume “The Master’s Touch”, written by Alberto Cavalli and produced by the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship. “This was the first great prize of my life as an artisan. I won, for my land and for my people. Contributing to the book has made me see my work from a different perspective, and I am very proud to be in the midst of this huge family of craftsmen.”

BY MIXING UNUSUAL MATERIALS, THOMASINE BARNEKOW MAKES GLOVES THAT ARE ARTISTIC AND WEARABLE, AND NEVER GO OUT OF FASHION

As a child, Thomasine Barnekow loved to observe the work of the many women who lived on the large farm where she grew up in the Swedish countryside. Some knitted, some embroidered and some dabbled in small tailoring jobs. Little did she know that one day those images would influence her future. Thomasine preferred to engrave wood and shape silver. When it came to deciding which faculty she would enrol at, she did not hesitate: engineering. “A few months later I was not so sure anymore. I wasn’t happy,” she tells us, sitting in her Parisian studio in the heart of Le Marais. “I needed to express my artistic side, so I decided to change. My friends who had decided to work in design had all chosen London, so I opted for the Design Academy in Eindhoven, in the Netherlands.” Thomasine concentrated on industrial design, but she still wasn’t sure it was the right choice. “I began to focus on fabrics, because I was fascinated by them. In one of the workshops I created my first project, which merged poetry and gloves. But the thunderbolt struck me only later.” A photograph sparked Barnekow’s imagination. “The subject was Michelle Lamy, the muse and wife of designer Rick Owens. I was impressed by the bracelets she was wearing. I began to imagine how to recreate that kind of movement in a glove. That’s when I made my first prototype.” Thomasine called her sculpture, a leather portrayal of jewellery, “Peau Précieuse”. It was created in the atelier of Georges Morand, master glove maker in Saint-Junien since 1946. After collaborating with Agnelle and Maison Fabre, two other famous French fine glove makers, Thomasine decided the time was ripe to launch her own business. “I am also very grateful to Spanish designer Elisa Palomino, who was on the jury of the International Talent Support in Trieste, in which I participated in 2007, who encouraged me to continue on this path. For me, gloves are not simply an accessory, but jewellery, and must be considered as such.” Today, Thomasine Barnekow exhibits and sells her gloves all over the world. Her creative process begins by observing her own hands. “I always have them in front of my eyes, so I can think of shapes to envelop

121

them. Nature and architecture are my main inspirations: the floral photographs of Karl Blossfeldt and the works of Oscar Niemeyer have influenced many of my creations. Before sketching the design I have in mind, I decide which materials to use. Leather is obviously my material of choice, but I also love to work with more unusual elements — plastic, vinyl — finding a way to harmonise them. That is the most exciting challenge.” Thomasine Gloves are divided into two lines: readyto-wear and couture. “For the former I rely on an artisan workshop in Hungary, which works with Italian and French raw materials. I have travelled a great deal to find the right level of quality, a strong artisan tradition and sustainable prices for a small brand such as mine. In the beginning, they were rather puzzled by my prototypes. Today they understand the challenge: to create a product that is both artistic and wearable, gloves that don’t just follow a trend, but are ageless and ‘forever’. Something that could be worn by a twenty-year-old girl or a woman of seventy.” Alongside her ready-to-wear gloves, which bear the names of the cities that inspired them, Thomasine personally creates one-off items in her studio. Her leather sculptures simulate the flight of swallows on the arm or shells clustered around it. “I recently completed a small collection of perfumed gloves – a tradition that dates back to the 16th century – which was presented at the Grand Musée du Parfum in Paris. I enjoy thinking that those who look at my gloves may wonder how it was possible to make them. Just as I am proud of the attention the press has devoted to me in the last few years. Until ten years ago, gloves were impossible to find in fashion magazines; in the 80s and 90s they were totally disregarded, while shoes and handbags got all the attention. Today there is a new consideration of the glove maker’s work, a world where craftsmanship and art meet to give life to an object that defies the concept of a seasonal item.”

PP. 48|51 A ROYAL MISSION 48

96 49

Eredità da tramandare

Missione REGALE IL BRITANNICO QUEEN ELIZABETH SCHOLARSHIP TRUST È UN ISTITUTO FILANTROPICO CHE DAL 1990 VEGLIA SUI MESTIERI A RISCHIO DI ESTINZIONE. ATTRAVERSO BORSE DI STUDIO E APPRENDISTATI, SOSTIENE GIOVANI ARTIGIANI E AFFERMATI MAESTRI di Akemi Okumura Roy (traduzione dall ’originale inglese di Giovanna Marchello)

Il Regno Unito vanta innumerevoli mestieri tradizionali, affascinanti e unici come i territori dove si sono sviluppati nel corso dei secoli, insieme a materie prime, strumenti di lavoro e competenze specifiche. Qui, come nel resto nel mondo, il progresso sta causando un pericoloso calo nel numero di artigiani e molti mestieri tradizionali rischiano l’estinzione. Tra le importanti associazioni che si prodigano per salvare questo prezioso patrimonio, il Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust merita una menzione particolare. Il Qest è un istituto filantropico fondato nel 1990 dalla Royal Warrant Holders Association (l’associazione che riunisce i fornitori ufficiali della Casa Reale inglese) per celebrare il 150° anniversario della sua creazione e il 90° compleanno della Regina Madre. La missione del Qest è di valorizzare l’eccellenza nei mestieri d’arte tradizionali attraverso borse di studio e apprendistati. Nel corso degli anni ha elargito più di quattro milioni di sterline per sostenere 412 borse di studio e 29 apprendistati indirizzati a persone tra i 17 e i 58 anni che operano in 130 discipline sia tradizionali sia contemporanee. Secondo le necessità, ogni borsista riceve tra mille e 18mila sterline, mentre agli apprendisti sono

In questa pagina, ritratto della Regina Elisabetta II dipinto da Alastair Barford, che nel 2012 è stato borsista del Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust. Il quadro è stato commissionato dalla rivista «Illustrated London News» nel 2015.

THE QUEEN ELIZABETH SCHOLARSHIP TRUST IS A CHARITABLE INSTITUTION CREATED TO PRESERVE TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

The United Kingdom can pride itself in many beautiful and unique traditional crafts, which have developed in a long history


122 renowned atelier of artist Charles H. Cecil in Florence. After he moved back from Italy, in 2015, he was commissioned to paint her majesty Queen Elizabeth’s portrait. Today, Alastair Barford’s works are both in private and public collections. Wayne Meeten, skilled jeweller and metal smith, received his scholarship in 2014. He was the first British artisan to learn both Zougan (inlay) and Chokin (metal carving) from Japanese masters, one of whom is a Living National Treasure. He is now handing them down to the next generation in his Devon studio. Mario Sierra is a scholar in hand-loom weaving. His aim was to resuscitate Mourne Textiles, the weaving company founded by his maternal grandmother, which closed down in the 1980s. He was awarded a scholarship in 2016, which allowed him to receive training from specialist Sheila Roderick, including loom maintenance, loom tuning, weaving and troubleshooting. Qest also funds several endangered crafts, like clog making, bell founding, coach building, bicycle making, woodwind instrument making. “The wonderful thing is that we are able to support such a broad range of skills from traditional rural crafts to contemporary and innovative crafts,” explains Deborah Pocock LVO, Executive Director of Qest. “We must not let these endangered crafts die out.” The next upcoming event is Qest’s third fundraising dinner, which will take place on 6 March 2018 at the Victoria & Albert Museum. The evening is a wonderful opportunity for about 250 highprofile guests to see the work of many Qest Scholars first hand and to raise funds to support similar talents though live and silent auctions. Qest is also strengthening partnerships with schools and colleges to help build solid opportunities for young people to work with their hands and become craft apprentices.

PP. 52|57 SOPHISTICATED MINIATURES 52

Suggestivi dialoghi

53

Sofisticate

Composizione di sedie di epoche e stili differenti tra cui spicca la sedia «Sole» di Piero Fornasetti (con lo schienale bianco, nella pagina a fianco). Si può ammirare visitando la mostra «In miniatura», fino al 7 gennaio 2018 a Milano a Villa Necchi Campiglio.

MINIATURE

DAI MAESTRI EBANISTI SETTECENTESCHI AI GRANDI PROTOTIPISTI MODERNI, OLTRE 200 PREZIOSI MODELLI DI MOBILI SONO IN MOSTRA A MILANO A VILLA NECCHI CAMPIGLIO

GUIDO TARONI

that encompasses local materials, tools and traditional skills. Like elsewhere in the modern world, technological progress is causing a sharp decline in the number of artisans and many traditional crafts are becoming critically endangered. Among the important associations that are striving to preserve this precious heritage, the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust deserves a special mention. Qest is the charitable arm of the Royal Warrant Holders Association and it was set up in 1990 to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Association and the 90th birthday of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother. Qest was established to support excellence in traditional British craftsmanship. It offers two forms of grant giving: scholarships and apprenticeships. Since its inception, it has awarded over £4 million to 412 scholars and 29 apprentices aged between 17 and 58 across 130 craft disciplines, from contemporary to traditional. Each scholar receives between £1,000 and £18,000, whereas apprentices are granted up to £6,000 a year, for a maximum of £18,000 over three years. Qest also develops seminars that cover topics such as setting up a business as a sole trader, pricing, sourcing suppliers and marketing, including on-line/offline presence, website development and social media. The success of the Qest programme is reflected in the percentage of recipients who continue practicing their crafts, which is as high as 93%. Many of these craftspeople are also leaders in their field. To qualify for the grants, candidates must pass an intensive 3-stage selection process. In each round, specially appointed master craftspeople assess up to 15 applications in terms of skill and potential and whether the funding request is realistic or not. In the final stage, 30 candidates are interviewed by a board of Qest Skills Advisors chaired by a Qest Trustee. The process for apprenticeships is very similar, with both the apprentice and employer attending the interview. Qest supports young artisans and established master craftspeople alike. It is particularly focused on those who continue an extinct craft, revive a craft business, and adapt and interpret the essential foundations of traditional craft to create a new craft having relevance in our modern society. Alan Partridge was granted a scholarship in 2007 to master the highly specialized skill of making reed shallots for pipe organs. He is now the last surviving shallot maker in Great Britain, which he supplies to some of the most prestigious churches, cathedrals and public buildings worldwide. “I am committed to the industry and I aim to serve the organ building trade both in the UK and internationally for as long as I can,” he says. “Shallot making is very labour intensive, but whilst I have had young people in my workshop over the years, passing on my skills and knowledge, unfortunately there isn’t enough work or potential for someone to earn a living.” After graduating in Fine Arts at University College Falmouth, Alastair Barford received funding from Qest to study portrait drawing and painting at the

di Alessandra de Nitto

VILLA NECCHI CAMPIGLIO IN MILAN HOSTS AN EXHIBITION FEATURING OVER 200 PRECIOUS FURNITURE MODELS

The fruitful partnership between FAIFondo Ambiente Italiano and the Cologni Foundation is renewed on the occasion of “Manualmente”, which takes place in the splendid setting of Milan’s Villa Necchi Campiglio, a jewel of architecture, art and applied arts poised between Art Deco and Rationalism. After exploring diverse creative

territories and materials such as paper, pottery, glass and precious stones, the sixth edition is entirely devoted to wood, the living material which in Lombardy has reached the most important expressions in its conception, design and fine craftsmanship. Bridging the past and the contemporary, the unprecedented exhibition entitled “In miniatura” (from 25 October 2017 to 7 January 2018) offers a fascinating journey into an outstanding know-how observed from the original angle of wooden models. Thanks to important loans from public and private collections, over 200 precious models of different types of miniature furniture are showcased in the exhibition, documenting the history of furnishings between the 17th and 20th centuries, small wooden masterpieces meticulously created with great attention to detail in the materials and decorations. The exhibits range from masterworks by 18th-century cabinetmakers to 19th-century sample models faithfully recreating the actual items of furniture, perfect in every detail: from ornaments to sophisticated miniatures for collectors, to fascinating dolls’ houses. In this way, coffee tables, chests, chairs, kitchen cupboards, wardrobes and dressing tables develop charming dialogues with the furnishings and rooms in the perfect setting of Villa Necchi: the echoing effect is always highly evocative, as the splendid, often playful photographs of Guido Taroni illustrate in the exhibition’s beautiful catalogue The exhibition presents another very interesting theme, less known to the public, of the model as a working instrument that became fundamental at the onset of industrial design, when designers and master craftsmen gave rise to extraordinary creative and working partnerships, and iconic design objects were the product of virtuous collaborations between manual know-how and design. Some of the most interesting items in the exhibition were made by famous Milanese cabinetmakers Giovanni Sacchi and Pierluigi Ghianda for some of the greatest designers of the 20th century, from Castiglioni to Nizzoli and Zanuso, from Frattini to Gio Ponti, Bellini and Magistretti. These designers were very conscious of the fundamental importance of craftsmanship and have always held the atelier’s work in the highest consideration, measuring themselves with the artisans in a constructive and generative relationship. “The great master craftsmen,” underlines Franco Cologni, “are a fundamental part of our cultural heritage, just like the assets safeguarded by FAI.” The display in the attic of Villa Necchi is dedicated to the late Pierluigi Ghianda. Curated by Lorenzo Damiani, it recreates – thanks to the models, notes, sketches loaned by his family – the historical workshop of the great “poet of wood”, one of the most celebrated cabinetmakers in the world. The extraordinary legacy of this unsurpassed master has been taken up by Romeo Sozzi, designer and passionate cabinetmaker, who


123

English version

took the baton directly from Ghianda, thus enabling his workshop to continue to live and create, in the name of absolute excellence. The entire history of design passed through the skilful hands of Giovanni Sacchi, regarded as the greatest Italian model maker. In the course of 50 years, this extraordinary figure engaged in dialogues with the most important architects and designers, creating over 25,000 models in his Milanese workshop. The exhibition pays homage to him by presenting some of the 300 models treasured in the Museum of Design of the Milan Triennale. “These objects,” underlines Triennale’s Director Silvana Annicchiarico, “are the extraordinary evidence of a production method that takes us back to the golden age of the masters of Italian design. They remind us that design is the expression of the culture of making, and show us how the designer tackled and solved the problems that appeared during the realisation of the project. Triennale Design Museum enthusiastically salutes the decision to populate the extraordinary spaces of Villa Necchi Campiglio with a selection of Sacchi’s models, displayed to establish a dialogue with the objects that they have contributed to making.”

PP. 58|63 WINGS AND ROOTS 58

Musei segreti

59

ali

E RADICI CLAUDE BORNAND

DAL 2000 A LOSANNA IL MUDAC HA SVILUPPATO UN’ATTITUDINE A RICERCARE FORME ARTISTICHE CHE FONDONO DIVERSI LINGUAGGI E CHE SI RIFANNO ALLA QUOTIDIANITÀ DELLE PERSONE, ALLA LORO DIMENSIONE DOMESTICA E AFFETTIVA

MUDAC

FIRME INTERNAZIONALI La collezione di vetro artistico contemporaneo raccoglie opere firmate da artisti di fama internazionale. In questa pagina, vaso «Yellow Magic» di Gernot Schluifer (1988-1989). A fianco, «Aspetta», di Max Ernst realizzato da Egidio Costantini (1968).

di Simona Cesana

THE MUDAC MUSEUM SEEKS ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS THAT COMBINE DIFFERENT LANGUAGES AND ARE CLOSE TO OUR EVERYDAY LIVES

In the hilly side of Lausanne, overlooking the city’s red roofs, the Museum of contemporary design and applied arts is located in a fine 17th-century building. The steep roof of its turret recalls the Gothic architecture of the Cathedral of NotreDame, which is a stone’s throw from the museum itself, just across the square that marks the historic centre of this city on the shores of Lake Geneva.The Mudac first opened its doors in 2000, when Maison Gaudard became the home of what had previously been the Musée des arts décoratifs of Lausanne: new home, new name and new projects too, which over the years have defined the museum’s splendid permanent collections of contemporary design, glass, ceramics, jewellery and print (including lithographs, illustrations and comic books). A solid base for the research and future

development of the museum, which, in 2020, will relocate in a new home, now under construction, in the new arts district called Plateforme 10: a place designed by Barozzi Veiga (Barcelona) and Aires Mateus (Lisbon) that will open near the railway station of Lausanne and which will also be home to the Musée de l’Elysée, dedicated to photography, and the Musée cantonal des Beaux-Arts, in a continuous dialogue between applied arts, fine arts and photography. In over one hundred temporary exhibitions, many catalogues and numerous side activities — from teaching to music, conferences and dance — the Mudac has developed an inclination to seek out the hybrid and unexplored forms of artistic expression combining different languages, and in particular the works that borrow from the applied arts, or crafts: this word identifies the category that belongs to neither art nor design, but to a sphere that is closer to “making” and therefore to the domestic and emotional dimension of our everyday lives, to our need to share and communicate. Deputy Director Claire Favre Maxwell explains the mission of the museum in a statement: “Mudac aims to examine the role of design in contemporary society. It does not hesitate to transcend the boundaries of disciplines, comparing design with arts, photography, fashion or graphism. Mudac is interested in societal phenomena and likes to analyse how designers and artists deal with those. Thus, it has put up exhibitions on themes such as mirrors and narcissism, safety, eroticism, the sense of touch, camouflage, animals in art and design, etc… On another level, Mudac has developed a ‘carte blanche’ series of exhibitions offered to designers, which allows visitors to get to know the preoccupations of designers nowadays.” Undoubtedly, the contemporary art glass collection is Mudac’s largest and most fascinating. It was born from an initial nucleus of 36 works, donated by collectors Peter and Traudl Engelhorn, which includes historic glass sculptured by artists such as Jean Cocteau and Max Ernst, made by Egidio Costantini in his Venetian workshop “La Fucina degli Angeli”. The collection features other works by internationally renowned glass artists such as Philip Baldwin and Monica Guggisberg, Lino Tagliapietra and the latest acquisitions, with works by contemporary designers such as Pieke Bergmans, design duo Studio Formafantasma and Studio Job. In the “Chromatic” exhibition, open until 14 January 2018, a selection of works from the permanent collection celebrates glass in all its colours, in a layout inspired by the colour wheel of Johannes Itten, renowned Swiss artist, Bauhaus School teacher and theorist in his own right. The contemporary ceramics collection consists of more than 300 pieces, mostly by Swiss artists and designers: a selection of utilitarian and abstract objects representing

the variety of Swiss creativity in the field of ceramics, from the best-known names to the new generations, from enamelled stoneware of the late 1990s to the most recent works in porcelain. The museum’s acquisition policy, for the ceramics collection as well as for design and jewellery, favours works by Swiss designers and young makers, promoting donations from young designers and selecting works that express innovation in research and incorporate the present: unique pieces and limited editions that represent the evolution of creativity, in a museum that protects and interprets the beauty and know-how of applied arts, balanced between art and design.

PP. 64|69 TIME FOR RARITIES 64

EDc ec ec ol lreant zo er i d da il amt ot ni m d oi

SANDRINE STERN HA RACCOLTO UN’EREDITÀ CENTENARIA CHE PATEK PHILIPPE NON HA MAI SMESSO DI SOSTENERE: QUELLA DEI MESTIERI RARI, MASSIMA ESPRESSIONE DI SAVOIR-FAIRE SENZA EGUALI

65

Nella collezione 2017 dei Mestieri rari, spicca la serie limitata di due orologi da polso «Calatrava» in oro bianco (il modello Patek Philippe per eccellenza, creato nel 1932), ispirati ai celebri «azulejos». Per ricreare questi splendidi «trompe-l’oeil», Patek Philippe ha scelto la raffinata tecnica della miniatura su smalto (patek.com).

di Giovanna Marchello

TEMPO di rarità

THE RARE HANDCRAFTS COLLECTION IS THE ULTIMATE EXPRESSION OF PATEK PHILIPPE’S UNPARALLELED KNOW-HOW

In 1831, the young Antoni Norbert Patek fled from Poland after the Russian army had crushed the insurgents in the November Uprising. He found shelter in Switzerland, which had welcomed many religious and political refugees for centuries. Calvinist Geneva, in particular, had become a notable crucible of creativity and technique with its concentration of goldsmiths, watchmakers and gem setters coming from France, Italy and many other countries in Europe. Antoni Patek became a trader of fine pocketwatches in Geneva, where he met French watchmaker Jean-Adrien Philippe, who had invented the first pendant crown winder without a key. The first nucleus of what became Patek, Philippe & Cie, in 1851, was created in 1839, when Patek’s partner was still countryman François Czapek. Some of their earliest, precious watches are displayed in the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva, where the Stern family (proprietor of Patek Philippe SA since 1932) has collected five centuries of outstanding masterpieces of Swiss and European watchmaking, as well as a library with over 8,000 volumes. It is here, in this collection of rare beauty that embraces hundreds of magnificent timepieces exquisitely decorated by goldsmiths, engravers, enamellers, gemsetters and miniaturists (from early watches dating back to the 16th century, to pocket and wristwatches, table clocks, automata and complications) that we can find the origins of a tradition that Patek Philippe maintains and develops in its Rare Handcrafts collection, the


124 ultimate expression of an unparalleled knowhow. “In our Rare Handcrafts collection,” says Sandrine Stern, creative director of all Patek Philippe’s production, “we use exactly the same techniques as before, as well as the same materials, the same ovens, the same enamel powder. For me and for the family, this is the base, the fundamental point on which we never compromise. For us, quality is the most important thing, because this is what we had before and today, nearly 180 years on, we still want to have the same quality.” Developed a decade ago, the Rare Handcrafts collection was strongly desired by Sandrine Stern, who rightly considers it her creature. Sandrine Stern’s leadership has developed a centuries-old legacy that Patek Philippe never ceased to support, not even when the market had caused the near disappearance of every form of artistic decoration on watches. “It was important for us not to stop these crafts, even if we had to keep them with us in stock. We wanted to make sure that the unique skills of the marquetry-maker, the guillocheur, the enameller and chainsmith could survive,” continues Mrs Stern. “Even when the market is low, we never stop. In fact, this spurs us to do even more and better.” Today, the Rare Handcrafts do not languish in the warehouses. The watches made in the second half of the 20th century have found a place of honour in the Patek Philippe Museum, while those exhibited at the Baselworld fair (about forty pieces a year, between one-off pieces and very small series) end up directly in the private collections of collectors and enthusiasts. To create a Rare Handcrafts collection worthy of its name, Sandrine Stern works with neither briefing nor budget: “For Patek Philippe, the point is not to focus on figures but on what we like. This means that when we start a collection, I never know how many pocketwatches I will have, how many wristwatches, table dome clocks etc. We start from the subject and decide which object will be the best for it.” The making of these special pieces is entrusted to the company’s in-house master craftspeople as well as to independent artisans and artists, such as miniature artist Anita Porchet. “For me, it is important to work with outside artisans, because this enables us to be even more creative.” For Sandrine Stern, to master the know-how is imperative in order to preserve the company’s credibility both with the market and with suppliers. “When I set up our workshop,” she explains, “it was important for me that we could do everything inside. So today we have at least one master for each métier within the company.” Patek Philippe trains its own watchmakers, polishers and workers for its regular production, but the process is more complex in the case of rare handcrafts. “At present, internal training is not feasible, although we certainly intend to do it in the future. It is not enough to learn the technique, it is also necessary to understand what you are doing and to do so, young people must be very motivated and undertake in-depth studies, which also embrace the fine arts. Because what we do here are not replicas: you need to understand the drawing and adapt it. It’s

a very long process and there must be passion as well as talent.” It takes at least two years to create a Rare Handcrafts piece, from its conception to its execution. And since this involves very difficult techniques, one never knows what can go wrong in the process and, for example, a watch may be damaged during the last fire of the enamelling. But this does not worry Sandrine Stern, because it is just the result that counts, not the time it has taken. “Our public has confidence in Patek Philippe because they know it’s a guarantee of quality but also of uniqueness,” concludes Mrs Stern. “They trust our experience and our good taste, knowing that the object they are buying is genuinely rare.”

PP. 70|73 VENICE EXPOSED 70

Mostre

71

La Serenissima

A NUDO ABBIAMO VISITATO L’ESPOSIZIONE CHE CELEBRA IL BICENTENARIO DELLE GALLERIE DELL’ACCADEMIA DI VENEZIA ASSIEME A CESARE DE MICHELIS, PROMOTORE DEL PROGETTO, ALLA SCOPERTA DEI RAPPORTI TRA ARTIGIANATO E ARTE di Stefano Karadjov

In queste pagine, un dettaglio di Rinaldo e Armida, dipinto nel 1813 da Francesco Hayez. È una delle opere esposte alle Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia nel contesto della mostra «Canova, Hayez, Cicognara. L’ultima gloria di Venezia», aperta fino al 2 aprile 2018 (gallerieaccademia.it).

CESARE DE MICHELIS TAKES US ON A VISIT OF THE EXHIBITION THAT CELEBRATES THE BICENTENNIAL OF THE GALLERIE DELL’ACCADEMIA IN VENICE

“The Veneto section will contribute what it can. I would not like it to give all the money, and I intend to disburse ten thousand zecchini on so many works by wholly Venetian brush and chisel. I will certainly not forget Hayez and Rinaldi and the others that are qualified to work here. But all this is worth nothing if the first part of this project does not contain one of your works. What is needed is the certainty of a statue of yours, and it should be the Polyhymnia, which could also be baptised as the Muse of History.” Two centuries ago, on 15 January 1817, Count Leopoldo Cicognara of Ferrara, president of the Academy of Fine Arts in Venice, sent this request to his friend Antonio Canova, appointing him as tutelary deity in the ultramodern operation — as we would say today — of cultural renewal that he had planned, and which the exhibition we are visiting retraces. The exhibition “Canova, Hayez, Cicognara. The Last Glory of Venice” is under way in the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice. Curated by Fernando Mazzocca, Paola Marini and Roberto De Feo, it celebrates the bicentennial of the opening of the museum and recreates the exceptional historical and artistic climate that Venice experienced in the first quarter of the 19th century, as is testified to by the birth of the Gallerie dell’Accademia themselves. Professor Cesare De Michelis, president of Marsilio publishing house and a scholar of Venetian culture, is among the promoters of this project. He accompanies us on a visit to the exhibition.

Q. Professor De Michelis, in what way does this exhibition recount the Last Glory of Venice? A. On its bicentennial, the exhibition celebrates the opening of the first Venetian museum, which was to preserve the memory and existence of a thousand-year-old civil and cultural tradition that was running the risk of disappearing together with the Republic itself. The museum was to collect the extraordinary evidence of the centuries-long history of its figurative arts. What emerged was a collection of Venetian paintings without equal, of international quality, which became the first compensation for the loss of so many masterpieces that had been seized from churches and schools during the convulsive years of the Napoleonic era. The exhibition evokes a special moment in Venice’s artistic history: a season of cultural relaunch that was heralded in 1815 by the return from Paris of the four Horses of St. Mark’s, the symbol of the city. The event is commemorated by the plaster model of one of the horses at the opening of the exhibition. Q. Every story has a protagonist, and the hero of this project is not an artist, but an illustrious intellectual, a mentor of artists, the president of the Academy of Fine Arts. A. Leopoldo Cicognara was the undisputed orchestrator of the historic circumstances we are narrating. His aim was to showcase the extraordinary artistic heritage of the Republic of Venice, promoting its continuation and development also through the Academy and its best students. Cicognara’s great innovativeness is also confirmed by his initiative of transforming an offering due to the Emperor, who was about to contract a new marriage, into the “Tribute of the Venetian Provinces”. The Tribute brought together a number of artworks by Venetian masters, and offered an extraordinary testimony of the quality of its artists and artisans, starting from Canova’s “Polyhymnia”, a painting on canvas by Hayez and sumptuous glass creations, furniture items, marble works and other memorable pieces. Cicognara had understood that the Tribute represented a commercial opportunity for the Academy’s artists, who had been left without work in the early years of the Restoration. Q. The exhibition also illustrates a very specific feature of Venice, spawned by the flourishing relationship between art and craftsmanship, and developed in its links with specific artistic crafts of the region, including glassblowing, cabinetmaking and bookbinding. A. It represents the highest and most unitary artistic production of Venetian Neoclassicism, the result of the joint effort of the region’s most prominent artists and the greatest Venetian master craftsmen of the time. We find a symbol of this in the table designed by the great painter and decorative artist Giuseppe Borsato: its enamel and bronze top was meant to demonstrate the skill of Murano glassworks to the Imperial House, at a time when Bohemian glass was the latest fashion and the success that Murano had enjoyed in the previous centuries had dwindled since the late 18th century. Q. Indeed, this collection embraces all


English version

PP. 74|79 THE ICE LEGEND 74

di Alberto Gerosa

Imprese

75

LA LEGGENDA DI GHIACCIO

Da sinistra: Acqua, Aria, Terra e Fuoco si cristallizzano nelle forme di questi quattro vasi (altezza 25 cm) del designer Jirˇ´ı Šuhájek (moser-glass.com/en).

CON I SUOI 160 ANNI DI STORIA, LA VETRERIA MOSER DI KARLOVY VARY, NELLA REPUBBLICA CECA, PERPETUA E INNOVA NEI SUOI MANUFATTI LA MEMORIA STORICO-ARTISTICA DELLA BOEMIA

IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC, THE MOSER GLASSWORKS CELEBRATES 160 YEARS PERPETUATING AND INNOVATING THE ARTISTIC TRADITIONS OF BOHEMIA

This is a story of ice and fire. In particular, of the ice superbly emulated by the crystal produced at the glassworks that

Ludwig Moser founded in the Bohemian town of Karlovy Vary in 1857. A likeness that reminds us of the great naturalist Pliny the Elder, who famously mistook rock crystal for petrified ice. Although the potassium glass manufactured in the Moser glassworks is only remotely related to rock crystal (which, being quartz, is in actual fact a mineral), they both share the same translucency and hardness, the latter being an essential requirement for glass engraving. Only the Moser glassmakers know the secret ingredients that are added to the mixture of quartz powder, silicon dioxide, soda and potash that is molten for hours at a temperature of over 1,450 °C. Thanks to this secret formula, the Moser engravers can create Gothic towers and miniature bestiaries that lurk within the eternal ice of their goblets, dishes and vases, made with the same skill that graced the wonders treasured by emperor and alchemist Rudolf II inside his legendary Wunderkammer in Prague, almost half a millennium ago. Before it can be decorated, the crystal must transmute from the shapeless, honey-like vitreous paste extracted from the crucible to the finished object. Both the glass blowers and their assistants are involved in this crucial stage: armed with an arsenal of beech or pear-tree wooden forms (all made inside the glassworks), pliers, cutters and diamond drills, they deftly shape bellies and feet, lengthen stems and cut unnecessary excrescences. The internal tension of the newly formed material is neutralised in the annealing oven. This phase is followed by grinding and engraving, the latter usually performed by means of a small wheel. Sandblasting is used only in combination with the decorative technique known by the name of “oroplastic” gilt, which characterised Moser’s production throughout the first Czechoslovak Republic (1918–1938). In this process, a thin layer of a reddish substance is applied on the objects with a fine brush; after firing and polishing, this substance takes on an unmistakable golden tint, thus revealing the noble nature of this unusual gilding technique. The common denominator of Moser’s production lies in its arcane and diaphanous nature, which is evoked in the figures, engraved almost like watermarks, which emerge little by little as the light shines through them. Nor can the preference for shaded tones, obtained by the skilful addition of metal oxides to the basic ingredients listed above, pass unnoticed. This remarkable feature is particularly appreciable in the whisky set designed by Lípa Oldrˇich in 1968: famous for its essential design and the thickened bottoms of tumblers and decanters that compose it, this range seems to come straight out of a middle-class home in the days of Dubcˇek and the Prague Spring. One thing is certain: Moser’s production is very distant from the orgies of light reflected in the glittering, regal lead crystal of France... to begin with, for the simple reason that Moser’s

crystal is completely lead-free. Those seeking a more sumptuous effect will find what they are looking for in the precious replicas of the vases made by Moser between the 19th and 20th centuries. Inspired by Art Nouveau aesthetics, halfway between Gallé and Mucha, many originals of these art objects are proudly exhibited in the collections of the Glass Museum in Passau, Germany. The intriguing decorations created by Jan Janecký (born in 1978) testify to the continuity of another manufacturing excellence typical of Karlovy Vary: hand-painting and handgilding on crystal. Moser glassworks holds a prominent position in the international artistic crafts scene, and this is proven by the fact that the company, entirely Czech-owned, enjoys the privilege of having been accepted as a member in the prestigious Comité Colbert, whose main objective is the preservation and promotion of French “art de vivre”. Equally remarkable is its success in Russia, a nation that inspired some of the decorative motifs in Moser’s creations: from the fauna of Siberia to Moscow’s Red Square that, together with St. Basil’s Cathedral, inspired a set of champagne glasses by Russian designer Konstantin Gayday. An extraordinary crossroads of culture and knowledge, Bohemia has returned to be an integral part of the unique cultural landscape that extends from the Czech Republic to Saxony. Not surprisingly, the Moser glassworks in Karlovy Vary, offering guided tours to its plant and adjacent museum, are a must-see destination on the route that joins Prague to Meissen. To the most sensitive travellers this itinerary will feel like coming back home in the company of familiar characters such as Giacomo Casanova, whose mortal remains were consigned to this wonderful land.

PP. 80|85 SPINNING A GOOD YARN 80

Imprese

81

sul filo

DI LANA

Una delle sale del museoarchivio storico di Lineapiù Italia a Campi Bisenzio (Fi): inaugurato nel 2012, racconta i 42 anni di storia dell’azienda leader nella produzione di filato per maglieria nel mondo (lineapiu.com).

STUDIOBONON PHOTOGRAPHY

the arts: paintings, groups of sculptures, two altars and two large marble vases, the table you mentioned, as well as two precious books, the role of which was to build a bridge between the artworks donated and the conservation of their memory, at the same time celebrating the flourishing Venetian cultural industry of art book publishing. Is this correct, professor? A. In order to immortalise the operation, Cicognara had all the various artworks that made up the donation line-engraved and collected in an album, which later became quite widely circulated and can still be found on the antiquarian market. The book’s elegant frontispiece shows the front and back of the medal that Angelo Pizzi moulded in wax with the portraits of the spouses: this piece marks a milestone in the resurrection of this Venetian art. Two unique specimens of the leather-bound album, made for the imperial couple, had exquisite bindings embellished with heraldic coats of arms in the corners, and gilded silver round and oval reliefs crafted by Bartolomeo Bongiovanni of Vicenza. The copy dedicated to the Emperor also bore, at the centre, the medallion reproducing “Jupiter with the Aegis” made of sardonyx chalcedony. This is one of the most interesting and significant pieces among the many masterpieces showcased in the exhibition held at the Gallerie dell’Accademia in Venice, inaugurated on 29 September 2017 and open until 2 April 2018. The Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship, a non-profit international organisation based in Geneva that promotes the values of artistic crafts and creativity, is among the institutions that have given their support to “The Last Glory of Venice”. Because, far from marking a limit, this exhibition — and in particular the unprecedented bringing together of the “Tribute of the Venetian Provinces” — re-evokes the celestial and earthly bodies that gravitate around what is beautiful and well made: the commissioner, the artist, the artisan, the mediator, the merchant, the collector, the connoisseur.

125

SALVARE UNA DELLE AZIENDE LEADER NEI FILATI PER MAGLIERIA E RIPORTARLA AL SUCCESSO: QUELLA DI ALESSANDRO BASTAGLI CON LINEAPIÙ SEMBRAVA UNA MISSIONE IMPOSSIBILE. E INVECE... d i A n d r e a To m a s i

ALESSANDRO BASTAGLI’S ADVENTURE WITH LINEAPIÙ SEEMED TO BE AN IMPOSSIBLE MISSION, INSTEAD...

The names of Alessandro Bastagli and Lineapiù Italia, leading manufacturer of knitting yarns renowned for the quality of its production and its constant research and innovation, are tied by a long-standing friendship and an illumination. In 2010, when Giuliano Coppini, who founded Lineapiù in 1975, asked his friend Alessandro to purchase his firm, the company


126 inevitably takes us back to Milan in the late 1970s. “I was working for several leather goods companies. One day at the Mipel fair [Ed. - the international fair of bags and fashion accessories] I came across the work of a young designer from Calabria, called Gianni Versace. I wanted to have him in my portfolio, but I was told that the bags were part of a wider range that included also clothing: I either took on the entire package or nothing. I was invited to his first fashion show and he won my heart. I did not have an office in those days, and I remember that we concluded the agreement in the accounting firm of Santo, the eldest of the three Versace brothers. This was the beginning of an extraordinary adventure that lasted until Gianni’s death. I am grateful for the opportunity and privilege of working with a person like him, whose competence, talent and creativity were truly unique.” The fashion that Bastagli breathed and experienced throughout his entire career returns powerfully in his new challenge: a few months ago Bastagli acquired the luxury brand Shanghai Tang, which David Tang founded in Hong Kong in 1994. “We started by launching a new line of scarves, small leather goods and costume jewellery. Next year, we will inaugurate a completely new collection, which will be based on high-quality raw materials, all rigorously Italian, at a reasonable price point. It’s my greatest joy to be involved in an elegant, ironic and sophisticated brand such as Shanghai Tang, which I have always admired in my trips to the Far East. For 18 years I spent at least four months a year in Southeast Asia, and what I have achieved I owe to that corner of the world. It’s funny to think that the first time I went there, in 1973, it was a real disaster: nobody was interested in the wallets by the brand I was representing, because the yen banknotes didn’t fit inside them.” On returning to Tuscany, Bastagli immediately had the entire sample range remade in the right size. Then he went back to Japan, and this time he came home with an empty suitcase. That’s what they call a head for business.

PP. 86|91 THE SOUND OF PERFECTION 86

Parlando di scrittura

In questa pagina, il taglio di un pennino Montblanc. A fianco, stilografica in oro rosa della Collezione Montblanc High Artistry dedicata ad Annibale e realizzata in 86 esemplari (furono 86mila i soldati che attraversarono le Alpi con il condottiero cartaginese).

87

IL PENNINO IN ORO DI OGNI STILOGRAFICA MONTBLANC VIENE REALIZZATO ANCORA OGGI DA ARTIGIANI CHE GLI DEDICANO OLTRE 100 FASI DI LAVORAZIONE. UN’ESPERIENZA SENSORIALE CHE COINVOLGE ANCHE L’UDITO... di Raffaele Ciardulli

Il suono della

PERFEZIONE

MONTBLANC

was suffering a serious financial crisis. “It was technically bankrupt,” says Bastagli, who received the prestigious Talents du Luxe award in 2016. “I accepted Giuliano’s invitation to visit the factory more on account of our friendship than out of any genuine interest. I knew nothing about yarns and, furthermore, until then I had been a trader, not an industrialist. Yet when I entered the workshops where Coppini had created revolutionary products, such as the first 100% viscous yarn and the “air yarn” that is hollow inside to allow optimal heat insulation, a multifaceted and fascinating world opened up before my eyes. I can still remember the enthusiasm I felt on leaving the factory. I returned home to my children and I asked their advice: the potential of Lineapiù appeared clear to me immediately, as did the risks associated with such an important investment. ‘Do what you think best, dad. Your instinct has never failed you,’ they told me. So it was that I decided to throw myself into it.” Body and soul. Thus Bastagli, the son of a watchmaker who had established himself as a distributor in the Far East of various brands, among which Gianni Versace, found himself running a group with 102 employees, a turnover of €26 million and an annual output of 650,000 kilograms of yarn. “I summoned everyone to instil a sense of responsibility in the entire group: we had to rescue a boat that was sinking and we could only succeed if everyone rowed together.” Seven years later, the numbers confirm that the enterprise was successful: the staff has grown to 150, the turnover is around €44 million and the production exceeds one million kilograms of yarn. “The key words of the relaunch reflect the history and tradition of Lineapiù: quality, innovation and service. Our clients, especially in the luxury segment [Ed. Lineapiù Italia supplies Chanel, Prada, Louis Vuitton and Gucci, among others], need to be continually stimulated with emotions. Considering the vastness of the offer available to them, it is necessary to impress the buyers, assisting them in their choices, explaining to them what they can achieve by opting for this or that yarn, and providing them with solutions. Furthermore, we must be ready to satisfy any request from our clients, who are increasingly demanding, informed and aware.” Bastagli’s story talks about emotions, care and attention, and these words are not the first ones that come to mind in relation to an industrial reality. “But for certain procedures, for certain types of yarn, the manual work involved is reminiscent of that of our artisans,” the manager explains. Similarly, one of Bastagli’s first initiatives, the Lineapiù award, is far removed from bookkeeping and balance sheets. “The competition is aimed at young designers who are already present on the market with their creations, but who need concrete help. Twice a year a highly specialist jury selects a talent to be rewarded: for three years, that is, for six collections, the winner will have unlimited access to Lineapiù’s yarns and historical archive for the creation of his or her sample collection.” After all, Bastagli’s professional career has always been characterised by an aptitude to seek out and support emerging talents in fashion. His story

EVERY GOLD NIB OF A MONTBLANC FOUNTAIN PEN CREATES A SENSORY EXPERIENCE THAT INVOLVES ALSO OUR EARS...

When we write, we reveal ourselves. We manifest our identity. We fix a trace of it, however ephemeral, and by fixing it, we

define the contours of our thoughts and emotions, we make plans, we organise, we prepare our actions. The sign left by the pen — or rather the nib — adds meaning and substance. It adds balance: the action of the mind merges with that of the hand and together they create, calibrating time and pressure, thicknesses and strokes. An equilibrium made of differences that the moving fingertip is unaware of, as it glides agilely over the keyboard, with the same cadence, the same pressure, the same monotonous rhythm. An equilibrium that is sought by those who eschew mechanical homologation, and seek truth and quality. The Hamburg manufactory that creates Montblanc writing instruments since 1906 is a place where this quality is cultivated thanks to the outstanding workmanship and design skills that can be found there. To this day, the gold nib of each Meisterstück is still handcrafted by master artisans in 35 different phases, followed by another 70 that are necessary to assemble and test the fountain pens. No sense is neglected, not even that of hearing. A specialist listens carefully to the sound that each nib produces as it slides across the paper: only an unbroken sound certifies its perfection. Many other exceptional competences convene in the Artisan Atelier situated in the heart of the factory: the skill of the master goldsmiths and setters, the preciousness of the metals, the inspiration of the designers. These qualities are all necessary to produce Montblanc’s limited editions. Other peaks of personalisation have been conquered by the master craftspeople who create the unique masterpieces of Montblanc Création Privée, making the bespoke dreams of particularly demanding customers come true. An extraordinary example of this mastery is represented by Figurado Création Privée: a writing instrument inspired by a passion for cigars, which is covered with genuine tobacco leaves. In order to create it, the artisans’ personalisation skills have explored new techniques for extracting the oil from the tobacco leaves before wrapping them around the metal body of the fountain pen. The leaves were protected with a cellulose coating similar to the one used in the restoration of paintings. In order to respect the shape of the cigar, a special retractable gold nib was created. This exclusive cigar is embellished with gems, white gold fittings and a Montblanc diamond crowning the cap top. No detail is overlooked, not even in the packaging, which was made from the finest wood and fitted with a glass viewing panel, so that the fountain pen can be admired without enduring the trauma of a sudden change in humidity. The future owner of the Figurado has actively participated in the creative process interacting via webcam with master artisans, jewellers, diamond setters and nib engravers over the smallest details of the creation. The skill of the Montblanc Création Privée workshops in creating exceptional


English version

objects does not overshadow the specific, distinctive expertise of the Hamburg Maison: the art of writing. The art by means of which we express the nuances of our personalities, and the art at the service of which the Montblanc Bespoke Nib was established, to capture and enhance the exquisitely individual expression of handwriting. The Hamburg headquarters and selected Montblanc boutiques, including those in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, Tokyo, Mexico City, Dubai, New York, Milan and Moscow, offer a detailed examination of individual handwriting, in order to identify the nib best suited to express each customer’s personal way of making thoughts and gestures, pen and paper interact. Using an instrument created and developed by Montblanc, customers are invited to write a short text to analyse the key parameters of their handwriting, including writing speed, writing pressure, pen rotation, swing range and inclination angle. These measurements are then examined by a Montblanc expert, who identifies the ideal nib for each type of handwriting. The nib can either be selected among the eight existing variations or else be made to measure from solid gold handcrafted at the Hamburg manufactory. The nib can be further personalised with the customer’s name engraved on it. Through an intensely individual experience, writing becomes the most private of gestures, the most essential and distinctive manifestation of style. Since style, etymologically, is none other than a specific way of writing: of using a stylus.

PP. 92|95 THE TURNING POINT IS BEHIND THE CORNER 92

Maestri contemporanei

DALLA PASSIONE PER LA FALEGNAMERIA AL DESIGN: A DIECI ANNI DALLA MOSTRA «100 CHAIRS IN 100 DAYS», MARTINO GAMPER RILANCIA IL BEN FATTO PER UNA LUNGA DURATA

93

La svolta È DIETRO

In queste pagine, dettaglio del paravento della collezione Re-Connection di Alpi, dove Martino Gamper reinterpreta il laminato disegnato da Ettore Sottsass negli anni 80 tagliando le venature già distorte in angoli acuti per un effetto 3D che manipola la prospettiva.

l’angolo di Ali Filippini

TEN YEARS AFTER “100 CHAIRS IN 100 DAYS”, MARTINO GAMPER REVITALISES THE PRINCIPLE OF WELL-MADE AND LONG-LASTING OBJECTS

Martino Gamper has chosen to live and work in London, where he studied at the Royal College of Art. He first approached carpentry in his hometown of Merano. He attended a sculpture course held by Michelangelo Pistoletto at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna and then a design course with Matteo Thun, with whom he later worked. Ten years have passed since his first exhibition, in which he reconfigured a hundred abandoned and reclaimed chairs, showing an aptitude for

“techno-performance” that later became his expressive feature. He has recently extended his collaborations to small projects for fashion brands, such as an accessories capsule collection for Valextra and the creation of window displays for Prada. Q. The exhibition featuring reconfigured chairs has been repeated like a format in various countries (the most recent in New Zealand last spring). What did that initial performance mean for you? A. “100 Chairs in 100 Days” undoubtedly marked my debut into the world of design, representing the moment when I received a degree of notoriety as a designer. Since then, the creation of chairs has more than doubled and a book is under preparation. At the heart of this experience is a working approach that I still find useful. From this point of view, I never get tired of developing the project, in addition to the fact that I’m truly interested in the chair as an object. I would never have done anything like this in Milan nor, for that matter, in Italy. London does not possess a true artisanal district like Brianza nor the same type of culture, and this fact has enabled me to create my personal project freely [Ed.- Gamper’s design approach is also characterised by a sound knowledge of the history of design, as demonstrated by his subsequent performances, in which he took apart and reassembled original furniture items designed by Gio Ponti and Carlo Mollino]. Q. With laminate veneers producer Alpi you have recently tackled an icon of design: the wooden patterns created by Ettore Sottsass... A. This was a beautiful challenge, because it enabled me to interpret something that already had a language of its own associated with postmodernism and the 1980s. Patrizia Moroso (of the Moroso company, with which I have been collaborating for some time) introduced me to Vittorio Alpi, who allowed me to work freely on the project. I chose a direct approach and, instead of obtaining the pieces of wood from the block made available to me, I preferred to saw it at various angles using the machinery in the workshop. Once it was cut into sheets, the wood grain was distorted in three different ways, which I used to give three-dimensionality to the new surface. This summer in Trentino I worked with my trusted carpenter, who has assisted me for twenty years, to create the three special pieces that make up the “ReConnection” range. Q. Having been trained as a carpenter, how do you see the return to craft in the design world? A. I see plenty of beautiful projects created by designers who work together with artisans, while others are actually discovering new crafts by combining the cultures of digital and traditional manufacturing processes. What I do not like is when I notice that someone is trying to pass off as “artisanal” something that is simply badly made, without any technical knowledge, merely by highlighting the value of imperfection.

127

I believe that a handmade product should have a longer lifespan than an industrial one, which means that the care with which you make and perfect it is very important. Even beyond the experimentation, which may indeed be absent. What I see in the revival of manual production is, on the one hand, those who approach it with the right commitment and, on the other, those who merely copy, just trying to suggest a “craft effect” in the finished object... Q. Regarding your collaborations with major furniture companies, what is the difference in working with these workshops? A. There is not much difference. If anything, the difference lies in the quantities and in certain details, but the machinery and technologies are the same. Especially in Italy, where the companies that make design furniture are still relatively small and artisanal at heart. The output is different, but the workplace and the process are not dissimilar. In London, I use two laboratory-workshops. The smaller one is close to my Hackney studio. This is where my team and I prepare prototypes, such as the ones for my latest “Round & Square” collection presented at the London Design Festival in September. My larger projects are developed in the other workshop, bigger and out of town, which I share with an artist and designer friend.

PP. 96|101 THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ESSENTIAL 96

vietato

Interni

97

IL SUPERFLUO NELLE COLLEZIONI CHE PORTANO IL SUO NOME, MARTA SALA UNISCE LE IDEE DEGLI ARCHITETTI LAZZARINI E PICKERING AL SAPER FARE DI UN TEAM DI ARTIGIANI BRIANZOLI. SENZA DIMENTICARE GLI INSEGNAMENTI DELLO ZIO LUIGI CACCIA DOMINIONI

d i A n d r e a To m a s i

Alcune delle creazioni di Marta Sala Éditions: divano Elisabeth, tappeto Ludovico con inserti in ottone, tavolo basso Mathus con piano di cristallo e paravento Luis. Nella pagina a fianco, lampada da parete in ottone Claudia (martasalaeditions.it).

MARTA SALA DRAWS ON THE TEACHINGS OF HER UNCLE LUIGI CACCIA DOMINIONI TO COMBINE CREATIVITY AND KNOW-HOW

Competence, joy, passion: Marta Sala talks quickly, her sentences running so fast that you almost struggle to keep up. Her enthusiasm is overwhelming, as is the case when one strongly believes in what one does. On top of this, there is the excitement of a recent debut. Although the personal and professional history of this tall, slender and beautiful lady has always been inextricably linked to design, her latest and most personal offspring is just a couple of years old. It bears her name, to which she has added the term “Éditions”, revealing her love for France and Paris in particular, the city where she has recently opened an apartment-studio, which she intends to transform into a meeting place of ideas and


128 that Sala learned from her uncle, architect, designer and urban planner Luigi Caccia Dominioni. In 1947, Caccia Dominioni set up Azucena, iconic brand of Italianmade quality, with his colleague Ignazio Gardella and Marta’s mother, Maria Teresa Tosi. For a long period of time, Sala was also involved in Azucena as creative director. “I feel a strong responsibility towards my personal history, what we call heritage today. I come from a world that no longer exists. To my mother I owe my taste and my passion for materials and colours. My uncle, instead, taught me to be rigorous, to avoid what is unnecessary. A piece of furniture must be smart, well made, pleasant to look at and reasonably priced. It must possess its own truth, a soul. Customers today are more demanding and prepared, thanks to social media. Anyone who comes to me knows that every piece has a history rooted in the unique culture of Italian know-how.”

PP. 102|105 ENCHANTING EMBROIDERY 102

Eccellenze dal mondo

La raffinatezza delle linee, la creatività e la perfezione del lavoro delle abili mani delle ricamatrici rendono il ricamo di Madera una vera arte.

103

IL RICHIAMO

SULL’ISOLA PORTOGHESE 3.188 ARTIGIANE TESSONO RAFFINATE TRAME DI LINO, SETA, COTONE E ORGANZA: È IL BORDADO MADEIRA, UN MARCHIO CERTIFICATO CHE VALORIZZA NON SOLO LA BELLEZZA DI QUEST ’ARTE, MA ANCHE IL GESTO DELLA MANO di Francisco Oliveira

IVBAM

creativity. Mestieri d’Arte & Design met Marta Sala in the Milan showroom that is hosting some of the forty-odd pieces she has made since 2015 in collaboration with two very special “partners in crime”, architects Claudio Lazzarini and Carl Pickering. “When I started Marta Sala Éditions, I had in mind to entrust each collection to a different designer. The ‘problem’ is that with Claudio and Carl we are always in complete agreement: what we do together works and is well-received and, what’s more, we thoroughly enjoy each other: why change? This does not mean that in future I would not like to work with other architects or designers who share my vision.” Her vision is expressed in functional and timeless furniture, one-of-a-kind objects created for the specific needs of a customer but which are also duplicable and can harmonise in pre-existing spaces. “Luxury today is being able to shape one’s space to one’s own needs. It is no longer the architect who defines it, but the person who will be living there. That’s why my furniture is always perfectly finished, so that it can be displayed from any angle.” To arrive at the end result, the ideas of Lazzarini, Pickering and Sala need to be interpreted by the skilled hands of craftspeople capable of transforming a design into an object. “Artisans are the tools that give life to an idea. Probably the most rewarding aspect of my profession is working with extraordinary craftspeople, also because they represent an ethical world of respect and honour, a world of trust and knowledge where a word is always kept. We Italians take our talent so much for granted that we tend forget it... I have created my own network in Brianza, a land of furniture products of excellence, where I can find all the skills I need in a radius of ten kilometres. I love to follow the making of each piece personally, and the artisan is not just a mere executor, his contribution is fundamental in defining an object’s proportions and the most suitable materials, and in achieving the ultimate goal of usability. The level of quality attained by our masters in the last few years is incredible. Equally surprising is their desire to take on new challenges, finding original solutions to a problem at a speed that can come only to those who have a deep knowledge of their craft.” A mediator between the architect/ designer and the artisan, in her collections Marta Sala seeks to combine a contemporary edge and fine craftsmanship. “To me, innovation means giving a new, multifunctional identity to the classics, always paying attention to the overall harmony of the object and to the details that are part of the design and make it different from any industrial production.” Details define the uniqueness of an object and they are never superfluous: a lesson

È il disegno l’anima di questo speciale ricamo: i movimenti fluidi e graziosi, la composizione di motivi floreali o l’alternanza di figure geometriche, disposti in strutture che rivelano una grande libertà artistica e un marcato genio creativo, conferiscono ai prodotti un carattere unico, romantico, poetico, mostrando la capacità delle artigiane di adattarsi anche alle tendenze sempre in divenire della moda. Tutto comincia dall’ispirazione del disegnatore che tradizionalmente elabora il suo progetto su carta. Il disegno passa poi al foratore, che ne buca i contorni lungo i tratteggi perimetrali. Segue quindi la fase di stampaggio: una spugna, intinta in una speciale miscela dal colore azzurro, viene passata sulla carta, in modo da marcare il tessuto nelle aree che saranno ricamate. Terminato questo stadio, il pezzo di tessuto stampato, insieme a fili di vario colore, passerà nelle mani agili e pazienti di una ricamatrice che vive di solito in campagna: qui, il saper fare tramandato di generazione in generazione è il principale ingrediente che porterà al compimento di un lavoro lungo e minuzioso, che può richiedere anche alcuni mesi per essere completato. Tovaglie, vestiti, camicie, lenzuola o delicati fazzoletti: nessun pezzo è

ON THE PORTUGUESE ISLAND OF MADEIRA, 3,188 EMBROIDERERS CREATE SOPHISTICATED DESIGNS ON COTTON, LINEN, SILK AND ORGANDY

Graceful motifs, floral patterns, geometrical figures, all arranged in designs that express great artistic freedom and a remarkable creativity: the essence of this special embroidery lies in the decorations, which, with their unique, romantic and poetic character, also reveal the artisans’ ability to keep up even with the evolving trends of fashion. The very first step in the production of Madeira Embroidery is the design, which is traditionally sketched on wax paper. Then the perforator pierces minute holes along the outline of the drawing. In the tracing phase, the drawing is transferred onto the fabric with a sponge dipped in a special blue ink, which is pressed on the paper. After this stage, the printed fabric, together with yarns of various colours, is sent to an embroiderer, who usually lives in the countryside. Thanks to the knowledge handed down from generation to generation, the embroiderer’s skilled hands will perform a long and meticulous task, which may take many months to complete. Tablecloths, dresses,

blouses, bedclothes or delicate handkerchiefs: no two pieces are ever the same and each carries a personal guarantee stamp, which certifies the excellence, genuineness and beauty of the product. An exclusivity heightened by the use of high-quality fabrics such as linen, cotton, silk and organdy. Once the embroiderer’s work is completed, the fabric is sent back to the factories, mostly located in Funchal, the regional capital. Here, the work is thoroughly checked and finished, and then only will the Bordado Madeira be fit to be certified. This manufacturing chain of outstanding skills needs to be protected, also in terms of quality and authenticity. For this reason, in 2006 the Instituto do Vinho, do Bordado e do Artesanato da Madeira I.P. (IVBAM) was created from the merger of a number of bodies safeguarding arts and crafts in the area. This committee is responsible for the certification seal on local products and their promotion and marketing. Bordado Madeira is therefore the seal of authenticity of a product addressed to a segment of the luxury market that values not only beauty and the refinement of embroidery, but also the pure and genuine manual skill of 3,188 artisans currently active on the island. To celebrate this age-old art, IVBAM has invested part of its resources in a museum dedicated to the iconic examples of Madeira Embroidery: a collection of fabrics decorated between the mid-19th century and the 1930s, the golden age of this savoir-faire. The major producers and exporters of Madeira Embroidery were founded between the 1920s and the 1980s. Mostly based in Funchal, these factories are the custodians of the local economy and active proponents of the Bordado Madeira mark overseas. Founded in 1925, Patrício & Gouveia is one of the most long-standing firms. The factory is visited annually by around 120,000 tourists, who have the opportunity to get to know and understand the various phases in the working of Bordado Madeira. The company’s wide variety of articles (for the bedroom, table, bathroom, children and souvenirs) is also exported to Japan, Saudi Arabia and the USA, in addition to being present on the European market. The founding of another historic factory, Abreu & Araújo, dates back to 1926; with three shops in the archipelago, Abreu & Araújo produces bordados in both classical and contemporary designs. Luís de Sousa was founded around 1930: tablecloths, monogrammed towels, bed linen and curtains are exported mainly to the UK, Italy, France and Spain. João Eduardo de Sousa specialises in the production of high-quality Medeira Embroidery since 1946. Its products are distributed locally as well as internationally. Even after the change in ownership, in 1996, fine craftsmanship remains the distinguishing feature of the company philosophy. Most of these factories are family-run businesses, such as Daniel Canha - Bordados, established in 1956. Bordal has been active since 1962: it produces embroideries on linen and cotton


English version

that are reinterpreted with a contemporary twist, while maintaining the artisan knowhow intact. Maria Alice G. Abreu, the “youngest” company, was founded in 1980. It took part also in the 1998 Lisbon World Exposition. All these names are associated with extraordinary personal stories, which represent a unique heritage for the cultural and economic future of the luxuriant islandgarden of the Atlantic.

PP. 106|109 COLBERT’S DREAM 106

Tradizioni da preservare

107

ILSOGNO

di Colbert Da secoli specializzata nella realizzazione di arazzi, la manifattura parigina dei Gobelins è diventata sinonimo stesso di questo raffinato e antico mestiere, che oggi trova nuove declinazioni e suggestioni grazie a un dialogo fertile ed efficace tra artigiani e artisti. Nella foto, un maestro d’arte esegue un nodo per realizzare un arazzo di nuova concezione.

80MILA MOBILI PREZIOSI, TAPPEZZERIE PREGIATE, TAPPETI RAFFINATI. DAL 1937 NELLA STORICA MANIFATTURA DEI GOBELINS E NEL MOBILIER NATIONAL SI RESTAURA LO SPLENDORE DEL PASSATO CHE CONTRIBUISCE AL PRESTIGIO FRANCESE NEL MONDO SIN DAI TEMPI DEL RE SOLE

di Alberto Cavalli

CONSERVING AND RESTORING FRANCE’S PRESTIGE IN THE WORLD SINCE THE DAYS OF THE SUN KING

The Mobilier National is a French institution that currently conserves and restores more than 80,000 precious items of furniture, fine tapestries and exquisite carpets. Epitomising the most noble and beautiful history of France, these objects decorate the official palaces of the French Republic, such as the Elysée Palace and the most important ministries. Since 1937, the complex that combines the historic Manufacture des Gobelins (famous for its tapestries, for centuries regarded among the most beautiful in the world) and the Mobilier National has been an authentic treasure chest of time, know-how and remarkable traditions: the dream of grandeur that has contributed to France’s prestige in the world since the time of Colbert lives on in this site. The Sun King’s wise minister, who wanted to make Paris the capital of taste, beauty, luxury and magnificence, established a system of Manufactures Nationales that are still considered an integral part of French heritage. The Gobelins and the Mobilier National are vibrant and vital institutions, an invitation to discover the beauty that can arise when craft meets art, and when the merging of science and craftsmanship breathes new life into the splendour of the past. Catherine Ruggeri has been in charge of the Mobilier National for the Ministry of Culture since July 2017. She is well aware that the reputation of French savoir-faire, which is based on a 400-year-old tradition of excellence that integrates modernity, attracts artists who perceive a new means of expression in textile art. The intuition of linking the savoir-faire of the Gobelins’

masters weavers to the creative inspiration of artists was fully affirmed in 1964, when André Malraux created a contemporary workshop of research and creation within the Mobilier National. Indeed, until the first half of the 20th century, there was a clear division between the universe of the artist as the creator of a model and that of the weaver, who then realised the artist’s design. Today, the Manufactures embrace a new working method inspired by a fruitful exchange between the creative figure and his interpreter; this approach challenges and attracts artists in a strong and substantial way, and establishes a new life line for the Manufactures and the Mobilier National, custodians of an identity that opens up to the spirit of the future by finding a way into the hearts of young people. Q. Tell us about the relationship between the Mobilier National and contemporary art. A. We enjoy full freedom of initiative and action, which allows us to establish the best forms of cooperation between artists (both French and international) and weavers. Artists perceive textile art as a congenial expressive medium to convey their vision of the world, and loom weaving offers endless possibilities. The patterns are no longer created exclusively by painters, but also by engravers, sculptors, architects, photographers and designers. The interaction between creative figure and interpreter is an effective stimulus in any artistic process. Every year the advisory committee chaired by the délégué aux Arts plastiques examines the proposed designs to be purchased. This commission, originally established in 1962, helps us to develop consistent and dynamic choices in what we purchase and enables our textile production to express the aesthetic visions of every period, thus affirming the role of the Manufactures on the artistic scene. Q. Do the French perceive the preciousness of this extraordinary heritage? A. Ever since it was opened to the public, the Mobilier National has attracted a great deal of enthusiasm, and this is a good indicator of the public’s interest in the extraordinary heritage of our institution. Every year, 6,000 people visit the Manufactures during the Heritage Days, and hundreds of thousands visit the Palaces of the French Republic, decorated with furniture and tapestries that are either made or restored here. The public appreciates the opportunity of a personal contact with the places where these items are created and restored: they love to see how great masterpieces are given new life, because they perceive them in a different way from when they see them in a museum. Q. What about the young generations: are they interested in learning the craft, or knowing more about the history and the activities of the Manufactures? A. The Mobilier National actually inspires spontaneous vocations in young

129

people, especially during special exhibitions and open days. Our institution also offers training programmes: here the craft is taught by means of apprenticeships lasting four years. At the end of the training we hold specialised competitions to allow those who have distinguished themselves to join the staff of the Mobilier National. We have noticed an increase in the percentage of young people who already have a high-school diploma but wish to return to more concrete crafts, to work with their hands. These young people want to learn how to draw, and study the history of art and styles. Integrating their training with ours has a deep meaning to them: here they rediscover the strength of their historical and cultural heritage and fully appreciate the fundamental importance of preserving and transmitting this ancient savoir-faire.

PP. 110|113 COLLECTOR OF IDEAS 110

Linguaggi progettuali

111

collezionista

DI IDEE Frequentava le aste, mossa dal desiderio di possedere certi oggetti. Poi, smessi i panni di architetto nel settore dell’edilizia, Cristina Celestino ha iniziato a realizzare arredi su misura, interpretando con eleganza e humour gli intrecci del contemporaneo. Senza passare inosservata Sopra, il decoro in ceramica Plumage di BottegaNove. Nella pagina a fianco, dall’alto: lampada a sospensione in ceramica Babette di Torremato; la collezione per la tavola e l’home decor Dolce Vita di Paola C., omaggio agli anni 50. «Ho avuto la fortuna di conoscere molti bravi artigiani che vado a cercare a seconda di quello che devo fare», spiega Cristina Celestino. «Vedendo il luogo in cui lavorano riesco a capire se ci sono i presupposti per continuare».

di Ali Filippini

CRISTINA CELESTINO’S MADE-TO-MEASURE FURNISHINGS INTERPRET THE CONTEMPORARY WITH ELEGANCE AND A TOUCH OF HUMOUR

Cristina Celestino was born in Pordenone in 1980. After graduating from the Faculty of Architecture at the IUAV in Venice, she began to work with prestigious design studios, devoting herself to interior architecture and design. In 2009 she moved to Milan, where she founded the Attico Design brand, creating lamps and furnishings characterised by meticulous research into materials and forms. One of her projects, the “Atomizer” produced by Seletti, has been included in the permanent collection of Italian design at the Milan Triennale. She designs exclusive projects for private clients and companies. Q. I would like to start with your passion for collecting, which perhaps explains your approach to research... A. I was always very interested in the history of architecture to the point that, hadn’t I had an inclination for design, I would have become a researcher. I love the history of interiors: Carlo Scarpa’s madeto-measure furniture, Adolf Loos’s houses, the use of colour in Le Corbusier’s details. In fact, I approached design as a collector at first, and only later as a designer. My passion for auction catalogues, which


130 are valuable instruments of knowledge, brought me to attend auctions, prompted by the desire to possess certain objects. It all continued quite naturally even when, having ceased to work as an architect in the building sector, I settled down in Milan, focusing more on interiors (for example, with the Sawaya & Moroni studio-brand), and I started to create made-to-measure furnishings in my own right. Q. That was around 2009, when you also began your adventure in selfproduction and design. A. I chose to produce the pieces for my first private orders personally, and in 2012 I participated in the SaloneSatellite [Ed. last year Celestino received the Salone del Mobile Milano Award Special Jury Prize], even though I did not know very much about the world of design and its communication techniques. I presented some furnishings that I had created with other designers under the name Attico Design, the brand with which I continue to self-produce. I like to see the process of making, since I love the material aspect of any product. Q. From this point of view, how do you relate to your artisans and how do you find them? A. I have had the good fortune to meet many fine artisans, with whom I collaborate depending on what I need to achieve. The moment I see where they work, I immediately understand if the conditions are right for us to continue. I believe that the person who creates the work must be curious, that the artisans should have an enlightened attitude towards the designer, with whom they must be willing to experiment. With some of them I have worked since the early years of Attico Design: as we known, virtuous collaborations are triggered in the relationship between the customer and the supplier. Q. Your passion for artisan techniques and craftsmanship emerges in both your special projects and in your art direction projects. A. Before starting to design a collection, I thoroughly research the potential of the company. For example, in my art direction for Fornace Brioni in Mantua I wanted to explore the expressiveness of terracotta with a collection of tiles in which the material is combined with colour or reinterpreted by designs and bas-reliefs. With BottegaNove what immediately struck me was the company’s ability to decorate ceramics by hand, as well as the endless variety of lustres at my disposal. This explains the creation of the Plumage collection (EDIDA 2017 – Elle Deco International Design Awards), which is based on the decorative element of feathers, chosen to exalt the chromatic potential of the textures. Q. Interior decoration projects for high-end retail stores are among your latest works. Could you tell us about tem? A. In the case of Fendi, it began with

the fitting-out of their travelling VIP Room, known as “The Happy Room”, at DesignMiami/ last December. It was a rare opportunity for me to create a collection incredibly rich in materials, with no limits whatsoever imposed on me. This experience enriched me on the technical side of the design, having supervised it in all its aspects. The concept has been replicated at the Fendi pop-up store in Tokyo Omotesando, where I was commissioned to produce the furnishings and a part of the interior. I have also just completed the new Sergio Rossi boutique in Faubourg Saint-Honoré in Paris, where I oversaw the interiors and furnishings. Working with established brands often means that there is an entire iconographic apparatus at your disposal, providing a rich source of inspiration. So when choosing the materials and how to work them, I aim at enhancing the company’s codes and working approach. It has to do with the heritage of the Maisons. I find that fashion houses are often more consistent with their historical identity, though they continue to renew themselves in a totally and, necessarily, contemporary way.

P. 114 IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF MICHELANGELO THE “DIVINE” ARTIST WAS CHOSEN TO REPRESENT THE FOUNDATION FOSTERING FINE CRAFTSMANSHIP

As a political expression, Italy has existed for just over 150 years. But Italy has always been present in the imagination of Europe as a recognisable cultural entity, attracting pilgrims and visitors, lovers of art and politicians curious of our regimes. All these people have taken a bit of our heritage back to their respective countries. It is no coincidence that, as many marketing experts know, what “works” in Italy is also successful in the rest of the world. It was thus to Italian experience, and specifically to the work carried out in over twenty years by the Cologni Foundation for the Métiers d’Art, which I founded in Milan, that a newly established international institution has looked. The purpose of this institution is to revitalise, initially in Europe and subsequently on a world scale, another type of heritage, which is linked to creativity and fine craftsmanship. Conceived by Johann Rupert, enlightened South African entrepreneur, and founded by him and myself in Geneva (an international city par excellence), the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship is quickly becoming the connection that was lacking between associations, institutions, foundations and other cultural bodies across Europe that are engaged, at various levels, in

the promotion of artistic crafts. The very choice of the name Michelangelo is emblematic. The supreme master lived at a time when Italy was just a cultural notion. An outstanding artist and a highly skilled artisan, the “Divine” Michelangelo is the eloquent emblem of the heights that talent can attain through the fortunate meeting of art, technique and, of course, the client or patron. Today more than ever, the client needs to be educated to appreciate what is beautiful and well made. For the Michelangelo Foundation, promoting, protecting and perpetuating artistic crafts is important also to secure adequate employment to tomorrow’s talent and, at the same time, to ensure that the new elites will have access to the wonderful objects that give value to our choices. Fine craftsmanship is the expression of a territory, of the history and evolution of our times, and it can also be an important vehicle of culture and work. At a time when technology seems to be replacing the human hand everywhere, the Michelangelo Foundation is engaged in the promotion of what only talent, workmanship and creativity can so splendidly achieve. In this way, fine craftsmanship can be saved from the standardisation often brought about by digitisation. For this reason, the Michelangelo Foundation is implementing some original projects that combine various initiatives in an ideal creative course. Like networking, to connect and promote different realities and activities in order to create effective synergies. Another tool is the definition of a common vocabulary to talk about artistic crafts and define excellence. Hence the publication of the volume “The Master’s Touch. Essential elements of artisanal excellence”, which was recently presented in London and Paris. The Michelangelo Foundation also encourages the relationship between design and craftsmanship through projects such as “Doppia Firma” (doppiafirma.com). Moreover, the Foundation fosters the diffusion of the know-how of great European craftspeople through meaningful events such as “Homo Faber”, an unprecedented celebration of skills at the highest level that will take place in Venice in September 2018. The new Michelangelo wants to be free to create tomorrow’s beauty. Thus the Foundation bearing his name works, plans and develops projects that will allow the talent of every Michelangelo - inspired not only by torment but also by ecstasy - to make our lives better.


MESTIERI D’ARTE & design Poste Italiane S.p.A-Sped. In Abb.Post.- D.L353/2003 (conv. in L. 27/02/2004 n.46) art.1,comma 1 DCB Milano - Aut.Trib. di Milano n.505 del 10/09/2001 - Supplemento di Arbiter N. 177/XXXIII

n o

COVER MESTIERI16 STESA.indd 1

versi h uded lis l g nc i En

16

Mestieri dArte Design

oro rosso

Gli inimitabili presepi in corallo di Liverino creati unicamente a mano all’ombra del Vesuvio

germania

La nascita di ogni pennino in casa Montblanc è un’esperienza sensoriale

ITALIA

Oltre 200 preziose miniature di mobili in mostra a Milano tra passato e contemporaneità

portogallo

Trame di lino, seta, organza e cotone: ecco tutti i segreti del Bordado Madeira

14/11/17 17:37


Pioneering since 1906. For the pioneer in you. Pensato per il viaggiatore contemporaneo e ispirato ai primi grandi viaggi per mare dell’epoca moderna, il Montblanc 4810 Chronograph Automatic incarna la precisione e la ricercatezza artigianale dell’orologeria svizzera di pregio. Scopra la storia completa su montblanc.com/pioneering. Crafted for New Heights.


9

ma Fir

Editoriale

a to d

ot B z n Fra

LA QUALITÀ COME ANTIDOTO ALLA BULIMIA DEL CONSUMO Non dobbiamo accumulare ma saper scegliere. Facendoci guidare dalla mano dell’uomo, che dà forma alla materia prima La qualità è l’unità di misura del bello, l’espressione del gusto di chi la persegue, che si sublima nella maestria del saper fare. La qualità è la prova, il risultato. È nella mano dell’uomo che dà forma alla materia prima. Con passione e attenzione. Soprattutto al dettaglio. La qualità non ha a che fare con il costo, ma con l’idea stessa di un oggetto: è l’attitudine a svolgere la propria funzione meglio e più a lungo delle altre. Per evitare la bulimia del consumo, un oggetto dovrebbe poter essere utilizzato con soddisfazione e per molto tempo. Sarà migliore per chi lo acquista se svolge il proprio compito bene e a lungo. Oggi è ardua impresa sfuggire alla bulimia del consumo. È una scelta non facile ed è difficile guarire, in un’epoca nella quale prevale l’eccesso smodato, conta chi ha migliaia (se non milioni) di follower, giacche, barche, auto, moto, case in eccesso, per apparire più che per essere. Ma le persone, il mondo, non hanno bisogno di questo. Piuttosto di tornare all’essenziale. Di trovarlo in sé e farlo diventare regola di vita. Meno ma meglio. Non significa chiudersi in un eremo e rinunciare al mondo, ma manifestare appieno la propria personalità e capacità di giudizio.

che la Qualità instaura con le nostre Emozioni, quello che io chiamo «fattore QE», che è fondamentale. Esso nasce nel vertice in basso di un triangolo, dalla profonda cultura Etica: sarà questa a determinare e creare il vertice contrapposto al piede del triangolo, quello Estetico. In sostanza, l’Estetica è la consecutio dell’Etica. Le due, insieme, elevano lo spirito della vita verso l’alto, verso il vertice QE. Quello che conduce verso questo vertice è un percorso che riguarda tutti, nessuno escluso, rispetto alla posizione sociale in cui vive.

N

Del resto è con l’uso, e non con l’acquisto, che facciamo veramente nostre le cose. Ma perché venga voglia di adoperarle e conservarle esse devono rivelarsi utili. Fruibilità e affidabilità spostano così il ruolo dell’oggetto dalla competizione alla soddisfazione, e il rapporto del soggetto con esso dalla cupidigia di possedere di più al desiderio di poter fare meglio. Così alla fine sappiamo, o meglio riconosciamo tra tante spinte devianti, che la qualità è nascosta nell’attitudine di una cosa a svolgere la propria funzione originaria meglio e più a lungo delle altre. Il cerchio si chiude. Ma la geometria ci viene in aiuto anche per spiegare il rapporto

Non dobbiamo accumulare ma saper scegliere, nel rispetto delle proprie possibilità economiche. Perché avere un solo paio di scarpe nel guardaroba, se sono di qualità, è meglio che averne dieci di dozzinale fattura. E chi non può permettersi un abito sartoriale di Caraceni, potrà comunque presentarsi al mondo con pertinenza rivolgendosi a realtà più in linea con il suo portafoglio, senza per questo sentirsi sminuito né tanto meno scivolare verso il basso. Abbiamo detto che la qualità è l’unità di misura del bello. Ebbene, questa unità di misura è universale. Anche se l’Italia vanta un immenso patrimonio di manualità e creatività artigianale, è interessante quindi volgere lo sguardo alla vicina Svizzera e agli altri Paesi europei, per svelarne le abilità manuali. Lo abbiamo fatto anche in questo numero. I meravigliosi presepi interamente realizzati in corallo a Torre del Greco parlano lo stesso linguaggio dei colorati cristalli boemi che escono dalla vetreria Moser. Il lino ricamato nell’isola portoghese di Madera esprime la stessa maestria dei preziosi filati per moda di Lineapiù Italia. Del resto, Bruno Munari ci ha insegnato che per progettare un oggetto occorre studiare il comportamento dell’individuo, i suoi rituali, le sue abitudini. Solo così potrà parlare un linguaggio universale. Quel linguaggio che si nutre sempre di qualità.


9

20 28 34

38 42

48

N SIO R D VE E H UD LIS L G C IN EN

Mestieri dArte Design

ORO ROSSO

Gli inimitabili presepi in corallo di Liverino creati unicamente a mano all’ombra del Vesuvio

GERMANIA

La nascita di ogni pennino in casa Montblanc è un’esperienza sensoriale

ITALIA

Oltre 200 preziose miniature di mobili in mostra a Milano tra passato e contemporaneità

PORTOGALLO

Trame di lino, seta, organza e cotone: ecco tutti i segreti del Bordado Madeira

In copertina, presepe napoletano in corallo creato da Liverino, composto da un mosaico di centinaia di piccole tessere giustapposte. Foto di Carlo Falanga.

52

Editoriale LA QUALITÀ COME ANTIDOTO ALLA BULIMIA DEL CONSUMO di Franz Botré

70 74

ALBUM di Stefania Montani Lavorazioni di stile NATIVITÀ CORALLINA di Federica Cavriana Icone del design L’INVENTORE DI SEGNI di Ugo La Pietra

80 86

Craft tradizionale ANIMA INSTANCABILE di Giovanna Marchello

92

Processi creativi GUANTO DI SFIDA di Luca Maino

96

Eredità da tramandare MISSIONE REGALE di Akemi Okumura Roy

102

Suggestivi dialoghi SOFISTICATE MINIATURE di Alessandra de Nitto

106

58

Musei segreti ALI E RADICI di Simona Cesana

64

110

Decoratori di attimi TEMPO DI RARITÀ di Giovanna Marchello

115

Mostre LA SERENISSIMA A NUDO di Stefano Karadjov Trasparenze LA LEGGENDA DI GHIACCIO di Alberto Gerosa Imprese SUL FILO DI LANA di Andrea Tomasi Parlando di scrittura IL SUONO DELLA PERFEZIONE di Raffaele Ciardulli Maestri contemporanei LA SVOLTA È DIETRO L’ANGOLO di Ali Filippini Interni VIETATO IL SUPERFLUO di Andrea Tomasi Eccellenze dal mondo IL RICHIAMO DEL RICAMO di Francisco Oliveira Tradizioni da preservare IL SOGNO DI COLBERT di Alberto Cavalli Linguaggi progettuali COLLEZIONISTA DI IDEE di Ali Filippini

English Version

Opinioni 14

Fatto ad arte di Ugo La Pietra IL TURISMO UCCIDE LA NOSTRA MANIFATTURA

16

Pensiero storico di Maurizio Vitta CONFRONTO AD ARMI PARI SULLA VIA DEL GUSTO

114

Ri-sguardo di Franco Cologni SULLE ORME DI MICHELANGELO


LA MIA VIGNA, LA MIA VITA. Ogni vitigno ed ogni vino sono racconti unici, di esperienza, tecnica e destino, che scrivono ogni anno una pagina della nostra storia.


12

Collaboratori

A RTI G I A NI D E L L A PA R O L A AKEMI OKUMURA ROY

Dopo essersi occupata della comunicazione per grandi brand del lusso, lascia Tokyo e il natio Giappone per seguire a Londra il marito, fotografo inglese. Lavora ora come corrispondente per numerosi media nipponici.

ANDREA TOMASI

Giornalista, ama raccontare storie di grandi dinastie o di chi ha saputo farsi da solo inseguendo sogni, idee e intuizioni. Si è laureato al Dams in Storia del cinema nonostante i suoi genitori lo volessero cuoco o architetto. Dopo una lunga esperienza in redazione oggi si divide tra l'attività di freelance e quella di consulente editoriale.

RAFFAELE CIARDULLI

GIOVANNA MARCHELLO

ALBERTO GEROSA

ALI FILIPPINI

STEFANO KARADJOV

SIMONA CESANA

STEFANIA MONTANI

MAURIZIO VITTA

Di solida cultura classica, per 18 anni è nel Gruppo Richemont, per 11 come direttore marketing di Cartier in Italia, poi presso Chantecler, Stefan Hafner, Roberto Demeglio. Oggi mette a frutto la sua esperienza in marketing e comunicazione come consulente e formatore nell’ambito di progetti didattici di alto profilo.

Laureatosi in estetica a Ca’ Foscari, è stato per un decennio docente a contratto di letteratura russa all’università di Vienna. Giornalista professionista, è stato direttore del periodico d’arte Goya e collabora con riviste specializzate in strumenti di scrittura e orologi, tra cui anche Penna.

È direttore progetti e sviluppo di Civita Tre Venezie e collaboratore del Gruppo Marsilio Editori. Curatore di eventi, è docente a contratto in progettazione degli eventi culturali e produzione esecutiva di mostre all’Università Cattolica di Milano.

Giornalista, ha pubblicato due guide alle Botteghe artigiane di Milano e una guida alle Botteghe artigiane di Torino. Ha ricevuto il Premio Gabriele Lanfredini dalla Camera di Commercio di Milano per aver contribuito alla diffusione della cultura e della conoscenza dell’artigianato.

Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte

Direttore generale: Alberto Cavalli Direttore progetti editoriali: Alessandra de Nitto Organizzazione generale: Susanna Ardigò

MESTIERI D’ARTE & DESIGN Semestrale – Anno VIII – Numero 16 Dicembre 2017 Direttore responsabile ed Editore: Franz Botré Editor at large: Franco Cologni Direttore creativo: Ugo La Pietra Vicecaporedattore: Andrea Bertuzzi Grafica: Deborah Bassani

Hanno collaborato a questo numero Testi: Federica Cavriana, Simona Cesana, Raffaele Ciardulli, D&L Servizi editoriali (revisione testi), Ali Filippini, Alberto Gerosa, Stefano Karadjov, Luca Maino, Giovanna Marchello, Stefania Montani, Akemi Okumura Roy, Francisco Oliveira, Francesco Rossetti (editing), Andrea Tomasi, Maurizio Vitta Immagini: Simon Bielander, Claude Bornand, Thibaut Chapotot, Arnaud Conne, Heidi Corpataux, Matteo Cupella, Carlo Falanga,

Cresciuta in un ambiente internazionale tra il Giappone, la Finlandia e l’Italia, appassionata di letteratura inglese, vive e lavora a Milano, dove si occupa da 20 anni di moda ed è specializzata in licensing.

Ha un dottorato in design presso l’università Iuav di Venezia con una ricerca sulla storia dell’esporre in ambito sia merceologico sia culturale. Collabora con riviste di settore, affiancando all’attività giornalistica ed editoriale quella formativa e curatoriale.

Dopo la laurea in design al Politecnico di Milano si occupa di arte applicata e design artistico collaborando con gallerie, riviste e artisti. Con l’associazione culturale Mille Gru, che ha fondato, realizza progetti culturali ed editoriali. Dal 2007 affianca Ugo La Pietra nelle attività di studio e archivio.

È autore di vari libri sull’estetica dell’esperienza quotidiana: nel campo del design (Il disegno delle cose, Il progetto della bellezza), comunicazione visiva (Il sistema delle immagini, Storia del design grafico), modelli di vita negli spazi architettonici (Dell’abitare), arti industriali (Il rifiuto degli dei, Le voci delle cose).

Fondazione Musei civici di Venezia, Åbäke and Martino Gamper, Dario Garofalo, Fabrice Gousset, Ivbam, Lineapiù, Massimo Listri, Angus Mill, Mobilier National, Mudac, Laila Pozzo, Susanna Pozzoli, Antoine Rozès, Studiobonon Photography, Benjamin Taguemount, Guido Taroni, Andreas Zimmermann Traduzioni: Language Consulting Congressi, Giovanna Marchello (editing e adattamento)

Pubblicazione semestrale di Swan Group srl Direzione e redazione: via Francesco Ferrucci 2 20145 Milano Telefono: 02.31808911 info@arbiter.it

PUBBLICITÀ A.MANZONI & C.

Mestieri d’Arte & Design è un progetto della Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte Via Lovanio, 5 – 20121 Milano © Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte.

Via Nervesa 21, 20139 Milano tel. 02.574941 www.manzoniadvertising.com

Tutti i diritti riservati. Manoscritti e foto originali, anche se non pubblicati, non vengono restituiti. È vietata la riproduzione, seppur parziale, di testi e fotografie.

www.arbiter.it www.fondazionecologni.it www.mestieridarte.it


14

Certi

Fatto ad ar te

ficato

d

a Ugo L a Pie tra

IL TURISMO UCCIDE LA NOSTRA MANIFATTURA

I souvenir, seppur utili a sostenere le spese dei musei, sono spesso prodotti in Cina, e sono penalizzanti per il nostro artigianato. Il turista, infatti, conoscendo già quello che acquisterà, tronca sul nascere i tentativi dei creativi, animati dall’intenzione di far evolvere le produzioni tradizionali

L’intellettuale e il politico, ma anche l’uomo della strada, sanno e ripetono da tempo che l’Italia potrebbe vivere e prosperare investendo sui nostri beni più preziosi: il turismo e i beni culturali. È vero, ogni giorno crescono i visitatori del nostro Belpaese e tutti sanno che qualsiasi turista/viaggiatore ama ritornare al proprio Paese portando le prove della propria esperienza: il souvenir! Il souvenir, quell’oggetto capace da solo di evocare un luogo, un momento, un’opera d’arte. Per ogni luogo culturale, dai più grandi musei del mondo (Metropolitan Museum di New York, Louvre di Parigi, National Gallery di Londra…), al più periferico museo etnografico, fino ai luoghi sacri, questi piccoli oggetti, che costano poco e che tutti «dobbiamo» comprare per avere la testimonianza del nostro avvenuto passaggio di visitatori, rappresentano il modo migliore per sostenere le spese dell’organismo museale.

le sia di significato, ma soprattutto non arricchiscono la nostra piccola o grande impresa: oggetti che non coinvolgono quindi né la capacità di progetto del nostro ingegno creativo né il nostro saper fare. Il secondo è legato al turismo di massa, che da sempre penalizza il nostro artigianato. Ormai tutti hanno capito che il turista medio, viaggiando dal suo luogo d’origine verso una meta culturale, ha bene in mente, fin dalla partenza, cosa visiterà e cosa di conseguenza acquisterà.

P

Un procedimento che, allo stesso modo, è evidente anche all’interno del nostro vasto territorio, ricchissimo di opere e monumenti e che purtroppo dà luogo a due fenomeni negativi in continua crescita. Il primo riguarda l’infinità di orribili oggetti, poco significativi, che vengono prodotti ormai da diversi decenni fuori dall’Italia, molto spesso da produttori cinesi; oggetti che non solo non portano nessun valore, sia fattua-

Per cui tutto l ’artigianato di tradizione, che in questi ultimi decenni è sopravvissuto attraverso il turismo (le ceramiche di Caltagirone sono apprezzate soprattutto dai turisti tedeschi, quelle di Vietri sul mare, sulla costiera amalfitana, sono acquistate dagli americani…) è sempre più legato a questo genere di flussi organizzati. Turismo che non concede nessuna trasformazione, aggiornamento o miglioramento del prodotto, poiché coloro che visitano questi luoghi sono alla ricerca di quegli oggetti che ancora prima di partire per il loro viaggio si erano prefissati di acquistare. Così addio a tutti i tentativi fatti da volenterosi progettisti, animatori, artisti, cultori della materia di cercare di partire dalla tradizione per rinnovarla, animati dalla nobile intenzione di far evolvere queste produzioni tradizionali verso nuovi mercati, per il benessere culturale e produttivo dei nostri artigiani!


Salvatore Siragusa

La fabbrica delle note di carta

La fabbrica delle note di carta Storia delle Arti Grafiche La Musica Moderna (1930–2007)


16

Pensiero storico

E

or lab

ri u a M

ato

da

i t ta V o i z

CONFRONTO AD ARMI PARI SULLA VIA DEL GUSTO È un elemento esteticamente attivo e sostanzialmente anarchico che governa le nostre scelte. Il terreno dove arte e artigianato dialogano da quando i loro confini si sono dissolti, complice il design

«That is the difference between a mechanic and an artist; he (the mechanic) cannot conceive as an artist». Le parole di Jacob Epstein, pronunciate nel corso del processo intentato da Brâncus¸i contro la sentenza del tribunale americano che nel 1926 aveva rifiutato di classificare alla dogana come opera d’arte il suo Oiseau dans l’espace, riecheggiano convinzioni antiche. All’inizio, fu lo schema platonico che definì un letto come un’idea, un oggetto di artigianato e un’immagine, facendo però sì che i due estremi, l’idea e l’immagine, si unissero in nome del pensiero e della creatività, e lasciando l’oggetto come semplice risultato dell’umile lavoro di un falegname. Alla fine, fu la nozione del «disinteresse» kantiano a chiudere definitivamente la partita, nonostante la più sottile distinzione proposta da Luigi Pareyson, che riconobbe sia al «lavoro del più umile operaio» sia al «capolavoro del più abile artigiano» un valore estetico, ma a patto che le loro opere mostrassero di valere «solo se riscattate da una loro estrinseca e meccanica applicabilità e inventivamente incorporate nelle regole individuali dell’opera d’arte». La storia ha in seguito ripresentato ossessivamente le antiche distinzioni fra arte e mestieri, ma dichiarandosi con ciò impotente a sbrogliare una matassa che, col tempo, si è fatta sempre più ingarbugliata. Oggi tuttavia l’indi-

gnazione di Brâncus¸i fa sorridere. Dopo la mobilia disegnata dai futuristi, che ha trovato il corrispettivo artistico negli interni della pop art, i confini accuratamente segnati tra i due settori culturali si sono dissolti. Complice confesso è stato il design, che ha ribaltato senza troppi riguardi la loro opposizione canonica, sostituendola con le più sfumate nozioni di «progetto» e «funzione».

E

Esso però ha finito con l’arenarsi nelle secche di una tecnologia sempre più raffinata, che ha ridotto il «fare» dell’artista e quello dell’artigiano a un’unica sequenza calcolata e stabile. I risultati sono sotto gli occhi di tutti: la Biennale di Venezia si presenta spesso come una mostra di design, mentre il Compasso d’oro si compiace dei suoi risvolti artistici. Se un giorno si darà una storia non edulcorata di questo processo, se ne dovrà dedurre immancabilmente la confusione, non in quanto eruzione disordinata di energie creatrici, come in un tempo lontano essa si dimostrò, ma solo a causa del vuoto d’idee nel quale essa ha navigato senza vederlo. Eppure, a leggere questa storia con occhi attenti alle sfumature, se ne ricava una chiave di lettura, timida e tremolante, ma fissa come una stella polare. Non si tratta della controversia fra arte e artigianato, sulla quale per secoli si è accanita una polemica pretestuosa, ma del confronto tra artigianato

*Filosofo e critico d’arte

*


18

Pensiero storico

e design, le cui radici storiche e sociali affondano in un terreno agitato, ma non privo di improvvise aperture e concomitanze. Comune a essi restano anzitutto il concetto di «funzione», che segna la qualità utilitaristica di qualunque oggetto d’uso, da un secretaire Biedermeier a una pesciera di Sambonet, e quello di «forma», che costituisce per entrambi un valore aggiunto, nel quale si rispecchia la qualità estetica dell’oggetto, da una sedia di Morris a una poltrona di Pesce. Le cose però si complicano nel momento della manifattura, non tanto per la vecchia questione dell’oggetto realizzato a macchina o a mano, quanto perché entra in ballo il fattore «replicabilità» che distingue il «pezzo unico» dal pezzo prodotto industrialmente all’infinito. Il problema riguarda, che lo si voglia o no, l’aspetto formale dell’oggetto: la sua bellezza è nell’opera artigianale tutta compresa nel manufatto, mentre in quella meccanica, o più precisamente di design, essa è tutta contenuta nel progetto.

contempla la «decostruzione» e da tempo Gillo Dorfles ha riconosciuto che non esiste un valore assoluto dell’arte, bensì «diversi modi di fruizione e di interpretazione, corrispondenti alle diverse personalità di chi osserva l’opera d’arte e variabili a seconda dei tempi, delle situazioni psicologiche, della stessa sensorialità del soggetto». Ma proprio su quelle diverse fruizioni e interpretazioni l’artigianato e il design vantano i loro sacrosanti diritti, che anzi aumentano col regredire culturale dell’arte. Il predominio del «gusto» appare proprio laddove l’artigianato e il design si confrontano su un terreno a entrambi sconosciuto, ma da cui essi traggono la vitalità della loro esistenza. Nell’aspro confronto che li oppone, l’humus vitale dei desideri, delle aspettative, degli elaborati diagrammi delle scelte del loro istitutivo destinatario (pubblico, utente, cliente, consumatore), forma un unico scenario sul quale essi proiettano la loro cangiante fisionomia, assimilando nelle loro scelte le tendenze e i sogni della società.

N

La questione, che in arte promuoverebbe a capolavoro un «pezzo unico» e condannerebbe una copia come falso, appare però sotto un altro aspetto. In effetti, essa è pronta a mostrarsi sotto un’altra luce semplicemente rovesciandola e ponendo la questione sociale al posto del puro godimento estetico. Così, è facile scoprire come il concetto di «irripetibilità», se declinato sul piano di un’etica sociale, assume toni negativi, mentre l’idea di una estetica ampiamente condivisa si colora di una validità indiscussa. L’oggetto personalizzato di un artigiano sconta la sua unicità, della quale invece il design si sbarazza in nome dell’eguaglianza sociale, pagando però lo scotto di una «estetica diffusa» o, se si vuole, di un’esteticità standardizzata. C’è però un terreno sul quale artigianato e design si incontrano e si confrontano alla pari, ed è quello del «gusto». Il termine è antico e, per quanto riguarda la storia dell’arte, obsoleto. Già Hegel lo guardò con sospetto. Esso predominò sull’estetica fino al XIX secolo, allorché uno sbadato personaggio di Baudelaire lasciò cadere la sua aureola nel fango di una viuzza di Parigi. Oggi se ne

Nella loro cifra estetica si raccoglie la profondità delle emozioni: la loro adesione al corpo del soggetto, la loro completa mancanza di intenzionalità, il loro valore non conoscitivo, perfino il loro rifiuto di identificarsi in un sentimento, fanno del «gusto» un elemento esteticamente attivo, ma sostanzialmente anarchico, che governa le nostre scelte, tra cui quella degli oggetti. Questa paroletta indecifrabile, questo convitato di pietra, che contiene però il segreto della forma di tutte le cose, costituisce il vero legame e il terreno di confronto tra artigianato e design, in nome non di una poetica personale, ma dell’ampio e molteplice universo di una collettività che li accoglie e li giustifica. Tornano alla mente le riflessioni di Remo Cantoni, che approfondendo i temi della filosofia antropologica, richiamò l’attenzione di tutti su un mondo «stratificato e molteplice», capace di tenere conto «della problematicità e della pluridimensionalità dell’uomo». È dunque da qui che bisogna ripartire per affrontare le sfide di un tempo che è già oggi, e non più domani.

La storia ha ripresentato ossessivamente le antiche distinzioni fra arte e mestieri, dichiarandosi impotente a sbrogliare la matassa


The Michelangelo Foundation is proud to present The Master’s Touch, the English edition of unique research on defining excellence in craftsmanship. This international edition includes a fascinating epilogue featuring additional interviews with European artisans that reinforce the code of artisanal excellence developed by the original Italian volume. The book will be available in selected bookshops, through on-line retailers and on www.marsilioeditori.it

CavalliMASTERpagina24x32ok.indd 1

17/03/17 11:17


20

di Stefania Montani

CRAFTED SOCIETY Crafted Society è un progetto nato nella primavera 2017 da Martin Johnston, un imprenditore inglese con esperienza nel mondo della moda, con l’intento di promuovere l’artigianato italiano di eccellenza, e supportare le scuole di formazione professionale. Partendo da tre principi per lui fondamentali, qualità-tradizione-responsabilità sociale, Johnston ha coniato il suo motto «Luxury for good», riferendosi non solo al «fatto bene» che è componente essenziale delle creazioni artigianali, ma anche allo scopo etico e sociale del progetto. Parte delle somme ricavate, infatti, è destinata a progetti sociali volti a dare visibilità ai tanti artigiani sconosciuti che lavorano per grandi marchi e a mantenere viva la tradizione degli antichi mestieri. A tal proposito, infatti, una percentuale delle vendite sarà donata alla Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte per finanziare alcuni tirocini formativi. A concepire e disegnare la collezione Crafted Society è Lise Bonnet, direttore creativo del brand, compagna nel lavoro e nella vita di Martin Johnston. Insieme festeggiano il debutto sulla loro piattaforma di sneaker, jeans, sciarpe in cashmere, scarpe e cappelli: tutti capi di abbigliamento esclusivamente made in Italy. Le sneaker sono realizzate a mano dalla Ifg di Corridonia, guidata da Mario Grassetti, che con il figlio Giacomo rifornisce alcune delle più importanti case di lusso nel mondo. Il denim per i jeans, invece, viene prodotto da artigiani veneti specializzati. Partner del brand è l’industria tessile Berto. Lo sviluppo sartoriale è affidato al Laboratorio IMjiT35020 di Due Carrare. Le calzature sono realizzate dalle Pelletterie Ales di Tolentino. Ci sono poi le sciarpe in seta e cashmere impreziosite dall’estro creativo dell’artista Roger Selden. A rifinire l’opera sono i maestri artigiani del Lanificio Arca di Prato, fondata da Cino Cini. Ci sono infine i cappelli Panama della fabbrica Sorbatti di Montappone, nelle Marche, capitale italiana del cappello. Vendite su piattaforma e-commerce. craftedsociety.com


ALBUM


ALBUM 1

THE IRISH HANDMADE GLASS COMPANY Waterford (Irlanda) Henrietta street 11 Waterford è un’antica cittadina irlandese fondata dai Vichinghi nell’VIII secolo, sull’estuario del fiume Suir. La sua fama è dovuta alla lavorazione del cristallo che ancora oggi costituisce una delle grandi attrattive della città. Degna rappresentante di questa antica tradizione manifatturiera è la Irish Handmade Glass Company, fondata da un gruppo di maestri vetrai nel 2009. I nomi di questi straordinari artigiani sono Richard Rowe, Derek

Smith, Danny Murphy e Tony Hayes. Tutti loro hanno imparato come apprendisti a 15 anni, seguendo le orme dei loro padri. E da allora non hanno mai smesso di affinare le loro tecniche. Seguendo la tradizione dei maestri artigiani delle botteghe di un tempo, questi eccellenti vetrai hanno deciso di istituire all’interno della vetreria dei corsi di perfezionamento professionale per trasmettere il loro sapere alle nuove generazioni. Negli ampi locali della loro sede, la Kite Design, vengono eseguite tutte le fasi della lavorazione del vetro. theirishhandmadeglasscompany.com

1

2

PATRICK DAMIAENS Maaseik (Belgio), Aan de Lievenheer 5 Patrick Damiaens è un ebanista fiammingo che scolpisce secondo la tecnica di Liegi, una raffinata procedura messa a punto nel ’700 e utilizzata per impreziosire cassettoni, armadi, sedie, pannelli per i signori di quel tempo. Dal 1992, data di apertura del suo atelier di Maaseik, in Belgio, la sua sfida quotidiana è rendere ogni pezzo unico e dargli una storia. Damiaens utilizza sequenze di lavoro predefinite: prima prepara uno schizzo con una matita rossa, che in seguito ricopia su un foglio di carta da lucido; poi trasferisce i motivi ornamentali da lui creati su essenze pregiate, riportando ogni particolare con una punta a tracciare. Imprime così sui pannelli di legno foglie, fiori, frutti, bacche, strumenti musicali, putti, riccioli ispirati a modelli settecenteschi, stemmi nobiliari. Per «sgrossare» il legno e preparare la superficie per le fasi successive si serve di una fresatrice verticale. Munito poi di sgorbie, lime e strumenti sottilissimi, scolpisce ogni dettaglio fino a ottenere il risultato desiderato. Le sue sculture vengono spesso paragonate a dei pizzi in legno. Come quelle del suo maestro ideale, l’ebanista del ’700


23

3

Grinling Gibbons, noto per le cascate di fiori e di frutta che decoravano mobili, pareti e camini, e che lo resero famoso. Oltre a creare decori ex novo, Patrick Damiaens è un abile restauratore che lavora anche per i musei e per le fiere di antiquariato. Propone anche corsi di formazione a chi desidera apprendere questo raffinato mestiere che, come sostiene lui, «non ti lascia mai il tempo per annoiarti, perché ogni progetto è unico, diverso, e ha la sua storia». patrickdamiaens.be

2

PHILIPPE DEBEERST

3

ATELIER DE L’ALLIANCE Saint-Just-et-Vacquières (Francia) Le mas Champion Sara Bran è una straordinaria orafa, che dopo anni di studio e di pratica ha messo a punto l’innovativa tecnica «dentelle sur or» per realizzare monili che sembrano leggerissimi pizzi. Il suo studio e la sua ricerca sono stati premiati dai tanti riconoscimenti che l’hanno vista vincitrice del Grand

Prix de la Création 2011, finalista al Prix Liliane Bettencourt pour l’Intelligence de la Main, oltre che ospite nelle esposizioni di gioielli in alcuni musei e gallerie d’arte. I materiali da lei lavorati sono l’argento e l’oro a 18 carati, spesso impreziositi da diamanti e pietre importanti. Nel suo Atelier de l’Alliance, a Saint-Just-et-Vacquières (poco lontano da Avignone), Sara crea i suoi gioielli seguendo la tradizione orafa in tutti i procedimenti. La «dentelle sur or» è la parte innovativa del suo saper fare artigianale, che consiste nell’incidere una o più superfici, sovrapponendo le trame, creando dei movimenti con le diverse facce, completando la superficie con l’aggiunta di perle o pietre preziose. La padronanza dei gesti le consente di incidere a mano libera i suoi impalpabili pizzi. Il Museo delle arti decorative di Lisbona la ospita regolarmente mettendole a disposizione i documenti sugli antichi pizzi portoghesi. sarabran.fr


ALBUM 4

GALÉRIE KREO Parigi, rue Dauphine 31 Kreo è una delle più importanti gallerie francesi di design: l’ha aperta nel 1999 Didier Krzentowski che insieme alla moglie Clémence ha destinato il suo spazio nel XIII arrondissement al design e alla sperimentazione. Di qui sono passati tanti mostri sacri quali Ron Arad, Ronan & Erwan Bouroullec, Pierre Charpin, Naoto Fukasawa, Jaime Hayon, Konstantin Grcic, Hella Jongerius, Alessandro Mendini, Jasper Morrison, Marc Newson, Martin Szekely, Studio Wieki Somers, Ettore Sottsass, i fratelli Campana... Racconta Clémence Krzentowski: «Ci siamo conosciuti circa 30 anni fa e quello che maggiormente mi colpì di Didier fu la curiosità per tutte le cose, il suo desiderio di studiare e approfondire, la sua perenne caccia al tesoro che l’ha portato a scoprire tanti nuovi talenti». E Didier conferma: «Quando vedo un pezzo diverso dal solito, inusuale, mi incuriosisco. È come ascoltare una nuova storia...». Instancabili collezionisti e ricercatori di nuove soluzioni soprattutto nel campo dell’illuminazione, i coniugi Krzentowski nel 2008 hanno trasferito la loro galleria Kreo in rue Dauphine, nel cuore di Saint-Germain-des-Prés, a Parigi. Ma Kreo è molto più di uno spazio espositivo, è anche un laboratorio o meglio una fucina di idee e progetti che vengono realizzati dai designer contemporanei più innovativi, in edizione limitata e in esclusiva per Kreo. La galleria ha aperto da qualche anno un secondo avamposto a Londra, nel quartiere Mayfair. Oltre a presentare collezioni di design contemporaneo, è il punto di riferimento per le lampade francesi e italiane dagli anni 40 agli anni 80, periodo del quale Didier Krzentowski è grande esperto. Ha pubblicato due libri sulle luci dagli anni 50 a oggi, The complete designers’ lights, ognuno dei quali raccoglie 800 modelli di lampade. galeriekreo.com PÂTISSERIE DOLCETTI Ginevra, place du Bourg-de-Four 9 Una grande passione per la pasticceria tenuta nel cassetto. Poi il cambio di vita a 35 anni, il trasferimento

4

con la famiglia a Ginevra, la sfida: ricominciare a studiare per diventare mâitre pâtissier, frequentando corsi, master e facendo apprendistato con uno dei migliori chef pasticcieri francesi, mâitre Brocard. Oggi si può dire che Stefania Braggiotti è riuscita a dare vita al suo sogno: da cinque anni è nata Dolcetti - Pâtisserie Fine Italienne, un laboratorio artigianale che ogni giorno sforna dolci prelibati seguendo le ricette della tradizione regionale italiana e svizzera e consegnandoli a domicilio. I suoi clienti sono sia privati sia ristoranti oppure caffetterie. «La mia forza consiste nell’utilizzare materie prime di alta gamma, in parte provenienti dall’Italia, come farina, grano cotto, ricotta, frutta candita, e in parte dalla Svizzera, come latte, burro o cioc-

colato. Tra i miei dolci più richiesti c’è la pastiera napoletana, la cassata, lo strudel, il babà. Ma soprattutto la pasticceria mignon e i cannoli che realizzo con una sfoglia sottilissima e riempio al momento della consegna, affinché rimanga croccante». Le ordinazioni si possono effettuare online, 48 ore prima della consegna. patisserie-dolcetti.ch 5

R.T. RESTAURO TESSILE Albinea (Reggio Emilia) via Monterampino 17 Sulle pendici dell’Appennino emiliano, in una vecchia casa colonica ristrutturata, c’è uno dei più rinomati laboratori di restauro tessile d’Italia. Lo hanno aperto quasi 25 anni fa Angela Lusvarghi, Ivana Micheletti e Cristina Lusvarghi, cui


25 si è aggiunta in un secondo tempo Stellina Cherubini che, appassionate del loro lavoro, fanno veri miracoli portando a nuova vita ogni genere di tessuto antico. Dagli abiti del ’700 (calzature comprese) alle tappezzerie, dagli arazzi del ’500 ai pizzi e ai merletti. Il loro quartiere generale è un ex fienile ristrutturato: sul soppalco vengono tinti i filati e le sete, mentre al piano terra avvengono le varie fasi delle ricostruzioni manuali ad ago. Per il lavaggio c’è anche un’ampia vasca dotata di ponteggio mobile per spostare gli arazzi più grandi. Se invece il tessuto necessita di un trattamento a secco, vengono utilizzati solventi organici, che evaporano lasciando i colori inalterati. Per riposizionare la trama e l’ordito, dopo il trattamento a vapore, si stendono i tessuti sopra tavoli di cristallo. Le metodologie applicate ai restauri rispondono sempre ai criteri di reversibilità, di intrusione minima e di rispetto di ogni dato storico, artistico e sartoriale dell’opera originale. Tra i numerosi lavori eseguiti c’è il restauro di 40 abiti femminili e maschili e di vari accessori databili tra il 1795 e 1815 per l’esposizione Napoleone e l’impero della moda (2010) alla Triennale di Milano, il restauro del sipario del Teatro Ariosto di Reggio Emilia, il restauro degli abiti appartenuti a Benedetto XI, esposti prima al Quirinale e, fino al mese scorso, al Mao di Torino. restaurotessile.it

5

6

6

RAFA PÉREZ Haro (Spagna), Breton Herreros 17 Molti in Spagna, suo Paese natale, lo indicano come l’erede di Gaudí, per il carattere forte e originale delle sue opere. Confessa con semplicità il talentuoso Rafa, che ha ricevuto il premio speciale Fondazione Cologni in occasione del concorso «Open to art» organizzato dalla Galleria Officine Saffi di Milano: «I miei lavori a volte sorprendono anche me! Io utilizzo in genere impasti di argilla con caolino, ovvero porcellana, che mescolo e combino insieme all’argilla più scura, a volte arricchita da minerali, prima di

cuocere il tutto nel forno ad alta temperatura. L’argilla scura tende a espandersi, creando degli avvallamenti che sembrano crateri vulcanici e assumendo delle conformazioni che spesso vanno oltre la mia immaginazione, anche se sono io che predispongo gli strati e le forme. Questo è il fascino di trattare dei materiali così ricchi di proprietà e di componenti». Le sue straordinarie forme sono il frutto di un lungo processo di sperimentazione fatto con vari materiali attraverso gli anni. Nel suo laboratorio, Pérez lavora l’argilla a lastra, la stende col mattarello, sovrappone altri strati sottili variando la combinazione degli impasti, li taglia con la taglierina, arrotola le strisce di impasto come fossero nastri, poi li assembla conferendo alla composizione la forma finale desiderata, che spesso completa con colori. Una delle sue opere più importanti, Evoluzione del cilindro, è stata recentemente presentata al Museo nazionale della ceramica González Martí di Valencia accanto alle opere di alcuni dei più grandi artisti creatori di ceramica quali Antonio Gaudí, Joan Miró, Pablo Picasso, Eduardo Chillida, Antoni Tapies e Miquel Barceló. Peréz ha ricevuto importanti premi in Francia, Portogallo, Spagna, Danimarca. rafaperez.es


ALBUM 8

7

7

ALAN DODD Londra tel. +44 (0)7788 151248 Grande studioso di arte, storia e pittura, Alan Dodd è uno straordinario artista in grado di dipingere decori parietali e vedute in perfetto stile con gli ambienti delle case. La sua bravura è testimoniata dal suo curriculum: basti dire che tra i dipinti murali da lui creati ci sono cinque grandi «capricci» realizzati per la Painted Room del Victoria & Albert Museum, commissionati da Sir Roy Strong nel 1986; dei pannelli architetturali ispirati a Piranesi per le decorazioni dell’Alexandra Palace; il soffitto pompeiano della New Picture Room al Sir John Soane Museum di Londra, che trae spunto da disegni inediti del 1890. Mentre a Spencer House ha ripreso la decorazione della balaustra trompe-l’œil sulla settecentesca scala progettata dall’architetto Vardy. Spaziando dagli sfondi barocchi a quelli neoclassici, dai soffitti pompeiani alle chinoiserie, Dodd riesce a conferire carattere e omogeneità a ogni ambiente (nella foto, il soffitto di una sala da pranzo a Gerrards Cross). Mai banale, sempre in linea con lo stile della casa da decorare, utilizza tempere, pigmenti, oli, terre, a seconda delle superfici e degli effetti voluti. La sua versatilità gli consente di spaziare dai trompe-l’œil paesaggistici ai decori orientali, fino ai cieli con voli di rondini. Notevoli sono anche i suoi

finti marmi realizzati in più tonalità di colore per le zoccolature delle scale, rifiniti a cera. Munito di colori e pennelli, Alan Dodd fa interventi sia su porte e pareti di appartamenti sia su facciate e scaloni di palazzi, alberghi o musei. Spesso si occupa di scenografia e realizza gli sfondi e i costumi per le opere liriche e teatrali. Un artista a tutto tondo. I suoi clienti sono ormai internazionali, non solo in Inghilterra e in Europa ma anche negli Stati Uniti. www.alandodd.co.uk

ANTONELLA ZUNINO REGGIO Milano, via Lanzone 13 Prima una prestigiosa carriera come pr di Roberta di Camerino, poi di Gian Marco Venturi, Dolce & Gabbana, Cesare Paciotti; oggi artista-artigiana che crea, dipinge, personalizza borse, portafogli, scarpe e cappelli. Stiamo parlando di Antonella Zunino Reggio, vulcanica ed elegantissima signora, che da poco tempo ha deciso di mettere in pratica il suo diploma artistico rimasto a lungo nel cassetto allestendo un laboratorio artigianale tutto suo. Qui, munita di colori acrilici, oli, pennelli e tanta fantasia, crea decori per impreziosire accessori da donna e da uomo. Sono tutti dipinti da lei a mano libera, con tratti decisi e poi sfumati, secondo gli effetti che desidera ottenere. Le sue borse, le pochette e i portafogli sono realizzati in ecopelle, materiale che si presta a diversi tipi di lavorazione: liscio, martellato, tipo saffiano. A seconda della superficie che decora, la creativa signora stende i colori con diversi strati, sovrappone le tonalità, poi attende che si solidifichino per aggiungere sfumature, ombreggiature, piccoli particolari. Decora anche i cappelli di paglia. antonella.zuninoreggio@gmail.com

8


27 10

9

9

ARTE DEL FERRO Opera (Milano), via Trebbia 11/19 Luciano Gorlaghetti è un artigiano, figlio e nipote d’arte, che lavora il ferro fin da ragazzino. La sua fucina, all’interno di un grande capannone a Opera, è affollata da un’infinità di strumenti: incudini di varie dimensioni, trafilatrici, centinaia di pezzi che vanno dai martelli alle pinze alle forge, persino dei minuscoli attrezzi per lavorare i gioielli. Sullo sfondo un grande camino per il fuoco. «Partendo da un disegno», spiega Gorlaghetti, «posso realizzare complementi di arredo di ogni tipo. Qualunque idea può prendere forma nella mia fucina». Lungo le pareti ci sono campioni di vario tipo alternati a oggetti pronti per la consegna. «Sono entrato in bottega giovanissimo e, grazie ai preziosi insegnamenti di mio padre, ho sviluppato un’esperienza che oggi mi permette anche di effettuare restauri su ferri battuti antichi». I suoi interventi sono difficili da distinguere dalle parti originali, per la precisione con cui realizza gli ornati in tutti gli stili. «Una delle commissioni più particolari che ho ricevuto recentemente», confessa Gorlaghetti con giustificato orgoglio, «è una serie di lampioni di grandi dimensioni destinati alla città di San Pietroburgo». L’abile fabbro ha forgiato nella sua fucina anche la grande statua del Sole della piazza del paese, simbolo di Opera. artedelferrocmgl.jimdo.com

ARGENTIERE PAGLIAI Firenze, borgo San Jacopo 41r I Pagliai sono un’eccellenza italiana: basti pensare che il Mescitoio del Tritone, una straordinaria brocca-scultura in argento a forma di pesce realizzata dal nonno dell’attuale proprietario, è esposto in una vetrina del Museo degli argenti di Firenze. Una storia di tradizione e di amore per il mestiere tramandata di padre in figlio e che continua ai nostri giorni grazie a Paolo Pagliai, la moglie Raffaella e la figlia Stefania negli affascinanti locali di Borgo San Jacopo. Si utilizzano ancora gli strumenti del padre Orlando, creati appositamente per lui. Questi attrezzi, oltre alla sua profonda conoscenza degli stili, delle leghe, dei procedimenti

del passato, consentono a Paolo di essere uno straordinario restauratore e incisore. «Una specialità del mio laboratorio consiste nel ricreare posateria antica non più in produzione. Abbiamo realizzato anche una copia delle iniziali in argento con corona provenienti da un antico armadio di Paolina Bonaparte Borghese e delle ventole per lucerne del ’700 andate perdute». argentierepagliai.it

10


28

Lavorazioni di stile

natività

CORALLINA I noti personaggi della tradizione napoletana si uniscono a quelli biblici nei presepi di Liverino, realizzati interamente a mano utilizzando l’«oro rosso». Espressione più alta di un sapere artigianale inimitabile di Federica Cavriana

All’ombra del Vesuvio, tra il vulcano e il mare, si trova il comune di Torre del Greco: 30 km quadrati diventati, storicamente, patria del corallo. Da qui una volta partivano le «coralline», barche per la pesca dell’«oro rosso», e fin dal XV secolo qui si compra, si vende, si lavora e si colleziona questo straordinario materiale organico. La famiglia Liverino, che possiede il più importante Museo del corallo al mondo proprio in questa cittadina, ben conosce la storia di questa materia e dell’arte antica che la accompagna. Enzo Liverino, attuale titolare, s’innamora di questo mondo sin da ragazzo, quando nella bottega dei suoi avi sviluppa un’ammirazione profonda per il lavoro degli incisori impiegati dal padre, le cui opere esprimono una bellezza poetica e una maestria che resterà sempre impressa nella sua memoria. Sono gli stessi tagliatori che pian piano gli insegnano a riconoscere il valore di ogni pezzo già nella fase del taglio, che rivela i potenziali usi o le eventuali imperfezioni. Sarà poi il decennio passato tra Napoli e Taiwan a perfezionare

CARLO FALANGA

Realizzato con coralli del Pacifico e corallo rosso del Mediterraneo, questo esemplare di presepe napoletano creato da Liverino è composto da un mosaico di centinaia di piccole tessere giustapposte. Per ultimare una natività come questa, con una base di 18x38 cm, e un’altezza di 26 cm, i maestri incisori impiegano circa un anno di lavoro (storeliverino.com).


29


30

Lavorazioni di stile

DAL DESIDERIO DI PRESERVARE CIMELI E OPERE UNICHE È NATO IL PIÙ IMPORTANTE MUSEO DEL MONDO DEDICATO AL CORALLO. A TORRE DEL GRECO


Xxxxxx

la sua conoscenza del corallo e a farne un intenditore. Intanto, nel 1986, il padre Basilio realizza il sogno di una vita: mettere a disposizione di tutti le bellezze racchiuse nella collezione di famiglia, quelle opere in corallo asiatico, mediterraneo, di Sciacca, trapanese, napoletano, cinese e giapponese acquisite negli anni dal bisnonno e fondatore Basilio, da nonno Vincenzo, da papà Basilio, dal figlio Vincenzo (detto Enzo, l’attuale proprietario), e quelle che saranno aggiunte da suo figlio Basilio. Nasce così il Museo del corallo. Tanto è il desiderio di preservare questi cimeli e queste opere uniche, a vantaggio dei visitatori, che gli spazi espositivi, interamente scavati nella roccia, sono progettati per resistere idealmente anche a un’improvvisa eruzione del Vesuvio, come quella che cristallizzò nel tempo le città di Pompei ed Ercolano (gli scavi di quest’ultima si trovano a soli cinque chilometri dal museo). Prenotando una visita alla collezione, che include pezzi dal XVI secolo in poi, è possibile immergersi nella storia del corallo e comprenderne anche le fasi di lavorazione: da quando viene scelto grezzo, ben lavato, studiato per deciderne l’uso a partire dalla forma del ramo. Poi tagliato, diviso per dimensione, colore, qualità. Può essere arrotondato, bucato per essere infilato, o può essere inciso a bulino, secondo la fantasia dell’intagliatore. L’utilizzo della materia prima è orientato, in tutti i passaggi, a evitare gli sprechi. Dalle fasi di pesca, quando vengono raccolti solo i rami più grandi dai sub che lasciano quelli più piccoli per gli anni a venire, fino alla lavorazione del corallo, che non ammette scarti: anche le parti più piccole vengono utilizzate, per realizzare piccole perline o elementi decorativi, mentre la polvere di corallo è utile per la lucidatura. Il profondo rispetto per questa materia organica e l’amore per la sua professione hanno portato Enzo Liverino a divenire presidente della Commissione corallo in Cibjo (World Jewellery Confederation) e consulente della Fao per le statistiche sul corallo pescato nel mondo. Liverino è anche socio del Club degli orafi Italia, di Assogemme, consigliere di Federpietre, responsabile della Commissione perle, corallo e cammei dell’Ica, e referente per il corallo e cammei dell’Istituto gemmologico

A sinistra, la bucatura del corallo, una fase molto delicata della lavorazione. A destra, un pastore della scuola siciliana (1570), unico pezzo sopravvissuto della «Montagna di corallo», opera donata dal Viceré di Sicilia a Filippo II, re di Spagna, e conservata nel Museo del corallo. Gli oggetti esposti nelle sale sono della collezione privata della famiglia Liverino.

31


32

Lavorazioni di stile

italiano e del Gemmological Institute di Bangkok. La sua famiglia porta avanti questa attività dal 1894, con uno spirito orientato a una continua modernizzazione: nella creazione dei gioielli, in particolare, mantiene viva una tradizione preziosa e profondamente radicata nel territorio, rinnovandola oggi grazie a un design contemporaneo. Nondimeno, l’atelier Liverino rende onore alla storia di Torre del Greco producendo anche sculture di grande fascino, come i presepi interamente scolpiti in corallo. Così, dall’incontro di due eccellenze campane nascono pezzi unici, scene di Natività, la cui tecnica di lavorazione segue fedelmente quella del presepe napoletano del ’700. Un presepe che in questa versione sorprende l’occhio. Le usuali scene sacre e profane punteggiate di statuine fatte d’argilla e legno, vestite di tessuti più o meno sgargianti in mostra nelle ormai celebri botteghe napoletane di via San Gregorio Armeno, lasciano il posto in questo caso non solo a una sacra famiglia realizzata interamente in corallo: anche il taglialegna, lo zampognaro, persino cani, galline, oche e conigli sono vestiti delle sfumature preziose del tesoro organico pescato dalle profondità marine. In queste opere di esecuzione certosina anche la scenografia è interamente realizzata in «oro rosso» di varie specie: da quello del Pacifico, più chiaro, al Corallium rubrum del Mediterraneo. Piccole tessere vengono giustapposte a formare un mosaico che ricopre tutta l’opera, con straordinari effetti mimetici: ecco la porosità e il colore dei mattoni in cotto, la grana del brecciolino, ecco le nuance rosate del marmo di Candoglia nella riproduzione di elementi architettonici classici, mentre con l’accostamento di coralli rossi o quasi candidi l’artigiano gioca a definire una scala, o un raffinato pavimento a scacchiera. I noti personaggi della tradizione napoletana si confondono con quelli biblici, portati alla luce molto spesso dalle sezioni di uno stesso ramo di corallo, in cui gli intagliatori e incisori hanno individuato, con occhio esperto, le forme che avrebbero poi fatto nascere pazientemente, a bulino. Un presepe come questo può richiedere fino a un anno di lavoro, e costituisce una delle produzioni più impegnative ed esclusive degli artigiani Liverino, ma anche l’espressione più alta di un sapere artigianale inimitabile.

In alto, la «rociatura», ossia l’arrotondamento del corallo con tecnica moderna. Il corallo viene catalogato in base alla grandezza, alla qualità e al colore (a destra). Questo incredibile prodotto naturale, scheletro e sostegno di convivenza di piccoli animali marini, ha stregato per secoli gli abitanti torresi. Tra questi anche i Liverino, cresciuti a «pane e corallo».


33

DARIO GAROFALO

DAPPRIMA VIENE SCELTO GREZZO, LAVATO E STUDIATO PER DECIDERNE L’USO A PARTIRE DALLA FORMA DEL RAMO. POI TAGLIATO, DIVISO PER DIMENSIONE, COLORE E QUALITÀ


In Emiliasdfasdf questa pagina, sBus la dendanti famosa lampada diorerumet Falkland essedis delcumque 1964, prodotta id moloreda comnisquam Danese, realizzata voloria con una quam maglia quae tubolare volum velche maios si snoda et autempo e prende ratur? forma Um lungo ditatem anelli faccus di alluminio. di d erum A fianco, quamuna incti «Forchetta tecer oriatiae parlante», et aceped gioco quis di invenzione dolenditatia divolupti Munari, sincima che sapeva gnimi, trovare odi aut l’inconsueto assitasi ipiet, nell’ordinario; AAo culparci qui trasforma officiendiauna conseque forchetta dus insiti una occ mano.

COURTESY DANESE

34


Icone del design

l’inventore

DI SEGNI Prima di progettare un oggetto occorre studiare il comportamento dell’individuo, i suoi rituali, le sue abitudini. Bruno Munari è stato un artista totale che ci ha aiutato a capire, a usare, a valorizzare

COURTESY CORRAIN

di Ugo La Pietra

Quando Bruno Munari ritornava dai suoi viaggi in Giappone, oltre ad alimentare la sua passione per i bonsai, raccontava ai giovani designer italiani: «Sapete che la metà della popolazione mondiale non usa il letto?!». Gli orientali, infatti, dormono su una stuoia che al mattino riavvolgono e posizionano in un angolo della stanza, per poi srotolarla la sera prima di coricarsi. In questa frase è racchiuso uno dei tanti insegnamenti che ci ha lasciato il grande maestro Bruno Munari (1907-98), che ci dice che prima di progettare un oggetto occorre studiare il comportamento dell’individuo, i suoi rituali, le sue abitudini. Al contrario di ciò che spesso avviene nelle nostre università dove l’insegnamento invita lo studente a progettare partendo dalla tipologia di un oggetto, quella consolidata nel tempo. Il lavoro creativo di Bruno Munari ci ha lasciato tantissimi strumenti per decodificare, per capire, per conoscere: credo sia proprio questo il ruolo più importante che dobbiamo attribuirgli. Per costruire questi strumenti, Munari non rispettava nessuna regola disciplinare: di fatto ha sempre usa-

35


36 vissime» del 1945, dove il design irregolare allude al fatto che non sempre il concetto di funzione sta nell’uso diretto ma può essere anche nell’uso metaforico e, in questo caso, nell’impossibilità dell’uso. Gillo Dorfles ha sempre sottolineato l’atteggiamento giocoso e spesso ironico di Munari: le variazioni delle «Forchette parlanti» per «giocare con la fantasia» sono un esempio perfetto di questo atteggiamento che si ritrova nelle tante piccole e grandi invenzioni ed elaborazioni. Munari delle macchine inutili, dei libri per bambini, delle pitture negative-positive, del design, delle sculture da viaggio, della grafica editoriale, dei giochi didattici, dei messaggi tattili per i non vedenti... Munari è un artista totale, come lo ha recentemente definito lo storico Claudio Cerritelli, curatore di una bella mostra a Torino e di un bel catalogo. Un artista totale che si è occupato di un’enorme quantità e qualità di esperienze. Tutto questo è stato possibile grazie all’elasticità del suo modo di pensare e di guardare le cose che ci circondano, e alla disponibilità di un pensiero sempre pronto a modificarsi per migliorare le possibilità di conoscenza.

Sopra, Bruno Munari indossa i suoi Occhiali paraluce (Fondazione Vodoz-Danese, 1953), realizzati da un foglio di cartone piegato. A lato, Abitacolo, realizzato nel 1971 da Robots e ancora in produzione, è un’altra delle invenzioni di Munari: una struttura semplice, smontabile e rimontabile in forme diverse.

COURTESY REXITE - COURTESY CORRAINI

to modelli che superavano le varie scale di intervento e le varie separazioni disciplinari. Le sue sono ricerche fatte di continui spiazzamenti che proprio per la loro imprevedibilità ci aprono nuovi orizzonti e consentono di acquisire nuovi significati: per fare tutto ciò Munari ha realizzato anche molti oggetti, la cui vera natura (la loro vera funzione) è quella di «aiutarci a capire, aiutarci a usare, aiutarci a valorizzare, aiutarci a creare». «Aiutarci a usare»: come con il portacenere di Danese, progettato nel 1951, in cui finalmente non si vedono i mozziconi delle sigarette e neppure la cenere. «Aiutarci a valorizzare»: quasi tutti i suoi oggetti rispondono a criteri di semplicità, di minimo ingombro e di basso costo come la «Falkland», lampada tubolare in maglia del 1964, progettata con una struttura verticale di grandi dimensioni che si snoda su cerchi metallici di diametro diverso, ripiegabile, leggera, facile da montare. «Aiutarci a creare»: come con l’elemento d’arredo in metallo «Abitacolo», del 1971, dove lo spazio è modificabile dalla creatività del bambino. «Aiutarci a capire»: come con la «Sedia per visite bre-


Icone del design

37


38 Da secoli le donne di Nisa, piccolo borgo dell’Alto Alentejo, si ispirano alla natura per realizzare i loro preziosi «bordados», i sontuosi ricami che un tempo erano immancabili nei corredi nuziali. Dagli «alinhavados» (ricamo sfilato), al tombolo, alle coperte e agli scialli ricamati a punto catenella, alle applicazioni in feltro (sotto), di cui è specialista Dinis Pereira.


Craft tradizionale

ANIMA instancabile A 74 ANNI DINIS PEREIRA SI DEDICA ANCORA STRENUAMENTE ALLA SUA GRANDE PASSIONE: I RICAMI IN FELTRO CHE DA SECOLI CARATTERIZZANO I COSTUMI TIPICI DI NISA, PICCOLO BORGO PORTOGHESE

di Giovanna Marchello - foto di Susanna Pozzoli

39


40

Craft tradizionale

Dinis Pereira è una forza della natura. A 74 anni si dedica ancora anima e corpo alla sua grande passione, i ricami in feltro che da secoli caratterizzano i costumi tipici di Nisa, piccolo borgo dell’Alto Alentejo portoghese. Qui un tempo tutte le donne sapevano eseguire i loro preziosi bordados, i sontuosi ricami che non potevano mai mancare nei corredi nuziali delle giovani spose. Dal ricamo sfilato, al tombolo, alle coperte di feltro e agli scialli in lana ricamati a punto catenella, alle applicazioni in feltro di cui è specialista Dinis Pereira. Ciò che rende unici i ricami di Nisa non è solo la tecnica ma soprattutto i soggetti, che prendono sempre ispirazione dalla natura. La flora locale, infatti, è il punto di partenza di ogni creazione, e ogni artigiana sviluppa il proprio linguaggio, che è sempre riconoscibile. Lo stile di Dinis Pereira si distingue per la complessità dei disegni, per l’uso di feltro esclusivamente di lana, come vuole la tradizione, e per la varietà di colori impie-

che sta scomparendo. Collabora con il Museu do Bordado e do Barro, istituito nel 2009 dalla Camera municipale di Nisa per proteggere e dare visibilità ai ricami e alle terrecotte più belle del territorio. Lei stessa conserva migliaia di disegni su carta, alcuni vecchi di 100 anni, creati dalle sue compaesane per i ricami in feltro e da lei pazientemente raccolti nel corso del tempo. Da 30 anni, inoltre, Nisa celebra il suo artigianato e la sua gastronomia con una grande fiera che si svolge ad agosto, e dove Dinis espone le sue opere, alcune del passato e altre nuove, perché le piace continuare a rinnovarsi. Nel nuovo laboratorio fornitole dalla municipalità di Nisa, l’instancabile Dinis Pereira manda avanti la sua attività aiutata da due artigiane esperte e da quattro apprendiste. Ha da poco ultimato un’importante opera per la Camera municipale di Lisbona, che servirà a decorare le grandi finestre del municipio durante le feste: una serie di pannelli di 5 metri per 4 sui

gati. Essendo nata in una famiglia molto povera e dovendo crescere un figlio da sola, Dinis Pereira ha saputo rendersi indipendente realizzando ricami in feltro su coperte, tovaglie, tende e centrini destinati a negozi non solo in Portogallo, ma anche in Italia e ancora più lontano, negli Stati Uniti. Nei tempi d’oro dava lavoro a una ventina di artigiane. Quando il mercato per questo tipo di prodotti è crollato, nel suo orizzonte è arrivata Joana Vasconcelos, poliedrica e geniale artista di Lisbona, le cui visionarie opere incorporano le lavorazioni tipiche dell’artigianato portoghese. «L’essere coinvolta nelle sue creazioni mi ha dato la forza di andare avanti», spiega Pereira. «È un’esperienza fantastica, che mi permette di allargare il potenziale creativo dell’artigianalità di Nisa, oltre ovviamente al privilegio di essere esposta nel mondo intero». Come Joana Vasconcelos, anche Dinis Pereira è impegnata in prima linea nella conservazione di un patrimonio culturale

quali ha ricamato in feltro lo stendardo della città. Sta inoltre collaborando con una fabbrica di cappelli in feltro e anche con una fabbrica di scarpe in sughero (le querce da sughero sono caratteristiche dell’Alto Alentejo), che le hanno chiesto di creare dei motivi ornamentali prendendo spunto dai decori di Nisa. Inoltre, continua a realizzare bellissime borse con applicazioni in feltro disegnate da Kitty Oliveira, sua grande amica e mentore e da molti anni collaboratrice di Joana Vasconcelos. Recentemente Dinis Pereira è stata anche una delle protagoniste del volume The Master’s Touch, scritto da Alberto Cavalli e realizzato dalla Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship. «Questo è il primo vero riconoscimento della mia vita da artigiana. È una grande conquista, sia per la mia terra sia per la mia gente. Collaborando al libro ho potuto osservare il mio lavoro da una prospettiva diversa, e sono molto fiera di far parte di questa grande famiglia di artigiani».


41 Ci sono voluti anni per realizzare il tipico scialle di lana che Dinis Pereira, classe 1943, ha creato da ragazza per la sua mamma, e dal quale non si separa mai (a sinistra). Il ricamo in cui è specializzata nasce dall’accoppiamento di due tessuti in feltro (a destra). Dapprima si esegue il ricamo a macchina. Lo strato superiore di feltro viene poi sapientemente ritagliato lungo la cucitura, facendo cosÏ emergere il disegno.


42

Processi creativi

guanto SFIDA di

di Luca Maino

THOMASINE BARNEKOW È DIVENTATA UNA DESIGNER DI QUESTI ACCESSORI PER CASO. OGGI VENDE ED ESPONE IN TUTTO IL MONDO. VA ALLA RICERCA DEI MATERIALI MENO USUALI, PER DAR VITA A UN PRODOTTO CHE UNISCA ARTISTICITÀ E PORTABILITÀ. CHE NON SIA DI TENDENZA MA «PER SEMPRE»

L’INCONTRO DI DUE MONDI Nella pagina a fianco, un modello couture di Thomasine Barnekow che ricorda le forme del mare realizzato in collaborazione con l’artista Cécile Feilchenfeldt, appassionata di knitwear. I guanti firmati Thomasine Gloves si dividono in due linee, quella ready to wear e la couture.


BENJAMIN TAGUEMOUNT

43


44


Processi creativi

BENJAMIN TAGUEMOUNT FOR SARVENAZ DEZVAREH

Da bambina, Thomasine Barnekow amava osservare il lavoro delle tante donne che abitavano la grande fattoria nella campagna svedese dove è cresciuta. C’era chi faceva la maglia, chi ricamava, chi si dilettava con la piccola sartoria. Non credeva che quelle immagini un giorno avrebbero condizionato il suo futuro. Piuttosto Thomasine preferiva incidere il legno, plasmare l’argento. Quando si trattò di decidere a quale università iscriversi, non ebbe esitazioni: ingegneria. «I dubbi arrivarono qualche mese dopo: non ero felice», ci racconta seduta nel suo atelier parigino nel cuore del Marais. «Avevo bisogno di esprimere il mio lato artistico, così decisi di cambiare strada. Gli amici che si erano dedicati al design avevano scelto tutti Londra, perciò io optai per la Design Academy di Eindhoven, nei Paesi Bassi». Thomasine punta sul design industriale, ma non ha affatto le idee chiare. «Mi affascinavano i tessuti, così cominciai a concentrarmi su quelli. Durante un laboratorio realizzai un primo progetto che poneva in relazione poesia e guanti, ma la folgorazione arrivò qualche tempo

PER LEI NON SONO ACCESSORI MA BIJOU E COME TALI VANNO CONSIDERATI

45

dopo». Fu una fotografia ad accendere la fantasia di Thomasine. «Il soggetto ritratto era Michelle Lamy, musa e moglie dello stilista Rick Owens, a colpirmi furono i bracciali che indossava. Iniziai a immaginare come rendere quel movimento in un guanto. Fu così che nacque il mio primo prototipo». Peau Précieuse, questo il nome che Thomasine diede a quella scultura che simulava i monili con il cuoio, fu realizzato nell’atelier di Georges Morand, maestro guantaio a Saint-Junien dal 1946. Dopo essere passata da Agnelle e Maison Fabre, altre celebri realtà dell’alto artigianato francese, Barnekow decise che era arrivato il momento di dare vita a una propria attività. «Devo ringraziare anche la stilista spagnola Elisa Palomino, giurata dell’International Talent Support di Trieste a cui partecipai, che nel 2007 mi spronò a seguire questa strada. Per me il guanto non è solo un accessorio, ma un bijou e come tale va considerato». Il processo creativo di Thomasine, che oggi vende ed espone i suoi guanti in tutto il mondo, inizia osservando le proprie

SCULTURE DI PELLE DA ESPOSIZIONE Qui sopra, un pezzo unico realizzato da Thomasine Barnekow. Nella pagina a fianco, i modelli New York e Seoul in mostra al Grand Musée du Parfum di Parigi: la stilista ha realizzato una serie di guanti profumati che si rifanno alla tradizione del XVI secolo (thomasinegloves.com).


Processi creativi

mani. «Le ho sempre davanti agli occhi, quindi penso a delle forme che le avvolgano. A ispirarmi sono soprattutto la natura e l’architettura: le fotografie floreali di Karl Blossfeldt, così come le opere di Oscar Niemeyer, hanno contribuito a diverse delle mie creazioni. Prima di realizzare il disegno di ciò che ho in mente, valuto quali materiali utilizzare. Il cuoio ovviamente è quello d’elezione, ma amo lavorarlo con altri meno usuali (la plastica, il vinile...) trovando il modo di creare un’armonia. È quella la sfida più elettrizzante». I guanti firmati Thomasine Gloves si dividono in due linee, quella ready to wear e la couture. «Per la prima mi affido a un laboratorio artigianale in Ungheria, che lavora materia prima italiana o francese. Ho girato molto per riuscire a trovare alta qualità, solida tradizione artigiana e prezzi sostenibili per una realtà piccola come la mia. All’inizio, quando sottoponevo loro i miei prototipi, mi guardavano stranamente. Oggi hanno capito la sfida: dare vita a un prodotto che unisca artisticità e portabilità, capi che non siano di tendenza ma “per sempre”, sen-

POSSONO ESSERE INDOSSATI DA UNA DONNA DI 70 ANNI COME DA UNA RAGAZZA DI 20

za età, che potrebbero finire sulle mani di una ragazza di 20 anni così come su quelle di una donna di 70». Accanto ai modelli ready to wear che portano i nomi delle città che li hanno ispirati, ci sono poi i pezzi unici che Thomasine crea personalmente nel suo studio. Sono sculture di pelle che simulano un volo di rondini sul braccio o ancora conchiglie arenate sullo stesso. «Ho da poco finito di lavorare su una piccola collezione di guanti profumati, una tradizione che risale al XVI secolo, presentata al Grand Musée du Parfum di Parigi. Mi diverte pensare che chi vede una mia creazione stia lì a domandarsi come è stato possibile realizzarla. Così come mi inorgoglisce l’attenzione che in questi anni mi ha tributato la stampa. Fino a dieci anni fa trovare guanti sui giornali di moda era un’impresa, negli anni 80 e 90 ce ne siamo completamente dimenticati per dare spazio a scarpe e borse. Oggi c’è una nuova considerazione del lavoro del guantaio, un mondo in cui artigianato e arte si incontrano per dare vita a un oggetto che fugge dal concetto di stagionalità».

LA NATURA È LA SUA FONTE D’ISPIRAZIONE È un vero e proprio bouquet di guanti quello che potete ammirare qui sopra: Thomasine Barnekow si ispira proprio alle forme della natura per trarre ispirazione durante il processo creativo di un nuovo modello. Nella pagina a fianco, un guanto haute couture che avvolge l’intero braccio.

BENJAMIN TAGUEMOUNT

46


47


48

Eredità da tramandare

Missione REGALE IL BRITANNICO QUEEN ELIZABETH SCHOLARSHIP TRUST È UN ISTITUTO FILANTROPICO CHE DAL 1990 VEGLIA SUI MESTIERI A RISCHIO DI ESTINZIONE. ATTRAVERSO BORSE DI STUDIO E APPRENDISTATI, SOSTIENE GIOVANI ARTIGIANI E AFFERMATI MAESTRI di Akemi Okumura Roy (traduzione dall ’originale inglese di Giovanna Marchello)

Il Regno Unito vanta innumerevoli mestieri tradizionali, affascinanti e unici come i territori dove si sono sviluppati nel corso dei secoli, insieme a materie prime, strumenti di lavoro e competenze specifiche. Qui, come nel resto nel mondo, il progresso sta causando un pericoloso calo nel numero di artigiani e molti mestieri tradizionali rischiano l’estinzione. Tra le importanti associazioni che si prodigano per salvare questo prezioso patrimonio, il Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust merita una menzione particolare. Il Qest è un istituto filantropico fondato nel 1990 dalla Royal Warrant Holders Association (l’associazione che riunisce i fornitori ufficiali della Casa Reale inglese) per celebrare il 150° anniversario della sua creazione e il 90° compleanno della Regina Madre. La missione del Qest è di valorizzare l’eccellenza nei mestieri d’arte tradizionali attraverso borse di studio e apprendistati. Nel corso degli anni ha elargito più di quattro milioni di sterline per sostenere 412 borse di studio e 29 apprendistati indirizzati a persone tra i 17 e i 58 anni che operano in 130 discipline sia tradizionali sia contemporanee. Secondo le necessità, ogni borsista riceve tra mille e 18mila sterline, mentre agli apprendisti sono


96 49

In questa pagina, ritratto della Regina Elisabetta II dipinto da Alastair Barford, che nel 2012 è stato borsista del Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust. Il quadro è stato commissionato dalla rivista «Illustrated London News» nel 2015.


50 97

Eredità da tramandare

Sotto, tessuti realizzati a mano dalla Mourne Textiles, l’azienda tessile rilanciata da Mario Sierra, borsista in tessitura a mano. Nella pagina a destra: 1. La missione del Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust è di valorizzare l’eccellenza nei mestieri d’arte tradizionali attraverso borse di studio e apprendistati. 2. Alastair Barford. 3. Mourne Textiles. 4. «Shower of Comets» (Pioggia di comete) di Wayne Meteen, borsista in lavorazione dell’argento nel 2014. 5. Sam Woolham, apprendista maniscalco nel 2016. 6. Melissa White dipinge decori parietali ed è stata borsista del Qest nel 2007 (qest.org.uk).

assegnate fino a 6mila sterline all’anno, per un massimo di 18mila nell’arco di tre anni. Inoltre, il Qest propone ai suoi ex studenti dei seminari dove apprendere come far prosperare sia le loro imprese sia i loro mestieri. I temi trattati spaziano da come avviare un’impresa individuale alla definizione dei prezzi, alla ricerca di fornitori fino alle tecniche di marketing, tra cui lo sviluppo di un sito e i social media. Il successo del programma promosso dal Qest si riflette nel fatto che il 93% dei beneficiari continua a praticare il proprio mestiere dopo la conclusione degli studi. Molti degli artigiani sono inoltre figure di spicco nel loro campo. Per accedere al programma, i candidati devono superare una severa selezione in tre fasi condotta da esperti del settore e dagli skill advisor del Qest. In ciascuna sessione, alcuni maestri d’arte esaminano fino a 15 candidature in base alle loro capacità e al loro potenziale, nonché alla fattibilità della richiesta di finanziamento. Nella fase finale, 30 candidati sono valutati da una commissione composta dagli skill advisor, presieduta da un membro del consiglio del Qest. Il processo per la selezione dei tirocinanti è simile, ma in questo caso si valutano sia il potenziale apprendista sia il suo datore di lavoro. Il Qest si rivolge sia a giovani artigiani sia a maestri affermati, e dedica particolare attenzione a chi mantiene in vita un mestiere scomparso, a chi cerca di salvare dalla chiusura un’impresa artigiana e a chi si prodiga per adattare e interpretare le conoscenze fondamentali dei mestieri tradizionali, creando così un nuovo mestiere che abbia rilevanza nella società moderna. Nel 2007, Alan Partridge ha ricevuto una borsa di studio da 7.200 sterline per apprendere un mestiere molto specializzato: la realizzazione di canaletti per le canne ad ancia degli organi. Fornisce canaletti a chiese, cattedrali ed edifici pubblici in tutto il mondo: Usa, Australia, Paesi Bassi, Germania, Irlanda e Regno Unito. «Il mio impegno è totale, e spero di continuare a fornire l’industria organistica finché ne avrò la forza», racconta. «È un mestiere molto faticoso, ma il vero problema è che, anche se nel corso degli anni ho avuto diversi giovani a bottega proprio per tramandare loro il mio mestiere, purtroppo il lavoro è poco e non ci sono garanzie che si riesca a guadagnare abbastanza per vivere». Oggi Alan Partridge è l’ultimo costruttore di canaletti per canne ad ancia di tutta la Gran Bretagna.

Dopo la laurea in Belle arti conseguita nel 2011, Alastair Barford ha ricevuto una sovvenzione dal Qest per studiare ritrattistica presso l’atelier del noto artista Charles H. Cecil, a Firenze. Dopo il suo ritorno, nel 2015, la rivista Illustrated London News gli ha commissionato un ritratto della Regina Elisabetta. Oggi le opere di Alastair Barford sono presenti in collezioni pubbliche e private. Wayne Meteen, abile gioielliere e lavoratore di metalli, ha ricevuto la sua borsa di studio nel 2014. È stato il primo artigiano inglese ad avere l’opportunità di imparare le tecniche Zougan (intarsio) e Chokin (intaglio) da maestri giapponesi, uno dei quali è un Tesoro Nazionale Vivente. Le competenze che ha acquisito non possono essere apprese nel Regno Unito, ma oggi Wayne Meteen ha la possibilità di tramandarle nel suo studio nel Devon. Mario Sierra è stato borsista nella tessitura a mano. Il suo obiettivo era di rilanciare l’azienda tessile fondata dalla nonna materna, che ha chiuso i battenti negli anni 80. La borsa di studio ottenuta nel 2016 gli ha permesso di imparare il mestiere da Sheila Roderick, compresa la manutenzione del telaio, la sua costruzione, oltre alle tecniche di tessitura e alla risoluzione dei problemi. Oggi l’azienda di famiglia ha ripreso a lavorare e a mantenere le sue competenze. L’impegno del Qest si rivolge anche al sostegno di mestieri a rischio: lo zoccolaio, il fonditore di campane, il costruttore di carrozze, di biciclette e di strumenti a fiato. «La cosa affascinante è che siamo in grado di sostenere una gamma molto ampia di mestieri, da quelli che appartengono alla tradizione rurale ai più contemporanei e innovativi», spiega Deborah Pocock, direttore esecutivo del Qest. «Non possiamo permettere che questi mestieri scompaiano». Il prossimo evento promosso dal Qest sarà la cena di beneficienza che si terrà l’8 marzo 2018 al Victoria & Albert Museum, il tempio del design e dell’artigianato. Ospite della serata sarà David Linley, vice-patrono del Qest. Questa occasione permetterà a 250 ospiti illustri di vedere di persona i lavori eseguiti dagli studenti del Qest e, attraverso una serie di aste silenti e dal vivo, di raccogliere fondi per finanziare altri talenti. Il Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust sta inoltre consolidando i rapporti con scuole e università, al fine di offrire ai giovani reali opportunità di apprendere un mestiere che permetta loro di lavorare con le proprie mani.


51 96

1

2

3

4

5

6


52 Composizione di sedie di epoche e stili differenti tra cui spicca la sedia «Sole» di Piero Fornasetti (con lo schienale bianco, nella pagina a fianco). Si può ammirare visitando la mostra «In miniatura», fino al 7 gennaio 2018 a Milano a Villa Necchi Campiglio.


Suggestivi dialoghi

Sofisticate MINIATURE

GUIDO TARONI

DAI MAESTRI EBANISTI SETTECENTESCHI AI GRANDI PROTOTIPISTI MODERNI, OLTRE 200 PREZIOSI MODELLI DI MOBILI SONO IN MOSTRA A MILANO A VILLA NECCHI CAMPIGLIO

di Alessandra de Nitto

53


54


Suggestivi dialoghi

55

Dai soprammobili alle sofisticate miniature per i collezionisti fino alle fascinose case di bambola per i fortunati bambini della ricca borghesia

GUIDO TARONI

Nello splendido scenario di Villa Necchi Campiglio, una delle più belle residenze del Fondo ambiente italiano, gioiello di architettura, d’arte e arti applicate tra déco e razionalismo nel cuore di Milano, si rinnova in occasione di «Manualmente» il fruttuoso sodalizio tra il Fai e la Fondazione Cologni per la valorizzazione dei mestieri d’arte italiani. La nuova, sesta edizione di questa fortunata collaborazione, dopo aver esplorato territori creativi e materiali come la carta, la ceramica, il vetro, le pietre preziose con alcune splendide mostre, è interamente consacrata al legno, materiale nobile e vivo per eccellenza che ha trovato in Lombardia le più importanti declinazioni nella progettazione, nel design e nell’alto artigianato. L’inedita e suggestiva esposizione In miniatura (fino al 7 gennaio 2018) offre un originale itinerario in questo saper fare d’eccellenza tanto radicato nel territorio scegliendo un inedito punto di vista legato al mondo del modello in legno, tra passato e contemporaneità: dai maestri ebanisti settecenteschi ai grandi prototipisti moderni, che hanno avuto un ruolo chiave nella progettazione e produzione del mobile in Lombardia. Grazie a importanti prestiti provenienti da collezioni pubbliche e private sono esposti oltre 200

preziosi modelli di mobili in miniatura, che documentano la storia dell’arredo tra XVII e XX secolo, nelle sue diverse tipologie, oltre a essere veri piccoli capolavori lignei realizzati con grande minuzia e cura nei dettagli, nei materiali e nelle decorazioni. I modelli spaziano dai preziosi capi d’opera degli ebanisti settecenteschi ai fedelissimi pezzi da campionario ottocenteschi, perfetti in ogni dettaglio; dai soprammobili alle sofisticate miniature per i collezionisti fino alle fascinose case di bambola per i fortunati bambini della ricca borghesia. Così, piccoli tavoli, cassettoni, sedie, madie, armadi, toilette, intessono suggestivi dialoghi con gli arredi e i luoghi di Villa Necchi, che non potrebbe essere miglior cornice, scrigno di un’artigianalità colta e raffinatissima: l’effetto di riecheggiamento è a volte spiazzante e sempre molto evocativo, come ben mettono in evidenza le splendide e spesso giocose fotografie di Guido Taroni, nel bel catalogo della mostra. L’esposizione propone anche il tema molto interessante e meno noto al grande pubblico del modello come strumento di lavoro che diventa fondamentale con la nascita dell’industrial design, quando progettisti e maestri artigiani intessono sodalizi creativi e operativi straordinari e oggetti icona del design nascono dalla

A sinistra, armadio a due ante laccato e marmorizzato con fregi vegetali intagliati risalente al XVIII secolo. Nella pagina a fianco, cassettone del XVIII secolo in bois de rose e altri legni intarsiati a marqueterie.


56

Suggestivi dialoghi

L’esposizione propone anche il tema poco dibattuto del modello come strumento di lavoro che diventa fondamentale con la nascita dell’industrial design

A destra, alcuni oggetti della bottega di Pierluigi Ghianda: campioni di essenze, incastri, semilavorati e sculture. Nella pagina a fianco, mobile del XVIII secolo con ribalta e alzata in radica di noce impreziosito da cassetti foderati in pizzo e seta coevi.

direttamente da Ghianda e permettendo alla sua bottega di continuare a vivere e a creare, nel segno dell’assoluta eccellenza. Giovanni Sacchi, considerato il più grande modellista italiano, figura straordinaria che nell’arco di 50 anni ha dialogato con i massimi architetti e designer, ha dato vita nella sua bottega milanese a oltre 25mila modelli: tutta la storia del design è passata tra le sue mani sapienti. La mostra gli rende omaggio presentando alcuni dei circa 300 modelli conservati presso il Museo del design della Triennale di Milano. «Questi oggetti», sottolinea la direttrice Silvana Annicchiarico, «racchiudono in sé uno straordinario valore testimoniale: documentano infatti un modo di produzione che ci riporta all’epoca d’oro dei maestri del design italiano. Ci ricordano insomma che il design è espressione della cultura del fare, e raccontano come il progettista ha affrontato e risolto di volta in volta i problemi che si manifestavano nel corso della realizzazione del progetto. Triennale Design Museum saluta dunque con entusiasmo la scelta di popolare gli straordinari spazi di Villa Necchi Campiglio con una selezione dei modelli di Sacchi, esposti in modo da dialogare con gli oggetti che essi hanno contribuito a generare».

MATTEO CUPELLA

collaborazione virtuosa tra saper fare e progettualità: alcuni dei pezzi più interessanti della mostra sono quelli dei celebri ebanisti milanesi, Giovanni Sacchi e Pierluigi Ghianda, realizzati per alcuni dei maggiori designer del ’900, da Castiglioni a Nizzoli a Zanuso, da Frattini a Gio Ponti, da Bellini a Magistretti. Progettisti che avevano ben chiara l’importanza fondamentale del saper fare e che hanno sempre tenuto nella più alta considerazione il lavoro della bottega, misurandosi con l’artigiano in un rapporto costruttivo e generativo. «I grandi maestri artigiani», ci ricorda Franco Cologni, «al pari dei beni tutelati dal Fai sono parte fondamentale del nostro patrimonio culturale». A Pierluigi Ghianda, recentemente scomparso, è dedicato l’allestimento del sottotetto di Villa Necchi, curato da Lorenzo Damiani, che rievoca la storica bottega del grande «poeta del legno», uno degli ebanisti più famosi al mondo, grazie ai materiali (modelli, appunti, schizzi) messi a disposizione dalla famiglia. La straordinaria eredità di questo maestro insuperato è stata oggi raccolta da Romeo Sozzi, designer ed ebanista appassionato, che con i figli ne ha rilevato l’attività, raccogliendo il testimone


GUIDO TARONI

57


FIRME INTERNAZIONALI La collezione di vetro artistico contemporaneo raccoglie opere firmate da artisti di fama internazionale. In questa pagina, vaso «Yellow Magic» di Gernot Schluifer (1988-1989). A fianco, «Aspetta», di Max Ernst realizzato da Egidio Costantini (1968).

MUDAC

58


Musei segreti

59

ali

E RADICI CLAUDE BORNAND

DAL 2000 A LOSANNA IL MUDAC HA SVILUPPATO UN’ATTITUDINE A RICERCARE FORME ARTISTICHE CHE FONDONO DIVERSI LINGUAGGI E CHE SI RIFANNO ALLA QUOTIDIANITÀ DELLE PERSONE, ALLA LORO DIMENSIONE DOMESTICA E AFFETTIVA

di Simona Cesana


60

FABRICE GOUSSET

STUDIA L’EVOLUZIONE DEI FENOMENI SOCIALI COME I DESIGNER E GLI ARTISTI LI AFFRONTANO. È PER QUESTO CHE HA ALLESTITO MOSTRE SU TEMI COME SPECCHI E NARCISISMO, SICUREZZA, EROTISMO, SENSO DEL TATTO, TRAVESTIMENTO, ANIMALI


Musei segreti

SIMON BIELANDER

Nella zona collinare di Losanna, con vista sui tetti rossi della città, il Museo del design e delle arti applicate contemporanee ha sede in un prestigioso edificio risalente al XVII secolo, la cui torretta con tetto a falde spioventi rimanda all’architettura gotica della cattedrale di Notre-Dame, che si trova proprio a un passo dal museo, al di là della piazza che caratterizza il centro storico di questa città affacciata sul lago di Ginevra. Il Mudac ha sviluppato le sue attività in questa sede dal 2000, anno in cui Maison Gaudard è diventata casa di quello che prima era il Musée des Arts décoratifs della città svizzera: nuova casa, nuovo nome e nuovi progetti che si sono alternati definendo negli anni le preziose collezioni permanenti di design contemporaneo, vetro, ceramica, gioiello, stampa (litografia, grafica, fumetti). Basi solide su cui poggia la ricerca e lo sviluppo futuro del Museo che, nel 2020, traghetterà in un edificio, ora in costruzione, nel nuovo distretto artistico denominato Plateforme10: un luogo, progettato dagli studi di architettura Barozzi Veiga (Barcellona) e Aires Mateus (Lisbona), che si aprirà vicino alla

TRA PRESENTE E FUTURO Sopra, «Scampi» di David Bielander (2007), braccialetto in argento ed elastico (collezione della Confederazione svizzera in deposito al Mudac). Sotto, uno scorcio dell’attuale sede del Mudac e il progetto della futura sede a Plateforme10 che si inaugurerà nel 2020. Nella pagina a fianco, «Frozen In Time. Frozen Vase» di Studio Wieki Somers (2010).

61

stazione di Losanna e ospiterà anche il Musée de l’Elysée, dedicato alla fotografia, e il Museo cantonale di Belle arti, in un continuo dialogo tra arti applicate, belle arti e fotografia. Il Mudac, nelle oltre 100 mostre temporanee, nei numerosi cataloghi pubblicati e nelle varie attività collaterali (dalla didattica alla musica, dai convegni alla danza) ha sviluppato negli anni la sua attitudine a ricercare quelle forme ibride e poco esplorate di espressioni artistiche che fondono diversi linguaggi e in particolare quelle opere che si rifanno alle arti applicate, al craft, parola che ben identifica quella categoria che non appartiene né all’arte né al design, ma a quella sfera che è più vicina al fare e quindi alla quotidianità delle persone, alla loro dimensione domestica e affettiva, ai loro bisogni di condivisione e comunicazione. La vicedirettrice Claire Favre Maxwell ci spiega con una dichiarazione la missione del Museo: «Il Mudac intende esaminare il ruolo del design nella società contemporanea. Non esita a travalicare i confini delle discipline, confrontando il design con le arti, la fotografia, la moda o la grafica. Il Mudac è interessato all’evoluzione


62

LA CERAMICA IN 300 PEZZI Sopra, «Wheel I», collana in gomma di Noémie Doge (2007). Sotto, un pezzo della collezione di ceramica contemporanea «Pecoralis», di Morgane Virchaux (2010). Nella pagina a fianco, una foto dalla mostra «Mirror Mirror» con l’opera di Matteo Gonet «Look at me» (2016): vetro soffiato e specchio ai sali d’argento (mudac.ch).

re dalla collezione permanente celebra il vetro in tutti i suoi cromatismi, in un allestimento ispirato alla ruota dei colori di Johannes Itten, uno degli insegnanti della scuola Bauhaus e celebre artista e teorico svizzero.La collezione di ceramica contemporanea, formata da oltre 300 pezzi, comprende in gran parte opere di artisti e designer svizzeri: una raccolta di oggetti e di opere astratte che vuole rappresentare la varietà della creatività svizzera in campo ceramico, dai nomi più noti alle nuove generazioni, dalle opere in grès della fine degli anni 90 alle più recenti opere in porcellana. Le politiche di acquisizione del museo, per le collezioni di ceramica come anche per quelle del design e del gioiello, favoriscono le proposte dei designer svizzeri e dei giovani editori, promuovono le donazioni da parte dei giovani designer, privilegiando le opere che esprimono innovazione nella ricerca e che sanno calarsi nel presente. Pezzi unici e opere in edizione limitata che sanno rappresentare l’evoluzione della creatività, per un museo che si fa custode e interprete della bellezza e del saper fare nelle arti applicate, tra arte e design.

AN - ARNAUD CONNE / CEPV - HEIDI CORPATAUX

dei fenomeni sociali e a come i designer e gli artisti li affrontano. È per questo che ha allestito mostre su temi come specchi e narcisismo, sicurezza, erotismo, senso del tatto, travestimento, animali nell’arte e nel design. Parallelamente il Mudac ha anche sviluppato una serie di mostre personali dedicate ai designer intitolate Carte blanche con l’intento di far conoscere ai visitatori le direzioni di ricerca dei progettisti contemporanei». La collezione di vetro artistico contemporaneo è senz’altro la più vasta e la più affascinante del Mudac: nata da un primo nucleo di 36 opere donate dai collezionisti Peter e Traudl Engelhorn, comprende oggi sculture storiche realizzate da artisti come Jean Cocteau e Max Ernest nella bottega veneziana La fucina degli angeli di Egidio Costantini e opere firmate da artisti del vetro di fama internazionale quali Philip Baldwin e Monica Guggisberg, Lino Tagliapietra, fino alle più recenti acquisizioni, opere di designer contemporanei come l’olandese Pieke Bergmans, il duo Formafantasma e Studio Job. Nella mostra Chromatic, visitabile fino al 14 gennaio 2018, una selezione di ope-


COURTESY OF GLASSWORKS MATTEO GONET GMBH, PHOTO ANDREAS ZIMMERMANN

Musei segreti

63


64 SANDRINE STERN HA RACCOLTO UN’EREDITÀ CENTENARIA CHE PATEK PHILIPPE NON HA MAI SMESSO DI SOSTENERE: QUELLA DEI MESTIERI RARI, MASSIMA ESPRESSIONE DI SAVOIR-FAIRE SENZA EGUALI di Giovanna Marchello


EDc ec ec ol lreant zo er i d da il amt ot ni m d oi

65

Nella collezione 2017 dei Mestieri rari, spicca la serie limitata di due orologi da polso «Calatrava» in oro bianco (il modello Patek Philippe per eccellenza, creato nel 1932), ispirati ai celebri «azulejos». Per ricreare questi splendidi «trompe-l’oeil», Patek Philippe ha scelto la raffinata tecnica della miniatura su smalto (patek.com).

TEMPO di rarità


66

Decoratori di attimi

Nel 1831, il giovane Antoni Norbert Patek fuggì dalla Polonia dopo la Rivolta di Novembre, nella quale gli insurrezionalisti furono sconfitti dall’esercito russo. Trovò riparo in Svizzera, che da secoli accoglieva nel suo grembo molti rifugiati religiosi e politici. La calvinista Ginevra, in particolare, era famosa per la concentrazione di orafi, orologiai e incastonatori di pietre preziose provenienti dalla Francia, dall’Italia e dall’Europa intera: un vero e proprio crogiolo di creatività e tecnica. Fu qui che Antoni Patek, divenuto commerciante di orologi da taschino di altissimo pregio, incontrò l’orologiaio francese Jean-Adrien Philippe, già inventore del meccanismo di carica e di messa all’ora senza chiave. Il primo nucleo di quella che nel 1851 diventò la Patek, Philippe & Cie fu creato nel 1839, quando il socio di Patek era ancora il conterraneo François Czapek. Alcuni dei loro primissimi, preziosi orologi sono custoditi nel Museo Patek Philippe di Ginevra, dove la famiglia Stern (dal 1932 proprietaria della Patek Philippe SA) ha raccolto in una collezione di rara bellezza ben cinque secoli di capolavori dell’alta orologeria svizzera ed europea, nonché una biblioteca con oltre 8mila volumi. È proprio qui, tra centinaia di splendidi esemplari di segnatempo finemente decorati da orafi, incisori, smaltatori, incastonatori e miniaturisti (dagli esemplari risalenti al XVI secolo agli orologi da ta-

Da sinistra, lo smalto viene ridotto in finissima polvere; per fissarlo, dopo ogni passaggio il quadrante viene inserito nel forno a 750 °C. Sotto, orologio da tasca con decorazione guilloché. A lato, pendoletta Dôme in smalto cloisonné. L’artista ha impiegato 32,5 m di filo d’oro e 10 tonalità di smalti. Entrambi sono esemplari unici.

sca, da polso, da tavola, automi e complicazioni) che va ricercata l’origine di una tradizione che Patek Philippe conserva e sviluppa nella collezione di Mestieri rari, la massima espressione di un savoir-faire senza eguali. «Nella collezione di Mestieri rari», spiega Sandrine Stern, direttore creativo di tutta la produzione Patek Philippe, «impieghiamo esattamente le stesse tecniche del passato, nonché le stesse materie prime, gli stessi forni e smalti. Questa è la nostra base di partenza, il punto fondamentale sul quale io e il resto della famiglia non transigiamo mai. Per noi la qualità è un valore assoluto, perché è ciò che ci ha contraddistinto durante i quasi 180 anni della nostra storia». La collezione di Mestieri rari è nata una decina d’anni fa, ed è stata fortemente voluta da Sandrine Stern, che la considera giustamente una sua creatura. Assumendone la direzione, ha raccolto un’eredità centenaria che Patek Philippe non ha mai smesso di sostenere, neanche nei momenti in cui i gusti del mercato avevano decretato la quasi scomparsa di ogni forma di decorazione artistica sugli orologi. «Abbiamo sempre continuato a realizzare questi pezzi, anche se poi finivano per rimanere invenduti. Era importante che i mestieri rari dell’intarsiatore, dell’incastonare, del guillocheur, dello smaltatore e del catenista orafo potessero continuare a sopravvivere», continua la signora Stern. «Anche quando il mercato


67


68

Decoratori di attimi

è in sofferenza, noi non ci tiriamo mai indietro. Anzi, questo ci sprona a fare di più e meglio». Oggi i Mestieri rari non languono più nei magazzini. I pezzi realizzati nella seconda metà del ’900 hanno trovato un posto d’onore nel Museo Patek Philippe, mentre quelli che sono presentati alla fiera di Basilea (una quarantina di esemplari all’anno, tra pezzi unici e piccolissima serie) finiscono direttamente nelle raccolte private di collezionisti e appassionati. Per realizzare una collezione di Mestieri rari degna di questo nome, Sandrine Stern lavora senza briefing né budget: «Per noi la cosa più importante non sono i numeri, ma ciò che ci piace. Per questo, quando inizio a lavorare su una collezione, non so mai quanti orologi da tasca, da polso o pendolette dôme creeremo. Partiamo dal soggetto e decidiamo quale oggetto potrà valorizzarlo al massimo». La realizzazione è affidata a maestri interni all’azienda, ma anche ad artigiani e artisti indipendenti, come la miniaturista Anita Porchet. «Per me è importante lavorare anche con artigiani esterni, perché questo ci permette di essere ancora più creativi». Per Sandrine Stern, è assolutamente fondamentale padroneggiare il savoir-faire per avere credibilità sia nei confronti del mercato sia dei fornitori esterni. «Quando ho creato il nostro atelier», racconta, «ho voluto assicurarmi di avere a disposizione le risorse interne

Da sinistra, l’artista riproduce gli «azulejos» in miniatura; prima dell’applicazione dello smalto il quadrante viene lucidato a mano. Sotto, due maschere veneziane sul ponte dei Sospiri decorano il retro dell’orologio da tasca della pagina precedente, realizzato con la raffinata tecnica dello smalto «grisaille au blanc de Limoges». A lato, Sandrine Stern, direttore creativo di Patek Philippe.

in grado di realizzare tutte le tecniche, e infatti oggi abbiamo uno o più maestri in ciascuna disciplina». Patek Philippe si dedica alla formazione di orologiai e maestranze per la sua produzione regolare, ma il processo è più complesso nel caso dei mestieri rari. «Per il momento la formazione interna non è praticabile, anche se abbiamo sicuramente intenzione di metterla in atto in futuro. Non è sufficiente imparare la tecnica, è anche necessario capire cosa c’è dietro e per farlo i giovani devono essere disposti a impegnarsi molto di più e a compiere studi approfonditi, che abbraccino anche le belle arti. Perché non basta riprodurre un disegno, bisogna anche capirlo, interpretarlo. È un processo molto lungo, che oltre al talento richiede passione». Ci vogliono almeno due anni per creare un pezzo dei Mestieri rari, dalla concezione all’esecuzione. Trattandosi di tecniche molto difficili, non si sa mai cosa potrà andare storto e se, ad esempio, l’orologio rimarrà danneggiato durante l’ultimo fuoco della smaltatura. Ma questo non preoccupa Sandrine Stern, perché alla fine è solo il risultato che conta, non il tempo che c’è voluto. «Il nostro pubblico ha fiducia nel marchio Patek Philippe, perché sanno che è garanzia di qualità ma anche di unicità», conclude. «Si affidano alla nostra esperienza e al nostro buon gusto, sapendo che l’oggetto che stanno acquistando è autenticamente raro».


69


70

In queste pagine, un dettaglio di Rinaldo e Armida, dipinto nel 1813 da Francesco Hayez. È una delle opere esposte alle Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia nel contesto della mostra «Canova, Hayez, Cicognara. L’ultima gloria di Venezia», aperta fino al 2 aprile 2018 (gallerieaccademia.it).


Mostre

71

La Serenissima

A NUDO ABBIAMO VISITATO L’ESPOSIZIONE CHE CELEBRA IL BICENTENARIO DELLE GALLERIE DELL’ACCADEMIA DI VENEZIA ASSIEME A CESARE DE MICHELIS, PROMOTORE DEL PROGETTO, ALLA SCOPERTA DEI RAPPORTI TRA ARTIGIANATO E ARTE di Stefano Karadjov


«La sezione veneta darà quello che potrà. Io non vorrei che poi desse tutto il denaro, e vorrei erogare 10mila zecchini in tanti lavori di pennello e scarpello tutto veneziano. Non dimenticherò Hayez certamente e Rinaldi, e tutti gli altri che qui sono capaci di lavoro. Ma tutto questo non val nulla se per prima parte di questo progetto non v’è un’opera vostra. Qui ci vorrebbe la sicurezza d’una vostra statua, e sarebbe la Polimnia che potrebbesi battezzare anche per la Musa della Storia». Questa richiesta il conte ferrarese Leopoldo Cicognara, presidente dell’Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia, indirizzava due secoli fa, il 15 gennaio 1817, all’amico Antonio Canova, per assegnargli il ruolo di nume tutelare nella modernissima operazione di rinnovamento culturale da lui imbastita, che la mostra che stiamo visitando ricorda. Alle Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia è in corso Canova, Hayez, Cicognara. L’ultima gloria di Venezia, a cura di Fernando Mazzocca, Paola Marini e Roberto De Feo, che ricostruisce la congiuntura storica e artistica veneziana del primo quarto di ’800, testimoniata dalla stessa nascita delle Gallerie dell’Accademia. Il professor Cesare De Michelis, presidente della casa editrice Marsilio e studioso della cultura veneta, nonché tra i promotori di questo progetto, ci accompagna in visita alla mostra. Domanda. Professor De Michelis, in che senso questa mostra racconta l’ultima gloria di Venezia? Risposta. La mostra celebra, nel suo bicentenario, l’apertura del primo museo veneziano, al quale fu affidato il compito di tenere viva la memoria e la presenza di una tradizione civile e culturale millenaria che rischiava di scomparire insieme alla Repubblica, ricostruendo con una documentazione straordinaria la vicenda secolare delle sue arti figurative. Ne sortì una raccolta della pittura veneziana come non ne esiste eguale, di qualità internazionale, che si trasformò nel primo risarcimento rispetto alle perdite di tanti capolavori sottratti alle chiese e alle scuole soppresse negli anni convulsi del periodo napoleonico. La mostra, dunque, rievoca un momento speciale della storia artistica veneziana: una stagione di rilancio culturale


© ARCHIVIO FOTOGRAFICO FONDAZIONE MUSEI CIVICI DI VENEZIA

Mostre

che si annuncia nel 1815 con il ritorno da Parigi dei quattro cavalli di San Marco, opera simbolo della città, che sono ricordati con la collocazione del calco in gesso di uno dei cavalli in apertura della mostra. D. Ogni storia ha un protagonista, e in quest’occasione l’eroe del progetto non è un artista, ma un illustre intellettuale, un mentore d’artisti, il presidente dell’Accademia di Belle Arti. R. Il regista indiscusso della congiuntura che raccontiamo fu Leopoldo Cicognara, che mirava a valorizzare lo straordinario patrimonio artistico della Serenissima, promuovendone, anche attraverso la valorizzazione dell’Accademia e dei suoi migliori allievi, la continuazione e lo sviluppo nell’arte dell’epoca. La grande modernità di quest’uomo si conferma anche nell’iniziativa di trasformare un tributo dovuto all’Imperatore, che convolava a nuove nozze, nell’Omaggio delle Provincie Venete che raccoglieva una serie di capi d’opera dei maestri veneziani che avrebbe offerto una straordinaria testimonianza della qualità dei suoi artisti e artigiani, a cominciare dalla Polimnia di Canova, da una tela di Hayez, e poi da vetri sontuosi, mobili d’arredamento, marmi e altre opere memorabili, nell’aver intuito cioè che l’operazione dell’Omaggio avrebbe offerto un’opportunità commerciale per gli artisti della sua Accademia, artisti che erano rimasti senza lavoro nei primi anni della Restaurazione. D. La mostra delinea anche una specificità veneziana, figlia della fiorente relazione tra arte e artigianato, nei suoi legami espliciti con specifici mestieri d’arte delle Venezie, tra cui il vetro, l’ebanisteria, la rilegatura. R. Si tratta della più alta e unitaria produzione artistica del Neoclassicismo veneto, frutto dello sforzo congiunto dei maggiori artisti veneti con i grandi maestri d’arte veneziani del tempo. In questo senso simbolico è il caso del tavolo disegnato dal grande Borsato, pittore prospettico e ornatista: il suo piano in smalti e bronzi avrebbe dovuto dimostrare alla Casa Imperiale quanto le fornaci muranesi fossero in grado di produrre, in un’epoca nella quale erano i cristalli di Boemia a essere à la page, mentre il vetro muranese dalla fine del ’700

non riscuoteva più il successo dei secoli precedenti. D. Si tratta infatti di un gruppo di opere rappresentativo di tutte le arti: dipinti, gruppi scultorei, due are e altrettanti grandi vasi di marmo, il già citato tavolo in bronzo e legno nonché due preziose rilegature, il cui ruolo era quello di costruire un ponte tra le opere d’arte donate e la preservazione della loro memoria, celebrando al contempo la fiorente industria culturale veneziana dell’editoria d’arte. Non è così, professore? R. Per immortalare l’operazione Cicognara fece incidere al tratto tutti i diversi capi d’opera che componevano il donativo e li fece raccogliere in un album, che ebbe poi una discreta diffusione e si trova ancora nel mercato antiquario. Esso recava nell’elegante frontespizio il recto e il verso della medaglia modellata in cera da Angelo Pizzi con i ritratti degli sposi, un pezzo che segna un punto fermo nella resurrezione della medaglistica veneziana dopo decenni. Due esemplari unici dell’album realizzati in pelle, per i coniugi imperiali, proponevano rilegature squisite arricchite da stemmi araldici agli angoli e da rilievi tondi e ovali in argento dorato, cesellati dal vicentino Bartolomeo Bongiovanni. La copia dedicata all’Imperatore recava anche, al centro, il medaglione riproducente il Giove egioco in calcedonio sardonice. È quest’ultimo uno dei pezzi più interessanti e significativi tra i molti capolavori che questa mostra propone alle Gallerie dell’Accademia di Venezia, inaugurata lo scorso 29 settembre e visitabile fino al 2 aprile 2018. La Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship, organizzazione internazionale non profit basata a Ginevra che promuove i valori dei mestieri d’arte e della creatività, è tra gli enti che hanno deciso di supportare fattivamente l’Ultima gloria di Venezia. Perché lungi dal segnare un limite, questa mostra, e in particolare l’inedita ricongiunzione dell’Omaggio delle Provincie Venete, rievoca il sapiente rispecchiarsi di quei corpi, celesti o terrestri, che gravitano intorno al bello: il committente, l’artista, l’artigiano, il mediatore, il mercante, il collezionista, il conoscitore.

73

Sopra, «Ritratto di Leopoldo Cicognara» realizzato da Francesco Hayez nel 1816 circa. Sotto, un leone raffigurato dallo scultore Antonio Canova. A fianco, dal basso, statua «Omaggio delle Provincie Venete alla Maestà di Carolina Augusta Imperatrice d’Austria» 1818; un’opera parte del «Tavolo dell’Omaggio delle Provincie Venete» (1818) di Giuseppe Borsato, Bartolomeo Bongiovanni e Benedetto Barbaria.


74

di Alberto Gerosa

LA LEGGENDA

Da sinistra: Acqua, Aria, Terra e Fuoco si cristallizzano nelle forme di questi quattro vasi (altezza 25 cm) del designer Jirˇ´ı Šuhájek (moser-glass.com/en).


Imprese

75

DI GHIACCIO

CON I SUOI 160 ANNI DI STORIA, LA VETRERIA MOSER DI KARLOVY VARY, NELLA REPUBBLICA CECA, PERPETUA E INNOVA NEI SUOI MANUFATTI LA MEMORIA STORICO-ARTISTICA DELLA BOEMIA


76 97

A destra, la lampada da tavolo Stephanie, realizzata in 50 esemplari, è un chiaro omaggio allo stile floreale dei primi del ’900. Le sue decorazioni sono state dipinte da Jan Janecký secondo i dettami che hanno fatto celebre la vetreria. Sotto, scorci del museo aziendale, dove la storia della vetreria si dipana sotto lo sguardo vigile del fondatore Ludwig Moser (1833-1916). Nella pagina a lato, vaso Lake World (33 cm di altezza), Collezione Moser 2017, celebrativa dei160 anni dell’azienda.

È una storia fatta di ghiaccio e fuoco, quella che vi stiamo per raccontare. Soprattutto di ghiaccio. Quello che il vetro cristallo dell’azienda fondata nel 1857 da Ludwig Moser nella località boema di Karlovy Vary emula in maniera del tutto virtuosistica, quasi a suffragare l’antico abbaglio di Plinio il Vecchio sul cristallo di rocca, scambiato dal grande naturalista per ghiaccio pietrificato. Pur essendo solo lontanamente imparentato con quest’ultimo tipo di cristallo (che per l’esattezza è un minerale, il quarzo ialino), il vetro potassico prodotto da Moser ne imita bene il tipico colore bianco neve, reso trasparente da certosine sessioni di politura, nonché la durezza, indispensabile per assecondare al meglio l’arte degli incisori. A tale scopo gli artigiani boemi aggiungono ingredienti (noti solo agli iniziati) alla polvere di quarzo, all’ossido di silicio, alla soda e alla potassa, che fusi per ore e ore ad altissime temperature (si arrivano a superare i 1.450 °C) danno luogo all’impasto vitreo. Questo il segreto all’origine delle torri gotiche e dei bestiari in sedicesimo ibernati nei ghiacci eterni dei calici, dei piatti e dei vasi con maestria non inferiore alle mirabilia che quasi mezzo millennio fa abbellivano la leggendaria Wunderkammer praghese dell’imperatore alchimista Rodolfo II d’Asburgo. Certo, prima di poter essere decorato il vetro deve subire la trasmutazione dal bolo informe e di aspetto mieloso estratto dai crogioli al manufatto di forma compiuta. Alle fasi cruciali attendono i soffiatori e i loro aiutanti che, forti di un multiforme armamentario fatto di stampi in legno di faggio o di pero (tutti realizzati all’interno della manifattura), di pinze, cesoie e punte di diamante, formano pance e piedi, allungano gambi e tagliano escrescenze superflue. Le tensioni della materia appena plasmata vengono neutralizzate dalla permanenza all’interno del forno di ricottura. Si arriva poi alla molatura e all’incisione; quest’ultima viene quasi sempre effettuata mediante rotella, mentre si ricorre alla sabbiatura solo in combinazione con la tecnica decorativa nota con il nome di oroplastika, tanto caratteristica della produzione di Moser nel periodo della Prima Repubblica Cecoslovacca (1918-1938). Tale tecnica consiste nell’applicare fasce liquide dal colore rossastro che in seguito alla cottura e alla levigatura assumono l’inconfondibile tonalità giallo carico dell’oro zecchino, tradendo così la nobile natura di quella singolare vernice. Denominatore comune dei prodotti Moser è il loro fascino arcano e diafano, che si manifesta nelle figure incise quasi alla stregua d’im-


Imprese

77


78 97

Imprese

mediante smalti colorati e oro. Che Moser sia una realtà di primo piano nel panorama dell’artigianato artistico internazionale è dimostrato dal fatto che questa azienda a capitale ceco al 100% gode del privilegio di far parte del prestigioso Comité Colbert, impegnato nella salvaguardia e diffusione all’estero dell’art de vivre francese. Notevole è anche l’affermazione di questo marchio in Russia, Paese che ha ispirato alcuni motivi decorativi dei cristalli Moser, dalla fauna siberiana alla moscovita Piazza Rossa, che insieme alla cattedrale di San Basilio ha suggerito al designer Konstantin Gayday un nuovo set di bicchieri da Champagne. Da sempre straordinario crocevia di uomini e saperi, la Boemia torna oggi a essere parte integrante di quell’unico paesaggio culturale che si estende tra la Repubblica Ceca e la Sassonia. Non a caso la vetreria Moser, che offre visite al suo stabilimento e al contiguo museo aziendale, costituisce ormai per molti insieme a Karlovy Vary una tappa obbligata nell’itinerario che da Praga conduce a Meissen. Un itinerario che per il viaggiatore accorto avrà il sapore di un ritorno a casa, accompagnati dalla memoria di personaggi familiari, primo fra tutti quel Giacomo Casanova che proprio da queste parti riposa... Sopra, soffiatura, molatura e lucidatura a mano con l’ausilio di agata o ematite sono alcune tra le fasi più cruciali della lavorazione del vetro cristallo a marchio Moser. A destra, un bicchiere del Whisky Set ispirato alla fauna siberiana. Oltre all’orso sono disponibili l’alce, il cinghiale, la lepre, il lupo e la volpe. Nella pagina a lato, il vaso Softhard (h 30,5 cm), novità 2016 concepita da Milan Knı´žák, che è disponibile in tre sfumature di arancione e giallo.

magini in filigrana, i cui contorni si rivelano allo sguardo in tutta la loro pienezza poco alla volta, con la complicità della luce. Né d’altronde sfugge la predilezione accordata alle tonalità sfumate, ottenute mediante la sapiente aggiunta di ossidi metallici agli ingredienti sopra ricordati. Come avviene in alcune tra le più fortunate varianti del set da Whisky concepito da Lípa Oldrˇ ich nel 1968: famoso per il suo design essenziale e per i caratteristici fondi ispessiti di bicchieri e decanter, pare essere uscito da un interno quasi borghese dei tempi di Dubcˇek e della Primavera di Praga. Una cosa è certa: siamo lontanissimi dalle orge di luce dello sfavillante, regale cristallo piombico francese... anche perché nel cristallo di Moser il piombo proprio non c’è. Chi è alla ricerca di uno sfarzo più ostentato potrà comunque optare per le preziose repliche dei vasi realizzati da Moser a cavallo tra i secoli XIX e XX, debitori in buona parte all’estetica Art nouveau, a metà strada tra Gallé e Mucha, e motivo di vanto delle raccolte del Museo del vetro di Passau, in Germania. Firmate da Jan Janecký (classe 1978), queste intriganti rivisitazioni testimoniano la continuità di un’altra eccellenza della manifattura di Karlovy Vary: la pittura su vetro


79


80

Una delle sale del museoarchivio storico di LineapiÚ Italia a Campi Bisenzio (Fi): inaugurato nel 2012, racconta i 42 anni di storia dell’azienda leader nella produzione di filato per maglieria nel mondo (lineapiu.com).


Imprese

sul filo

STUDIOBONON PHOTOGRAPHY

DI LANA

SALVARE UNA DELLE AZIENDE LEADER NEI FILATI PER MAGLIERIA E RIPORTARLA AL SUCCESSO: QUELLA DI ALESSANDRO BASTAGLI CON LINEAPIÙ SEMBRAVA UNA MISSIONE IMPOSSIBILE. E INVECE... d i A n d r e a To m a s i

81


82

Imprese


STUDIOBONON PHOTOGRAPHY - MASSIMO LISTRI - ARCHIVIO STORICO LINEAPIÙ

83

È una storia di amicizia e folgorazione come licenziatario per l’Oriente di diversi quella che lega il nome di Alessandro marchi, su tutti Gianni Versace, si ritrova In alto, Alessandro Bastagli, proprietario di Lineapiù Bastagli a Lineapiù Italia, azienda leacosì alla guida di un gruppo con 102 diItalia dal 2010: fu visitando pendenti, 26 milioni di euro di fatturato e der nei filati per maglieria riconosciuta i laboratori di filatura una produzione di 650mila chilogrammi a livello mondiale per la qualità dei suoi (nelle foto sopra), che si prodotti e il costante lavoro di ricerca e di filato all’anno. «Chiamai tutti a raccolta convinse ad acquistare innovazione. Quando nel 2010 Giuliano per responsabilizzare l’intero gruppo: c’era l’azienda in gravi difficoltà. A lato, tessuto Angel (p/e Coppini, colui che aveva fondato Lineauna barca da salvare dal naufragio, solo 2018, Collezione Lineapiù). più nel 1975, chiede all’amico Alessandro remando tutti insieme potevamo pensadi acquistare la sua realtà, l’azienda versa re di farcela». Sette anni dopo, i numeri in gravi condizioni finanziarie. «Tecniraccontano il successo dell’impresa: i dipendenti sono saliti a 150, il fatturato si camente era fallita», racconta Bastagli, assesta sui 44 milioni di euro e il filato prodotto supera il insignito nel 2016 del prestigioso premio Talents du Luxe. «Accettai l’invito di Giuliano a visitare la fabbrica più per milione di chilogrammi. «Le parole chiave del rilancio, nel il rapporto che ci univa che per reale interesse: non avevo rispetto della storia e della tradizione di Lineapiù, sono alcuna competenza sui filati e inoltre fino ad allora ero stato state e continuano a essere qualità, innovazione e servizio. più un mercante che un industriale. Quando tuttavia entrai Il cliente, specie quelli della fascia lusso (Lineapiù Italia nei laboratori dove Coppini aveva creato prodotti rivoluzioproduce tra gli altri per Chanel, Prada, Louis Vuitton e nari come il primo filato 100% viscosa, o ancora il filo d’aria Gucci, ndr), deve essere continuamente stimolato. Convuoto all’interno per permettere un isolamento termico siderata la vastità dell’offerta, bisogna riuscire a emozionare il compratore aiutandolo nella scelta, spiegandogli ottimale, mi si aprì un mondo complesso e affascinante in cosa potrà realizzare optando per questo o quel filato, tutte le sue sfaccettature. Ricordo ancora perfettamente la fornendogli soluzioni. Inoltre, dobbiamo essere pronti sensazione di entusiasmo con la quale uscii dall’azienda. a soddisfare qualsiasi richiesta del cliente, ormai sempre Tornai a casa dai miei figli e chiesi loro un consiglio: le più esigente, consapevole e attento». potenzialità di Lineapiù mi apparvero chiare da subito, così Emozione, cura e attenzione sono altre parole che si ripecome i rischi correlati a quell’investimento così importante. tono nel racconto di Bastagli, non sempre le prime a cui “Papà, fai come credi, il tuo istinto non ti ha mai tradito”, si pensa quando la narrazione tocca una realtà industriale. mi dissero. Fu così che decisi di infilarci la testa dentro». «Ma per certi procedimenti, per alcuni tipi di filato, c’è un Testa e cuore. Bastagli, figlio di un orologiaio affermatosi


lavoro di manualità che richiama quello Fu l’inizio di un’avventura straordinaria Alcune fasi del lavoro dei nostri artigiani», spiega il manager. durata fino alla morte di Gianni. Sono in tintoria, dagli estrattori Così come avulsa da libri contabili e conti grato di aver avuto la possibilità e il pri(in alto, a sinistra) vilegio di poter lavorare con una persona da quadrare è una delle prime iniziative al dettaglio delle vasche a come lui, le cui capacità, talento e cremesse in campo da Bastagli, il Lineapiù braccio (a destra) fino atività erano davvero unici». Award. «È un concorso rivolto a giovani agli asciugatori (qui sopra). E la moda, respirata e vissuta da Bastagli designer già inseriti sul mercato con le Nella pagina a lato, tessuto Luxor (a/i 2015/16, nell’intero arco della sua carriera, torna loro creazioni ma bisognosi di un aiuto Collezione Lineapiù). prepotentemente anche nella prossima concreto. Per due volte all’anno una giuria altamente specializzata seleziona un sfida: il manager ha da pochi mesi acquisitalento da premiare: per tre anni, ovvero to il brand di lusso Shanghai Tang, fondaper sei collezioni, il prescelto avrà comto nel 1994 da David Tang a Hong Kong. pleto accesso ai filati di Lineapiù e al suo archivio storico «Per ora abbiamo lanciato una nuova linea di foulard, piccola pelletteria e «custom jewellery», l’anno prossimo debuttereper la creazione del proprio campionario». D’altra parte, scovare nomi emergenti della moda sui quali scommettere mo con una collezione completamente rinnovata all’insegna e puntare è uno degli aspetti che caratterizza il percorso dell’alta qualità delle materie prime, rigorosamente italiane, a un prezzo però ragionevole. Per me è una gioia occuparmi professionale di Bastagli da sempre. Il filo del racconto ci di un marchio elegante, ironico e raffinato come Shanghai riporta inevitabilmente indietro, nella Milano di fine anni Tang, di cui per altro sono sempre stato grande estimatore 70. «Lavoravo per diverse aziende di pelletteria, al Mipel nei miei viaggi in Oriente. Per 18 anni ho trascorso almeno (Fiera internazionale della borsa e dell’accessorio moda, quattro mesi l’anno nel Sud-est asiatico, devo la mia fortuna ndr) mi imbattei nel lavoro di questo giovane stilista calabrese, Gianni Versace. Chiesi di poterlo avere nel mio a quell’angolo di mondo. E pensare che la prima volta che portfolio, mi spiegarono che le borse facevano parte di una ci andai, nel 1973, fu un vero disastro: nessuno comperò i collezione più ampia che comprendeva anche e sopratportafogli del marchio che ai tempi rappresentavo perché tutto abbigliamento: o mi prendevo l’intero pacchetto, o non ci stavano gli yen, il cui formato era molto diverso sia niente. Mi invitarono così alla sua prima sfilata e ne rimasi dalle lire che dai dollari». Rientrato in Toscana, Bastagli non conquistato. Non aveva ancora una sede, ricordo che per perse tempo e fece rifare l’intero campionario in dimensione perfezionare gli accordi ci trovavamo nello studio da comSol Levante. Quindi ripartì alla volta del Giappone tornando mercialista di Santo, il più grande dei tre fratelli Versace. con le valigie vuote. Quando si dice avere fiuto per gli affari.

STUDIOBONON PHOTOGRAPHY - MASSIMO LISTRI - ARCHIVIO STORICO LINEAPIÙ

84


E c c e l l e n z e d a lI mmporne ds oe

85


86

MONTBLANC

In questa pagina, il taglio di un pennino Montblanc. A fianco, stilografica in oro rosa della Collezione Montblanc High Artistry dedicata ad Annibale e realizzata in 86 esemplari (furono 86mila i soldati che attraversarono le Alpi con il condottiero cartaginese).


Parlando di scrittura

IL PENNINO IN ORO DI OGNI STILOGRAFICA MONTBLANC VIENE REALIZZATO ANCORA OGGI DA ARTIGIANI CHE GLI DEDICANO OLTRE 100 FASI DI LAVORAZIONE. UN’ESPERIENZA SENSORIALE CHE COINVOLGE ANCHE L’UDITO... di Raffaele Ciardulli

Il suono della

PERFEZIONE

87


Parlando di scrittura

Sopra e nella pagina a fianco, in basso, la goffratura: è la stampa della decorazione sul pennino. A destra, in alto, la fase della molatura o gradazione: serve per dare la forma a ogni pennino, per cui sono necessarie oltre 100 fasi di lavorazione (montblanc.com).

Scrivere è manifestarsi. Rendere manifesta la propria identità. Fissarne una traccia, per quanto effimera e, fissandola, definire il contorno del proprio pensiero o delle proprie emozioni, presagire, predisporre, preparare le proprie azioni. La penna, anzi il pennino, aggiunge senso, aggiunge segno, aggiunge corpo. Aggiunge equilibrio: l’attività della mente si fonde con quella della mano, insieme creano, dosando tempi e pressione, spessori e tratti. Un equilibrio fatto di differenze sconosciute al movimento del polpastrello che, agile, si muove sulla tastiera, con la stessa cadenza, con la stessa pressione, con la stessa monotona percussione. Un equilibrio fatto di differenze ricercate da chi sfugge l’omologazione meccanica; una ricerca di verità e di qualità. La manifattura di Amburgo che dal 1906 crea gli strumenti da scrittura Montblanc è uno dei luoghi in cui si coltiva questa qualità grazie alle eccellenze della progettazione e della realizzazione manuale. Il pennino in oro di ogni Meisterstück viene ancora oggi realizzato da maestri artigiani che gli dedicano 35 diverse fasi di lavorazione, che precedono altre 70 fasi necessarie all’assemblaggio e al collaudo. Nessun

senso viene tralasciato, nemmeno l’udito: uno specialista ascolta attentamente il suono che ciascun pennino produce scivolando sulla carta; solo un suono continuo certifica la sua perfezione. Nel laboratorio artigiano, nel cuore della manifattura, altre eccellenze si incontrano. L’abilità dei maestri orafi e degli incastonatori, la preziosità dei metalli, l’estro dei disegnatori. Tutte qualità necessarie per la realizzazione delle edizioni limitate. Altre vette della personalizzazione sono state conquistate dai maestri artigiani di Montblanc Creation Privée, che realizzano capolavori da scrittura in esemplari unici portando nella materia i sogni di clienti particolarmente esigenti. Uno straordinario esempio di questa maestria è la Figurado Creation Privée: uno strumento di scrittura ispirato alla passione per i sigari e ricoperto di autentiche foglie di tabacco. Per la sua realizzazione, la capacità di personalizzazione è stata spinta sino all’esplorazione di nuove tecniche di estrazione dell’olio contenuto nelle foglie di tabacco, prima di avvolgerle sul corpo metallico della stilografica. Per la protezione delle foglie sono stati utilizzati rivestimenti di cellulosa presi in prestito

MONTBLANC

88


89


Sopra, il controllo manuale: questa operazione viene fatta su ogni esemplare. A lato, dall’alto, l’applicazione della maschera prima del trattamento galvanico; i pennini che hanno superato i test di qualità possono essere assemblati al corpo di una Meisterstück.

dalle tecniche di restauro. È stato quindi realizzato un apposito pennino retrattile in oro per rispettare la forma del sigaro. Un sigaro speciale, impreziosito con gemme, decori in oro bianco e l’emblema Montblanc con un diamante alla sommità del cappuccio. Nulla è stato tralasciato, nemmeno nella confezione, creata con il legno più pregiato e un pannello in vetro in modo che la stilografica possa essere ammirata senza subire il trauma di uno sbalzo di umidità. Il futuro proprietario della Figurado ha partecipato ai processi creativi e alla loro messa in opera che ha potuto seguire via webcam interagendo sui più piccoli dettagli con esperti artigiani, gioiellieri, incastonatori di diamanti e incisori di pennini. Ma l’abilità nella creazione di oggetti eccezionali degli atelier della Montblanc Creation Privée non mette certo in ombra la specifica, distintiva competenza della Maison di Amburgo: l’arte della scrittura. Arte nei cui gesti esprimiamo le sfumature della nostra personalità, arte al cui servizio è nato il Montblanc Bespoke Nib, che cattura ed esalta quell’espressione così squisitamente individuale che è la grafia. La sede di Amburgo e una selezio-

ne di boutique Montblanc, tra cui quelle di Hong Kong, Shanghai, Singapore, Tokyo, Città del Messico, Dubai, New York, Milano e Mosca, offrono ai propri clienti un accurato esame della grafia, che consente di individuare il pennino capace di esprimere al meglio la personale maniera di far interagire pensieri e gesti, penna e carta. I clienti, utilizzando uno strumento sviluppato e realizzato da Montblanc, possono scrivere un breve testo grazie al quale diviene possibile analizzare i parametri chiave della propria grafia tra i quali la velocità, la pressione, il campo di oscillazione, la rotazione e l’angolazione. Questi dati vengono esaminati da un esperto che identifica il pennino ideale per ciascun tipo di grafia, che potrà essere scelto tra le otto varianti esistenti o creato manualmente su misura in oro massiccio dagli artigiani della manifattura, che potranno personalizzarlo anche con l’incisione di un breve testo. Attraverso un’esperienza intensamente individuale, scrivere diventa così il più privato dei gesti, la più essenziale e distintiva manifestazione di stile. Poiché lo stile, etimologicamente, altro non è che la specifica maniera di scrivere: di usare uno stilo.

MONTBLANC

90


Parlando di scrittura

91


92 DALLA PASSIONE PER LA FALEGNAMERIA AL DESIGN: A DIECI ANNI DALLA MOSTRA «100 CHAIRS IN 100 DAYS», MARTINO GAMPER RILANCIA IL BEN FATTO PER UNA LUNGA DURATA

In queste pagine, dettaglio del paravento della collezione Re-Connection di Alpi, dove Martino Gamper reinterpreta il laminato disegnato da Ettore Sottsass negli anni 80 tagliando le venature già distorte in angoli acuti per un effetto 3D che manipola la prospettiva.


Maestri contemporanei

La svolta È DIETRO

l’angolo di Ali Filippini

93


94 Martino Gamper ha scelto di vivere e lavorare a Londra dove ha studiato presso il Royal College of Art. Nato a Merano dove ancora giovane si avvicina all’arte della falegnameria, ha partecipato al corso di scultura dell’Accademia di Belle arti di Vienna, tenuto da Michelangelo Pistoletto, seguendo poi un corso di design con Matteo Thun col quale ha lavorato. Sono passati dieci anni dalla sua prima mostra dove ha riconfigurato cento sedie abbandonate e recuperate dimostrando un’attitudine «tecno-performativa» diventata poi la sua cifra espressiva. Recentemente ha esteso le collaborazioni dal design a piccoli progetti per fashion brand come capsule collection di accessori (Valextra) e creazione di display per vetrine (Prada). Domanda. La mostra sulle sedie riconfigurate, come fosse un format, è ripetuta in diversi Paesi (la scorsa primavera in Nuova Zelanda). Che cosa ha significato quell’iniziale performance? Risposta. L’esperienza di 100 Chairs in 100 Days è senza dubbio stata il mio ingresso nel mondo del design, il momento in cui ho ricevuto un po’ di notorietà come progettista. Ora la creazione delle sedie è arrivata a più del doppio ed è in corso di preparazione un libro. Alla base di questo progetto c’è un metodo di lavoro che io trovo ancora utile, da questo punto di vista non mi stanco di andare avanti nell’esercizio, oltre al fatto

In basso, una parte della collezione «100 Chairs in 100 Days», un progetto personale, iniziato nel 2007 e ancora in corso, dedicato all’oggetto sedia, trasformata ad arte a partire da modelli trovati e assemblati. A lato, il paravento di Alpi e un ritratto del designer (martinogamper.com).

che sono veramente interessato all’oggetto sedia. Non avrei mai fatto una cosa simile a Milano o comunque in Italia. Il fatto di trovarmi a Londra, dove la mancanza di una vera filiera di artigianato, come può essere per noi il caso della Brianza, e soprattutto di una certa sua cultura, ha permesso alla fine che io potessi creare liberamente un mio progetto personale (dove l’approccio progettuale di Gamper è caratterizzato anche dalla conoscenza della storia del design, come dimostrano le successive performance in cui smonta e riassembla mobili originali disegnati da Gio Ponti o Carlo Mollino). D. Recentemente si è misurato con l’azienda di laminati Alpi, con un’icona come il pattern ligneo di Ettore Sottsass... R. È stata una bellissima sfida perché mi ha permesso di interpretare qualcosa che aveva già un suo linguaggio legato al postmoderno e agli anni 80; tramite Patrizia Moroso dell’azienda omonima con cui collaboro da tempo, ho avuto modo di incontrare Vittorio Alpi che mi ha concesso grande libertà nel progetto. Ho scelto subito un approccio diretto e al posto di far lavorare il blocco di legno messomi a disposizione per ricavarne dei pezzi ho preferito segarlo in angoli diversi, ricorrendo ai macchinari e al laboratorio. Una volta tagliato in fogli, la venatura si era distorta in tre modi differenti che ho usato per dare tridimensionalità alla nuova superficie. Questa estate con il mio falegname di fiducia, col quale collaboro da 20 anni in Trentino, ho lavorato il materiale creando i tre pezzi speciali di Re-Connection. D. Come vede il ritorno al craft nel mondo del design, lei che nasce come artigiano del legno? R. Vedo un sacco di bei progetti di designer che cercano di collaborare con gli artigiani e altri che addirittura stanno riscoprendo dei nuovi mestieri cercando di unire la cultura della fabbricazione digitale a quella tradizionale. Non mi piace quando mi accorgo che si vuol far passare una cosa semplicemente fatta male, senza nessuna conoscenza tecnica, per «artigianale» solo perché magari se ne esalta il valore dell’imperfezione. Il prodotto fatto a mano per me deve avere una vita più lunga di un prodotto industriale, quindi la cura con cui


Maestri contemporanei

95

ÅBÄKE AND MARTINO GAMPER - ANGUS MILL

lo fai e lo perfezioni è molto importante. Anche al di là della sperimentazione che peraltro può essere assente. Quindi in questa sorta di ritorno al fatto a mano trovo da un lato chi lo fa con l’impegno giusto e dall’altro chi semplicemente copia cercando solo di suggerire un «effetto craft» nell’oggetto finito... D. Collabora anche con importanti industrie del mobile. Ci sono delle differenze nella relazione con questi laboratori? R. Direi di no, la differenza sta semmai nella quantità e in alcuni dettagli ma le macchine e le tecnologie che si adoperano sono le stesse. Specie in Italia, dove le aziende che realizzano mobili di design sono ancora relativamente piccole e in fondo ancora molto artigianali. Il prodotto che ne esce è diverso ma il luogo di lavoro e il processo non sono poi tanto dissimili. A Londra mi appoggio su due botteghe-laboratori. Uno, più piccolo, si trova vicino allo studio, ad Hackney, ed è un laboratorio dove con la mia squadra prepariamo dai prototipi di studio ai pezzi finiti, come per l’ultima collezione Round & Square presentata al London Design Festival a settembre. L’altra bottega, più grande, si trova fuori città ed è un luogo di lavoro condiviso con un amico artista e progettista dove riesco a realizzare progetti più grandi.


96

vietato

IL SUPERFLUO NELLE COLLEZIONI CHE PORTANO IL SUO NOME, MARTA SALA UNISCE LE IDEE DEGLI ARCHITETTI LAZZARINI E PICKERING AL SAPER FARE DI UN TEAM DI ARTIGIANI BRIANZOLI. SENZA DIMENTICARE GLI INSEGNAMENTI DELLO ZIO LUIGI CACCIA DOMINIONI

d i A n d r e a To m a s i


Interni

Alcune delle creazioni di Marta Sala Éditions: divano Elisabeth, tappeto Ludovico con inserti in ottone, tavolo basso Mathus con piano di cristallo e paravento Luis. Nella pagina a fianco, lampada da parete in ottone Claudia (martasalaeditions.it).

97


© ANTOINE ROZÈS

98


Interni

99

«IL LUSSO OGGI È CONFORMARE LO SPAZIO AI PROPRI BISOGNI. NON LO DEFINISCE PIÙ L’ARCHITETTO, MA CHI DEVE ABITARLO»

Competenza, divertimento, passione: Marta Sala parla veloce, le frasi si rincorrono così svelte che quasi fai fatica a starci dietro. Il suo è un entusiasmo che ti travolge, quello di chi crede profondamente in ciò che fa. In più c’è l’euforia di un debutto recente, perché anche se questa signora alta, sottile e bella ha una storia personale e professionale indissolubilmente e da sempre legata al design, la sua ultima e più intima creatura ha giusto un paio d’anni e porta il suo nome, con l’aggiunta del termine Éditions che tradisce l’amore per la Francia, Parigi in particolare, la città dove ha da poco aperto un appartamento-atelier che nelle intenzioni diventerà punto d’incontro e confronto di idee e creatività. Mestieri d’Arte & Design la incontra invece nello showroom milanese dove sono esposti alcuni dei circa 40 pezzi realizzati dal 2015 a oggi con la collaborazione di due specialissimi «partners in crime», gli architetti Claudio Lazzarini e Carl Pickering. «Quando ho dato vita a Marta Sala Éditions, l’intenzione era quella di affidare ogni collezione a un progettista diverso. Il “problema” è che con Claudio

e Carl l’intesa è totale, ciò che facciamo funziona e piace e in più ridiamo moltissimo: perché cambiare? Ciò non toglie che in futuro mi piacerebbe lavorare con altri architetti o designer che condividano la mia stessa visione», ovvero complementi d’arredo funzionali e senza tempo, pezzi unici creati per l’esigenza specifica di un cliente ma riproducibili e in grado di adattarsi a spazi preesistenti. «Il lusso oggi è poter conformare lo spazio ai propri bisogni. Non è più l’architetto a definirlo, ma chi quello spazio lo deve abitare. Per questo i miei mobili sono perfettamente rifiniti da ogni punto di vista, perché qualunque loro parte può essere esposta», così racconta con tono appassionato. Per arrivare al risultato finale, il lavoro di Lazzarini, Pickering e Sala ha bisogno di essere tradotto dalla sapienza di mani artigiane che trasformino il disegno in oggetto: «Sono lo strumento che dà vita all’idea. Il contatto con artigiani straordinari è forse l’aspetto più gratificante della mia professione, anche perché si entra in contatto con un mondo etico di rispetto e onore dove vale ancora la parola data, un mondo di fiducia e conoscenza. Noi

Sopra, un dettaglio del tavolo Eugenio in ottone satinato e la lampada Megan in ottone e marmo. Qui sotto, il retro della sedia Murena con stampa floreale. Nella pagina a lato, Marta Sala posa nel suo atelier parigino.


100

Interni

«HO CREATO UNA RETE DI ARTIGIANI IN BRIANZA. IN DIECI CHILOMETRI HO TUTTE LE COMPETENZE CHE MI SERVONO»

Sopra, tavolino Harry con piani in marmo di Calacatta e lampada da terra Guya classic. Qui sotto, un dettaglio della scrivania Cristoph. Nella pagina a fianco, lo specchio da tavolo o parete Renoir.

italiani diamo talmente per scontato il nostro talento da dimenticarcene. Ho creato una mia rete in Brianza, terra d’eccellenza nell’arredo: in dieci chilometri ho tutte le competenze che mi servono. Amo seguire la realizzazione di ogni pezzo personalmente, e l’artigiano non è solo un mero esecutore: il suo contributo è fondamentale nella definizione della proporzione di un oggetto, dei materiali più idonei da utilizzare, nel raggiungimento dell’obiettivo finale che è e resta la fruibilità. È incredibile il livello qualitativo raggiunto dai nostri maestri negli ultimi anni, così come è sorprendente la loro voglia di mettersi sempre in gioco, accettare nuove sfide, trovare soluzioni inedite a cui prima non avevano mai pensato con una velocità che è propria di chi ha una profonda conoscenza del mestiere». Mediatrice tra l’architetto/designer e l’artigiano, Marta Sala cerca anche di coniugare nelle sue collezioni contemporaneità e mestiere d’arte, futuro e passato; e così spiega: «Innovazione per me significa prendere pezzi dal sapore classico e dare loro una nuova identità multifunzionale prestando la massima at-

tenzione all’armonia finale dell’oggetto e ai dettagli che fanno parte integrante del progetto e lo discostano dalla produzione industriale». Dettagli che definiscono l’unicità del pezzo e non sono mai superflui, una lezione questa che la Sala ha imparato dallo zio, l’architetto, designer e urbanista Luigi Caccia Dominioni, che nel 1947 diede vita con il collega Ignazio Gardella e con la madre di Marta, Maria Teresa Tosi, ad Azucena, storico marchio del Made in Italy di cui la Sala è stata a lungo direttore creativo. Del suo retaggio ricorda: «Sento una forte responsabilità per la mia storia, quello che oggi si definisce heritage. Vengo da un mondo che non c’è più. A mia madre devo il gusto, l’ossessione per i materiali, i colori. Lo zio, invece, mi ha insegnato il rigore, il non concedere spazio a ciò che non serve. Un mobile deve essere intelligente, fatto bene, bello da vedere e con un costo ragionevole. Deve avere una sua verità, un’anima. Oggi, grazie anche ai social media, i clienti sono più esigenti e preparati. Chi arriva da me sa che ogni pezzo ha una sua storia radicata in quella cultura del saper fare italiano che ci rende unici».


101


102 La raffinatezza delle linee, la creativitĂ e la perfezione del lavoro delle abili mani delle ricamatrici rendono il ricamo di Madera una vera arte.


Eccellenze dal mondo

103

IL RICHIAMO

SULL’ISOLA PORTOGHESE 3.188 ARTIGIANE TESSONO RAFFINATE TRAME DI LINO, SETA, COTONE E ORGANZA: È IL BORDADO MADEIRA, UN MARCHIO CERTIFICATO CHE VALORIZZA NON SOLO LA BELLEZZA DI QUEST ’ARTE, MA ANCHE IL GESTO DELLA MANO

IVBAM

di Francisco Oliveira

È il disegno l’anima di questo speciale ricamo: i movimenti fluidi e graziosi, la composizione di motivi floreali o l’alternanza di figure geometriche, disposti in strutture che rivelano una grande libertà artistica e un marcato genio creativo, conferiscono ai prodotti un carattere unico, romantico, poetico, mostrando la capacità delle artigiane di adattarsi anche alle tendenze sempre in divenire della moda. Tutto comincia dall’ispirazione del disegnatore che tradizionalmente elabora il suo progetto su carta. Il disegno passa poi al foratore, che ne buca i contorni lungo i tratteggi perimetrali. Segue quindi la fase di stampaggio: una spugna, intinta in una speciale miscela dal colore azzurro, viene passata sulla carta, in modo da marcare il tessuto nelle aree che saranno ricamate. Terminato questo stadio, il pezzo di tessuto stampato, insieme a fili di vario colore, passerà nelle mani agili e pazienti di una ricamatrice che vive di solito in campagna: qui, il saper fare tramandato di generazione in generazione è il principale ingrediente che porterà al compimento di un lavoro lungo e minuzioso, che può richiedere anche alcuni mesi per essere completato. Tovaglie, vestiti, camicie, lenzuola o delicati fazzoletti: nessun pezzo è


Eccellenze dal mondo

Il disegno è l’anima del ricamo di Madera. I movimenti della natura sono prestati al ricamo dando ai manufatti un carattere unico. La varietà e la bellezza dei disegni nascono dall’ispirazione dei disegnatori, che dal secolo scorso ne hanno composti a migliaia, tutti dotati di alta sensibilità, anche grazie all’influenza multiculturale e di vari movimenti artistici.

mai uguale all’altro, e ognuno di essi ha un’impronta personale legata ai valori della raffinatezza, della genuinità e della bellezza. Un’esclusività accentuata dal solo uso di tessuti pregiati quali il lino, la seta, il cotone e l’organza. Concluso il lavoro della ricamatrice il tessuto torna nelle fabbriche, che nella maggior parte dei casi hanno sede nelle vicinanze del capoluogo Funchal, dove i lavori vengono sottoposti al controllo finale; solo dopo tutte queste operazioni il Bordado sarà pronto per essere certificato. Una filiera di competenze d’eccellenza che necessita di essere protetta anche sul piano della qualità e dell’autenticità. Dalla fusione di più enti per la tutela dei mestieri d’arte del luogo, nel 2006 nasce a Funchal l’Instituto do Vinho, do Bordado e do Artesanato da Madeira, I.P. (Ivbam), comitato responsabile del sigillo di garanzia dei prodotti locali e della promozione e divulgazione degli stessi. Bordado Madeira viene perciò riconosciuto come un vero e proprio marchio destinato a un segmento di

lusso che valorizza non solo la bellezza e la raffinatezza del ricamo, ma anche il gesto della mano, puro e autentico, delle circa 3.188 artigiane presenti sull’isola. Per celebrare quest’arte secolare, l’Ivbam ha dedicato parte delle proprie risorse a uno spazio museale che raccoglie vere e proprie icone del ricamo di Madera, in una collezione di tessuti decorati dalla metà del XIX secolo agli anni 30 del ’900, identificando nel periodo romantico uno dei picchi di massimo splendore per questo savoir-faire d’eccellenza. Fondate tra gli anni 20 e gli anni 80 del ’900 e per la maggior parte basate a Funchal, le imprese produttrici ed esportatrici del Bordado Madeira sono custodi dell’economia locale e fautrici dell’esportazione del marchio all’estero. Patrício & Gouveia è la realtà più longeva, fondata nel 1925. Questa impresa è annualmente visitata da circa 120mila turisti che hanno modo di conoscere e comprendere le varie fasi di lavorazione del Bordado Madeira. La grande varietà di articoli (letto, tavola, bagno, bambino e souvenir) viene esportata anche in Giappone, Arabia Saudita e Stati Uniti, oltre a essere presente sul mercato europeo. Al 1926 risale la fondazione di un’altra storica fabbrica, Abreu & Araújo che con ben tre punti vendita nell’arcipelago produce bordados con disegni sia classici sia moderni. Intorno al 1930 nasce Luís de Sousa: tovaglie, asciugamani con i propri monogrammi, lenzuola e tende vengono esportati soprattutto in Inghilterra, Italia, Francia e Spagna. Dall’agosto 1946 João Eduardo de Sousa si dedica alla produzione di qualità. I suoi ricami sono destinati sia al mercato regionale che all’esportazione oltre i confini nazionali. Anche con il cambio di gestione nel 1996, l’alta artigianalità continua a essere un caposaldo della filosofia del marchio. Una peculiarità delle fabbriche è spesso la conduzione a carattere familiare, come Daniel Canha - Bordados, fondata nel 1956. La ditta Bordal è attiva dal 1962: lino e cotone vengono reinterpretati in chiave moderna mantenendo intatto il know-how artigiano. La più giovane, Maria Alice G. Abreu, nata nel 1980, ha partecipato anche all’Expo di Lisbona di fine secolo. Tutti questi nomi sono legati a storie uniche e personalissime, un vero e proprio patrimonio per il futuro culturale ed economico della rigogliosa isola-giardino dell’Atlantico.

IVBAM

104


106

Da secoli specializzata nella realizzazione di arazzi, la manifattura parigina dei Gobelins è diventata sinonimo stesso di questo raffinato e antico mestiere, che oggi trova nuove declinazioni e suggestioni grazie a un dialogo fertile ed efficace tra artigiani e artisti. Nella foto, un maestro d’arte esegue un nodo per realizzare un arazzo di nuova concezione.


Tradizioni da preservare

ILSOGNO

di Colbert

80MILA MOBILI PREZIOSI, TAPPEZZERIE PREGIATE, TAPPETI RAFFINATI. DAL 1937 NELLA STORICA MANIFATTURA DEI GOBELINS E NEL MOBILIER NATIONAL SI RESTAURA LO SPLENDORE DEL PASSATO CHE CONTRIBUISCE AL PRESTIGIO FRANCESE NEL MONDO SIN DAI TEMPI DEL RE SOLE

di Alberto Cavalli

107


Tradizioni da preservare

S

Sono più di 80mila i mobili preziosi, le tappezzerie pregiate, i tappeti raffinatissimi che l’istituzione francese del Mobilier National attualmente conserva o restaura; pezzi che raccontano la storia più nobile e bella di Francia e che ancora sono utilizzati per arredare i palazzi del potere come l’Eliseo, o come i più importanti ministeri. Il luogo che dal 1937 riunisce la storica Manifattura dei Gobelins (celeberrima per gli arazzi, da secoli considerati tra i più belli del mondo) e il Mobilier National è un’autentica cassaforte del tempo, del saper fare e delle tradizioni d’eccellenza: qui si perpetua quel sogno di grandezza che, sin dai tempi di Colbert, contribuisce al prestigio francese nel mondo. Il saggio ministro del Re Sole, che volle fare di Parigi la capitale del gusto, del bello e del lusso, oltre che dello sfarzo, creò infatti un sistema di manifatture che ancora oggi sono considerate parte integrante del patrimonio francese: luoghi tuttora vivaci e vitali, les Gobelins e il Mobilier National sono un invito alla scoperta della bellezza che può nascere quando il mestiere incontra l’arte e quando la scienza e l’artigianato procedono insieme per donare nuova vita allo splendore del passato. Catherine Ruggeri, dal luglio 2017 responsabile del Mobilier National per il ministero della Cultura, sa bene che la reputazione del savoir-faire francese, che si

basa su una tradizione d’eccellenza antica di almeno quattro secoli e aperta alla modernità, è un grande attrattore per gli artisti che percepiscono nell’arte tessile un nuovo modo di espressione. Un’intuizione, quella di legare il savoir-faire dei maestri tessitori dei Gobelins all’ispirazione creativa degli artisti, che ha trovato piena affermazione soprattutto dal 1964, quando André Malraux crea all’interno della manifattura un atelier di ricerca e di produzione artistica contemporanea. Sino alla prima metà del XX secolo, in effetti, l’universo dell’artista inteso come creatore del modello e quello del tessitore, che del modello stesso era il realizzatore, erano considerati come distinti. Oggi il nuovo metodo di lavoro che si è affermato presso le manifatture, ispirato a uno scambio fruttuoso tra il creativo e il suo interprete, interroga e attira gli artisti in maniera forte, sostanziale. E disegna una nuova linea vitale per le manifatture e per il Mobilier National, custodi di un’identità che si apre allo spirito del futuro facendo breccia nel cuore dei giovani. Domanda. Quali sono i rapporti tra il Mobilier National e la contemporanea produzione artistica? Risposta. Oggi disponiamo di una grande autonomia d’iniziativa e di azione, che ci permette di stabilire le migliori condizioni

MOBILIER NATIONAL - THIBAUT CHAPOTOT

108


di collaborazione tra artisti (non solo francesi, ma internazionali) e tessitori. Gli artisti percepiscono nell’arte tessile un modo d’espressione congeniale per esprimere la loro visione del mondo; e la tecnica della tessitura a licci ha la particolarità di offrire possibilità infinite di scrittura. I modelli non sono più creati solo dai pittori, ma anche da incisori, scultori, architetti, fotografi, designer. La dialettica tra creativo e interprete costituisce uno stimolo efficace per tutti i processi artistici. La commissione consultiva, costituita nel 1962 e presieduta dal direttore artistico, esamina ogni anno le proposte di acquisto dei modelli da tessere: questa commissione contribuisce a elaborare delle scelte d’acquisto coerenti e dinamiche e permette alla produzione tessile di esprimere le visioni estetiche di ogni epoca e di affermare il ruolo delle manifatture nella scena artistica. D. Questo patrimonio straordinario è percepito come prezioso dai francesi? R. L’entusiasmo che riscontriamo da quando il Mobilier National è visitabile è un buon indicatore dell’interesse del pubblico per lo straordinario patrimonio della nostra istituzione: 6mila visitatori accorrono ogni anno a visitare le manifatture, in occasione delle Giornate del patrimonio; e altre centinaia di migliaia visitano i palazzi della Repubblica, con i loro mobili e i loro arazzi re-

alizzati o restaurati qui. Il pubblico apprezza molto le occasioni di incontro diretto con i luoghi dove si crea e dove si restaura: amano vedere come i grandi capolavori tornano a vita nuova, vedendoli con un occhio diverso rispetto a quando sono esposti nei musei. D. E le giovani generazioni hanno interesse ad apprendere il mestiere, o a conoscere meglio la storia e le attività delle manifatture? R. Il Mobilier National suscita addirittura vocazioni spontanee nei giovani, soprattutto in occasione delle esposizioni speciali e delle giornate di apertura al pubblico. La nostra istituzione è anche in grado di erogare formazione: qui il mestiere si impara sotto forma di apprendistato, che dura quattro anni. Al termine di questo periodo di apprendimento vi sono dei concorsi specializzati, per permettere a chi si è distinto di entrare nell’organico del Mobilier National. Constatiamo una sempre maggiore percentuale di giovani, già in possesso di un diploma di scuola superiore, che desiderano tornare a mestieri più concreti, al lavoro sulla materia; giovani che vogliono apprendere il disegno, la storia dell’arte e degli stili. Integrare la loro formazione con la nostra ha per loro un senso molto profondo: qui riscoprono la forza del patrimonio storico e culturale e diventano pienamente consapevoli della fondamentale importanza di conservare e trasmettere questo savoir-faire antico di secoli.

Conservazione, restauro, creazione: il Mobilier National e la manifattura dei Gobelins non sono solo luoghi di preservazione dell’eccellenza del passato, ma sono veri e propri atelier in cui pezzi magnifici rinascono a nuova vita, in cui si creano capolavori inediti, in cui si formano giovani generazioni di maestri (mobiliernational. culture.gouv.fr).


110

Sopra, il decoro in ceramica Plumage di BottegaNove. Nella pagina a fianco, dall’alto: lampada a sospensione in ceramica Babette di Torremato; la collezione per la tavola e l’home decor Dolce Vita di Paola C., omaggio agli anni 50. «Ho avuto la fortuna di conoscere molti bravi artigiani che vado a cercare a seconda di quello che devo fare», spiega Cristina Celestino. «Vedendo il luogo in cui lavorano riesco a capire se ci sono i presupposti per continuare».


Linguaggi progettuali

111

collezionista

DI IDEE Frequentava le aste, mossa dal desiderio di possedere certi oggetti. Poi, smessi i panni di architetto nel settore dell’edilizia, Cristina Celestino ha iniziato a realizzare arredi su misura, interpretando con eleganza e humour gli intrecci del contemporaneo. Senza passare inosservata

di Ali Filippini


112

Linguaggi progettuali

LAILA POZZO PER DOPPIA FIRMA - MFCC, FCMA, LIVING

Cristina Celestino nasce nel 1980 a Pordenone e dopo aver concluso la facoltà di Architettura Iuav di Venezia, inizia a collaborare con prestigiosi studi di progettazione e dedica la sua attenzione all’architettura d’interni e al design. Nel 2009 si trasferisce a Milano dove fonda il brand Attico Design: una produzione di lampade e arredi caratterizzati dalla ricerca meticolosa sui materiali e sulle forme. Tra questi il progetto Atomizer, prodotto da Seletti, entra a far parte della collezione permanente del design italiano della Triennale di Milano. Disegna progetti esclusivi per una clientela privata e per aziende. Domanda. Mi interessa partire dalla sua passione per il collezionismo che forse spiega un po’ della sua ricerca... Risposta. Mi è sempre piaciuta la storia dell’architettura al punto che se non avessi avuto l’attitudine progettuale avrei seguito da ricercatrice questa strada. Amo la storia degli interni: gli arredi su misura di Carlo Scarpa, le case di Adolf Loos, l’uso del colore nei dettagli di Le Corbusier. Credo, in effetti, di essermi avvicinata al design prima come collezionista che come progettista: dalla passione per i cataloghi d’asta, che sono validi strumenti di conoscenza, sono passata a frequentare le aste, acquistare e vendere dei pezzi mossa dal desiderio di possedere certi oggetti. Il tutto è proseguito in modo abbastanza naturale quando, smessa l’attività di architetto nel settore dell’edilizia, sono ripartita da Milano occupandomi più di interni (lavorando per esempio con lo studio-brand Sawaya & Moroni) e iniziando a realizzare arredi su misura per conto mio. D. In quel momento, intorno al 2009, inizia anche la sua avventura nell’autoproduzione e nel design. R. Ho scelto di produrre personalmente i pezzi delle mie prime commesse private e nel 2012 ho partecipato al Salone Satellite (in questo

Sopra, la Toeletta, parte della collezione The Happy Room per Fendi. In alto, la designer Cristina Celestino con l’artigiano toscano Massimo Borgna con il quale ha partecipato alla seconda edizione della mostra Doppia Firma. Cristina Celestino disegna progetti esclusivi per una clientela privata e aziende come Alpi, Atipico, BBB Emmebonacina, Budri, Durame, Fendi, Fornace Brioni, Flexform, Ichendorf, Mogg, Paola C., Pianca, Seletti, Tonelli Design e Torremato.


113 contesto l’anno scorso ha ricevuto il Premio speciale della giuria Salone del mobile Milano Award, ndr) pur non conoscendo molto il mondo del design e della sua comunicazione. Lo feci presentando alcuni arredi che avevo già realizzato insieme ad altri disegnati ad hoc, il tutto con il nome Attico Design, ovvero il brand con il quale continuo ad autoprodurmi perché mi piace vedere realizzate le cose, amando la matericità di qualsiasi prodotto. D. Come si relaziona con i suoi artigiani e come li cerca? R. Ho avuto la fortuna di conoscere molti bravi artigiani che vado a cercare a seconda di quello che devo fare; vedendo il luogo in cui lavorano riesco a capire se ci sono i presupposti per continuare. Per me è fondamentale che chi realizza il lavoro abbia la curiosità, diciamo persino un atteggiamento illuminato, verso il progettista con cui deve avere la voglia di provare a sperimentare cose nuove. Con alcuni di questi la collaborazione risale ai primi anni di Attico Design, quindi come noto si innescano delle relazioni virtuose nel rapporto cliente-fornitore. D. Sia nei progetti speciali sia nelle art direction emerge la sua passione per tecniche e lavorazioni artigianali. R. Prima di partire con il disegno di una collezione faccio molta ricerca rispetto alle potenzialità dell’azienda. Nella mia art direction per la Fornace Brioni di Mantova ho voluto esplorare l’espressività del cotto con una collezione di piastrelle dove il materiale è abbinato al colore o viene reinterpretato dalle grafiche e dai bassorilievi. Con BottegaNove e la ceramica, quello che mi colpì da subito era la capacità della ditta di decorare a mano e direi l’infinita disponibilità di lustri a mia disposizione. Il che spiega, in quest’ultimo caso, anche la decisione di lavorare con Plumage (premio Edida 2017 - Elle Deco International Design Awards) su un elemento decorativo come la piuma, scelta per esaltare al massimo le diverse texture cromatiche.

D. Tra gli ultimi lavori ci sono progetti di interior per il retail d’alta gamma. R. Nel caso di Fendi l’occasione è partita con l’allestimento della Vip room itinerante «The Happy Room» alla fiera Design Miami/Basel lo scorso dicembre. Non capita spesso di fare una collezione così ricca di materiali, dove non mi è stato imposto nessun limite e che mi ha arricchita dal lato tecnico della progettualità avendola seguita in tutti gli aspetti. Ora il concept è stato replicato nel pop-up store Fendi di Tokyo Omotesandö dove mi hanno affidato la produzione degli arredi e una parte dell’interior. Per quanto riguarda il retail design ho appena

completato anche la nuova boutique Sergio Rossi a Parigi, in Faubourg Saint-Honoré, di cui ho seguito interior e arredi. Lavorare con brand storici vuol dire spesso avere a disposizione un apparato iconografico, come se fosse un abaco progettuale già pronto, ricco di spunti da cui partire. Quindi anche per la scelta e la lavorazione dei materiali cerco di valorizzare i codici e le lavorazioni dell’azienda. Ha a che fare con l’heritage delle Maison e trovo che rispetto al design i fashion brand siano spesso più coerenti in merito alla loro identità storica pur continuando a rinnovarsi in modo assolutamente, doverosamente, contemporaneo.

Nella collezione The Happy Room per Fendi, il tema dell’intarsio dei materiali, matrice stilistica della Maison, viene riproposto nella grafica creata con marmi e onici a contrasto nel piano dei tavolini. «Non capita spesso di fare una collezione così ricca di materiali, dove non mi è stato imposto nessun limite e che mi ha arricchita dal lato tecnico della progettualità avendola seguita in tutti gli aspetti», spiega Cristina Celestino.


e

mblema eloquente dello splendore cui può giungere il talento, il «Divino» è stato scelto come simbolo della Fondazione che salvaguarda l’alto artigianato

SULLE ORME DI MICHELANGELO

ti Te s

n Fra

co

a to d

ogn l o C

ia mon

i

L’Italia come espressione politica esiste da non molto tempo: poco più di 150 anni. Ma l’Italia come un universo culturale riconoscibile è sempre stata presente nell’immaginario dell’Europa, attirando pellegrini e visitatori, turisti amanti dell’arte e politici incuriositi dai nostri regimi, che hanno poi portato con sé nei loro rispettivi Paesi un po’ del nostro patrimonio. Non è un caso se, come molti esperti di marketing sanno, ciò che «funziona» in Italia funziona poi anche nel resto del mondo. Proprio all’esperienza italiana e in particolare al lavoro fatto in oltre vent’anni dalla Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte che ho fondato a Milano, ha dunque guardato una nuova istituzione internazionale di recente nascita, per rilanciare su scala (per ora) europea e poi mondiale un altro tipo di patrimonio: quello legato alla creatività e all’alto artigianato. Voluta dall’illuminato imprenditore sudafricano Johann Rupert, e da lui fondata insieme a me a Ginevra (città internazionale per eccellenza), la Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship si è rapidamente strutturata come l’anello di congiunzione che mancava tra le associazioni, istituzioni, fondazioni e altre realtà culturali che, nei diversi Paesi europei, operano a vario livello per promuovere i mestieri d’arte. La scelta stessa del nome, Michelangelo, è emblematica: supremo maestro italiano vissuto in un momento in cui l’Italia era appunto solo una

Ri-sguardo

114

nozione culturale, sommo artista, artigiano sapiente, il «Divino» è l’emblema eloquente dello splendore cui può giungere il talento, quando si verifichi il fortunato incontro con l’arte, la tecnica e naturalmente il cliente, o il committente. Perché è il cliente, oggi più che mai, che deve essere educato all’amore per il bello e il ben fatto. E promuovere, proteggere, perpetuare i mestieri d’arte, per la Michelangelo Foundation significa anche agire per garantire adeguata occupazione ai talenti del futuro, al contempo assicurando alle nuove élite l’accesso ai meravigliosi oggetti che danno valore alle nostre scelte. Espressione del territorio, della storia e dell’evoluzione dei tempi, le attività di alto artigianato possono costituire un importante veicolo di cultura e di lavoro: in un momento dove la tecnologia sembra soppiantare ovunque la mano dell’uomo, la Foundation lavora per valorizzare quanto il talento, la pratica, la creatività riescono a realizzare in maniera eccellente, salvando così l’alta manifattura dal rischio di omologazione che la digitalizzazione spesso comporta. Proprio per questo la Michelangelo Foundation sta portando avanti alcuni progetti originali che uniscono, come in un’ideale rotta creativa, diverse iniziative. Il networking, appunto: unire e far conoscere le diverse realtà e le diverse attività, per creare sinergie efficaci. Ma anche la definizione di un linguaggio comune per parlare di mestieri d’arte e definire l’eccellenza: a tal fine è stata pubblicata la ricerca The Master’s Touch. Essential elements of artisanal excellence, già presentata a Londra e Parigi. La valorizzazione del rapporto tra design e artigianato, grazie al sostegno di progetti quali Doppia Firma (doppiafirma. com) e la divulgazione del saper fare dei grandi artigiani d’Europa, attraverso eventi che lascino il segno: come Homo Faber, un’inedita celebrazione del saper fare di più alto livello che avrà luogo a Venezia nel mese di settembre del 2018. Il nuovo Michelangelo chiede di poter essere libero di creare le forme della bellezza di domani: e la Fondazione che porta il suo nome opera, lavora e crea proprio per permettere a ogni Michelangelo, animato dal tormento ma anche dall’estasi, di rendere migliore la nostra vita grazie al suo talento.


FIND YOUR DIFFERENCE

NOT AN ARTIST Discovering the professions of Contemporary Art

SCOPRI L’OFFERTA FORMATIVA DEDICATA ALLE PROFESSIONI DELL’ARTE IED.IT/ARTE MILANO | BARCELONA | CAGLIARI | COMO | FIRENZE | MADRID | RIO DE JANEIRO | ROMA | SÃO PAULO | TORINO | VENEZIA

COVER MESTIERI16 STESA.indd 2

14/11/17 17:37


MESTIERI D’ARTE & design Poste Italiane S.p.A-Sped. In Abb.Post.- D.L353/2003 (conv. in L. 27/02/2004 n.46) art.1,comma 1 DCB Milano - Aut.Trib. di Milano n.505 del 10/09/2001 - Supplemento di Arbiter N. 177/XXXIII

n o

COVER MESTIERI16 STESA.indd 1

versi h uded lis l g nc i En

16

Mestieri dArte Design

oro rosso

Gli inimitabili presepi in corallo di Liverino creati unicamente a mano all’ombra del Vesuvio

germania

La nascita di ogni pennino in casa Montblanc è un’esperienza sensoriale

ITALIA

Oltre 200 preziose miniature di mobili in mostra a Milano tra passato e contemporaneità

portogallo

Trame di lino, seta, organza e cotone: ecco tutti i segreti del Bordado Madeira

14/11/17 17:37

Mestieri d'Arte & Design N°16 - English version  
Mestieri d'Arte & Design N°16 - English version  
Advertisement