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Mestieri dArte Design SUPREME MASTERY

The values, skill and traditions of MAM craftsmen are handed down to younger generations; a legacy consecrated by the work of world famous glassmaker Lino Tagliapietra

GEMS

Van Cleef & Arpels premieres in glamorous Milan

MATTER

The noble art of Capodimonte porcelain

SHOEMAKING ART Bespoke footwear takes form at Berluti, Paris


100 P. 5 MAKING AND THINKING TO BECOME A MASTER

FONDAZIONE COLOGNI SUSTAINS THE YOUNGER GENERATIONS, OFFERING THEM THE PROJECTS, INITIATIVES, VALUES AND STORIES FEATURED IN THESE PAGES

The joy of making, and making well, is a message that today seems more revolutionary than ever. Between the vacuity of instantaneousness and the devouring of time, personalities such as Alberto Casiraghy, the publisher featured in this issue, teach us how true welfare is not born from speculation or financial investments, but from the day-to-day joy of transforming talent into a profession. Is this not a veritable Copernican revolution, which places gestures, looks and relations at the centre of a form of “making” which is first and foremost a form of “thinking”? Helping younger generations rediscover the pleasure of working with passion is one of the goals of Fondazione Cologni, whose project A School, a Job. Training to excellence has already helped more than 200 young people transform their dream of becoming the master artisans of tomorrow into a life project. But to be effective, such guidance must be based on concrete examples and true stories - such as those of the MAM – Masters of Arts and Crafts that Franco Cologni reveals in these pages. Every two years, the worthiest artisans are awarded the title of Master, which, to quote De Amicis, “after ‘father’, is the noblest, the sweetest name which one man can apply to another man”. Masters who work from the harmony of their ateliers, such as Jochen Haidacher; Masters who embellish the products of major luxury Maisons, such as the experienced silk weavers who produce iconic scarves and ties for Hermès; Masters who give a new lease of life to works of art, such as the restorers who - poised between science and craft - are restoring Antonio Vivaldi’s collection of violins with the support of the Michelangelo Foundation. The Geneva-based foundation has also helped 50 young students from all over Europe extend their skills through a range of Summer Schools designed to allow - as we will read - young and skilled hands, apprentices and gurus, to work with glass, wood, rushes and stone, generating an opportunity for exchange and experimentation that has left a clear and visible imprint on the careers of these young people. An imprint that reveals an irreplaceable genius loci: territoriality - which forms an integral part of the value underlying fine craftsmanship - becomes an element of identity and legitimacy, as we will read in the stories dedicated to Berluti and Real Fabbrica di Capodimonte, a historical enterprise which has been given a new lease of life. New also is the life that Sara Ricciardi instils into ancient crafts, integrating them in her quintessentially poetic and magic – but also highly determined – design approach; new is Chanel’s review of its corporate heritage, resulting in high-end

jewellery collections that touch the heart with extraordinary force; new are the skills required of the younger generations, as we are told by two winners of the “Artigiano del cuore” contest launched by Wellmade, a community of people who love, follow, seek and comment fine craftsmanship online. From the acute observations of Ugo La Pietra to the inspired closing words of Franco Cologni, issue no. 20 is promoting a minor revolution that we hope will take root: that of presenting an extraordinary enterprise and describing its origins, its goals, its history, its splendour, its endeavours, its results and its inspirations. Because, to quote Keats, “beauty is truth, truth beauty”, and it is beauty that changes our heart. Have a good read! (Alberto Cavalli)

P. 10 DECORATION: A FORGOTTEN DISCIPLINE

OUR SOCIETY HAS LEARNED TO APPRECIATE HIGH-QUALITY DESIGN, BUT FAILS TO UNDERSTAND THE ADDED VALUE OF DECORATIVE ARTS

The fact that our Academies of Fine Art still have Departments of Decoration may well represent an important cultural asset for Italian art and design. Yet for too many decades this discipline has been at loggerheads with industrial design of rationalist inspiration. Ignored by the lecturers who should be teaching it (in most cases artists who have settled with their assigned post, but were in fact hoping to teach painting), decoration has also been eliminated by the Milan Triennale (once defined the Triennale of Decorative Arts), and it is now merely a pale reminder of what, up until the 1950s, was once practised and represented in major events such as the Biennale in Monza or the Triennale in Milan. Some believe they have rediscovered traces of the ancient splendour of this discipline in artistic craftsmanship, a field in which many craftspeople still allow themselves to be carried away by the pleasure of handling materials, in a quest to achieve a decorative “effect”: something that creates a feeling of surprise and wonder. However, this artistic practice does not seem to find a keen, interested audience in Italy. Unfortunately, in recent years our consumer society has acquired a taste for “good” design: sober, practical, aesthetical but perhaps incapable, unsuitable or unwilling to adopt decorative values. Thus it is difficult to find heartfelt appreciation of the added value of decorative artwork in our market today. This decorative art avails of experience and expressions that allow the material to achieve outstandingly sophisticated production standards. But how can all of this be appreciated by consumers who cannot tell the difference between porcelain and ceramic, glass and crystal, an industrial mosaic and a handmade one, wood that has been carved or turned on a lathe? This incompetence has

increased over the years, creating an even greater gap between Italy and the world of international crafts. So whilst it is true that more and more of our young designersartisans-artists are committed to rediscovering the culture of making, the transformation of materials, of artistic craftsmanship, they find themselves working in an “autarchic world” as they cannot find, or do not want to seek out, a sincere approach to the applied and decorative arts in Europe. On the other side of the Alps, there are museums of decorative arts, galleries and indeed a market, whereas in this country there is no fertile terrain to nurture the decorative arts. Our starting point should be in schools: but this is a discipline that has all but disappeared from Academies. Art Institutes have been closed, design schools don’t open up to external workshops for real experiences in handling materials…. So it seems there is no new energy to help us rediscover this discipline and re-establish a fertile, dynamic relationship with the cultures currently reviving this field, from the USA and across Europe, to Japan and Korea. (Ugo La Pietra)

P. 12 THE CODE OF TALENT

A LITTLE MORE THAN A YEAR AFTER THE DEATH OF CESARE DE MICHELIS, WE WISH TO CELEBRATE THIS PUBLISHER, HUMANIST AND INTELLECTUAL OF GREAT COURAGE AND WISDOM WITH AN EXCERPT FROM ONE OF HIS MOST POIGNANT TEXTS ON CRAFTSMANSHIP, TAKEN FROM LA REGOLA DEL TALENTO (MARSILIO EDITORI, 2014), A PROJECT DEVELOPED BY FONDAZIONE COLOGNI DEI MESTIERI D’ARTE AND FONDAZIONE DEUTSCHE BANK ITALIA FEATURING 17 OF THE BEST ITALIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS SCHOOLS

Craftsmanship evokes the ancient practice of a creative use of the hands, and thus one that is not repetitive but open to variation through innovation. The crafts comprise all the trades that seemed to have been wiped out by the introduction of industrial machinery, able to replace human labour with a mass production of objects that are all identical to the prototype. The modern established itself as a celebration of the supremacy of the machine and the wealth that stemmed from it, and as an acceptance of the triumph of the copy over the original. Sameness claimed victory when everything could be reproduced ad infinitum: the masses took the place of the individual, the crowd pressed from all sides; art, which is the mythical archetype of the artisan’s work, evoking the Promethean greatness of man, became multiple, reproducible at will thanks to technology. One, a hundred, a thousand, a hundred thousand, in an unstoppable crescendo. Modernisation affected every aspect of society and life, sweeping away the institutions of the ancien régime and imposing the new rules of constitutions and


English version democracy, under which public opinion, and above all the view of the majority, was always right, in the sense that from this came power, all power, political and civil, but cultural too. What counts in modernity, therefore, is not quality, subject to an opinion founded on the comparative method and thus supported by experience and knowledge, but quantity, not at all a matter of opinion because it is measured “scientifically,” without ambiguities or uncertainties, on a numerical scale. Thus the decline of craftsmanship coincided with the rise of the modern that vanquished it, with its stranglehold on everything, and on the contrary its reappearance in the world is a further confirmation that modernisation is over and it really is the beginning of a new era, subsequent to the modern: not postmodern, but more simply post. An era that has to learn to do without the modern, its myths, its illusions and its imperatives, but without going backward, as this is not permitted to humanity. Going back to the crafts, to the trades, after their elimination in modernity, cannot simply be the restoration of a vanished world. It has a very different and richer meaning, in the opposite sense of innovation, research and the renewal of tradition in a time of discontinuity, without in any case disregarding the existence of the machine and its mass-produced articles. In the crafts the role of ability and skill, the force of experience, are being reintroduced; the preeminence of the individual, the marvel of the aura, the mystery of beauty, the delight of competition, the inspiration of comparison are strong. It is, in short, a farewell to the modern, to its not very human values, and the beginning of a new and extraordinary adventure leading to an unknown and not for this reason any less disquieting destination. I’ve made it with my hands exactly as I had imagined, and it is similar to many other objects, but a little different too, and in this difference there is the mark at one and the same time of a regained authoriality and of an invention that is never finished. Not knowing how to do anything with your hands is no longer the aristocratic emblem of the modern intellectual, but the mark of an unhealthy subjection, of an enduring servitude, of a freedom not won back. Modernity has had its day. The world emerged from the 20th century trying in every possible way to shake it off. Nostalgia for the good old days is on the lips of many, but we neither wish nor know how to do without democracy in society and in politics. We would, however, like to take the destiny of the arts and crafts out of the hands of public taste, renewing a primacy of quality and skill for which it is hard to find solid foundations. And so there is nothing left for us to do but find a way of deriving authority not just from tradition but also from “talent”; every time we are certain that this is in our grasp, ours at last forever, it eludes us again, forcing us to chase after it once more. To help us in this, to show us a path to follow, remain

the schools, all the better if accredited and authoritative, if they have managed not to lose their bearings, reworking instead with fidelity and patience the lessons of experience and tradition; if, in other words, they are schools of excellence.After modernity, therefore, we are left with this Sisyphean task, the exciting and indispensable quest for the “code of talent”. (Cesare De Michelis)

PP. 16|23 ALBUM

ALICE MOCELLIN Milan, Corso San Gottardo 12 (Italy)

This extraordinary artist-artisan “embroiders with iron”: her skilled hands yield plants, forests and wild beasts that resemble impalpable shadows. “I use iron to represent nature. It’s a hard, dense, strong, cutting material, but it’s also flexible, soft, vulnerable and fragile: when it rusts, it reveals just how fleeting it is,” Alice explains. This talented artisan produces wall decorations, which she transforms into forests of firs inhabited by foxes, deer and squirrels. The effect is extraordinary. “I started making my first works using wire when I was still at university. Then I learned how to cut zinc with a pantograph, and that’s when my first scenes came about. Now, thanks to manual plasma cutting, I can work with harder materials such as sheets of iron, which I design, cut by hand and oxidise.” Alice also creates large iron spheres out of which she carves mountain and cityscapes, inserting details and subjects requested by her clients. She took part in the Biennale Arte Donna held in Trieste in 2019, as well as the Otranto Film Festival with the scenes entitled “Il mondo sospeso”. alicemocellin.com

likes finding out “what’s behind things”. This is what prompted her, after her studies in industrial design, to work in a foundry. Her first success came in 2014, when she designed and developed GrisFonte radiators (for which she received a prize) and began working with Vacheron Constantin and the Association Laine d’ici. She then met master blacksmith Philippe Naegele, who handed down his experience and mapped out her path. Today, Bertille has taken over her teacher’s forge, where she works using all the tools of the time-honoured trade, such as pliers, pincers, moulds, hammer, sickle and, above all, fire. “I’ve always wanted to try my hand at the world of metal. It’s a noble material, but one that is hard to master,” Bertille explains. “I like to invent new forms from scratch but with the mastery of traditional techniques. My objects invite people to touch and handle them, because I’m convinced that the hand of man has a pivotal role to play in design today.” Bertille Laguet received the Relève Métiers d’art Suisse 2019 award, the Bourse Culturelle 2018 de la Fondation Leenaards, and the Swiss Design Award 2017. She has also taken part in Art Basel. bertillelaguet.ch

FÁBRICA RAPHAEL BORDALLO PINHEIRO Caldas da Rainha, Rua Rafael Bordalo Pinheiro 53 (Portugal)

Raphael Bordallo Pinheiro was a painter and caricaturist with a particular flair for ceramic creations, and one of the most influential people in 19th-century Portuguese culture. In 1884, his first creations at the Fábrica de Faianças in Caldas da Rainha proved an instant success: he went on to develop azulejos, panels, vases, centrepieces, basins for fountains, jugs, dishes, perfume bottles and enormous animals, receiving several gold medals at international exhibitions for his exuberant creativity. The manufactory is now part of the Visabeira Group, but it continues to turn out products to Bordallo Pinheiro’s drawings, using the same production process as in the past: soup tureens shaped like pumpkins and cabbages, dinner sets with deer, bears and squirrels, chandeliers with frogs and flowers, vases, lamps and flower pots. There are also many models created by the new generation, in keeping with traditional techniques. Two museums have been dedicated to Raphael Bordallo Pinheiro: one in his birth house in Caldas da Rainha, and one in Lisbon. bordallopinheiro.pt

FRANCESCO MEDA Milan, Via Savona 97 (Italy) BERTILLE LAGUET Lausanne, 53 avenue des Bergières (Switzerland)

Bertille Laguet is curious about life and

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Talented young designer Francesco Meda was born into the trade. His father Alberto designed for the world’s most prestigious furniture manufacturers. After spending a period of time in England working with major designers, Francesco returned to Milan


102 where he began sharing the studio with his father. “I started as a trainee assistant, but gradually took part in every aspect of his projects. The first satisfaction was winning the Golden Compass with him, with a project for sound-absorbing panels we designed together for Caimi. Now I alternate production projects that are virtually on an artisan scale, with products for major manufacturers such as Kartell, Molteni and Dada. Thanks to self-production, I am constantly in touch with the artisans, who have taught me a great deal. With my work for industry, on the other hand, I’ve had the chance to familiarise myself with constantly evolving technologies.” Francesco Meda took part in the last edition of the Best of Italy, promoted by Coincasa and Elle Décor, along with two other designers and Francesco Montorfano, a young carpenter who owns the eponymous workshop in Cantù. francescomeda.com

friendship. These are the ingredients behind a new business venture starring the marble chip and cement paste tile company Premiata Fabbrica di mattonelle in graniglia e pasta di cemento A. Tessieri & C., established in Lucca in 1902, and a group of friends who are now running the company: Pier Giorgio Tessieri, great-grandson of the factory’s founder, Manuel Vellutini, Marco Pierallini and Alessandro Mennucci. “On the one hand, I wanted continue a story that went all the way from my great-grandfather Alfredo up to me; on the other, I wanted to preserve all the beauty and craftsmanship that go into the tiles. The entire production process is handmade, using the same techniques and moulds used over 100 years ago.” Today, a group of worthy craftspeople shape the marble chip tiles or cement tiles using the old hydraulic presses and over 300 original moulds. The colours are mixed using secret formulas, which are the factory’s greatest legacy. tessierimattonelle.com

MI.CO.GI CONFEZIONI Turin, Via San Secondo 74 (Italy)

AURUM BY FEDERICA FABIANO Milan, via Luigi Razza (Italy)

Federica Fabiano creates jewellery to her own designs as well as those of her customers using lost-wax casting. A pupil of Alba Cappellieri, director of Vicenza’s Jewellery Museum and an expert in the evolution of jewellery, Federica learned the secrets at the trade at the Scuola Orafa Ambrosiana, as well as the most futuristic technologies. Today, she alternates her work as a jeweller with teaching at the Design Faculty of Milan’s Politecnico. She designs her jewellery with 3D modelling using sophisticated Rhino software. “The great thing about 3D is that you can see the end result when you are still in the design phase. But manual skill is still an essential part of my creations,” the skilled jewellery maker confides. “In fact, after they have been cast, I do the assembly, rhodium plating, filing and setting the stones, as well as engraving and polishing. And in those phases it’s the skill of the hand, the artisan’s talent and experience, which are essential.” Federica Fabiano receives by appointment. aurumgioielli.net

PREMIATA FABBRICA MATTONELLE A. TESSIERI Lucca, via San Marco 58 (Italy)

A heritage of craftsmanship that has been part of Italy’s manufacturing history for over 100 years, a unique product of its kind and four entrepreneurs united by a long-term

An interesting destination for lovers of quality household linen is the shop belonging to skilled artisan Maria Miglietta, who with the help of two co-workers, sews table cloths, placemats, sheets and bespoke towels, tailoring them to the customer’s tastes. “The business was started by my parents, Cosimo and Giuseppina, over 50 years ago. I was raised amidst embroidery thread and sewing machines in their first shop, which was just around the corner from here. In spite of her age, my mother is still an excellent seamstress and is always on hand to give me advice.” Various types of fabric are cut to measure in the store, ranging from linen to cotton, silk, towelling and piqué. For the finishing touches, there is a variety of trimmings, braid embroidered borders and drawn thread work of various kinds, cross-stitch customisations, light embroidery and broderie anglaise applications. micogi.it

RIHARDS VIDZICKIS Līgatnes, Vienkoči (Latvia)

Rihards Vidzickis holds a doctorate in Engineering, a diploma in crafts and a master’s degree from Riga Technical University. For him, it has always been essential to combine his scientific research with studies of traditional manual techniques. As a result, he has become an expert in woodworking. He is a sculptor with a passion for building canoes and basins for kneading dough and bowls, all out of blocks of wood. “Working with wood in a single block is a process that requires time and technical knowledge. The particular feature of pieces made from a single block is that they are extremely hard-wearing, a quality which is not only essential for the canoes, but for many vessels as well.” He has become a member of the Northmen guild

of artisans, which unites northern Europe’s master artisans in a single platform. Rihards Vidzickis is also famous for having founded the Wood Museum in Latvia’s Vienkoči Park. The Museum hosts the World Wood Days, an important event bringing together woodcutters and artisans from all over the world, along with the students of Riga Technical University. vienkoci.lv

ZUBER Rixheim, 28 rue Zuber (France)

In the heart of Alsace is an artisan factory that has been producing wonderful papierpeints wallpaper, renowned worldwide, since 1790: it is the oldest manufacture of wallpaper still functioning today. The archive numbers over 150,000 prints, which are used to create panoramic designs that cover entire walls. The technique involves using paint to print on long rolls of paper 48cm wide, then assembling them to decorate panels or entire rooms. The effect is one of a magnificent trompe-l’oeil. In the vast atelier in Rixheim is a series of pear-wood presses engraved with a variety of motifs. It can take up to 2,000 prints in different shades to yield the most complex panoramic designs. The printing process requires skills handed down through the generations: to safeguard this legacy of craftsmanship, a school and a museum have been created in a wing of the factory. Another of Zuber’s specialities is “velvet” papers, created by sieving thin layers of dyed wool over the surface of each strip of paper and gluing them with an animal adhesive, creating three-dimensional designs. zuber.fr

OBERLINGER

Windesheim, Hauptstr. 44 (Germany)

The Oberlinger family has specialised in building organs since the late 1700s. This long tradition grew in the 19th century thanks to Jakob and the skills of his brother Karl, an outstanding wood craftsman. Together they introduced noteworthy innovations into the company, going on to become the region’s most important organ builders. Today, grandson Wolfgang and his daughter Anja both work for the business with the help of around 80 skilled artisans. Under the Oberlinger brand, organs, pianos and harpsichords are created and restored before being exported the world over. One example is the Oberlinger organ bought by the Beijing Central Conservatory. The workshops,


English version which cover a surface area of 1,500 square metres, are home to the design department, the modern research and development office and the sound department. Since the 1990s, the company has ramped up its scientific approach to building organs, hedging its bets on more flexible and less bulky instruments. The Oberlinger Museum is also worth a visit. oberlinger.eu

PP. 22|25 AD HOC

TACS Stia, Via Sanarelli 49 (Italy)

Casentino is an extraordinary fabric produced since Medieval times in the heart of Tuscany. The Tacs factory is located in Stia, an ancient village perched high up on a hill near Arezzo. Established 50 years ago thanks to the determination and commitment of Bruno Savelli, it has grown over the years with his son Massimo, who in 2016 was awarded the title of Master Craftsman and a knighthood. Today, the business continues under the guidance of David, of the third generation: “Casentino cloth is a traditional wool fabric which hails from Medieval Stia. It was the climate and the presence of the River Arno that led the area to develop textile production as early as the 15th century. The first wool manufacturers, who changed the very social history of the Casentino area, were set up in the middle of the 19th century. When my grandfather first founded the company after the war, he decided to maintain all the traditional processes. Originally, Casentino cloth owed its success to the fact that it withstands water and protects against the cold. Using modern treatments, we have managed to add softness and lightness to each garment.” tacs.it

PETER TING London, 83 Crampton Street (UK)

Peter Ting is a highly talented designer and ceramicist. He spent his childhood in Hong Kong before moving to the UK where he has lived, worked and taught for many years. At the age of 35 he already had his own business, supplying his ceramic wares to stores the world over. Appointed to create ranges for HM The Queen, HRH The Prince of Wales, Thomas Goode, Asprey and Legle, Ting has made a name for himself designing ornamental pieces and dinner sets. In 2004, his interest in white Chinese porcelain took him on a visit to Dehua, which marked a turning point in his work: “I met the Chen family of master ceramists, who guard porcelain secrets handed down from father to son. I was so struck by their skill that I started working with them to create a contemporary collection based on the Dehua tradition.” The result was the Buddha Hands series, now part of the permanent collection in London’s Victoria & Albert Museum. In 2016 the designer and writer Ying Jian founded the Ting-Ying Gallery. ting-ying.com/peter-ting (Stefania Montani)

COMETA’S OLIVER TWIST SCHOOL AIMS AT PROVIDING YOUNG PEOPLE WITH TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES

“The OECD reports a decline of over one million students, while almost half the current teachers are retiring. Italy is recording the third highest level of young people who are neither in employment nor in education or training (NEET) amongst all OECD countries: 26% of young people aged 18 to 24 are NEET, compared with the OECD average of 14%. Italy and Colombia are the only two OECD countries with rates above 10% in both categories (inactive and unemployed) in the 18-24 age group.” The news was released by Ansa this morning, 1 October 2019. It’s disturbing. What can be done in a situation like this? Is it possible to start over? Where from? But today there isn’t time to dwell on our worries; it is a special day here in Como, and in Cometa’s Oliver Twist school there is much to be done. It is the first and therefore the most special day of the year, and just like every year, the students are in the main hall, waiting to hear Erasmo’s welcome speech. More than 30 years ago he welcomed the first needy child, laying the grounds for the creation of a small village which now houses a school and 1,000 children and young people who have found someone to look after them and accompany them on their journey to adulthood. “You are unique. You are eternal, a one-off. There has never been anyone like you, nor will there ever be. Discover what is excellent in you,” he repeated this year, looking each of them in the eye. This is his welcome to Cometa, the invitation to each person returning or coming here for the first time: start over from the truth within you. By taking a gamble on yourself, right now, whatever your background. This certainty also underpins a new adventure, the Ad Hoc project. Ad Hoc means “for this specific case or situation” and the name couldn’t be more appropriate. It reminds us of the attention every child deserves, and attention to the detail invested in every aspect of his or her education. In particular, there are two pivotal elements that Ad Hoc aims to enhance and develop. The first is the notion of a “hands-on” approach through the creation of a school-workshop that can adapt to the changes in education. The traditional model based on learning “by accumulation”, from knowing to doing, is now being rejected by many young

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people. The project’s educational approach is not created artificially. Instead it is the result of a customised process of observation and active listening (hence the definition ad hoc) which prompted us to offer teenagers educational experiences that are real and practical, involving training both in workshops and in the working world. We are convinced this is the best way to tackle educational poverty. The educational value of work is paramount, all the more so at a time when the working world is of vital importance for teenagers, given that school and family have often become, unfortunately, fragile environments. The second element is the pivotal nature of the Master, on whom the missions of the partners - Cometa and Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte in particular - converge. Both institutions are committed to training the next generations of Master Craftspeople, and they have found fertile terrain in the Ad Hoc project. According to Erasmo Figini, founder of Cometa, “the world needs teachers. Teacher who are willing to work with the kids, to educate, train and introduce them to the context and its meaning, harnessing the wealth of knowledge afforded by our traditions.” The project thus aims to foster and support the Master Craftspeople who, in Italy and worldwide, hand down “the intelligence of the hand” through the generations. Today’s crafts businesses, which have inherited Italy’s tradition of the Medieval workshop and the Renaissance atelier, are a living and breathing testimony of the relationship between technical skill and the human mind. Franco Cologni, Chairman of the Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte, observes that the value of the encounter between young people and Master Craftspeople is precious and irreplaceable, because it is based on setting examples, including those of a moral kind. The experiences offered by this project bring girls and boys closer to a world that is steeped in knowledge and value, “helping them understand that by using their hands they can express themselves and display their own talent, thus boosting their self-confidence. Above all, it makes them feel part of something beautiful, important and shared.” In the next four years, the project - selected by Impresa Sociale Con i Bambini with the support of Fondazione De Agostini for the prevention of educational poverty in the Como area - will help 120 young people at risk of dropping out of school, or who have already dropped out, rediscover themselves and their talents. This is the aim: 120 young people who will have a qualification, a job, and a starring role in their own lives. The actions of the project rotate around three main cornerstones: involvement of the educational community through information and training sessions for families, teaching staff and professionals; customisation of the courses for the beneficiaries, starting from the specific needs of each individual; and lastly, accompaniment both in education and at work, through practical and educational workshops run by local master artisans. Thanks to the contribution of Tiresia


104 of Milano Polytechnic, all the activities will be monitored and measured using specific parameters for the entre duration of the project in order to gauge how much value and social impact the activities have generated. It is a significant experience for the local area, and one which sees the involvement of a virtuous and representative network of players: schools, public authorities, private organisations and private businesses in the social sphere. Together they lead this project, which aims to find new ways to foster understanding and reduce the phenomenon of dispersion, whilst at the same time exploring the means to counteract it adopted to date. As a result, the workshop has become a place of culture and recuperation: it opens people to the educational value of work. Much can be learned from work, particularly manual work. And it makes it possible to grow, get to know ourselves and our context better. “I never thought I could make something so beautiful,” one of the boys on the project tells us about the workshop he took with Milan’s famous master goldsmiths. An experience of beauty often thought to be accessible to few, and which can instead be accessible to everyone. It is a need which comes from the heart of all, but young people have lost sight of this goal. So we need to help them rediscover it, giving them the reasons why and allowing them to experience beauty and order, quality of life. This is Ad Hoc. So where can we start over from? We think we can start from here, from the 120 young people who in four years will be saying “I never thought I could make something so beautiful”. (Carlo Garbagna)

PP. 26|29 NO ONE IS RICHER THAN ME

USING A LETTERPRESS PRINTING MACHINE WITH MOVABLE TYPES, ALBERTO CASIRAGHY CONQUERED WRITERS AND FAMOUS ARTISTS

“I’m afraid of holidays,” says Alberto Casiraghy, poet, aphorist, “thinker”, illustrator and publisher. As a result, it is possible to find him at his home in Osnago on the 14th of August if you pay him a visit. It is no ordinary house (Alda Merini called it a “private lunatic asylum”), a fact we realise from the outside gate. It is crammed full of the objects, colours and words that set this residence apart from the tidy run of identical villas in this Brianza village. The

Pulcinoelefante house has a kitchen, just like every home. It has a table and chairs, a sofa and a sitting room. But the sitting room is entirely taken up by a printing machine with movable types, the Superaudax Nebiolo. The kitchen table is where the little books are bound. The dishes and glasses are all stacked next to the sink because, instead of sideboards, there are chests full of movable lead types, arranged according to font and size: Times, Garamond, Bodoni… The walls and indeed every corner of the house is piled high with layers of drawings, photographs, cut-outs, memorabilia and an assortment of objects (mostly of no value) given to Alberto by anyone passing by. Everyone knows there is room for everything, and that anything can find a home here. A white fluff bears witness to the work performed in this Wunderkammer every day for the last forty years: it is the priceless Hahnemühle cotton paper, which releases its fibres each time it is cut. I pay Alberto a visit along with poet Dome Bulfaro and, on this occasion, we create a little book together. Four pages with a short poem and an original drawing. Alberto takes the sheet of paper, folds it and cuts it to size, while we compose the title and verse, choosing from the characters in the chest of drawers. Then it’s time to run a print test. The craftsman places the types in the machine. He fixes them in place, switches on the machine, checks the ink level…”You won’t believe it, but some people actually come here with a pen drive, thinking they can plug it into the machine… I print with lead types! It’s like things have come unstuck, so many people seem unable to hold the different levels of reality together.” Alberto Casiraghy started working as a typographer as a young lad in the village printing shop. “In the 1960s Osnago was known for its printing tradition. The typography belonged to the mayor, and we printed books for Adelphi”, later continuing in Milan and the newspaper building in Piazza Cavour. He gave up working as a typographer with the advent of digital photocomposition, going on to work as a set designer. “Can you think of an aphorism which sums up the meaning of craftsmanship to you?” I ask. “I think it’s this,” he replies: “I have many eyes because I leave all the doors open.” Having checked the test run, we proceed with the print, which Casiraghy oversees with precision and skill. About 30 copies of the little books are made. They are hand-stitched with needle and thread on the kitchen table, finished with a drawing, a touch of colour, some even with small three-dimensional objects… Poets, artists, illustrators: the list and variety of people who have come to Alberto to make their own little “hatchling” with him is endless. “Sebastiano Vassalli used to come every year during the August bank holiday, that way he was sure he wouldn’t get stuck in traffic on the motorways.” Halfway through the afternoon, the copies of edition number 10,555 are ready… that’s how many titles he has published since 1982, the year he first established Pulcinoelefante. Alberto keeps one

copy for his archive, which takes up every one of the wardrobes in his first-floor bedroom, as well as every other gap where he finds room for them. “My friend Giorgio is upstairs sorting out the archive. I’m going to donate it to the City of Milan. Just think, if someone wants to see the little book by Gillo Dorfles, then they will be able to…” Alberto’s home is always frequented by lots of people. The best known anecdotes involve Alda Merini, with whom he shared a very unusual friendship for over 20 years and for whom he published more than a 1,000 little books. Maurizio Cattelan used to sleep on the sofa in the kitchen when he was young; then there were famous writers and artists such as Allen Ginsberg, Ezra Pound, Arturo Schwarz, Emilio Tadini and Enrico Baj. Alberto loves sharing tales of his encounters with a tongue-incheek, affectionate tone: from the famous artist to people from the village who ring his doorbell because they know Alberto is always there, and that he never turns anyone away. “My life is made up of infinite meetings and stories: is there anyone richer than me?” (Simona Cesana)

PP. 3O|33 MAM: A MODEL FOR EUROPE

THE AWARD CREATED BY FONDAZIONE COLOGNI IN 2016 AIMS AT BECOMING INTERNATIONAL

As the pages of this magazine remind us, Italy has no shortage of skilled craftspeople creating beautiful, well-made objects. In Italy this wealth of craftsmanship tends to be overlooked by public bodies, which should not only protect, but indeed enhance, nurture and accompany it in the future. To fill this regulatory and above all cultural void, in 2016 Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte, in conjunction with Alma, the International School of Italian Cuisine, set up the MAM-Maestro d’Arte e Mestiere award for Masters of Arts and Crafts. Every two years, it rewards those who have distinguished themselves in the realm of master craftsmanship. The brains behind the prize is Franco Cologni, whose aim was to set a new tradition: indeed, in just two editions, it has already become a sought-after, keenlyawaited award. “In 1976, my friend Valéry Giscard d’Estaing transformed the Société d’Encouragement aux Arts et à l’Industrie into the Société d’Encouragement aux Métiers d’Art, now known as the Institut National des


English version Métiers d’Art. He did so to support France’s finest master artisans, and to give them an official title,” Cologni explains. “I set out to follow his example, and to establish a title in Italy that would be recognised as an objective benchmark. More than just an indication of a flawless technical standard, it should also reflect a cultural and creative approach to crafts, which can distinguish between masters and ordinary workers. The crafts of food and hospitality has been developed alongside Alma, the Italian school of fine cuisine.” In order to ensure the recognition it gives is as objective as possible where quality and merit are concerned, Fondazione Cologni only considers profiles submitted by a series of specific technical juries comprising experts, art historians, museum directors and professionals. “There are certain essential cornerstones,” Cologni explains. “Enrolment with the Chamber of Commerce, having worked for more than 10 years, performing educational activities, awards already received… then there is the assessment work according to the 11 criteria of excellence Fondazione Cologni has drafted and collated in the volume The Master’s Touch. Each member of the jury is invited to evaluate, for each of the candidates, the extent to which the craftsmanship criteria have been met (namely manual skill, which is also a cultural approach), along with authenticity, competence, craftsmanship, creativity, training, innovation, interpretation, originality, talent, territory and tradition.” The MAM award boasts a high-profile patronage, as well as the support of the President of the Italian Republic. “But we believe official support could also go one step further: this year, for example, we asked for our MAM awards to be acknowledged as ‘ethno-anthropological assets’ by the Ministry for Cultural Heritage,” Cologni continues. “Fondazione Cologni and Alma are relatively small organisations, but we have taken on a project that is vital for the identity and culture of our country. I would like the authorities to be more aware of the role that we play as intermediaries in making initiatives like this possible.” In the 2016 and 2018 editions, awards were presented to over 150 Masters of Arts and Crafts. Both ceremonies were held in the Milan Triennale. Each new MAM-winner was given a special bronze-cast medal with a diameter of 18 cm created by the Scuola dell’Arte della Medaglia of the Italian mint. The subject of the medal changes with each edition, and always evokes the link between the mind’s capacity to create and the hand’s ability to execute. Now the MAM has made its mark nationally, Franco Cologni is already at work to take it abroad. “We have embarked on a venture with the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship because we’d like to identify MAM figures in every country in Europe (for the time being). We believe the approach we have devised should serve as a springboard for countries where our interpretation of the official title of ‘master artisan’ has yet to be

created. The first step is always comprehending, understanding and helping one another. For this reason, with the Michelangelo Foundation we have launched an online evaluation tool based on our 11 criteria of excellence. Accordingly, we are at the disposal of official bodies wishing to capitalise on our experience to establish a form of recognition that rewards merit, skill and the culture of doing things well.” (Giovanna Marchello)

PP. 34|37 A FOURSQUARE ART

IN A CARRÉ HERMÈS, SILK BECOMES THE PAINTER’S CANVAS, ON WHICH COLOUR GIVES LIFE TO THE DRAWING

Ninety by ninety centimetres. The perfect square. A geometric shape inherent in the name: carré, the French term for “square”. When spoken with the right accent, it instantly evokes that touch of French elegance that is so quintessential of Hermès. Because the carré scarf is a truly iconic Hermès accessory. A concept of ethics and aesthetics applied to state-of-the-art products. Silk is the main material of choice - the painter’s canvas with cashmere, muslin, silk twill and cotton also being given pride of place, based on the concept that every raw material must comply with the highest standards of quality. That’s what we have come to expect from Hermès. A pure expression of taste, which takes shape in the classical 90x90 cm scarf, in the 45x45 cm gavroche, in the extra-large 140x140 cm version, and in the more recent 70x70 cm carré. Each is a reflection of the same processing method, which has remained unchanged since the Hermès scarf hit the world of women’s accessories, challenging the status quo and soon also taking the men’s accessories market by storm. Born of the designers’ creative flair, the scarves’ originality lies in the choice of subject, brought to life by a veritable dance of colours. The design of each carré takes six months to one year to be completed. Hermès has been producing scarves since 1937, with over 2,500 designs made to date - each telling a different story. The company was founded in Lyon at the behest of Émile Hermès and Robert Dumas, two refined producers of horse riding saddles and accessories. It wasn’t until 1948 that the carré made its début in the Maison. That year, Émile Hermès met Marcel Gandit, a skilful weaver from Lyon who invented a special

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printing screen capable of creating complex colour compositions rich in contrast and shading, and entrusted him with the realization of a carré scarf based on a Norman-inspired design. The task was anything but simple, but Gandit completed it successfully. The rest is history. Designs telling the story of the wonders of the world, the seasons, the beauties of nature and its animals, the equestrian art and its evolutions, contribute to creating the amazing spectacle that is the Hermès’ silk “square”. After being briefed by Pierre-Alexis Dumas, Hermès artistic director, artists, designers, illustrators and craftspeople produce a series of sketches, which are subsequently narrowed down to the design that, if approved, will become the latest Hermès carré. The drawing is then sent to a Gaudit engraver, who breaks it down into printing screens (up to 40), which will be used to generate the composition through the overlapping of colours. The subsequent printing and dyeing process is conducted by the Ateliers A.S, owned by the Maison, which performs colour proofs (about fifty on average) directly on silk, drawing from a colour palette of over 75,000 hues. The colours are prepared like magic potions, on a veritable kitchen stove, using saucepans, containers, whisks, spatulas and filters. The choice of printing composition is entrusted to a committee based in Paris. A printer then applies colour by laying the printing screens on a 100-metre roll of silk twill, which will serve to produce 100 scarves. Each dye has a creamy texture, and is scraped through the steel screen in order to deposit on the silk fibre below. Finally, the scarves are dried and starched. Et voilà, c’est un carré Hermès. (Valentina Ceriani)

PP. 38|41 VIVALDI’S VIOLINS

RESTORING THE COLLECTION BELONGING TO THE ISTITUTO SANTA MARIA DELLA PIETÀ IN CREMONA

The initiative entitled I Violini di Vivaldi. Venezia-Cremona, la via della musica is being promoted by the Istituto provinciale per l’infanzia Santa Maria della Pietà, which has inherited the collection of instruments, in conjunction with the Fondazione Museo del Violino Antonio Stradivari in Cremona, a centre of excellence of international standing in the field of stringed instruments. The project, which is part of the broader “Cremona


106 Barocca” initiative, also sees the collaboration of the Istituto di istruzione superiore Antonio Stradivari in Cremona, the Cultural District of Violin Making in Cremona, Fondazione Cariplo in Milan, Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte in Milan and the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship in Geneva. The operative part is run though a partnership between the Laboratorio Arvedi di diagnostica non invasiva of Pavia University with the Laboratorio di diagnostica Cr.Forma and the Istituto superiore Antonio Stradivari in Cremona. All are members of the stringed instrument cultural district of Cremona, which brings together experiences in fine craftsmanship, research, studies and education. All share know-how in making instruments (enrolled in UNESCO’s list of intangible heritage of mankind). The broad-based project sets out to study, preserve, restore and enhance the collection of stringed instruments at the Istituto Santa Maria della Pietà. In part, the collection reveals the history of the Ospedale della Pietà, first established in 1346 to assist abandoned children. Antonio Vivaldi (1678 – 1741), nicknamed the “Red Priest” owing to the colour of his hair, embarked on an ecclesiastical career and was ordained as a priest in 1703. The following year he had to give up celebrating Holy Mass because of a bronchial disease. He then became a violin teacher at Pio Ospedale della Pietà and dedicated himself to the musical education of the young orphans until 1740. The pupils lived under strict discipline, and were all part of the school Choro. Vivaldi composed many pieces for them, and purchased about 50 musical instruments, 24 of which are still housed at the Istituto Santa Maria della Pietà. The collection is an exceedingly rare set of Baroque instruments from a single ancient musical chapel, and have not undergone any changes for modern performance. This exceptional series features two cellos made by Matteo Grofiller (1659–1742), a violin made by Andrea Guarneri (1626-1698) and another made by Pietro Guarneri (1695–1762). Almost all the instruments ceased to be used in the late 18th century, when the violin had yet to finish its evolutionary journey. Most of them are thus still in their original state and provide an exceptional source of information into the stringed instruments of the day, on construction techniques, sizes, characteristics of the neck and the length of the vibrating string (in use until the 17th century). Maria Laura Faccini, the farsighted president of the Pietà di Venezia, decided to approach the Cremona Violin Museum to set up a project that would restore, care for and catalogue the 17 instruments of the collection, under the supervision of Fausto Cacciatori, curator of the Violin Museum’s collections and master luthier. The project was presented to the public in Venice on 12 September 2019 by Maria Laura Faccini and Gianluca Galimberti, Mayor of Cremona and president of the Violin Museum. At the end of the presentation, an intense concert was

performed by I Virtuosi Italiani with conductor Alberto Martini on violin, who played the precious Antonio Stradivari violin Lam-ex Scotland University 1734. Subsequently the 17 instruments – 12 violins, two cellos, two double basses and a viola – were moved to Cremona to undego the various treatments, starting with photographic documentation (visible and ultraviolet). This was followed by an anoxic and anti-woodworm treatment. Scientific analysis and restoration work will follow. In all, the restoration project will take around one year. The cost will be borne by the Istituto della Pietà in Venice. President Faccini has raised awareness amongst associations and institutions, asking them to help with a donation. The first to accept was the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship in Geneva. At the end of the project, in conjunction with Venice’s Teatro la Fenice, some of the instruments will be used by the theatre’s orchestra professors as part of the “Vivaldiana” project at Teatro Malibran. While the restoration work is being finished, the Fondazione Museo del Violino in Cremona has lent the Istituto della Pietà 14 instruments (some of which are reconstructions of Baroque instruments found in Vivaldi’s scores), made by the students of the Scuola internazionale di Liuteria under the direction of master luthiers, and will be displayed in schools as part of the exhibition entitled Ad arco e pizzico. A special initiative then, and one which will restore a collection of incalculable value to its former splendour thanks to a joint venture between a number of highly skilled organisations, and to the support and awareness of farsighted public and private patrons. (Susanna Ardigò)

PP. 42|47 WHITE GOLD MASTERPIECES

THE CAPODIMONTE PORCELAIN MANUFACTORY AND THE CASELLI-DE SANCTIS INSTITUTE ARE COMMITTED TO THE PERPETUATION OF AN ANCIENT CRAFT

The two manufactories of Capodimonte and, later, of the Real Fabbrica Ferdinandea were both in harmony with Europe. Though they were established as Royal porcelain manufactories, the Real Fabbrica survived only 16 years. In the course of subsequent centuries, the time-honoured, priceless art of fire continued to live on thanks to the commitment and dedication of a number of local manufactories. Above all, it has resisted

to protect a glorious tradition much admired beyond Italy’s borders: a reputation that allowed the city of Naples to take its rightful place amongst the cities that have written the history of Italian ceramics, thanks to the historic G. Caselli ceramics and porcelain school. To this day, the Capodimonte park is still home to the Real Fabbrica di Capodimonte and the “Caselli-De Sanctis” Istituto ad Indirizzo Raro, established with the aim of pursuing this time-honoured traditional craft whilst also conceiving and experimenting with innovations in the field. The decision to house the institute in the same ancient building inside the grounds of Capodimonte, once home to the first Real Fabbrica della Porcellana, symbolically represents the desire to perpetuate its historical past. Not only was the school first created as Italy’s only officially appointed centre for training qualified professionals and technical figures specialising in ceramics and porcelain; it also had a specific mission to promote, analyse and protect traditional ceramics in the area, relaunching, in particular, porcelain production. The Institute holds the trademark, and is the only manufactory that can adorn its pieces with the Bourbon fleur-de-lis. It also houses the Didactic Porcelain Museum, which displays historical pieces alongside new ranges created by renowned artists and designers, the archive of historical prints, the old kilns dating back to the 18th century and the machinery once used for production, along with educational workshops for adults and children. In 2017 the Ministry afforded it “Indirizzo Raro” or Rare Orientation status. Today, the most critical aspect facing ceramics production lies in its ability to combine tradition, skill, experience and the mystery of ancient secrets, despite the market’s constant demand for innovation. The desire to develop a system running on parallel lines, oriented around training and the manufactory itself, is the result of my background as a designer. The dialogue between craftsmanship and design is giving a new lease of life to both training and production itself. It is no coincidence that in the space of just two years of work in this wonderful manufactory, we have already managed to create a new catalogue of products, ranging from historical pieces to designer ones. The recent exhibition at the Capodimonte Museum, Napoli di lava, porcellana e musica showcases a collection of innovative objects in the last exhibition hall. The collection features unique and exclusive pieces, designed by myself and produced within the School and the Real Fabbrica di Capodimonte. No less significant are the partnerships with designers and artists of the calibre of Calatrava, Liu Jianhua, Walead Beshty, Yee Sookyung, Mariangela Levita and Diego Cibelli, to name but a few. Creating stable partnerships with universities and local institutions has enabled the Capodimonte Museum, the Duca di Martina Museum, the Madre Museum, local organisations, foundations and businesses to generate a legacy exchanging skills, knowledge,


English version life experiences. The new premises are the result of restoration work that involved all the sites. It has restored the production chain of the Real Fabbrica di Capodimonte, now finally brought back to life. The institute boasts the presence of university lecturers, experts and researchers in broad fields of scientific interest. The location in the Real Bosco di Capodimonte renders the institute even more unique, given its important role in attracting visitors as well as cultural and artistic enhancement. The G. Caselli school and Real Fabbrica di Capodimonte have an archive of models dating back to Bourbon times, a large number of items produced by the Caselli institute from the 20th century to the present day, including a number of Augustus Rex models, banqueting services, miniatures and animal-shaped containers. It also houses an extensive collection of designer pieces, along with a new collection of ceramics created during the period of the great innovations of Roberto Mango (1950-1968), founder of the Neapolitan design school. To support this work, a Centre for research and documentation at the disposal of the school, companies and the local area has been set up. Testimony of our public commitment, of our tangible vocation for the local area, is also provided by the open workshops, and above all the Forno Civico or Civic Kiln project. This has already been opened to the public and placed at the disposal of other business and artisans wishing to avail themselves of the service. The Caselli institute of Capodimonte is at the centre of a programme of partnerships between manufacturers, universities, cultural protection bodies and organisations for local enhancement and government. Together they reinforce the programme for the development and promotion of Capodimonte porcelain as part of the broader plan to foster education and training resulting from recognition of this rare orientation. (Valter Luca De Bartolomeis)

PP. 48|53 REVEALING WONDERS

THE FIRST ITALIAN EXHIBITION OF VAN CLEEF & ARPELS TAKES PLACE AT PALAZZO REALE IN MILANO

Set against the prestigious neoclassical backdrop of Palazzo Reale in Milan, Van Cleef & Arpels is exhibiting, for the first time in Italy, over 500 jewels, watches, precious objects and archive documents developed since 1906, the year in which the French Maison was founded.

Presented by Milan City Council’s Culture department and Palazzo Reale, and produced by Van Cleef & Arpels in conjunction with Fondazione Cologni, the exhibition entitled Van Cleef & Arpels: Time, Nature, Love is curated by Alba Cappellieri, professor of Jewellery Design at Milan’s Politecnico and Director of Vicenza’s Jewellery Museum. The exhibition is divided around three concepts: Time, Love and Nature, which are considered the values that best represent the Maison. In the stunning setting created by designer Johanna Grawunder, the Time section is divided into ten rooms, each dedicated to a key characteristic of our time. In the words of the curator, it sets out to “demonstrate the French Maison’s ability to represent the Zeitgeist, the spirit of the time, in full. But it also aims to display the Maison’s capacity for embodying the eternal value of beauty and, at the same time, the ephemeral power of seduction.” Starting with Six memos for the next millennium, an essay written in 1985 by Italo Calvino, the ten rooms provide an interpretation of Van Cleef & Arpels’ stunning jewellery pieces and their relationship with time. In particular, they look at the links with what Calvino identified as the five most emblematic values of our times: Lightness, Quickness, Visibility, Exactitude and Multiplicity, which correspond with the French company’s masterpieces to a surprising extent. The exhibition concludes with a tribute to the two founding values of Van Cleef & Arpels: Love and Nature. The Maison, which owes its roots to a marriage, has always made love a focal point of its creations. Besides the stunning jewels and exquisite objects, the exhibition also features archive documents, sketches and gouaches, which illustrate the sources of inspiration and express the artistic sensitivity of their creators. We interviewed curator Alba Cappellieri and Managing Director of Van Cleef & Arpels Nicolas Bos. They outlined the characteristics of this outstanding exhibition in detail. Question. Nicolas Bos, how did the idea of developing an exhibition in Milan with Alba Calleppieri first come about? Answer. Milan is one of the great capitals of culture, and I’ve been wanting to present the Maison’s story there for some time now. The pivotal role of this city in the world of creation, design and of the decorative arts makes it an essential place for us. Above and beyond the presence of our boutique, we have forged ties with events and institutions here such as the Salone del Mobile, the Poldi Pezzoli Museum, La Scala and the Creative Academy. And it is thanks to the Creative Academy (Richemont Group’s school of design, based in Milan) that I first met Alba Cappellieri, when she was working there as an expert jewellery designer. When the chance came up for an exhibition at Palazzo Reale, we asked her to curate it so she could give her own take on the Maison through a completely new project with ties to Italian culture. I really enjoy this kind of joint venture, because they stimulate dialogue and enhance the

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way our creations are looked at. Q. Alba Cappellieri, to understand the world of Van Cleef & Arpels, you used the five values first defined by Italo Calvino in Six memos for the next millennium. What made you adopt this perspective? A. Italo Calvino was the first Italian to be invited to Harvard University, in 1984, to hold the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Lectures. In that first series of conferences, the author talked about the “values to be preserved in the coming millennium,” namely Lightness, Quickness, Visibility, Exactitude and Multiplicity. The conference on the sixth value, Consistency, was supposed to be drafted at Harvard itself, but unfortunately Italo Calvino passed away before he could complete it. These “values, qualities and specific features”, as he called them, represent absolute values for literature. But they apply to jewels as well, and indeed to any other object of our time. They support interpretation and comprehension of the period we live in, above and beyond the disciplines themselves. They offer interesting means of interpreting the relationship between Van Cleef & Arpels and time: it is an irregular, interrupted form of time, as complex as that of the 20th century. The literary device allowed us to see that each of these five “proposals” represents some of the French Maison’s icons, the eternal beauty of which expresses and crystallises the spirit of the time that helped mould them. Q. Nicolas Bos, what was it in this interpretation of the Maison that appealed to you? A. In the works by Italo Calvino I am familiar with (The baron in the trees, The nonexistent knight or Invisible cities) I was fascinated by his 20th-century writing, which still maintained its ties with all things wondrous, with tales and with childhood. Thanks to Alba, I discovered his American Lessons, which encouraged a parallel between the world of jewellery and the sphere of literature, in an attempt to find a common link with values that wouldn’t be artificial. Suddenly, some of Calvino’s words struck me because they seemed to define us to perfection: in the ateliers, we often talk about “exactitude” and “lightness” when we are describing our creations. Q. Alba Cappellieri, you explore other concepts in the exhibition as well, like Intersections. Can you tell us more? A. I added five additional values to Calvino’s. They are all part of the Maison’s DNA: Paris, Exoticism and Intersections with dance, fashion and architecture. The section dedicated to Paris is much more than a simple tribute to the city in which the Van Cleef and Arpels families first embarked on this extraordinary adventure in 1906. Exoticism allows us to understand the visionary capacity of the Maison’s founders when it came to exploring unknown worlds in search of unique gemstones, drawing on other cultures for inspiration, colours and motifs. This ability to create connections is very rare


108 in fine jewellery, which aspires towards the transcendence of eternity, and tends to cast aside the immanence of the ephemeral nature of present-day tastes. Q. Alba Cappellieri, how did you devise the name of the exhibition, “Time, Nature, Love”, namely the three great topics it revolves around? A. I see Time, Nature and Love as the most important, defining values of life, and they also define the objects that accompany our daily lives. Unfortunately, they are not easy to come across in jewellery, because it is a discipline that aims to strike a balance between eternity and the ephemeral, between tradition and fashion, between love and investment, between beauty and concept, nature and artifice. Fine jewellery cultivates a dimension that aspires towards eternity; it is heedless of the Zeitgeist, the spirit of the time. This does not apply to Van Cleef & Arpels, which always displays a leaning towards its own time. The exhibition displays its ability to represent a period as discontinuous as that of the 20th century and its impasses, its ability to embody the eternal values of beauty as much as it does the fleeting power of seduction. Through some of the Maison’s creations, nature becomes art, both in terms of gemstones and skill, and in terms of a humanistic leaning towards harmony. Love is the most powerful energy in the world, and every piece of Van Cleef & Arpels jewellery is made with love. In addition, Van Cleef & Arpels pieces, which are symbols and tokens of love, have influenced some of the 20th century’s most iconic love stories. It is the first time I have come across the values of Time, Nature and Love all bound together in one jewellery Maison. Studying its extraordinary history and heritage has completely surpassed my expectations. Q. Alba Cappellieri, the “Time” section comprises ten rooms. What prompted you to dedicate so much space to this topic? A. Every object has to represent its own epoch. It is what gives it meaning and value. Time is a crucial element of creativity and craftsmanship: it is what moulds the appearance of objects, determining function and social utility, defining style, influencing the materials and techniques used, indicating their origins, layering tastes and above all revealing context. I’ve conducted a great deal of research into Maison Van Cleef & Arpels to gain an understanding of how they express the notion of Zeitgeist in their precious objects. And I also examined and applied ten specific 20th-century characteristics, adopting Italo Calvino’s American Lessons as the starting point. Q. Nicolas Bos, in your view, what has the Maison always maintained ties with in its own epoch whilst still managing to create timeless pieces? A. It is really hard to see it from the inside. You have to put some distance between

yourself and the history of the Maison. The ties were not necessarily conscious when the pieces were first conceived, but they can be made out afterwards. This is probably the result of how the Maison has always worked, its open approach to the world, the attention it pays to different lifestyles, social change, evolutions in how creations are worn, both in fashion and jewellery itself. Van Cleef & Arpels has always been interested in what is happening in the artistic world, as well as creation in general. The timeless character of our products is linked to the very nature of our work: by definition, jewellery uses precious, age-old materials that are not determined by their period of time. But the fact that the Maison’s style has endured, that it has developed seamlessly, without interruption, and that it has always been consistent, is a factor of true timelessness. This ability to focus on certain professions, to remain true to its own style, to incorporate innovations without allowing itself to be dominated by the spirit of the time, embodies the true strength of the Maison. Q. Alba Cappelleri, precious objects occupy an important place in the exhibition. Why did you decide to place this aspect of Van Cleef & Arpels creations on show? A. The precious objects are displayed in the “Multiplicity” room, which I feel is one of the most spectacular in the whole exhibition. It features objects ranging from the Minaudière (a precious treasure chest invented by Charles Arpels in 1933) to cigarette cases, lamps and perfume bottles, not to mention a birdcage, a model boat or a sculpture of Buddha. Less known than Van Cleef & Arpels jewellery, these are unique objects of extraordinary style and savoir-faire. They teach us something about beauty, art, craftsmanship and talent. For Calvino, Multiplicity was a means of knowledge, a bridge between individuals and ideas: it is exactly what Van Cleef & Arpels has done, and continues to do. Q. Nicholas Bos, I ask you the same question... A. Precious objects are an exceptional part of our heritage, and they haven’t always been valorised. Unlike necklaces, bracelets or brooches, which are part of a tradition dating back thousands of years and likely to continue, objects are linked to specific moments of the art of living. Their role is often associated with a particular moment in time, one they conjure up like memories of a lifestyle from the distant past. With this exhibition, we set out to highlight the intrinsic quality of these pieces, so not the practical nature but the quality of the craftsmanship involved, their dimension as pieces of art. Through the prism of multiplicity, objects create a surprise, revealing the wonders they encompass. Thanks to their secrets, historical machines or carriage clocks can, at times, be a greater source of surprise than a traditional piece of jewellery. Q. Alba Cappellieri, what is your favourite

creation in this exhibition? A. The Zip necklace, without a shadow of doubt! Needless to say, I love many of the Maison’s jewels and its outstanding works of art, but the Zip necklace took my breath away. As the director of Vicenza’s Jewellery Museum, I also chose it for the museum because of its ability to combine incredible jewellery-making skills with the industrial practicality of the zip, originally applied to American uniforms. A masterpiece in conception, innovation, creativity and technology, and one worth discovering in full! Q. What about you, Nicolas Bos? A. Like Alba, I have to say it’s the Zip necklace. To my mind, it is a pivotal, distinctive piece for the Maison. The partnership we have had with Alba came about because of this very creation, which rightly inspired her reflection on the spirit of time. The Zip necklace is thus an icon of both Van Cleef & Arpels and the exhibition itself. (Livia Tenuta)

PP. 54|57 SUMMER SCHOOL PRIDE

THE MICHELANGELO FOUNDATION LAUNCHED ITS FIRST EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMME FOR THE TRANSMISSION OF FINE CRAFTSMANSHIP

Lisbon and London, the colours of Aubusson and the wind of Belle-Île-enMer all provided the backdrop for the first Summer School Programme organised by the Michelangelo Foundation for Creativity and Craftsmanship, the non-profit organisation based in Geneva, whose mission is to promote and transmit fine craftsmanship in Europe. The series of events allowed young students of applied arts and design schools to try their hands at crafts they had not come across before. It offered an opportunity to learn new techniques, meet craftspeople of international standing, and exchange ideas with colleagues from all over the continent. “One of the points that defined the selection process was diversity,” explains Celine Vogt, Manager of Strategic Relationships at the Michelangelo Foundation. “We decided, along with the institutions that helped us develop our Summer School Programme, to include professional profiles that trained in different fields. We are persuaded that by exchanging and comparing ideas we can create a fertile terrain for creativity.” Thanks


English version to the Michelangelo Foundation, 46 out of the 200-plus students who applied could thus take part in seven courses held in four different locations. The Michelangelo Foundation not only bore the costs for enrolment but also travel, food and accommodation expenses. In Lisbon, ten promising young students specialising in craft and design dedicated themselves to the art of basket-weaving: in the course of three weeks, they had the opportunity to learn the secrets of an ancient craft and create 15 objects later displayed at the Museo de Arte Popular, a partner in the initiative along with the Portuguese Ministry of Culture and Fundação Ricardo do Espirito Santo Silva, a private charitable institution that promotes decorative arts in Portugal. The Programme continued at City & Guilds of London Art School, since 1879 a reference point in the UK in training contemporary artists, carvers, and conservators. For one week, eight students followed eight different courses that included stone and wood carving, gilding and verre églomisé (glass which is gilded then engraved). 20 students worked for two weeks in Aubusson, a timehonoured centre of excellence in the production of tapestries, to create a work inspired by the collections produced by this legendary workshop in the 1960s. The last leg of the Summer School Programme run by the Michelangelo Foundation was held in Belle-Île-en-Mer. This sliver of land off the coast of Nantes is home to Fluïd, an important collective of glass blowers. French Hot Glass Family Association holds various seminars there in collaboration with famous international names such as Tobias Møhl and Backhaus-Brown, outstanding masters for the eight lucky students picked by the Michelangelo Foundation to master glass blowing techniques. “The Summer School Programme is the product of an exchange of ideas and goals,” concludes Jacques Rey, Head of Strategic Relationships at the Michelangelo Foundation. “Handing them on to the younger generations is one of the basic missions of our organisation, probably the issue dearest to the hearts of our founders Johann Rupert and Franco Cologni. In a world where those who don’t go to university are perceived as being inferior, we want to remind people how important it is to follow their inclinations, along with the vital role played by professions that require apprenticeships often longer and more demanding than an entire degree course. We decided to develop the Summer School Programme when we saw how much attention and curiosity young people displayed towards our previous initiatives, in particular the first edition of Homo Faber, the major biennial dedicated to fine craftsmanship, which will return to Venice in 2020. Working with the Portuguese Minister of Culture Graça Fonseca and our friends at Aubusson, our project gradually took shape. Given the success and participation we have witnessed, we hope we can repeat it and turn it into an ongoing event, and a key feature of our foundation.” (Luca Maino)

PP. 58|63 A BUTLER IN A TRUNK

THE PERFECT WARDROBE FOR THE ARBITER ELEGANTIARUM IS FITTED WITH A TECHNOLOGICAL HEART

The piece is inspired by a travel trunk known as the “wardrobe of the modern man”, used by poet and aesthete Gabriele D’Annunzio in the early 20th century. Made of natural elm, it is actually much bigger and above all heavier than D’Annunzio’s portable wardrobe. It is designed to contain a selection of the garments dearest to the contemporary “arbiter elegantiarum” for each season: the most threadbare ones, the shoes with the soles that are most worn out. It measures 4.4 metres in width when the two front doors are open, 80 cm in depth and 2.1 metres in height, but each single part can be customised. Inside it conceals a technological heart: the Refresh Butler. This futuristic appliance is made by Swiss company V-ZUG, first established in 1913, and imported and distributed in Italy by Frigo 2000, a company that has made a seemingly-ordinary element, namely steam, its strong suit. The Refresh Butler takes about two and a half hours to regenerate and refresh suits at the end of the day. It does so harnessing sophisticated technology: first with steam itself, reducing creases in jackets, trousers, shirts and coats, then with titanium dioxide activated by UV lamps to eliminate odour molecules deposited on garments, thanks to a forced airflow system. The Refresh Butler has a number of programmes that can also be timed, including one for drying clothes thanks to a heat pump, which generates warm air. Generally speaking this 17,000-Euro gem can store and preserve any garment, as long as it is not in leather or fur. As Neapolitan lawyer Giancarlo Maresca says, “bespoke electrical appliances can make the difference.” An expert on the gentleman’s world, he personally conceived and designed every single part of the wardrobe on millimetre paper: every recess and drawer is made in exactly the right size for a specific object, from jackets to trousers, hats, shirts, pocket squares, neckties, braces, umbrellas, cufflinks, watches, underwear and so on. As the lawyer stresses, “there is a world out there that doesn’t just make do. It’s a world for men of good taste used to customising every moment of their lives. Unfortunately, what ruins suits is neither time nor use: it’s the wardrobe itself. Suits really suffer when they are crammed into small spaces.” With this verdict,

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Maresca conveys the very essence of this special wardrobe, presented in the Arbiter lounge at the last edition of Pitti Uomo, in Florence. “And if we are to continue for a another 100 years,” adds Marco Ruscelli, head of distribution markets at V-ZUG, “we need to be completely different to anything else on the market. Our path is bespoke.” The wardrobe has been designed by architect Fabio Gianoli together with Habits, a Milan studio specialising in industrial design, and is crafted by Jochen Haidacher, owner of the Haidacher carpentry in Perca (Bolzano). “I really liked the idea of making a ‘top-flight wardrobe’, which makes space for the garments,” Haidacher told me. “First of all, we set out to find the right wood, and we found it in naturally treated elm, which we sourced locally, along with the burnished brass used for the details, which give a natural sense of elegance.” Architect Gianoli also revealed: “I saw the photos of D’Annunzio’s trunk a few years ago. I was fascinated by its simplicity, and I thought it would be right to give it a new touch: the V-ZUG appliance is entirely in keeping with this idea. We have clothed it with a wooden pinstripe suit. My idea is to make it even more technological, turning it into a ‘mobile’ piece of furniture, just like V-ZUG ovens. It is a challenge, this one is only the first prototype.” Maresca concludes: “Dressing is an eternal art, although its utility cannot be perceived. But taking care of objects is useful to all mankind.” (Alessandro Botré)

PP. 64|67 A SPECIAL PLACE

IN THE DRAGA&AUREL STUDIOWORKSHOP A LIFETIME’S PASSIONS TAKE THE FORM OF UNIQUE OBJECTS.

Serbian textile designer Draga Obradovic and German painter Aurel K. Basedow share a project of life and work. Their secret is the art of repêchage, featuring a wholly original take, which has earned them followers and, doubtless, many imitators, as is usually the case with trailblazers. It is a secret that has also enabled them to work with many top Italian and foreign companies for years now, including Baxter, Wall&Deco and Anthropologie. Recently, the limited-edition sphere has also noticed them. We caught up with them after their participation in Nomad Venice and the London Design Fair to find out more. Draga explains: “After living in Florence, where we


110 were both studying art, we ended up in Como during the 1990s. For years I worked in fashion, particularly in fabrics, whilst Aurel, who trained as a cabinetmaker even though he had chosen to be an artist, was keen on colour and material. In 2007, we decided to turn our shared passions into a business. The result is the studio where we design, exhibit, receive clients, and the workshop where we work.” They started out by upcycling vintage pieces, regenerating existing objects. Thus their know-how was transferred to reinterpreting chairs and furnishing accessories. All completely hand made. “The project is still called Heritage. It started with choosing 20th-century vintage pieces we liked, and whose beauty we admired. Not being signature pieces allows us to give them a new life. It leaves room for interpretation, so the furniture plays a starring role in the setting. The creative part lies in designing handmade screen prints. These can be applied to hard surfaces such as the doors of a cupboard or a table top, but also to soft surfaces like the upholstery of chairs and sofas. The process is finished by resin-coating the surfaces in a purpose-built lab to give the pieces their finished appearance and guarantee usability. If necessary, restoration work is done in our workshop. We use special techniques that have fallen into disuse, like shellac instead of synthetic varnishes, which nourishes the wood and lets it breathe.” As the studio grew, Draga&Aurel started making objects of their own or in collaboration with other companies. “While taking part in the Milan Furniture Fair 10 years ago,” Draga continues, “we met Baxter, the Como-based company specialising in leather furnishings, with which we still work on the distribution of several capsule collections. The venture involves everything from decorating leather by hand to limited editions of furnishing accessories.” Through the new collections of objects like those presented at the last Milan Design Week, linked to collectible design, they are now also exploring the field of art-design galleries. “It was quite a natural progression. In a certain sense we both have artistic backgrounds, so our story began with unique objects and different reference points, art and fashion, but with very personal approaches. The challenge was making this approach reproducible by using variations on a theme, such as the chairs, where the base is standard and the series are similar, but not the same.” The Transparency Matters installation alludes to the transparent nature of the materials used (plexiglass, resin and glass), but also to the evolution of the designers. “Transparency Matters tells the story of what we can do with our artisans, without restrictions posed by the market or manufacturability imposed by a company.” In Venice, the Ormeggi collection designed for the entrance of the itinerant collectible design exhibition Nomad at Palazzo Van Axel, with just a few pieces (a bench, stools and a screen) set out to portray objects that symbolise the waterways, such as the wooden piles. Draga&Aurel truly care about craftsmanship. This lends a certain

warmth, even when using “cold” materials such as resin. They work like Renaissance artists, so communication with the artisans is vital: “We have a network of master craftspeople. We have met many over the years, and we are very proud of them. We really enjoy working with them to discover obsolete technologies and attempt to give a contemporary interpretation. We recently did this when we rediscovered the heat moulding process, using moulds and fibreglass; but also using wallpapering techniques of days gone by, or glass fusing. It’s a challenge that excites us when we achieve a certain kind of effect on a surface.” (Ali Filippini)

PP. 68|71 RUSSIAN INSPIRATIONS

CHANEL PRESENTS 60 NEW AND UNIQUE PIECES CREATED IN ITS FINE JEWELLERY ATELIER

Like stars in a perfect constellation, Russian intellectuals, artists and aristocrats escaping the 1917 Revolution animated Paris in the 1920s and 30s with their wealth of culture. They exerted a magnetic appeal, creating ever-shifting equilibriums between style, luxury and refinement. Coco Chanel, the protagonist of an equally revolutionary fashion in its utterly modern approach, was not immune to the charm of the symbols these charismatic individuals conveyed: they were emblems of an empire which had already disappeared, but which still echoed the power of centuries-old traditions, of assured taste, of extravagance nourished by exoticism. Whilst she never actually visited Russia, Coco Chanel held close links with the country. Her intense (albeit brief ) love affair with Grand Duke Dimitri Pavlovich, cousin of Tsar Nicholas II, gave her privileged access to the lifestyles of the aristocrats who had made Paris, Biarritz and Nice their new homes. Officers, noblemen and women, refined ladies who often had to invent a new life for themselves but who played a part in that lavish, creative atmosphere, inspired by individuals such as Stravinsky, Diaghilev and the stars of the Ballets Russes: Léonide Massine, Serge Lifar and Boris Kochno. A mirror shaped like a two-headed eagle of Russian inspiration adorned Mademoiselle’s apartments in Rue Cambon; the sister of Grand Duke Dimitri, Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna, opened an embroidery studio that worked exclusively for Chanel. Many magnificent aristocrats fleeing

from Moscow and St Petersburg found work as models or saleswomen in Mademoiselle’s Maison. And the fascination of those distant, powerful symbols juxtaposed Coco’s bare-bones modernism to perfection. Whilst she was having her iconic fragrance bottles sculpted (the creator of N°5 was once the parfumeur to the court of the Tsars), releasing women’s bodies from the trammels of the past and condensing the appeal of elegance down to its very essence, Chanel was also allowing herself to be inspired by the iconographic riches of the East, by an exoticism which went from Venice to Byzantium and all the way to Moscow. This ideal universe of evocative references and influences has now been revived in the fine Le Paris Russe jewellery range Maison Chanel presented last July in Paris. It features over 60 unique pieces created in the fine jewellery atelier at 18 Place Vendôme, Paris: a collection which, thanks to its stunning gemstones (chiefly diamonds) and the very highest craftsmanship on the gold and platinum structures, has become a timeless celebration steeped in symbols capable of great expressive strength. Where the two-headed eagle is a powerful graphic sign, both in the form of the Aigle Cambon (inspired by Mademoiselle’s mirror) and the Aigle Protecteur interpretation (with the extraordinary diamond choker), the wheatsheaves symbolising gold and plenty have been treated with a light, refined hand for the Blé Gabrielle and Blé Maria versions. Here, with an evocative reference to Tsaristuniforms, the diamonds sit alongside coloured gemstones of great depth. But perhaps it is in the Roubachka and Sarafane lines that the skill of the Chanel Joaillerie master craftsmen manifests itself most clearly. In Russian tradition, the rubashka is a men’s shirt worn with a low-slung belt tied at the waist and often embroidered with folklore motifs. In the early 1920s, Chanel introduced several truly extraordinary interpretations of the rubashka, which may well have been inspired by Grand Duke Dimitri himself: in its feminine guise, embellished with fur or thickly embroidered, the simply-cut blouse has not lost its versatility but has instead acquired an exotic allure which is sumptuous and sophisticated. The Roubachka set from the Le Paris Russe collection comprises a bracelet, two chokers, earrings and two rings. It evokes the elaborate embroidery of those now legendary garments: the diamonds and pearls appear to bloom on the settings, and the motifs alternate with a graphic layout that showcases the light hand used on the settings, as well as the flawless cuts themselves. The sarafan, the long and flared iconic women’s garment typical of Russian dress, has been given an exquisite new interpretation: the Saraphane set, of which the transformable choker is the undisputed stand-out piece, conjures up the floral designs that often adorned the garments. The diamonds and pearls establish a sequence, as if recreating a lightweight weave against a disk of snow. It is as if the stars are shining on the snowy expanses


English version of a Russia that never really existed for Chanel, but, for this very reason, it is a Russia that has never been forgotten. (Alberto Cavalli)

PP. 72|75 UNIQUE FOOTWEAR

BERLUTI’S EXCLUSIVE SHOES ARE HANDMADE IN PARIS ACCORDING TO A TRADITION THAT DATES BACK TO 1895

In 1895, Alessandro Berluti, a young shoemaker from Senigallia, developed a shoe crafted from a single piece of leather. Featuring just three pairs of holes for the laces, it was totally devoid of decorations or visible seams. The technical features were concealed, allowing the eyes to dwell on the clean shape of the shoes and high quality leather. A glance at Berluti’s sketches from the late 19th and early 20th centuries reveals the footwear’s distinctly aristocratic flair. At that time, when gloves and shoes were tapered and tight-fitting to evoke a social and mental status far removed from materiality, the thirty-year-old Italian shoemaker made the great leap from fineness to lightness, from lightness to simplicity, and from simplicity to sleekness. And that’s not all. The model looked refined without affecting the internal volumes, on the one hand allowing the feet to breath rather than be constrained in tight-fitting brogues and on the other granting an attractive dynamic, manly guise at a time when sports and outdoor activities were taking hold. With a stroke of genius, the Alessandro model - perhaps the most copied of all time - employed craftsmanship to dominate material and vision to go beyond craft to art. These were the rare and precious ingredients of Berluti’s aesthetics, to this day unchanged and victorious. The extraordinary innovative force of the Alessandro model created such enthusiasm that it was exhibited at the 1900 Universal Exposition in Paris, where Berluti shortly afterwards took up residence. During the 1920s, Paris became the melting pot for artists and the showcase the whole world looked to. Around this time Torello, Alessandro’s fifth son, succeeded in linking the family name to those of influential clients. It was thanks to Torello that Berluti became a brand of world fame, and he exploited this by opening a boutique in Rue du Mont Thabor in 1928, soon, however, transferred to 26, Rue Marbeuf. In 1959, his son, Talbinio, developed a line of ready-made footwear, which helped to further advertise

the brand’s name. Talbinio, however, was not so naive as to neglect the company’s rigorously hand-crafted production, which constituted the roots by which the whole tree received sap and vitality. As the 1960s began, cousin Olga made her entrance in Rue Marbeuf. She was endowed with an aggressive taste, almost primitive in fact, being free as only pioneers can be. As soon as she had the company in hand she shifted direction from “innovation” to “revolution”. As with all great masters, her work did not please all, but the fact remains that, unconventional though it often was, it changed men’s shoes forever. Before her there existed only an English style, based on the proportion of volumes, and an Italian one, concentrated on the harmony of lines and angles. Olga envisaged a third factor, with a high emotive potential, till then quite neglected: colour. She developed a type of leather that became known as “Venezia”, which was worked ecru and tinted only when the shoe was finished, so each pair would be unique. Thus was born a pictorial style impossible to ignore, which was to place France third in the list of the great shoemaking powers. Within just a few years, Olga moved from an impressionistic direction, based solely on colour, to one worthy of the avant-garde and of pop art. She inserted contemporary inspirations such as tattoos and piercings, but also intriguing graffiti traced on Baroque parchment. At this point, after remaining creative director for a few more years, she ceded the company to LVMH. From the very beginning, Bernard Arnault considered Berluti one of the jewels in his crown, and handed it over to his son Antoine, who would favour continuing research in the prêt-a-porter collections and preserving tradition in the Rue Marbeuf boutique. It is not widely known that Paris, seemingly as changeable as the fashions of which it is ambassador, is actually the most traditional city in Europe and a rich source of precious craftsmanship. Florists, jewellers, confectioners, restorers, tailors and dressmakers, not to mention the city’s hundreds of chocolatiers, transmit a savoir faire similar to its symbolic tower, fragile and rigid to the eye but strong and flexible in reality. Berluti’s modern day structure does not differ from that set up by Torello. Taste in fashion drops from the heights of stylistic studies in the top level collections, and rises from direct contact with clients in the sancta sanctorum of the bespoke workshop. In each case, comfort and lightness are favoured, not as ends in themselves but as a means of reaching those aims they share with the clientele: an elegance founded on a very Parisian joie de vivre. Forming new masters is a long process, carried on internally through contact with the older order. Each pair of shoes represents a challenge, a journey traversed though age-old techniques and ever new directions, inspired every time by the individual client. The Rue Marbeuf workshop also carries out a process that is absolutely unique, for it cannot be repeated without the instruments and without the patient transmission of

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the special skills it requires. The lasts are constructed one by one. Others use industrial lasts to which material is added or taken away so as to reproduce the foot volumes, whereas here wooden logs are chipped away and the necessary volumes shaped from the whole log. The inevitable imperfections resulting from a surface so worked contribute, in my opinion, to giving the end product that lived in and intimate look which has always characterised a hand-made Berluti shoe. How much does all this cost? From 6,200 Euros up: not such an exaggerated fee to join an exclusive club, whose secret members include the best-known names in the world (Giancarlo Maresca)

PP. 76|79 IN THE BEGINNING, THERE WAS CHAOS

THE CONTRIBUTION OF YOUNG AND ECLECTIC SARA RICCIARDI TO THE ART OF CREATION

Sara Ricciardi is a young and eclectic designer originally hailing from Benevento, who lives and works in Milan. She creates works that establish empathy with those looking at them, whether in shops, installations or products. “If I have to find a common denominator in my projects, it’s that in the beginning I use what I call ‘drifts’. I never arrive in a gallery or in a company with preconceived ideas. I am naked, and I try to perceive the essence during our meetings,” says the designer. “I never submit drawings or ideas unless there has been a meeting, during which I keep asking questions so I can get attuned to the person requesting me to do the project. And it is while I am getting to know them that I find the language I need to build it.” Because first and foremost, for Sara there is a poetic inspiration which then leads to its material realisation. Her upcoming works include that of creative director of La Grande Bellezza, the Starhotels project supporting fine Italian craftsmanship developed in conjunction with OMA-Osservatorio dei Mestieri d’Arte in Florence, Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte in Milan and Gruppo Editoriale. The initiative is one of contemporary patronage geared towards engaging in actions that support Italian craftsmanship. These include the production of several home décor ranges designed by Sara Ricciardi and made by handpicked artisans.


112 “The wonderful thing about this hotel chain is that each of its buildings respects the genius loci of the city it is located in. As a result, each collection will have a different spirit,” the designer explains. She continues: “The first one will be Starhotel Rosa Grand in Milan. For them I’m creating a dining collection bringing together various outstanding forms of craftsmanship.” Sara is also a collector, though not methodical and ordered, of objects that tell stories she is attached to, objects which become part of her world in no particular order. “I feel at home with chaos. The important thing is managing to isolate specific moments so I can later set them in place. A rational injection is also needed though, otherwise I’d be overwhelmed by chaos,” the designer says smiling. Isolating a moment, investigating it, looking into it in depth, leads to a quality that would not otherwise be there. Sara is one of those people driven by the sacred fire of “making”, but who has learned, through Japanese culture, to create voids. “It takes bravery to thin things out.” Her creative universe ranges from interior design, such as the concept store to launch the brand Attico for the Luisa Via Roma boutique in Florence, to installations such as l’Île de Serge conceived during the Salone del Mobile for Serge Ferrari, not to mention her work with Bianco Bianchi and Venini, where outstanding craftsmanship was underscored by her design vision. Amidst all this, she also finds time to hold courses at Naba, and many workshops in Italy and abroad. The question that springs to mind is: how do you manage to keep up with everything? “The fatalism of Campania, the part of Italy I originally come from, helps me in this respect. It’s a positive attitude that helps you overcome performance anxiety. And in New York, I learned to accept failure: mistakes are part of growing,” she stresses. In her small studio, everything is on the move. And it is in that creative magma bordering on chaos that everything comes to life. Sara’s energy is felt by everyone who meets her: she is so likeable, she cannot help but win people over. An unstoppable form of creativity, which is also expressed in her future plans. “This year I’m opening my new studio, and I’d like to have a two-fold relationship with my work. I’ll be designing products for businesses and galleries, and doing interior design work. At the same time, I’ll be conducting my own personal research, which doesn’t respond to commercial dynamics, on the topic of magnetism, the constant attraction between oneself and objects, or between oneself and other people, which I’m fascinated by. And I want to concentrate on the interaction between body and space,” she announces. We leave her to her tasks. On the way home, the words of Nietzsche come to mind (from Thus Spoke Zarathustra): “One must still have chaos in oneself to give birth to a dancing star.” And Sara Ricciardi’s designs dance on the notes of life. (Marina Jonna)

PP. 82|85 IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT

IN STEFANO RICCI’S SILVERSMITHING WORKSHOP, FINE CRAFTSMANSHIP IS AT THE HEART OF PRECIOUS AND ICONIC OBJECTS

Everyone thinks of Stefano Ricci as an exclusive luxury-lifestyle brand specialised in clothing, accessories and shoes. Not many people know that Ricci is also a producer of wine, cigar humidors and silverware such as trays, chalices, plates, small sculptures and other artistic handmade objects, whose function is to decorate the table. A function that arises from a personal need: a great admirer of silver tableware, Ricci loves making toasts from a silver chalice, not least because of the metal’s considerable hygienic properties. A bit like a contemporary King Arthur, surrounded by the modern-day knights who frequently sit at his table in his Tuscan estate in Poggio ai Segugi. Ricci’s passion for silver goes back a long way and has not always been blessed with good fortune. It started to take concrete shape in 1993, when he opened his first flagship store in Shanghai. Ricci turned to external silversmiths for the production of ampoules, chalices and centrepieces based on his own sketches. Despite a promising début, the sector soon ran into hard times, and within five years young yet experienced silversmiths climbed the hills of Fiesole to inform Ricci that circumstances were forcing them to take up a new profession. Perhaps as gardeners. At that point the businessman decided to take a gamble: he would set up a new silversmithing workshop, alongside his in-house tie making, silk processing and jewellery making ateliers for the brand’s bags and clothing, then display the products in his boutiques and see what happened. As the years passed, however, Ricci’s intuition became so successful as to help revitalise Italy’s once thriving silversmithing tradition, at a time of crisis that was seriously undermining its existence. Moreover, Ricci contributed to incrementing the Italian community of silversmiths through far-sighted choices: like that of systematically placing an apprentice alongside every master silversmith, thus ensuring the transfer of know-how to the newer generations; or that of offering the Ricci goldsmiths, in charge of producing buckles in gold and other precious metals and stones, the chance to change department and become silversmiths, thus considerably enriching their skill set. Today, Ricci’s silversmithing

workshop is an essential element of the Florentine company’s firmament of highend craftsmanship workshops. Here, age-old techniques continue to be employed, such as repoussage and Bottello chiselling. Repoussage grants three-dimensionality by hammering the silver sheet (suitably supported on a layer of pitch) on the reverse side, following the design traced out on the sheet itself, thus creating a relief pattern through a positive/negative process. The finishes are then performed with a chisel. Bottello, instead, is a typically Florentine form of chiselling, more suitable for larger patterns than the finer work normally performed using a traditional chisel: it consists in securing a heated iron bar with a rounded tip to a lathe and then hammering it to impress a concave form on the inner side of the sheet being handled by the silversmith, thus creating an ornamental pattern through the positive/negative process described above. Frequently used by Stefano Ricci to forge grape vine designs in silver, bottello requires the silversmith’s full understanding of the material so as to impart hammer blows of exactly the right intensity. Consequently, it is no surprise that the processing times are much longer than, for example, laser techniques: a tray may take up to a month to complete. A month that makes all the difference between serial production and an item of fine craftsmanship… (Alberto Gerosa)

PP. 84|89 CREATIVE NEW MASTERS

IN MILAN, SUBALTERNO1 IS A SPACE AND A GROUP OF DESIGNERS COMMITTED TO SELF-PRODUCTION

Over the last ten years, many young designers have committed themselves to the difficult task often known by the name of “selfproduction”. More than just self-promotion, for the designers involved self-production represents the quest for a new approach to the profession of “designer”. They no longer design “for the industry”, but work for their own personal production, communication and sales needs, with the result that they themselves have become “the business”. The process followed by Milan’s Subalterno1 in the Lambrate area, and the work it has achieved, is exemplary. The venue has seen a succession of experiences involving designers committed towards “new design strategies, from self-production to design for components and recuperating materials and functions into something that resembles an evolved form of the ready-made.” Often


English version the goal has been to bring artisan businesses, designers and fablabs together, in an attempt to develop a new approach to producing, selling and communicating: not just traditional craftsmanship then, but also craftsmanship applied to the new technologies, thanks to production made possible by 3D printers. Driven by Stefano Maffei and Stefano Micelli, a number of young designers have taken a path that has yielded original and innovative design results. Amongst others, they include works by Andrea Gianni, Duilio Forte, Lorenzo Damiani, Paolo Ulian, Antonio Cos, Massimiliano Adami, Lorenzo Palmeri and Matteo Ragni. Self-production is the keyword. “Italian self-production” is the new brand for self-made Italian design, and for a number of years Subalterno1 has represented a place where these new design and production perspectives are able to coagulate. By following different inspirations provided by a variety of topics (reworking Murano glass or redesigning the production and use of pasta, reflections on objects of minimal size to the relationship between man and the natural world…), the group of designers has engaged in opening up to new themes. In so doing, it has involved still more new authors, such as Studio Graffe, Giacomo Moor, Brian Sironi, Tecnificio, Riccardo Vendramin and Nucleo, to name just a few of those who have come into contact with the projects of Subalterno1. A long and demanding sequence of exhibitions and works have stimulated the imagination and afforded a place in which to experiment, explore and take gambles. The experience has broached ever-more ambitious goals, such as in the latest exhibition, Politics, curated by Stefano Maffei with the indomitable enthusiasm of Andrea Gianni and the participation of young (and less young) designers. This recent exhibition discusses how design might transform the world, thanks to Maffei’s clear curatorial title: “Transforming design to transform the world.” The exhibition takes a critical look at the long season which, to paraphrase Maffei, “has hedged its bets on the infinite development of infinite resources, but which today is collapsing in the clash with tangible social, environmental and economic challenges, the very existence of which we have steadfastly refused to acknowledge.” As a result, this project takes a practical look at our problems. It looks at social issues and aspires to a form of design that reflects changing models of thought and development in design itself. Today the group is opening up to face new issues, but whilst its work is increasingly “engaged” on a social level, it has failed to find a professional working scope. Like production in small series, self-production cannot grow in a society in which the “vital parameters” of a network of museums, institutions, galleries, market, collectors and quotations are all missing. Recent generations have not measured up against the great international system of applied arts (crafts), which from the States reaches as far as Europe, Japan and Korea; a system featuring

its own cultural and productive energies set against a backdrop that appreciates, defends and showcases one-off objects and small-scale runs. In short, everything our own self-production scene aspires to be, but which unfortunately cannot find a foothold of its own on our market. (Ugo La Pietra)

PP. 90|93 STRONG ROOTS

MASSIMO MONINI HAS PRESERVED ROMETTI’S PRECIOUS HERITAGE OF HISTORY AND CRAFTSMANSHIP

It is a known fact that Italian art is firmly linked to the artist’s studio, to the Renaissance model of handing down knowledge from master to pupil. The same is also true for Italy’s immense wealth of material culture, and this is particularly the case for ceramics. The story of Umbertide, where the Rometti manufactory has been operational since 1927, differs somewhat to that of better-known towns of Deruta or Gualdo Tadino: it doesn’t have an ancient tradition in ceramics like other Umbrian cities, and perhaps this aspect has allowed Rometti to produce wholly original ceramics. This is thanks also to the cultured company the manufactory kept in the 1930s, when it played host to Roman artists immersed in the whirlwind of Futurism, who were able to give full rein to experimentation in ceramics at Umbertide. The company’s ventures with well-known artists and big names in international design is ongoing: Ambrogio Pozzi, Lilian Lijn, Chantal Thomass, Kenzo Takada, Ugo La Pietra and Christian Tortu are just some of those who have designed for Rometti in recent years. To this day, it continues to be a hothouse of experimentation for young artists, thanks to the commitment of owner Massimo Monini and artistic director Jean Christophe Clair, who each year organise an Award addressed to schools and an apprenticeship within the company. Massimo Monini, who took over the company in 2010, decided to dedicate his energies to this “crazy but gripping” business venture, as he calls it. His first approach was as a collector with the passion of an art enthusiast. Question. When did you first come across Rometti ceramics? Answer. I’ve always been a passionate collector and this love of ceramics prompted me to visit the manufactory in the summer of 2009. I was fascinated by it, and I bought two Venuses:

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enigmatic figures, geometrically perfect, the result of Ambrogio Pozzi’s visionary creativity. Q. What was it that prompted you to acquire Rometti? A. Rometti threw down the gauntlet of relaunching the business, offering me the company’s priceless legacy of history and craftsmanship. I knew how respected he was, about his top-flight ventures with the big names of art and design, and I was fascinated by his ability to achieve works of outstanding beauty using a material as humble as clay. I loved how original the shapes were, the fine decorations and glazes clumsily copied by hordes of imitators in the glorious 1930s and 40s. So I decided Rometti deserved to resume its historical place amongst the cream of Italy’s ceramic producers. Q. A brave business choice, if we think that in the last ten years many Italian artisan manufactories have closed down, or have faced considerable problems reorganising their production for a struggling and constantly changing market. A. It is a tough challenge, and a risky one, but I knew its legacy of skilled craftsmanship was outstanding, and that it was still intact. It was necessary to get back to “high-level” production, to dedicate our efforts to research and experimentation, to launch new collections and find new markets... without neglecting the care and attention for the time-honoured techniques of Rometti’s precious heritage. Q. Ten years on, would you say you have won the challenge? A. I’m aware that a great deal has been achieved, and I feel proud to have taken the manufactory to an international dimension. Our collections are in demand in Northern Europe, the USA, in Asia and in the Arab nations. We have acquired this prestige through tremendous effort, making a few mistakes along the way. The role played by artistic director Jean Christophe Clair and the craftspeople at Rometti has proven fundamental. Without their contribution, this result would not have been achieved. Q. What aspects do you feel are most urgent for the development of Rometti? A. There is still a great deal to be done. Markets evolve, and it takes a complex strategy to tackle the challenges of the future. We are investing heavily in research into new technical and aesthetic solutions. We are flexible when it comes to customer requests, and we make sure we meet them with a bespoke approach. Q. Where do the soul, the roots of your work lie? A. The combination of design and craftsmanship underpins Italian success stories worldwide, and I am proud that Rometti plays a part in this. But I’d like to stress that our real strength lies in our Umbrian roots, the almost osmotic relationship we have with the local area. After 20 years in France, my return to Umbria proves what close ties I have with this land steeped in art, history and culture. (Simona Cesana)


114 PP. 94|97 THE BEAUTY OF BEING AN ARTISAN

ARTIGIANO DEL CUORE IS AN ONLINE COMPETITION THAT GIVES A VOICE TO ITALIAN ARTISANS

The initiative was born in 2018 from the partnership between Wellmade, the community that sustains master craftsmanship in Italy, and Brevimano, a digital platform for finding work in the crafts, with the support of Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d’Arte. The aim is to discover new talents and stimulate the interest of a broader audience of artistic craftsmanship enthusiasts, using an appealing and culturally evolved social media approach. In the space of just two editions, the Artigiano del Cuore competition has gathered entries from around 200 artisans from all over Italy, involving more than 12,000 users who have voted for their favourite craftsperson on well-made.it. The competition is open to two categories of artisans, which change each year. To enter, the key requisite is excellence. This is assessed by a panel of experts, based on specific criteria. But it takes more to get into the finals and win the competition: it takes a story that wins people’s hearts. The community of users decides who the winners are, voting for their favourite from the finalists picked by the panel. The prizes for the winners are short documentaries produced by Wellmade, in which the winners talk about their lives inside and outside their workshops. The first edition saw shoemakers Sandro Barbera & Sons triumph in the category of “Clothing and Ornaments”, and mosaic artist Fabrizio Travisanutto winning in the “Furnishing and Decorating” category. Sandro Barbera opened his atelier in Biella in 1968, and today is passing his savoir-faire on to his sons Andrea and Stefano. Everyone knows them in town, and everyone loves their made-to-measure shoes. Fabrizio Travisanutto won over the public with the story of his father Giovanni, a member of the prestigious School of Mosaic Artists of Spilimbergo, from whom he inherited his craft. Their masterpieces adorn some of the world’s most important locations: from major airports in the USA to subway stations in New York, from Irish and Greek monasteries to the Basilica of St Sepulchre in Jerusalem. In 2019, the finalists who have received most votes were Bruna Mariani in the category “Preserving Beauty”, dedicated to masters of restoration, along with Serena Dominijanni

and Carlotta Corduas in the “Journeys of Excellence” section for talented youngsters taking part in Fondazione Cologni’s project “A School, A Job. Training to Excellence”. Bruna Mariani is a restorer who works with jewellery, armour and precious metals. She has always been on the move, travelling from East to West to restore splendour to objects of incalculable artistic and cultural value. Serena Dominijanni restores books, documents and works on paper. Some years ago, Serena and her husband opened an artistic bookbindery in the Roman neighbourhood where Serena was born and raised. Carlotta Corduas is a decorating artist who restores paintings. She is pursuing her dream of opening an atelier in her hometown Naples with a mixture of passion and sacrifice, ambition and difficulties to overcome. What do all these “well-made champions” have in common? None of them are influencers on the social networks, but in the space of a few days, all of them managed to pick up hundreds of votes with the involvement of friends and relatives, neighbours and loyal customers: people who know the quality of their production, the sacrifices they have made and the passion they put into their work each day. To understand the real value of craftsmanship, one has to step into a workshop and see the beauty these masters create, to touch it for ourselves. Artigiano del Cuore is a chance to share this talent and raise its profile, in the hope of inspiring new generations to follow in their footsteps and ensure Italian skills continue to be handed down. (Gianmarco Luggeri)

P. 98 THE HUMAN INTELLIGENCE OF THE HANDS

TACTILE FLAIR ALLOWS US TO CULTIVATE OUR TALENT WITHOUT FORGETTING THE EXTRAORDINARY VALUE OF OUR UPPER LIMBS

In his famous painting depicting the metamorphosis of Daphne, transformed into a laurel tree to escape the amorous clutches of the god Apollo, Piero del Pollaiolo draws the viewer’s attention to the fact that the first limbs to change appearance in the transformation from human being (albeit a mythological nymph) to another living form are the arms and, more specifically, the hands. It is as if the painter wished to underscore that what makes us profoundly and genuinely human is precisely our ability to use our hands, our fingers, our fingertips, to consciously generate new and evolving shapes. Losing this ability means regressing to a less noble, less significant form of life from the point of view of the production of beauty. Yet, we often “forget” the extraordinary value of the intelligence of our hands. We standardise our gestures, without appreciating the difference between a gesture of affection and one of unfriendliness, between

gestures that require great sacrifice and those that can be performed without thought. The Italian language, like other Romance languages, places great emphasis on manual skill in the development of our faculties. Suffice it to say that the verb “prendere”, that is, to seize something with our hands, is embedded in many other actions: “ap-prendere”, meaning to learn; “com-prendere”, meaning to embrace and include; “intra-prendere”, meaning to experience a new adventure. And then, when Italians wish to say they have truly comprehended a concept, they say it has been “afferrato” – taking us right back to the original notion of “grasping”. Learning, embracing, experiencing, comprehending, grasping: every action that requires a conscious enrichment of ourselves and of our mind, every process that causes us to metamorphose our abilities in a new and more beautiful direction, centres inevitably around the hands. It is these intelligent limbs that the art historian Henri Focillon rightly celebrates in his treatise In Praise of Hands: “Man has created his own hands – by which I mean that he has gradually freed them from the animal world, released them from an ancient and innate servitude. But hands have also created man. [...] Knowledge of the world demands a kind of tactile flair. Sight slips over the surface of the universe. The hand knows that an object has physical bulk, that it is smooth or rough, that it is not soldered to heaven or earth from which it appears to be inseparable. The hand’s action defines the cavity of space and the fullness of the objects which occupy it.” The concept of a “tactile flair” is a beautiful image that I believe lays the foundations for a better way of experiencing our talent. In the infinite and repetitive liturgies of excellence, sadly hackneyed and jaded by marketing, the great masters – those who not only do, but also convey, those who make a special talent both productive and fertile – can still claim to possess a “tactile flair”. It is a gift that allows a project to mutate into a product; one that awakens authentic vocations capable of ensuring the creation of new beauty; one that relaunches and injects life into age-old traditions. Being able to “grasp” improves our ability to comprehend, also in the metaphorical sense of comprehending others. A handshake, a caress, a human gesture, are often more effective than words. And while it is true that we must respect ourselves and the others by not encroaching on other people’s space, it is also true that the human touch still makes the difference when contrasted with homologation, loss of sense and alienation. Remembering that learning and comprehending are based on the concept of “grasping” grants a warmer, more dynamic dimension to actions that we normally see confined to a more intellectual sphere, encouraging us to invest on appreciating that form of beauty which is generated by touch. This is nothing but a small investment on an ability that is all too often neglected, but which is deeply, genuinely human.(Franco Cologni)


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19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_052_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:48:51

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_053_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:50:39

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_054_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:48:54

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_055_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:53:31

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_056_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:49:00

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_057_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:53:37

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_058_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:55:20

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_059_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 17:55:45

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_060_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:01:56

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_061_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:02:03

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_062_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:35:42

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_063_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:28:09

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_064_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:22:47

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_065_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:02:08

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_B


F39-19C1941_066_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:23:16

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19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio4_W1_F


F39-19C1941_067_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:20:43

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19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_068_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:29:06

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_069_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:29:11

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_070_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:36:09

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_071_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:36:14

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_072_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:36:17

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_073_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:36:22

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_074_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:37:51

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_corr_075_MDA20_ok 1

27-NOV-19 10:25:10

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_076_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:43:40

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_077_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:43:29

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_078_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:43:47

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_079_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:49:00

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_080_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:47:23

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_081_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:49:08

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_B


F39-19C1941_082_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:50:12

5

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio5_W1_F


F39-19C1941_083_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:54:29

6

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_084_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:55:13

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_085_MDA20_corr 1

27-NOV-19 14:09:21

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_086_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:54:30

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_087_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 18:59:59

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_088_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:00:06

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_089_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:00:06

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_090_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:00:38

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_091_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:03:23

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_092_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:03:30

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_093_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:09:45

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_094_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:10:16

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_095_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:03:35

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


F39-19C1941_096_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:10:24

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_097_MDA20 1

26-NOV-19 19:11:28

19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_B


F39-19C1941_098_MdA20_risguardoCOLOGNI 1

26-NOV-19 19:10:27

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19C1941_MESTIERIDARTE$_Trimboxes_foglio6_W1_F


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27-NOV-19 14:10:24

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