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Volume Twenty Seven, Number 8

October 2013

Joe, Beaumont, say goodbye to each other after nearly 25 years By Mary Graff

Residents and staff pulled out every stop they could in August to wish President/CEO Joe a happy and healthy retirement. The staff gave him a rousing party and donated a Japanese Snowball tree to be planted in his honor; the residents gave a more formal dinner (“We come to praise Joe, not to bury him,” Chairman Don Trachtenberg smilingly misquoted to loud applause) and gave him Photo by Louise Hughes an iPad. Not with a bang but a barrage of balloons was how staff ended their farewell party Goodbye continued on page 15 for Joe. More pictures on the inside.

Capital Projects: Construction is ready to begin this fall By Joe Fortenbaugh and the Capital Projects Committee

Construction on Beaumont’s latest capital projects, under development for over a year, is expected to begin as early as sometime this month. Following is a summary of the project’s various elements:

FITNESS CENTER The fitness center will be relocated to two new wings to be constructed on the exterior of the south and west sides of the swimming pool. These wings will total 3,000 square feet. One wing will house the aerobic fitness equipment: treadmills, bicycles and elliptical machines. The other wing will house the anaerobic weight training machines; equally important, there will be a multipurpose room for uses

including group exercise, table tennis, massage and storage. SWIMMING POOL The swimming pool will be renovated with new piping, lighting both inside and outside of the pool, a new ceiling, a new surface on the pool deck and steps replacing the ramp. A lift will be installed for individuals who need assistance to enter and exit the pool. A fresh-water bromine water treatment will be employed. Projects continued on page 2


Projects continued from page 1

LOWER MERION TOWNSHIP Lower Merion Township’s Zoning Board approved our application on July 11. The application went to the Planning Department in August, was accepted as complete and was forwarded to the Montgomery County Planning Department, which approved it on August 27. Unfortunately, a number of questions were raised by Planning Department officials concerning the planned grounds maintenance building. It was not possible to provide the needed information by their August 16 deadline, so, to avoid an indefinite delay, we withdrew the maintenance building site work from the application. We expect to be able to resubmit the maintenance building site plans in several months together with our pond dredging application. Our applications were reviewed by the Planning and Land Development committees in September and subsequently by the Board of Commissioners. Building permits are expected to follow.

LOCKER ROOMS The current fitness center will be excavated to the level of the swimming pool deck and will become a women’s locker room with three private changing rooms, showers, sitting areas and other amenities. The men’s locker room will be enlarged and completely renovated. LIBRARY and ARTS AND CRAFTS ROOM The Mary Louise Anstine Library and the Arts and Crafts Room will exchange locations. Both rooms will be renovated with new carpeting, paint and some lighting enhancements. The library will have a bay window, half the cost of which has been donated by nine residents. New bookshelves will be installed in the library. HALLWAYS New carpeting, paint and lighting will brighten the Lower Commons hallways.

In Memoriam

MANSION The Mansion/Personal Care elevator will be renovated and enlarged to allow for ease of use and the transportation of hospital gurneys.

Philippus Miller August 18, 2013

H. Hoffman Dolan September 16, 2013

Bob Gretz September 25, 2013

PERSONAL CARE Beaumont’s Personal Care unit, on the second and third floors of the Mansion, will be updated and renovations will be made to the corridors, common and staff areas and resident bathrooms. New carpeting, lighting and wall covering will be installed and some of the woodwork refinished. All of the windows on the second and third floors will be replaced. The Personal Care unit will be enhanced with brighter colors and a more contemporary design theme.

Members of the Beaumont Community extend deepest sympathy to their family and friends.

BEAUMONT NEWS The Beaumont News is published by the residents and staff of the Beaumont Retirement Community, 601 N. Ithan Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

BISTRO The renovated kitchen entrance, Rogers Room and Card Room will provide a totally new, upscale, casual cocktail and dining experience for private occasions, sporting events and other resident functions. In this area will be a bar, large-screen televisions, dining accommodations and a game room which will house a billiard table among other games.

Editor Assistant Editor and Production Manager Graphic Designer Photo Editor Events Manager Proofreader Circulation Manager

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Mary Graff John Hall TJ Walsh Louise Hughes Kim Norrett Jennie Frankel Barbara O’Brien


Medals and memories: one man’s World War II By Ann Louise Strong (according to Alvan Markle); by Alvan Markle (according to Ann Louise Strong). See Ann Louise’s note at the end.

Many of us at Beaumont know Alvan as an intelligent, quick, happy, healthy 95-year old gentleman with a wicked sense of humor. Some us know him as an astute financial analyst and writer. But few of us know him as a decorated veteran of World War II and the Korean War. Among his eight commendation and “I Was There” awards is the European Campaign Medal with battle stars for the Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes (the Bulge) and Central Europe campaigns. In addition, he was awarded the Croix de Guerre avec Etoile de Vermeil [with vermeil star] in 1945 “for exceptional war services rendered in the course of operations during the Liberation of France” from General Charles de Gaulle, President of the Provisional Government of the Republic of France and Chief of its Army. (Alvan said he was kissed on both cheeks by a de Gaulle aide with a bushy mustache.) In the course of his service, Alvan witnessed many noteworthy events, a few of which are described here. By way of background, Alvan’s ancestors came to this country in the late 1600s and early 1700s. The Alvan Markle III, at a formal event some years ago with Markles were Protestant Huguenots who fled France to the Military Order of Foreign Wars, Past Commanders’ avoid religious persecution and settled in Pennsylvania. insignia, around his neck. He is a graduate of Fay School, The Hill School, Yale University, The Artillery School, and the Command and In the spring of 1944 His Majesty the King kindly General Staff College. He was taught to think and to sent Britain’s finest ship, the Queen Elizabeth, to take govern himself. When his Yale class graduated in 1941, Alvan to the King’s United Kingdom. She also carried he was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Field 20,000 men stacked four high on canvas bunks laced on Artillery. He volunteered and went on active duty July 1 pipe frames. Breakfast was served from 3 a.m. to noon, of that year. and dinner from 3 p.m. until midnight in 33 sittings. After training cannoneers at Fort Bragg for two Of course British naval officers ran the ship, but the years, Alvan, then a captain, was assigned to the 266th 266th was given responsibility for control of the miliField Artillery Battalion as the staff officer responsible tary passengers, so Alvan had good quarters and the run for plans and training. He prepared the outfit to pass of the ship. No slow convoy voyage for him. The Elizaits tests and then was assigned command of its Headbeth had newly-invented radar and relied on her speed quarters and Headquarters Battery. Subsequently, he to avoid the German submarines. On her forepeak in became commander of Battery C, a heavy firing battery total blackout, the sensation of her huge mass hurtling equipped with 240mm howitzers. These were 10-inch through the night was indescribable. She was so fast she guns from which 112 pounds of gunpowder threw a reached the Firth of Clyde only three and a half days 360-pound high-explosive projectile up to 14 miles with after leaving New York. great accuracy and devastating impact. Medals continued on page 4

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Medals continued from page 3 Alvan’s battalion was sent to Canford Cliffs on the craft guns. General Bradley wanted the planes to fly south coast of England, where on June 5 the invasion the length of the target to reduce the danger that short fleet assembled at his feet in the Solent, the large bay releases might strike General Joseph Lawton Collins’s between the Isle of Wight and the mainland. The Brits front-line troops. History says that despite an aborted likened it to Piccadilly Circus because the traffic was so first attempt, the flyers still did it their way, but that is heavy: battleships, aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers, not true. transports, scores of Landing Ship Tanks (LSTs, also Alvan was near Saint André-de-Bohon on an obknown as Large Slow Targets), and hundreds of Landservation post built by the Germans atop a tall pine ing Craft Infantry (LCI). It was an unforgettable sight. tree, several miles north of the target area, with an The next morning they were unobstructed view in all direcgone. Normandy was their tions. He watched as the planes target. came hour after hour, one When it was time for after another in single file, at a Alvan’s unit to go into the vulnerable medium altitude. As troop marshaling area, a they approached Saint-Lô, they storm came up. They sat swung right and, with incredible in pyramidal tents for courage, they flew Indian file three days playing bridge the entire length of the target and watching the barrage dropping thousands of bombs. balloons over Southamp German flak batteries ton sway in the downpour, near Saint-Lô took a deadly toll, while others fought in and Alvan saw many medium Normandy. When they were B-25s and B-26s go down. landed at Omaha Beach, However, no heavy B-17 Flying the enemy had been forced Fortresses were struck within back, and Alvan’s unit was his view. The explosions threw not under direct fire. up an immense cloud of smoke Beyond the beach was and dust over the target, obscurThe Croix de Guerre awarded Alvan by General the Bocage—farmland ing all landmarks, so the folCharles de Gaulle. divided into thousands of lowing bombardiers simply released their loads into the small fields by hedgerows composed of entangled rocks, cloud. Unbeknownst to them, a light breeze had drifted dirt, bushes, small trees and vines three or four feet that cloud over our forward lines, and Alvan heard later high, making a natural fortification every 50 yards or that there were many casualties from our own bombs. so. This made progress difficult and slow and cost many Cobra opened the door for the VII Corps to break out, casualties. Beyond the Bocage was a range of low hills and when Alvan went through Saint-Lô he saw that running from Saint-Lô to Périers, where much stronger only a few broken chimneys remained standing, and resistance was seen. Nevertheless, the First Army had to every square yard in the target area was marked with a break out of its small beachhead. bomb crater. General Omar Bradley requested, and General After repulsing a very serious counterattack at MorDwight Eisenhower approved, Operation Cobra, the tain, which could have cut the supply line to General unprecedented aerial saturation bombardment on an George Patton’s Third Army and most of the First, the area five miles wide and one mile deep along this high Allies had trapped the German 7th Army and its 5th ground. Every available bomber was to participate. Panzer army in the Falaise Pocket. To close the gap the Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory proBritish were to attack from the north while the Amerposed that the approach to the target be perpendicular icans attacked from the south. To avoid a dangerous to its width in broad formations at high altitude to min- clash between friendly forces, each was given a boundimize exposure to the deadly German 88mm anti-airary at which to halt. Bradley’s troops reached theirs as

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planned, but Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery’s did caught some barbed wire under the left front fender, not, so the enemy escaped to give us a lot of trouble passed the mines. A dangling wire snagged one of them later. and dragged it under the rear wheels. They all exploded, Alvan celebrated the liberation of Paris there and at igniting eight cans of gasoline on the truck. Alvan got Versailles. Then on to Germany, where our troops were the driver to the aid station, where he died. When the stopped at the Roer river as resistance became desperate. fire burned out, his Executive Officer had the wreckage One day in broad daylight a freight train came into view cleared. The battery was soon ready for action, and across the river about 10 miles distant. It had obviously fire-missions commenced. A few days later, C Battery underestimated the range was strafed by four Messof Alvan’s guns. The first erschmitt 109s; but by round destroyed the track then it was well dug in, in front and stopped and they did little damit. The next blocked all age. retreat. The trapped box In December the cars contained munitions Germans surprised the and provided a most Americans with a powsatisfying target. erful attack by the 6th Whenever we atPanzer Army through the tempted to cross the Ardennes Forest. It was Roer, the Germans would known as the Battle of open the floodgates on the Bulge. Alvan’s battery the Schwammenauel was pulled out of the forDam upstream, and est, given back his 240s, boats, bridge pontoons, and sent to join the VII The guidon, or unit flag, carried by the battery Alvan and men would be swept commanded through five campaigns Corps which, he was in World War II. away. The only way to the told, was “in reserve.” He soon dams was through the Huertgen Forest, and that found out that General Collins had six divisions, each ground was bitterly contested. The 9th and 28th of which had every regiment fully committed and fightDivisions were badly mauled and sent to quiet sectors ing hard. That was our reserve. It was hard to fight in to recuperate. Ammunition for Alvan’s guns was in the snow and cold, difficult to move on icy roads, and short supply, and he was given six captured German anything but easy to emplace 44-ton guns on frozen 105mm howitzers with plenty of shells and ordered into ground in blackout. The First Army on the north and the forest. Artillery requires an open field of fire, and the Third Army on the south stopped the Panzers, rolled the only suitable position lay in the edge of some woods them back, and went on to the Rhine. just south of the village of Huertgen. Unfortunately it Alvan’s battery crossed the Rhine at Remagen and was heavily mined and held the frozen bodies of both continued with the First Army as it met with the Ninth German and American soldiers who had fought there. to encircle the large Ruhr industrial region and German While they were reconnoitering in the deep snow, Army Group B. As the noose was tightening on the Alvan’s Motor Officer lost a foot to an undetectable Wehrmacht, Alvan was on the road with his driver and Schu mine, and Alvan had to evacuate him to an aid radio operator in a jeep. They saw a German soldier station that he found in the village. With the good help waving a large white flag at the edge of a wood some of a detachment of engineers who also suffered casualdistance away and approached him. In poor English he ties, many mines were cleared, enabling the guns to be told them that there were German soldiers who wanted emplaced. to surrender and offered to show where they were. They found nine large Teller anti-tank mines in the Sitting on the hood, he guided them into the woods dirt access road and placed them in a pile nearby. Shortto a farm compound where they found a battalion of ly thereafter, a four-ton ammunition truck, which had six or seven hundred soldiers commanded by a Lieu-

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Medals continued on page 6


Medals continued from page 5 tenant Colonel who wanted to negotiate. Following General Ulysses S. Grant’s example, Alvan demanded unconditional surrender but conceded that they could take one truck to carry their wounded. When he marched them out he saw the German commander riding in the truck beside the driver. Alvan had their men pile their weapons in the courtyard and his driver threw the bolts into a nearby well. The spoils of war included a safe full of German marks (the money was turned over to Finance but the safe he kept), 22 officers’ pistols (Alvan gave all of them to his subordinates later), and several cases of the finest liquor and wine marked in German “Reserved for the Wehrmacht” (which the entire battery well enjoyed). There was also a supply of European tobacco products which were of no interest to the Americans. Alvan ordered them distributed, and their Sergeant Major climbed to the loft of a barn and threw them down to scrambling smokers who knew that, as prisoners of war, it would be a long time before they got more. It was a real pleasure for the Americans to see the Germans beating each other up for this tobacco. Alvan saw the death camp at Buchenwald when some of the inmates were still there. It was so horribly, cruelly evil that to this day he cannot speak of it without emotion. Victory in Europe was declared on May 8, 1945, and Alvan’s orders to redeploy to Japan were canceled when nuclear bombs ended the war in the Pacific. It was his conclusion that what happened in Germany could happen in any country, including ours, that allowed its worst people to gain control of its government. Except for the first few paragraphs, I played a minor role in putting together this moving and articulate account of some of Alvan Markle’s experiences in World War II. Alvan and I met several times. I would write, plague him with more questions, and then write again. Finally, perhaps as the easiest way to reach a conclusion, Alvan took to his own computer and brought to vivid life his war in the European theater. —Ann Louise Strong The News enthusiastically welcomes letters from readers, including non-residents. We ask you to sign your name, though requests for anonymity in print may be honored. Letters need not be typed (though typing is appreciated), but please write as legibly as possible and include your phone number (for the editors’ use only). E-mail letters to Mary Graff at both her two e-mail addresses: graffs18@gmail.com and MGraff@BeaumontRetirement.com, or mail to her in care of Beaumont at 601 N. Ithan Avenue, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010.

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Boards and committees as of October 2013: the Go-To list for residents old and new By Jennie Frankel

Readers interested in a particular committee will find that they need not read through this entire article, as attempts have been made to make each board and committee entry complete in itself. GOVERNING BOARDS BEAUMONT RETIREMENT COMMUNITY INC. (BRCI), the policy-making board—Dr. Don Trachtenberg, chairman; Dr. Geraldine Paier, vice chairman, and Mr. Birchard Clothier, secretary, with Mr. Michael Churchman, Mr. Isaac (Quartie) Clothier (cousin to Birchard), Mr. Robert Herd and Mrs. Debora Zug. Ex officio: Mr. Joseph J. Peduzzi, CEO, and Susan Kendra, CFO. Geraldine Paier is chairman of the Health Care Committee and also serves on the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Her husband, Dolf, is chairman of the Finance and Capital Projects committees. Birchard Clothier is chairman of the Wine and Spirits Committee and also serves on the Dining Services committee. His wife, Marlynne, is a member of the Marketing Committee. Quartie Clothier also serves on the Green Committee. His wife, Barbara, serves on the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and is a member of the Resident Services Committee. Michael Churchman also serves on the Safety and Security Committee. His wife, Jean, serves on the Resident Services and Library committees. Robert Herd also serves on the Grounds Committee. His wife, Sally, is on the House Committee and is in charge of flower arrangements throughout the public rooms. Debora Zug also serves on the Health Care committee. BEAUMONT RETIREMENT SERVICES INC. (BRSI), the board in charge of operations—Mr. John Woolford, chairman, and Mr. James Luther, vice chairman, with Mr. Fred Brenner, Mr. James Egan, Mrs. Norma Fabian and Mr. Edward Rosen. Ex officio: Mr. Joseph J. Peduzzi, CEO; Susan Kendra, CFO, and Linda Lemisch, Vice President of Health Services. Committees continued on page 10


Mike’s Roundup By Mike Bailey, Housekeeping There’s a new sheriff in town Who’s name is also Joe But before we get into that There are a few things you should know Bob got married, moved to a new house and had Colton On 7/31 David from Housekeeping received a gift of his own A new baby boy healthy and blessed Just some moments of joy we shall never forget

Fitness Director Bob and Andrea Stedeford introduced Colton shortly after his birth.

While Brock’s little princess came to say “hello” Just in time to say goodbye to “Kahuna” Joe A staff planned party With a humorous twist Congrats to Chef John On his September 4 marriage The demo has started Carpet has been laid Within a few more weeks You will see a brand new place.

Young Brock Nichols, 20 months, greeted new sister Samantha, born in August. (Though young Brock has same first name as our Housekeeping Director, he is not a Jr.)

“ Until next time don’t squat with your spurs on!”

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What travelers may have m

Photo by Louise Hughes

Executive Chef John Bauer performed at summer luncheons in the Liseter Garden.

One of the highlights of a summer circus staged by L cohorts was the sight of serious environmental lawye the lap of Housekeeping’s Howard Barron, clown ex

Photo by Louise Hughes

A trip to see the Phillies play turned into a birthday celebration for Bobbi Rosen, when a Phillies representative sprinkled her with confetti and led everyone nearby in song. From left: Peter Binzen, Charlie Wood, Bobbi and Bobbi’s daughter Amy. Behind Amy is her sister, Roni.

SUMMER CARNIVAL FOR STAFF CHILDREN: Arrsema Kassahun prize from a previous game, prepares to pitch a pingpong ball into a vase Drayton offers encouragement.

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missed during the summer

Photo by Louise Hughes

Photo by Louise Hughes

Off to Maine for the summer were Nancy Harris and her 1931 Model A Ford, though they traveled separately; first taking Jeanne Cortner (left) and Carole Morgan for a spin in the rumble seat.

Louise Hughes and her er Ann Louise Strong in xtraordinaire.

Photo by Josephine Mary Hall

n, 6, wearing on her head a e as game mistress Cynthia

Photo by Erikka Cahill, recreation assistant

Margie Manlove rewards Timbite Kassahun, 8, with tickets to cash in at the prize table.

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Committees continued from page 6 Mrs. Fabian also serves on the Capital Project and House committees. Her husband, George, is on the Marketing Committee. Mr. Rosen is a member of the Resident Services Committee and the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. SUPPORT COMMITTEES DINING SERVICES COMMITTEE— Mrs. Joan Roberts, chairman, with Mr. Peter Abel, Mr. Birchard Clothier (BRCI Board Representative), Mrs. Fytie Drayton, Mr. John Lloyd, Mrs. Barbara O’Brien and Mrs. Elizabeth Webb. Ex officio: Mrs. Rose-Marie Pringle, Director of Dietary and Dining Services; John Bauer, Executive Chef and Director of Food Services; Sonya Clarke, Food Services secretary, and Mr. Peduzzi. Mrs. Roberts also serves on the Grounds Committee. Mr. Clothier is chairman of the Wine and Spirits Committee and is a BRCI board member. His wife, Marlynne, is a member of the Marketing Committee. Mrs. Drayton is a member of the Nominating and Resident Services committees. Mr. Lloyd also serves on the Finance Committee. Mrs. O’Brien is a member of the Library Committee. FINANCE COMMITTEE— Mr. Adolf (Dolf ) Paier, chairman, with Mr. John Lloyd, Mr. Bruce Mainwaring, Mr. Alvan Markle III and Mr. John Place. Ex officio: Dr. Trachtenberg, Mr. Woolford, Mr. Peduzzi and Ms. Kendra. Mr. Paier is also chairman of the Capital Projects Committee. Mr. Paier’s wife, Geraldine, is vice chairman of the BRCI board, chairman of the Health Care Committee and a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Mr. Lloyd also serves on the Dining Services Committee. Mr. Mainwaring chairs the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and is a member of the Marketing and Capital Projects committees. Mr. Place is a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and a member of the Safety and Security Committee. Mr. Place’s wife, Katharine, is on the House Committee. GREEN COMMITTEE— Mrs. Ann Louise Strong, chairman, with Mr. Quartie Clothier (BRCI board representative), Mr. John Gregg, Mr. Dick Maass, Mr.

George Miller, Mrs. Ann Reed and Mr. Charles Wood. Ex officio: Mark Hritz, Director of Grounds; Brock Nichols, Director of Housekeeping and Laundry, and Mr. Peduzzi. Mr. Clothier’s wife, Barbara, serves on the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and the Resident Services Committee. Mr. Gregg is a member of the Music Committee. Mr. Miller is chairman of the Nominating Committee and a member of the Health Care Committee. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Library Committee GROUNDS COMMITTEE— Mrs. Nancy Harris, chairman, with Mrs. Helen Ballard (Birchard Clothier’s sister), Dr. John Carson, Mr. Robert Herd (BRCI board representative), Mrs. Joan Roberts, Dr. Dean Snyder, Mrs. Joan Thayer and Mrs. Peggy Wolcott. Mr. Peduzzi and Mr. Hritz serve ex officio. Dr. Carson is a member of the Nominating and the Resident Services committees. Mr. Herd’s wife, Sally, serves on the House Committee and is in charge of flower arrangements throughout the public rooms. Mrs. Roberts is chairman of the Dining Services Committee. HEALTH CARE COMMITTEE— Dr. Geraldine Paier, chairman, with Mrs. Jeanne Cortner, Mrs. Patsy Fraser, Mrs. Anne Godfrey, Dr. Clayton Kyle, Mrs. Margie Manlove, Mr. George Miller, Mr. Stuart Saunders and Mrs. Debora Zug (BRCI board representative). Ex officio: Dr. James Morris, Medical Director; Mr. Paul McCleary, Director of Nursing; Ms. Renee Connolly, Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner; Dr. Trachtenberg, Mr. Peduzzi and Mrs. Lemisch. Dr. Paier is a member of the BRCI board and also serves on the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Her husband, Dolf, is chairman of the Finance and Capital Projects committees. Mrs. Cortner is the Co-Chair of the Resident Services Committee and is also a member of the Library Committee. Mrs. Fraser also serves on the Resident Services Committee. Her husband, Ronald, is a member of the Safety and Security Committee and the Marketing Committee. Mr. Miller is chairman of the Nominating Committee and a member of the Green Committee. HOUSE COMMITTEE—Mrs. Marian Lockett-Egan,

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chairman, with Mr. Frank Boyer, Mrs. Norma Fabian, Mrs. Sally Herd, Mrs. Lee Pierson, Mrs. Katharine Place and Mrs. Bobbi Rosen. Ex officio: Audrey Walsh, Director of Marketing; Warren Gillings, Director of Maintenance; Mr. Peduzzi and Mr. Nichols.

ton is a member of the Dining and Resident Services Committees. Mrs. Homeier is co-chair of the Library Committee. Mrs. Rhodes’s husband, Alfred, is chairman of the Safety and Security Committee. Mrs. Ziesing is Co-Chair of the Bridge Committee.

Mrs. Lockett-Egan is also a member of the Wine and Spirits Committee. Mr. Boyer is also a member of the Safety and Security Committee. Mrs. Fabian is on the BRSI board and a member of the Capital Projects Committee. Her husband, George, is a member of the Marketing Committee. Mrs. Herd’s husband, Robert, is on the BRCI board and a member of the Ground’s Committee. Mrs. Place’s husband, John, is on the Safety and Security Committee, the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and the Finance Committee. Mrs. Rosen is a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board.

RESIDENT SERVICES— Mrs Jeanne Cortner and Mrs. Susan Woolford (wife of John), co-chairs, with Mr. Peter Binzen, Mrs. Elizabeth Bole, Dr. John Carson, Mrs. Jean Churchman (wife of Michael), Mrs. Barbara Clothier (wife of Quartie), Mrs. Fytie Drayton, Mrs.Patsy Fraser, Mr. Raymond Freudberg, Mrs. Eloise Gretz, Dr. Jay MacMoran, Mr. Edward Rosen and Mrs. Elizabeth Royer. Ex officio are Mr. Peduzzi, Mrs. Kim Norrett, Director of Resident Services, and Mrs. Louise Hughes, Trip Coordinator.

MARKETING COMMITTEE— Mr. Alan Tripp, chairman, with Mrs. Marlynne Clothier, Mr. George Fabian, Mr. Ronald Fraser, Mrs. Mary Graff, Mr. Bruce Mainwaring, Mr. Roland Morris and Mr. Anthony Parrotto. Ex officio: Mrs. Walsh, Marketing Director; Mrs. Milissa Cwenar, Marketing Assistant, Dr. Trachtenberg and Mr. Peduzzi.

Dr. Carson is a member of the Nominating and the Grounds committees. Mrs. Cortner serves on the Health Care and Library committees. Mrs. Churchman is a member of the Library Committee. Her husband, Michael, is a BRCI Board member and serves on the Safety and Security Committee. Mrs. Clothier is a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Her husband, Quartie, is a BRCI Board member and serves on the Green Committee. Mrs. Drayton is a member of the Dining and Nominating committees. Mrs. Fraser is on the Health Care Committee. Her husband, Ronald, serves on the Safety and Security and the Marketing committees. Mr. Freudberg is a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Mrs. Gretz is co-chair of the Art Show Committee. Mr. Rosen is a BRSI Board member and a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Mrs. Woolford’s husband, John, is the BRSI Board Chairman and also serves on the Capital Projects and Finance committees.

Mr. Tripp is also a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board, the Wine and Spirits Committee and the Capital Projects Committee. Mrs. Clothier’s husband, Birchard, is a member of the BRCI board, chairman of the Wine and Spirits Committee and a member of the Dining Services Committee. Mr. Fabian’s wife, Norma, is on the BRSI board, the House Committee, the Capital Projects Committee and the Resident Services Committee. Mr. Fraser’s wife, Patsy, is on the Health Care and Resident Services committees. Mrs. Graff is the editor of The Beaumont News. Mr. Mainwaring is also chairman of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and a member of the SAFETY and SECURITY—Mr. Alfred Rhodes (husFinance and Capital Projects committees. band of Betsy), chairman, with Mr. Frank Boyer, Mr. Churchman (BRCI representative), Mr. Ronald Fraser, NOMINATING COMMITTEE— Mr. George MillMr. John Place and Mrs. Mary Carol Ryan. Ex officio are er, chairman, with Dr. Elias Burstein, Dr. John Carson, Mr. Peduzzi and Charles Koch, Director of Security. Mr. Mrs. Fytie Drayton, Mrs. Marietta Homeier, Mrs. Betsy Boyer is a member of the House Committee. Mr. FrasRhodes and Mrs. Sinclair (Sis) Ziesing. Ex officio: er is a member of the Marketing Committee. His wife, Mr. Peduzzi and Mrs. Jennifer Frankel, Administrative Patsy, serves on the Health Care and Resident Services Assistant. Mr. Miller is also a member of the Green and committees. Mr. Place is a member of the Beaumont Health Care committees. Dr. Carson is a member of the Fund Advisory Board and the Finance Committee. His Grounds and Resident Services committees. Mrs. DrayCommittees continued on page 12

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Committees continued from page 11 wife, Katy, is a member of the House Committee. Mr. Rhodes’s wife, Betsy, is a member of the Nominating Committee.

Dining Services Committee. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Green Committee. Mrs. Yurchenco is a member of the Music Committee.

ACTIVITY COMMITTEES

MUSIC COMMITTEE— Dr. Robert Morgan, chairman, with Mr. John Gregg, Mrs. Joan Stuart and Mrs. Mary Yurchenco.

ARTS—Mrs. Jane Garrison and Mrs. Eloise Gretz, cochairs.

Dr. Morgan’s wife, Carole, is a co-chair of the Library Committee. Mr. Gregg is a member of the Green Committee. Mrs. Yurchenco is a member of the Library Committee.

Mrs. Garrison is a member of the Library Committee and Mrs. Gretz is a member of the Resident Services Committee. BINGO—Resident Services Department

WINE and SPIRITS COMMITTEE—Mr. Birch Clothier, chairman, with Mr. Bennett Blum, Mr. Lon Homeier, Mrs. Marian Lockett-Egan, Mr. AlanTripp and Mrs. Susan Woolford.

BRIDGE COMMITTEE— Mrs. Devie Andrews and Mrs. Sinclair (Sis) Ziesing, co-chairs, with Mrs. Marion Snyder (wife of Dean), Miss Patsy Dushane, Mrs. Marjorie Lott and Mrs. Charlene Simpson.

Mr. Clothier is a BRCI Board member and serves on the Dining Committee. His wife, Marlynne, is on the Marketing Comittee. Mrs. Lockett-Egan chairs the House Committee. Mr. Tripp chairs the Marketing Committee and also serves on the Capital Projects Committee and the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Mrs. Woolford is a co-chair of the Resident Services Committee. Her husband, John, chairs the BRSI Board and is a member of the Finance and Capital Projects committees.

Mrs. Snyder’s husband, Dean, is on the Grounds Committee. Mrs. Ziesing is a member of the Nominating Committee. FLOWER COMMITTEE— Mrs. Herd Mrs. Herd’s husband, Robert, is a BRCI Board member and serves on the Grounds Committee.

OTHER COMMITTEES

LIBRARY COMMITTEE—Mrs. Marietta Homeier and Mrs. Carole Morgan (wife of Robert), co-chairs, with Mrs. Libby Adelman, Mrs. Margie Baird, Mr. Peter Binzen, Mrs. Jean Churchman (wife of Michael), Mrs. Jeanne Cortner, Dr. Pauline Foster, Mrs. Jane Garrison, Mrs. Sally Morris (wife of Roland), Mrs. Barbara O’Brien, Mrs. Ann Reed, Mrs. Marsha (Tuppie) Solmssen and Mrs. Mary Yurchenco.

BEAUMONT FUND ADVISORY BOARD—Mr. Bruce Mainwaring, chairman, with Mrs. Barbara Clothier, Mr. Raymond Freudberg, Dr.Geraldine Paier, Mr. John Place, Mrs. Bobbi Rosen, Mr. Ed Rosen (no relation) and Mr. Alan Tripp. Mrs. Clothier also serves on the Resident Services Committee. Her husband, Quartie, is a BRCI Board member and serves on the Green Committee. Mr. Freudberg also serves on the Resident Services Committee. Mr. Mainwaring also serves on the Finance, Marketing and Capital Projects committees. Dr. Paier, a BRCI member, chairs the Health Care Committee. Her husband, Dolf, is chairman of the Finance and Capital Projects committees. Mr. Place is on the Finance and Safety and Security committees. Mrs. Rosen is on the House Committee. Mr. Rosen is a BRSI Board member and serves on

Mrs. Morgan’s husband, Robert, chairs the Music Committee. Mrs. Homeier is a member of the Nominating Committee. Mrs. Churchman is a member of the Resident Services Committee. Her husband, Michael, is a BRCI board member and serves on the Safety and Security Committee. Mrs. Cortner is a member of the Health Care Committee and is a co-chair of the Resident Services Committee. Mrs. Jane Garrison is co-chair of the Arts Committee. Mrs. O’Brien is a member of the

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Beaumont’s resident farmer reflects on summer of 2013; considers filing suit

This will be my case: Tired of putting up with an abbreviated tomato crop resulting from virus attacks, I eagerly sought refuge in the technology of grafting. Grafted tomatoes, I was told, were resistant to both the early and the late tomato blight. So I purchased two for the outlandish sum of $25.

By Dean Snyder

Without the aid of climate historians, my reflections on this past summer are less than favorable. Overall it was a great summer for grass, corn growers and well diggers. On the dark side, our vegetable garden is a mess. The cool nights, cloudy days and frequent rains served us poorly, as the tomato crop is done and our one week of 90-degree weather way back in July somewhere did in the lettuce crop. The dog days of August did not materialize as the month of August came and went without one day of 90 degrees. Having lived my life engaged in agriculture, I find it easy to rationalize and look forward to next year, confident that 2014 will be a great year. (This time not haunted by the dark thought that one more crop failure could mean the bank will own the farm.) Rather, I am entertaining the thought that I might join the here and now and sue somebody.

Two things: One: The plants were advertised as the Rutgers, but my plants yielded two different varieties. Two: One plant began showing signs of late blight at blossom time, and both plants began showing signs of the airborne early blight. The airborne virus kills rapidly while the soil-borne late virus kills very slowly until harvest time. The plant struck with both diseases died suddenly overnight after yielding two tomatoes. The other plant began dying from the top down while yielding the grand total of five fruits. (When I file my claim I will refrain from improperly calling the tomato a fruit, as in the case of Nix v. Hedden, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that tomatoes are vegetables.) The honey bee situation is a different story. Early in the season I emailed Harriton inquiring about their winter losses. They lost a bunch. In years past I looked forward to seeing Farmer continued on page 14

the Resident Services Committee. Mr. Tripp chairs the Marketing Committee and also serves on the Wine and Spirits and the Capital Projects committees.

is a co-chair of the Resident Services Committee and a member of the Wine and Spirits Committee.

CAPITAL PROJECTS COMMITTEE—Mr. Dolf Paier, chairman, with Mrs. Norma Fabian, Mr. Bruce Mainwaring, Dr. Trachtenberg, Mr. Tripp and Mr. Woolford. Mrs. Fabian also serves on the Capital Projects and House committees. Her husband, George, is on the Marketing Committee. Mr. Paier chairs the Finance Committee. His wife, Geraldine, is a BRCI Board member, Chair of the Health Care Committee and a member of the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board. Mr. Mainwaring chairs the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board and also serves on the Finance and Marketing committees. Mr. Tripp chairs the Marketing Committee, serves on the Beaumont Fund Advisory Board, and is a member of the Wine and Spirits Committee. Mr. Woolford chairs the BRSI Board and also serves on the Finance Committee. His wife, Susan,

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ADMISSIONS AND RESIDENT REVIEW— Joseph J. Peduzzi, Chairman, with Ms. Renee Connolly, Certified Registered Nurse Practitioner; Mrs. Milissa Cwenar, Marketing Assistant; Mrs. Jeanne Drumheller, Director of Wellness Center; Mrs. Linda Lemisch, Vice President of Health Services; Miss Julie Morse, Resident Care Coordinator; Dr. James Morris, Medical Director, and Mrs. Audrey Walsh, Director of Marketing. (No residents serve on this committee.) Minutes of most of these committees are available in the Minutes Books in the Library. Next month: board and committee functions explained.


A Whine-y Toast to Joe By Alan R. Tripp

How did he manage all those years? Though you may think this quite absurd, At Beaumont, he’s King Joe the First, Not simply Fortenbaugh the Third. How did he manage all those years? How did he make things run so fine? The answer is quite clear, my dears, Joe found the answers on the vine. For noisy people in the bar, Joe would water their Pinot Noir. To people who would drive him crazy, He’d slip them Sangiovese.

Photos by Louise Hughes

Standing to offer final “Whine-y” toasts to Joe were past and present Wine and Spirits Committee members (from left): Don Trachtenberg, Marian Lockett-Egan, Mary Schnabel, Maurice Webster, Dining Services Director Rose-Marie Pringle, Susan Woolford, Herb Diamond, Bennett Blum and Alan Tripp. At Joe’s right hand, as always, Administrative Assistant Jennie Frankel.

To those who whispered, “Go to hell,” Joe simply proffered Zinfandel. For ladies screeching like your Aunty, Joe would cut off their Chianti. And when the snowplows wouldn’t go, Joe said, “Fill them with Merlot!” Now Joe said “non” much more than “oui,” By simply serving French Chablis. But, best of all, and in the main, Joe left the taste of real Champagne. How did he manage all those years? For every wine, he knew the word. No wonder, he’s King Joe the First, Not simply Fortenbaugh the Third. How did he manage all those years? And make Beaumonters toe the line? The answer is quite clear, my dears, Joe found the answers on the vine.

Sitting in for former Wine Committee member Bill Graff at the committee’s party for Joe was Beaumont News editor Mary Graff, who seized the chance to thank Joe for his unfailing support of the News, even when it ran pictures of him that might have been seen as a little less than flattering.

Farmer continued from page 13 bees in our garden, but in 2013 I saw them only one time, savoring the buckwheat growing on the idle garden beds. Harriton bees suffered severe losses but the keepers were able to split surviving colonies in hopes of recovering those losses.

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Homage To Our Longtime Leader By Peter Binzen

From Austin to Baldwin, let it be told Beaumont’s boss is not very old He’s run this joint for a great many years With humor and high jinks and not a few tears And old folks here keep coming through With canes and walkers and wheelchairs, too Some of our ladies are colonial dames But they don’t insist on fancy first names Mitsi and Margie and Tuppie and Gracie Shelly and Fytie—I rest my case-y Now indeed the time has arrived To hail the one who has survived To honor him from head to toe The man who’s simply known as “Joe” We salute you, Joe, with shock and awe A fond farewell to Fortenbaugh.

Photo by Louise Hughes

Dancing or clapping at staff farewell party for Joe are (from left) Sonya (Food Services), Jennie (Administration), Greg (Maintenance) Sulan (Housekeeping) and Rose-Marie (Dining Services).

Photo by Louise Hughes

Wine rack made from a retired wine barrel was a retirement present for Joe from Jennie Frankel, administrative assistant, and Rachel Debus, accounts receivable. Inscribed with an expression of Joe’s often heard behind the doors of the front office—“Just another day in paradise!”—it was made by relatives of Rachel’s in California. For more of their work see www. temeculawineart.com. Goodbye continued from page 1 Also at the dinner, Dolf Paier, stern chairman of our Finance Committee, gave an unwontedly warm (even a little fuzzy) speech of appreciation, and Peter Binzen burst into rhyme. Our new columnist, Housekeeping’s Mike Bailey, included him in his first staff roundup. The Wine and Spirits Committee met to toast him. Administration’s Jennie Frankel and Rachel Debus gave him a wine rack made from a retired wine barrel . Our huge new buses—sleek, comfortable and glossy black—arrived just in time to add luster to the festivities. And in a surprise development, all parties to our Capital Projects planning discussions reached agreement among themselves and with Lower Merion Township on construction to begin this month, in time for Joe to write about it. Then came the final moment. Does anyone out there not know by now that Joe loves and knows a lot about wine? Our Chief Executive Master of the One Liner’s parting quip at 12:50 p.m. August 30, as staff and residents massed at the front door for a last goodbye, took the form of a passing of the torch to his successor, Joe Peduzzi. A torch? Well, not exactly. A corkscrew! (More about Joe II, and a Welcome Joe party planned for October 10, in November.) Many of us loved Joe, including a few who remember his first day, almost 25 years ago, when Beaumont was in the throes of a challenging infancy. They will feel an emptiness in those spaces where—zipping through, totally booked, Goodbye continued on page 16

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Goodbye continued from page 15 tugging at his collar, tossing off a one-liner, moving on—he used to be. Others, happy to be here but content to let our leaders lead, hardly knew him. Some who knew him but did not always agree with him were already hoping for better luck with his successor. Joe, driven by a work ethic that always had him down in one trench or another (“with us,” recalled Security’s “Big Ed” Johnson admiringly) did not have time—nor did he much care—to worry about his popularity. Joe spent part of his last full day at Beaumont making sure he had said goodbye to everyone he could (sometimes to that person’s surprise), getting his last haircut from Oscar, offering to push a wheelchaired client of Oscar’s back to his room, trying to finally catch up on paperwork, and packing. Rarely seen without dress shirt and tie, Joseph Harrison Fortenbaugh III also took a last walk around the grounds in a tattered white T-shirt. He said he had received it from a blood donation center and was getting one more wear out of it before throwing it away and boarding a plane for Florida. “GOT BLOOD,” the T-shirt said. I think few, if any, of us would fail to agree that Joe put both his back and his heart’s blood, as well as almost 25 years, into fostering the growth of this community into the place we all so enviably call home.

Photo by Louise Hughes

Above: Not with a flame but a corkscrew was the way Beaumont’s Number One Oenophile passed the torch to his successor, Joe Peduzzi, on his way out the front door. Below: Torch passed, Joe Peduzzi holds the corkscrew aloft.

Photo by Louise Hughes

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Bnews october 2013 singles