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SOUTH ASIAN ART CLASSICAL, MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY ONLINE AUC TION (NO BUYER’S PREMIUM)

23 - 27 MARCH 2017


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South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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South Asian Art Classical, Modern AND Contemporary Online Auction (no buyer’s premium)

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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South Asian Art Classical, Modern AND ContemporarY SALE NUMBER: 1701 ONLINE AUCTION MARCH 23 - 27, 2017 No Buyer’s Premium ‘What You Bid Is What You Pay’

Auction Opening March 23, 2017 6:00 p.m. onwards UAE Standard Time

Auction Closing March 27, 2017 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. UAE Standard Time

Viewings March 12-23, 2017 11:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. By appointment 903|The Metropolis Business Bay Dubai | UAE +971 55 815 3030 +971 55 825 3030 auction@artiana.com


SPECIALIST AND SERVICES ARTIANA P.O. Box 112646 Dubai | UAE Sale Number: 1701 Specialist

Lavesh Jagasia +971 50 796 3030 lavesh@artiana.com Services Artiana Help Desk +971 55 815 3030 +971 55 825 3030 Registration and Written Bids auction@artiana.com Payment, Collection and Other Services info@artiana.com It’s Easy to Buy at Artiana Additional information on the buying process is available on page 115. Conditions of Sale This auction is conducted under the Conditions of Sale as stipulated in the catalogue on page 122. Copyright Notice No part of this catalogue may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Artiana. Š Copyright, Artiana, 2017

Front Cover: Lot 46 Page 134: Lot 51 (detail) Inside Front Cover: Lot 33 (detail) Inside Back Cover: Lot 41 (detail) Page 2-3: Lot 21 (detail) Back Cover: Lot 10 Page 4: Lot 4 (detail)


CONTENTS SALE GUIDE 9 Classical SOUTH ASIAN ART LOTS 1 - 25 51 MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY SOUTH ASIAN ART LOTS 26 - 60 115 IT’S EASY TO BUY AT ARTIANA 116 AUCTION CLOSING SCHEDULE 117 WRITTEN / ABSENTEE BID FORM 118 BIDDING INCREMENTS 119 BUYING AT ARTIANA 122 CONDITIONS OF SALE 127 ARTIANA GUARANTEE 128 STORAGE AND COLLECTION 129 ARTIST PROFILES AND INDEX


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Classical South Asian Art lots 1 - 25

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Expert: Renzo Freschi Renzo Freschi is an expert in Oriental Art and has extensively travelled within Asia since 1971. He has curated over forty monographic exhibitions on different aspects and periods of Asian art and has published several catalogues on the subject. In 2013 he curated the public exhibition The Magic of India, from the Temple to the Court, Masterpieces of Indian Art, showcasing more than 200 works of Indian art from the most important Italian collections. Artiana would like to thank Renzo Freschi for his expertise and assistance in preparing this section of the catalogue.

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lots 1 - 10

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Ganesh, the son of Shiva and Parvati, is worshipped in India as the god of abundance and because of his skill of removing all obstacles.

LOT 1

Dancing Ganesh sandstone height - 26.5 in. (67 cm.) width - 17 in. (43 cm.) depth - 6.75 in. (17cm.) 10th/11th century India, Rajasthan

US$ 20,000 - 30,000 PROVENANCE Private collection New York, since 1947.

In this high relief, the elephant-headed god wears jewels on his neck, head, arms and belly. He is represented with six arms (two are missing) in a very elegant dancing pose. While standing in his right leg, he is harmonious, sensuous, perfectly balanced despite the volume of his belly. His trunk tastes delicious sweets from the bowl he holds in his left hand. On the upper high sides, two apsaras drop flower garlands in order to venerate the god. The relief is an angular one, with a large stone wall at its right side. Despite the loss of his two right arms, this figure of Ganesh gives the impression to be quite intact because of its considerable power and grace.

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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A Jain tirthankara (master) is seated in meditation in the middle of two pillars. A couple of nude Jinas belonging to the Digambara sect are standing in two niches beside their master.

LOT 2

A Jain Shrine sandstone height - 15.75 in. (40 cm.) width - 17 in. (43 cm.) depth - 7 in. (18 cm.) 11th/12th century India, Rajasthan

Figures are inserted into an architectural structure, a sort of miniature temple that reminds the great jain temples of Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. The central niche is nicely worked - as the real temples are - and seems to underline the sacred power of the jain master, seated and still as an icon.

US$ 7,000 - 10,000

Outside of the architectural frieze is standing an elegant, dynamic dancing figure supported by a makara (aquatic mythological animal) holds floral offerings, while at the left side this figure is missing and only some geometrical motives appear.

PROVENANCE Private collection New York, since 1947.

This relief is very old but the Jinas’ figures are in perfect conditions.

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Durga is the great goddess, the companion (shakti) of Shiva, the incarnation of the feminine principle. She absorbed the old pre-Vedic figure of the Mother Goddess and was the first female goddess to be worshipped in a Hindu’s proper cult.

LOT 3

Durga sandstone height - 15 in. (38 cm.) width - 23.25 in. (59 cm.) depth - 5.5 in. (14 cm.) 11th/12th century India, Rajasthan

US$ 7,000 - 10,000 PROVENANCE Private collection New York, since 1947.

Durga has different forms and representations. Here she is depicted with four arms bearing: the trident, the snake, the amrita bowl (with sacred water) while her fourth arm is in dhyanamudra (meditation gesture). She sits in sukhasana (posture) between two columns that create a sort of sacred space enhancing her figure. Beside the goddess, two female figures in tribhanga posture (the typical triple bend) hold a flywhisk as a sign of devotion and respect. They are probably the river goddesses Ganga and Jamuna, who also appear in the Shiva iconography. This relief is so deeply carved that the figures seem to be sculpted quite entirely. Conservation is good, only the head of the left devotee is missing.

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LOT 4

Devi Bust sandstone height - 27.5 in. (70 cm.) width - 19.75 in. (50 cm.) depth - 11.75 in. (30 cm.) 11th/12th century India, Madhya Pradesh

US$ 30,000 - 50,000 PROVENANCE Robert Wilson Collection, USA.

A superb bust of a goddess. She holds a finely graved high cylindrical tiara (kirita-mukuta) on her head, the same one of Vishnu, with a makara head (aquatic mythological animal) in the middle. This tiara is typical of the South India’s statues and of Vishnu’s ones: this let us identify the goddess as Lakshmi, the wife of Vishnu. This tiara/crown is a symbol of majesty: if worn by a goddess, this signify that the figure is a supreme deity. Behind the head, there is a refined halo with two concentric crowns. The inner one is decorated with lotus leaves, the outer one with elaborated floral motives. Wonderful, sumptuous jewels are spread in the whole bust: at lobes, neck, breast, arm, thus underlining the importance of this venerated goddess. The abundance of breast - so typical of Indian Art - symbolizes fertility and maternity. This bust relief is deeply sculpted; part of the halo is missing.

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This stele depicts the god Vishnu with goddess Lakshmi to the right and goddess Parvati to the left.

LOT 5

Vishnu with Lakshmi and Saraswati black stone height - 23.5 in. (60 cm.) width - 10.25 in. (26 cm.) depth - 4.25 in. (11 cm.) 12th century, Pala Period Bangladesh

Over them, two apsaras drop flower garlands to honour the god. Below them, two kneeling devotees keep joined hands as a sign of devotion and prayer. Vishnu is portrayed in the classical form: with his four arms holding the mace, the lotus, the wheel and the conch, his attributes. Details are sculpted with great care and refinement. Figures seem to move away from the background.

US$ 12,000 - 18,000

The piece is an excellent example of Pala Dynasty art, which showed in the stone steles chiefly than in sculpture the iconic power of its figures. Pala steles are a characteristic of major Pala Art.

PROVENANCE Private collection, Italy.

The stele is in a very good state; the top only suffered little damage.

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LOT 6

Preaching Buddha schist height - 9.5 in. (24 cm.) width - 15.25 in. (39 cm.) depth - 2.75 in. (7 cm.) 2nd/3rd century North Pakistan

US$ 8,000 - 12,000 PROVENANCE Sotheby’s. Acquired from the above by a private Boston-based collector, in the1990’s.

The frieze shows a devotional scene with the Buddha preaching among a group of monks, bodhisattvas and donors. The scene is inserted in a classical architecture, defined on both sides by two columns made of elegant geometrical motives. At the center stands the Buddha; his right hand (missing) is in abhaya mudra (gesture of protection) and the left one is securing his monastic robe. At both sides, and above and below the Buddha, stand monks, bodhisattvas and donors, all them in gestures of devotion and worship. This frieze was decorating the walls of a stupa, the most famous Buddhist monument, and shows a fine hellenistic influence. The figures are well proportioned, their attitude shows a classical plasticity. The overlapping and intersecting of the garment pleats reinforce the classical style of the frieze and an impression of vitality, endowing it with an aristocratic elegance. The frieze has been made by the typical stone of Gandhara sculptures and monuments, a schist of blue-grey colour, that in this case is in a good condition.

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LOT 7

Bhudevi bronze height - 17.75 in. (45 cm.) width - 6.25 in. (16 cm.) depth - 4.75 in. (12 cm.) 16th/17th century, Vijayanagar period India

US$ 15,000 - 25,000 PROVENANCE Lawrence J. Hooker Revocable Trust, USA.

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This is a standing bronze statue of smiling Hindu goddess Bhudevi or Bhumi-Devi representing Mother Earth. She is the consort of Varaha, an avatar of Vishnu, and is regarded as the mother of goddess Sita. Her left arm graciously follows the body’s line thus keeping towards outside. She wears on the head the same kind of tall headgear of husband Vishnu. Posture is elegant. Drapery of dress is refined, embellished by the contrast between the big belt and the fineness of transparent tissue on the soft belly. Earrings in the form of two makaras - aquatic mythological animals - are particularly ingenious. This statue in perfect condition, is a beautiful example of South Indian bronze sculpture.


LOT 8

Durga bronze height - 17.5 in. (44.4 cm.) width - 6.75 in. (17.2 cm.) depth - 10 in. (25.4 cm.) 17th century India

US$ 25,000 - 35,000 PROVENANCE From the estate of the Count and Countess Haller V. Hallerstein, Boston, USA

A rare, important statue of goddess Durga in her eight-arm form, standing on a base with two tenons where a prabha (aureole for altars) was fixed. The statue is a tantric representation of Durga, the Shiva’s sakti (female incarnation), representing her magic and esoteric strength. Her eight hands hold eight ritual objects, the same found on the various manifestations of the Durga form. There are the thunderbolt, the ritual drum, the sword, the trident, the ritual cup, the shield among others. The goddess with flames in her hair is quite a powerful image, even considering the contrast with her serene expression. From the stylistic point of view, this statue is very interesting; it has characteristics very close to popular art but it preserves the South India statues’ classical features. All that, together with its considerable size, underlines the effect of this figure.

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 9

Krishna Venugopal (playing the flute) bronze height - 11 in. (28 cm.) width - 4 in. (10.5 cm.) depth - 4 in. (10 cm.) 18th/19th century India, Orissa

US$ 3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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The beloved god Krishna - one of the most worshipped of Indian pantheon - is represented here while playing his (missing) flute. In fact, that harmonious sound was irresistible for the gopis, the young shepherdesses who were in love with him. Krishna’s hands are raised parallel to his face in order to handle the instrument. His left leg only holds the weight of the body. The right one crosses the other as in performing a dance step. In Orissa, Krishna as an icon of Love was very popular. Usually, Krishna Venugopala’ figures were stylized in a folk style very different from the classical one, but also very appreciated just because of their essentiality. The statue is in perfect condition.


LOT 10

Buddha Head polychrome stucco height - 9.25 in. (23.5 cm.) width - 5.75 in. (14.5 cm.) depth - 6.5 in. (16 cm.) 4th/5th century North Pakistan

US$ 20,000 - 30,000 PROVENANCE Private collection, Paris A Thermoluminescence Analysis is consistent with the dating of this catalogue entry, and the report by Laboratory Ralf Kotalla accompanies the lot.

This Buddha head reflects the typical Gandhara style with a clear hellenistic influence. The elongated earlobes only and the half-shut eyes show the Indian origin and taste. The intensity of expression, the lengthened shape of eyes (that denote an oriental origin), the elongated earlobes, the circle (urna) in the middle of the forehead, the cranium protuberance (usnisa) are distinguishing characteristics of the Buddha. Furthermore, the sweet faraway look absorbed in deep meditation is typical of Buddhist art. Face’s oval is perfect, eyebrows are gently arching, nose is straight. The face’s soft simplicity contrasts and points out the hair, which is treated according to an incisive cutting. Fineness of features is emphasized by the polychrome stucco. The beautiful aesthetic quality of this head is a fine example of Gandharan stucco sculpture.

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Expert: J.P. Losty J.P. Losty was for many years curator of Indian visual materials in the British Library in London and has published many books and articles on painting in India from the 12th to the 19th centuries. Artiana would like to thank J.P. Losty for his expertise and assistance in preparing this section of the catalogue.

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lots 11 - 25

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The Maharaja here is not of course of the ruling family of Mewar which in 1855-56 was Maharana Sarup Singh (r. 1842-61), but would be the ruler of one of the thikanas or feudatory states of Mewar. Many such rulers appear in the great paintings of court activity from the 19th century in the Udaipur palace collection with inscriptions naming those present. Topsfield records two rulers named Sher Singh in paintings dated 1851: (Kaka) Sher Singh of Bagor and Sher Singh of Diwala (1990, nos. 29 and 32). Sher Singh of Bagor is called kaka (any senior male relative), since he was the elder brother of Maharana Svarup Singh, who had been adopted into the Mewar royal house from the thikana of Bagor. This royal connection makes him the more likely candidate for a portrait from the royal studio. This type of portrait with the rider on horseback with attendants with royal insignia, armed guards and the like set against a plain green ground and distant dimpled hills had been formalized by the artist Tara around 1840-50 (Topsfield 1980, nos. 266-68). Here Sher Singh is preceded by two chobdars (silver-stick bearers) and two men bearing decorated palm or plantain leaves, while there follow two attendants with different kinds of parasols, a spear carrier and a hookah-bearer for the maharaja’s hookah which he is smoking while riding. Four armed retainers of the sort seen in the contemporary paintings of scenes of royal activities guard the little procession (e.g. Topsfield 1990, nos. 29-30; Topsfield 2002, fig. 234). They are all chatting among themselves, somewhat distracting from the dignity of the occasion if indeed it is meant to be a dignified procession. Strangely they are all including Sher Singh wearing a more old-fashioned type of turban than that normally worn in the reign of Sarup Singh, one with a crescent-shaped cockade at the back which the Maharana himself invented. References Topsfield, A., Paintings from Rajasthan in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1980 Topsfield, A., The City Palace Museum, Udaipur – Paintings of Mewar Court Life, Mapin, Ahmedabad, 1990 Topsfield, A., Court Painting at Udaipur: Art under the Patronage of the Maharanas of Mewar, Artibus Asiae, Zurich, 2002

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LOT 11

Maharaja Sher Singh riding with at t endants opaque pigments with gold and paper folio 46 x 33 cm. painting 41 x 27.5 cm. Mewar, dated 1855-56

US$ 2,500 - 3,500

Inscribed in nagari on the verso: maharajadhiraja shri Sher Singh ji ki tasbir ko pano o 1912 ka posa sud 14 bhaumai goro kacan sumer ye asvar huva thaka ki along with royal Mewar inventory numbers (‘portrait of Maharaja Sher Singh inventoried on Thursday the 14th day of the bright half of the month Pausha in Samvat 1912/AD1855-56, riding the horse Kacansumer adorned with a gold garland’). PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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Ghanerao is one of the thikanas of Marwar or Jodhpur, situated south of the capital and close to the Mewar border. A long continued tradition of royal portraiture was maintained by the Thakurs from the early 18th century to the middle of the 19th (see Crill 2000 ‘Ghanerao’ for its history). Thakur Ajit Singh (r. 1800-56) was one of the last rulers to keep up this tradition and several portraits of him and of his son Pratap Singh survive (see Crill op. cit., figs. 12-15). In our splendid double portrait Ajit Singh (on the right) holding a wine cup is seated opposite Thakur Tej Singh (whose thikana is not given in the inscription) who holds a flower, while attendants wave morchhals over them. They are both smoking from hookahs, and being entertained by two male musicians and seven female singers in a courtyard on a terrace. The sarangi and tabla players are especially well observed. Noblemen sit behind each Thakur, some holding wine cups. Two pavilions frame the action between which is a pool with fountains while a distant garden can be seen beyond. The clouds are arranged above in overlapping curls, one of the fashions peculiar to Marwar painting at this time. At the bottom of the picture in the centre of the action as if an attendant walks forward holding a cup and pouring wine from a flask into it. Special points of interest in our painting include the male hairstyles: Tej Singh and all the men on his side have shaved the back of their heads and let their hair grow into curled dreadlocks behind their ears. Turban styles on both sides with their relatively flat turban cloths secured by differently coloured bands are very different from the high-peaked style of turban worn at this time in Man Singh’s court in Jodhpur itself. The two principles and several of their nobles are wearing muslin jamas embroidered with the chikan work of Lucknow. Tej Singh has a jewelled dagger stuck through his cummerbund, while Ajit Singh has a pistol in the same place, a detail not often seen in paintings, and holds his katar in his unoccupied hand. The movements of the head and body of the tabla player are especially well observed. The painting is very much in the style of Dana of Jodhpur who painted other portraits of Ajit Singh and his son at Ghanerao (Crill 2000 ‘Ghanerao’, figs. 12-13) as well as the Thakur of Chandawal (Crill 2000 ‘Marwar‘ fig. 102). All three have much the same sort of composition on a terrace between pavilions and with a distant garden. The balustrades with their interlaced arches are common to many Jodhpur paintings at this time, but the beautifully painted flowers with trees beyond seen in other examples of Dana’s work are rarer. As usual in Jodhpur painting at this time, little attention is paid to relative scale, so the less important figures even if nearer the viewer are smaller than the main ones. References Crill, R., Marwar Painting: A History of the Jodhpur Style, India Book House Ltd., Bombay, 2000 Crill, R., ‘The Thakurs of Ghanerao as Patrons of Painting’ in Topsfield, A., ed., Court Painting in Rajasthan, Marg Publications, Bombay, 2000, pp. 92-108

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LOT 12

Thakur Ajit Singh of Ghanerao and Thakur Tej Singh opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 33.5 x 41 cm. painting 28 x 36.5 cm. attributed to Dana of Jodhpur, c. 1810-20 Inscribed on the verso in nagari: Thakuran Ajit Singh ji Ghanerao and Thakuran Tej Singh ji

US$ 3,000 - 5,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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Our painting is unfortunately not inscribed, so it is not possible to identify the subject of this splendid court scene of an unnamed Thakur of Marwar enjoying a musical performance. He is seated wearing a white jama over blue and gold striped paijama, a red cummerbund, and a saffron turban decorated with magnificent jewels as well as a flower garland, another of which he wears round his neck along with other jewels. He is seated at ease among brocaded cushions and bolsters on a red rug drinking from a wine cup, while three of his nobles sit beside him also enjoying wine. These are all garlanded with flowers while a basket of flowers sits in front of them. Three attendants behind them carry further refreshments, one of whom waves a morchhal over the Thakur. Three women singers are seated facing them, one with her arms in the air making hand gestures accompanying the singing. Two men sit behind them playing the sarangi and the tabla, the latter with the histrionic gestures beloved of tabla players everywhere. The scene is set on a terrace outside a pavilion with a shamiana over the Thakur. Beyond the balustrade of the terrace is a garden with massed flowers and stylized trees. The scene seems to be set at night with a dark sky, although cranes are flying through it and we can see clouds outlined as the petals of flowers above. The painting is very much in the style of Dana of Jodhpur who painted several portraits of Maharaja Man Singh all dated 1811 in the Kunwar Sangram Singh collection (Crill 2000 ‘Marwar’ p. 102). He also painted portraits of Marwar Thakurs, including Ajit Singh and his son Pratap Singh of Ghanerao (Crill 2000 ‘Ghanerao’, figs. 12-13) as well as the Thakur of Chandawal in 1815 (Crill 2000 ‘Marwar‘ fig. 102). All these as well as the double portrait of Ajit Singh of Ghanerao and Tej Singh in this collection have much the same sort of composition on a terrace with one or more pavilions and with a distant garden. The beautifully painted flowers with trees beyond as in our two paintings attributed to Dana are also seen in other examples of Dana’s work noted above. Our musicians are based on the same charbas as in the Ajit Singh and Tej Singh composition. The cranes appear again in Dana’s portrait of the Thakur of Chandawal in durbar (Crill 2000 ‘Marwar’ fig. 102). All these paintings have varied stylizations for the clouds, but the flower petal arrangements in our painting do not seem to have been repeated. The Thakur’s physiognomy is depicted very carefully so that we can observe his beard joining his mustache with its ends brushed up loosely, his shaven chin and back of the neck, and the heavy bangs of hair falling in front of his ears. While some or all of these features appear in other Jodhpur portraits at this time, no other Thakur seems to have precisely this combination. Also unusual for a Marwar Thakur is the triple jewelled ornament attached to his turban, whereas the Thakurs of Ghanerao and Chandawal normally wear more modest ornaments. Were it not for the bangs falling before his ears rather than behind, he might be taken for Kunwar Pratap Singh of Ghanerao (Crill 2000 ‘Ghanerao’ figs. 13-15), who alone among these portraits wears a similar kind of turban ornament. However, dreadlock bangs in front of the ears are an acknowledged fashion in other Marwar thikanas, for instance at Pali (Crill 2000 ‘Marwar’ fig. 103), but there the turban style is very different. References Crill, R., Marwar Painting: A History of the Jodhpur Style, India Book House Ltd., Bombay, 2000 Crill, R., ‘The Thakurs of Ghanerao as Patrons of Painting’ in Topsfield, A., ed., Court Painting in Rajasthan, Marg Publications, Bombay, 2000, pp. 92-108

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LOT 13

A Thakur of Marwar enjoying music opaque pigments and gold and silver on paper folio 31.5 x 38.5 cm. painting 26 x 33 cm. attributed to Dana of Jodhpur, c. 1820

US$ 2,500 - 3,500

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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A nobleman dressed in Mughal 18th century costume is seated on a European-style chair with carved back. Two attendants stand behind him, dressed in the long robes and small turbans of the Deccan around 1800, one of whom waves a morchhal. The nobleman has a long sword in his folded hands, its point resting on the floral carpet underneath. The scene is set on a terrace with a dark blue parapet and light blue sky beyond. Above is a red canopy meant to cover the nobleman, but Indian artists rarely paid attention to the positioning of the poles supporting such devices.

LOT 14

A Mughal prince or nobleman seated opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 23.5 x 16 cm. painting 22.5 x 15 cm. Hyderabad, early 19th century

Such simplistic portraits of both contemporary and previous emperors, princes and noblemen were produced in some quantities in Hyderabad in the early 19th century. For a somewhat similar portrait of a Mughal nobleman standing on a terrace, see Sharma 1974, no. 22, fig. 21, and for a portrait of the contemporary minister Aristu Jah seated on a similar carpet, see Bautze 1987, no. 31. References Bautze, J., Indian Miniature Paintings, c. 1590c.1850, Galerie Saundarya Lahari, Amsterdam, 1987

US$ 1,000 - 1,500

Falk, T., and Archer, M., Indian Miniatures in the India Office Library, Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1981

PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

Sharma, O.P., Indian Miniature Painting: Exhibition Compiled from the Collection of the National Museum, New Delhi, Bibliothèque Royale, Brussels, 1974

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Maharaja Man Singh of Jodhpur (r. 180343) rides his gaily caparisoned horse, with attendants on foot accompanying him, in front of a large hill. Dressed all in white, his main adornment is his high-peaked yellow and red turban. He holds the reins with his left hand and strokes his horse’s neck with his right. Attendants on foot carry morchhal, silver sticks and chowrie as appropriate. The horse is beautifully decorated as was usual in Jodhpur painting, not only with its mane plaited and decorated with coloured fillets, but with coloured streamers attached to its bridle, and painted decorations round its body, the lower half of which as well as the legs have been painted red with henna. The group is passing a large hill, its lower rocks rendered in blue with flowers and grasses growing in the cracks between the rocks. It must be some significance but there is no inscription to tell us.

LOT 15

Maharaja Man Singh on horseback opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 34 x 22.5 cm. painting 33 x 22 cm. Jodhpur, 1810-20

US$ 1,500 - 2,500 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

Crill writes (2000, p. 140) that there were many hundreds of equestrian portraits produced in Man Singh’s reign, some splendid, to which the static formality of the Man Singh style lent itself very well. Her figs. 114 and 115 are fine examples from around 1820. Our more restrained painting is closer to an equestrian portrait of the freebooter Amir Khan in the V&A Museum from around 1815 (ibid., fig. 95). This is indeed a very restrained painting by the standards of Man Singh’s usual portraits, which show him either in frantic activity or else static in elaborate durbars or in garden scenes with his women. For a full account of the paintings of his reign and its troubled history, see Crill 2000, chapter 4. References Crill, R., Marwar Painting: A History of the Jodhpur Style, India Book House Ltd., Bombay, 2000

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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In this richly coloured painting, a royal lady is seated on a lilac mat on a white terrace leaning against a lilac bolster. She holds a hand-held hookah or nargila in one hand and its mouthpiece in the other about to put it into her mouth. She is dressed in dark purple shalwar with a gold diaper pattern covered by a light blue peshwaj and a dark blue dupatta with floral ends. Heavy jewellery loaded with pearls adorns her person. Beyond the marble terrace are serried rows of white flowers and a green background that ends above in clouds. A nimbus is meant to suggest she is a princess. A tray with gold flasks and covered pots sits on the mat beside her.

LOT 16

A princess smoking a hookah opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 27 x 22.5 cm. painting 22 x 18 cm. style of Sahib Ram, Jaipur, c. 1800

US$ 1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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The girl’s facial profile, her heavy jewellery, the orange streak over her eyebrow are similar to a fragmentary painting in the Freer Gallery, Washington DC, attributed to the Jaipur artist Sahib Ram (Aitken 2011, fig. 7). A seated portrait of Maharaja Pratap Singh in a private collection in New York (ibid., fig. 10) shows the same kind of arrangement of gorgeous clothes spread out tastefully over the body of the subject and the terrace. Similar too are the arrangements of the ripples of the peshwaj when compared with the Maharaja’s jama as they fall onto the mat, thereby allowing the differently coloured lining of the garments to be seen in a uniform pattern. The colour scheme here contrasting light and dark blues and purples is particularly striking. References Aitken, M.E., ‘Sahib Ram’, in Beach, M.C., Fischer, E., and Goswamy, B.N., Masters of Indian Painting, Artibus Asiae, Zurich, 2011, pp. 623-40


LOT 17

Yashoda and Nanda with the infants Krishna and Balarama opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 36 x 28 cm. painting 24 x 18.5 cm. mounted in a blue album page splashed with gold Jaipur, c. 1830-50

US$ 2,000 - 3,000 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

The foster parents of Krishna and Balarama, Yashoda and Nanda, are shown seated in a palatial room, with each holding one of the boys in his or her lap. Other infant boys of Braj and the calves are grouped around them. The room in which they are seated is covered with white plaster decorated with gold designs. An arched niche at the back perhaps intended for a divinity is empty. A lobed arch at the front of the picture distances the scene from the viewer. The artist suggests recession through the darkening of the areas immediately behind the arches. Such technically controlled paintings concentrating on decorative elements are typical of the Jaipur style in the 19th century, when were produced large numbers of sets of Ragamalas, Barahmasas and the like (compare Ahluwalia 2008, fig. 15). Devotional images such as this one are rarer. References Ahluwalia, R., Rajput Painting: Romantic, Divine and Courtly Love from India, British Museum Press, London, 2008

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Krishna is seated on a golden throne extending his hand to a woman beside him who is massaging or shampooing his arm. Another woman waves a chowrie, while a third kneeling off the carpet is preparing the unguents for the massage. A flask and a candle are positioned beside her. The scene takes place on a terrace covered with a polychrome carpet with a trellis pattern with stylized flowers inside each cartouche. A pavilion and high wall closes the back, while above the night sky is full of stars.

LOT 18

Krishna having his arm massaged opaque pigments with gold on paper folio 28.5 x 18 cm. painting 15.5 x 15 cm. mounted in a cream album page splashed with gold Jaipur, early 19th century

US$ 1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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A lord having his arm massaged is the iconography of Bhairava raga, but the lord in question is normally Shiva (e.g. Ebeling 1973, figs. 187, 191), although other variants are possible for this raga. A loving couple with a flame or light can turn the scene into Dipak raga, but it is not possible to say how much weight to accord to the candle here. For another polychrome trellis carpet from Jaipur in a painting of Shri raga, see Bautze 1987, no. 46. An earlier Jaipur representation of this scene with a prince rather than Krishna as the subject of the massage is in the British Museum (Ahluwalia 2008, fig 47). References Bautze, J., Indian Miniature Paintings, c. 1590 - c.1850, Galerie Saundarya Lahari, Amsterdam, 1987 Ebeling, K., Ragamala Painting, Ravi Kumar, Basel, 1973


LOT 19

Krishna and the gopis opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 27 x 19 cm. painting 19.5 x 14.5 cm. Bikaner, 18th century

US$ 3,000 - 5,000 PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai

In the time honoured image of Krishna Venugopala, Krishna with the flute, the god stands on a lotus in an easy posture, his flute out to the right and the god facing left, while gopis on both sides bring him offerings or stand in worship with their cattle. A stylised version of the River Jumna runs along the base of the picture while behind the green background morphs into the blue sky with stylised cloud motifs above.

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Krishna is seated in the ancient posture known as ardhaparyankasana within a grove of trees playing his flute. Not just a simple cowherd, he wears a dhoti of gold brocade and of course his gold jewelled crown and peacock finial. Two gopis on each side have come to listen to him and bring their offerings, while others below engaged in filling their water pots from the stream pause to listen. Cattle, a crocodile, various birds and monkeys also listen enraptured to the music of the divine player. The setting is an idyllic landscape full of beautiful trees and verdant meadows through which a river meanders below distant hills crowned with trees and a many-towered city. There were several Rohilla Afghan principalities in western Avadh in the later 18th century - Rampur, Bareilly, etc., but Farrukhabad is the only one as yet that has a school of painting linked to it, although the evidence is actually slight, being based on a portrait thought to be of Nawab Ahmad Khan Bangash (r. 1750-71), its ruler (Falk and Archer 1981, p. 189), during whose reign the style appears to have flourished. The style is basically that of Faizabad and Lucknow but with characteristic elongation of figures and of ladies’ faces and often in its early phases with a harsh palette involving orange, yellow and brown. The style is associated with the artist Muhammad Faqirallah Khan whose Avadhi females with their elongated figures and long narrow faces with receding foreheads and pointed noses seem to have influenced the artists of the short-lived Farrukhabad style in the 1760s and 1770s (documented in Binney 1973, nos. 103-105; Falk and Archer 1981, nos. 362i-vi; and Leach 1995 nos. 6.364, 365). While it is possible that Faqirallah actually worked in Farrukhabad and initiated this style there, no paintings signed by him in this characteristic Farrukhabad colouring have yet been forthcoming. The subject of Krishna and the gopis is an unusual one for Farrukhabad which apart from a few portraits concerns itself primarily with ladies and their doings. The artist has lavished much attention on the animals and birds, mingling the characteristic Hindu subject with a more typical Mughal one such as Majnun in the wilderness being comforted by the denizens of the wild. The page comes from an album of which two other pages from Farrukhabad are in the former Benkaim collection, now in the Cleveland Museum (Quintanilla 2016, nos. 82 and 83), with their characteristic album pages of dark browny-purple surrounds splashed with gold and calligraphic specimens on the versos. References Binney, E., 3rd, Indian Miniature Painting from the Collection of Edwin Binney, 3rd: The Mughal and Deccani Schools, Portland, 1973 Falk, T., and Archer, M., Indian Miniatures in the India Office Library, Sotheby Parke Bernet, London, 1981 Leach, L.Y., Mughal and other Indian Paintings in the Chester Beatty Library, London, 1995 Quintanilla, Sonya Rhie, Mughal Paintings: Art and Stories, The Cleveland Museum, Cleveland, 2016

LOT 20

Krishna and the gopis opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 30.5 x 22 cm. painting 29 x 21 cm. in a dark purply-brown album page splashed with gold with a Persian quatrain on the verso Farrukhabad, 1760-70

US$ 1,500 - 2,500

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PROVENANCE Galerie Louis Manteau, Brussels Private collection, USA


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Maharao Ram Singh of Kota (r. 1827-66) is one of the best represented of Rajput rulers with many aspects of his life both public and personal documented by his artists. He is represented in durbars with his court and with British officials, in the many festivals of the Hindu calendar, including Dussehra as here, the Asapura festival (Kreisel 1995, fig. 132), and the riotous spring festival of Holi (Topsfield 1980, pl. 7), as well as personal worship of the deities (Seyller 2015, no. 60), and of course many scenes of personal interest such as riding an elephant on top of the chajja of a pavilion in 1853 (Ehnbom1985, no. 64), playing polo with his noblemen (Welch 1997, no 63), entering Delhi in 1842 (ibid., no. 65), and scenes of him enjoying himself with his women (Seyller 2015, no. 61). Here he is, celebrating the autumnal Dussehra festival, commemorating the slaying of the buffalo-headed demon Mahishasura by the Devi, by hunting and killing a buffalo in a ritual slaying. Other pictures suggest that this was not a solitary affair but was a communal ceremony undertaken with his nobles (Kreisel ed. 1995, fig. 133). In our splendidly energetic painting, the Maharao is gorgeously apparelled in helmet and body armour, with room of course for jewels, over a lilac jama. He carries a small shield in his left hand which holds the reins, while an empty scabbard is by his side, the sword being used to slice at the neck of the buffalo, which is falling to the ground behind the horse. The horse is even more gorgeously caparisoned than the Maharao, with its tasselled mane, jewelled bridle and many chains with attached gold plates. Two attendants run beside on foot, one with a khanda sword and a chowrie, and the other with a sun-burst parasol. The latter may also be carrying an upright spear, unless it is attached to the horse in some way or held by an invisible attendant. The scene is set below a plain green hillside dotted with a few trees and with a walled garden near the summit of the hill. The Maharao here appears relatively young, being without his full set of bushy sideburns that grew gradually over the course of his reign. He came to the throne at the age of 19 and one of his earliest datable portraits shows him about 25 (Bautze’s fig. 14 in Welch et al. 1997, p. 53), when his sideburns were already heavier than they are in our painting. His profile with its bulbous ending to the nose and protruding lips is instantly recognisable. The horse rolls its eyes as the buffalo falls dying to the ground, its horns obtruding into the margin, but Ram Singh’s grave face is devoid of the pleasure of the hunt but rather intent on doing his ritual duty. A later and rather stiffer picture dated 1859 in the Mittal Museum in Hyderabad (Seyller ed. 2015, no. 63) shows the same ritual killing of the buffalo but with the Maharao using a spear rather than a sword, while a preliminary drawing for that painting is in the V&A Museum (Archer 1959, Kotah fig. 49). References Archer, W.G., Indian Painting in Bundi and Kotah, HMSO, London, 1959 Ehnbom, D., Indian Miniatures: The Ehrenfeld Collection, American Federation of Arts, New York, 1985 Kreisel, Gerd, ed. Rajasthan, Land der KÜnige, Linden-Museum, Stuttgart, in Zusammenarbeit mit Kunstverlag Gotha, 1995 Seyller, John, ed., Rajasthani Paintings in the Jagdish and Kamla Mittal Museum of Indian Art, Hyderabad, 2015 Topsfield, A., Paintings from Rajasthan in the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1980 Welch, S.C., et al., Gods, Kings and Tigers: The Art of Kotah, Prestel, Munich, New York, 1997

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LOT 21

Maharao Ram Singh killing a buffalo opaque pigments and gold on paper folio 16.5 x 25 cm. painting 15.5 x 24.5 cm. Kota, c. 1830-400

US$ 5,000 - 7,000 PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai

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The Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan (reg. 162858) stands upright facing left, one hand before his chest, the other holding the hilt of his wrapped up sword. He wears a cream jama sprigged with a gold design, a plain gold patka with ends patterned with cornflowers, and a long thin gold dupatta also with cornflower ends wrapped around him in the Deccani fashion. His turban is of red brocade with a gold and jewelled turban band. A green nimbus with a gold edge surrounds his head. He stands against an eau-de-nil plain sky. The background was probably once monochrome but another hand seems to have added a rippling green ground at the bottom with unattached flowers.

LOT 22

Shah Jahan opaque pigments on paper with gold folio 27.5 x 20 cm. painting 24 x 16.5 cm. Deccan, possibly from Aurangabad, mid-18th century

US$ 1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

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Many such portraits of the Mughal emperors, princes and noblemen were produced in the Deccan in the 18th century, following on from the similar albums from Golconda in the late 17th century produced for European consumption. Some of the latter have remained intact, allowing their provenances to be ascertained, but the later ones from the 18th century such as our example come mostly from dismantled albums so that it is not known whether they were produced for European or Indian consumption. For such an intact album from the early 18th century in the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, see Hurel no. 234, which still displays the brilliantly contrasting colours of Deccani painting as well as the type of ground aimed at in our painting. These colours have been toned down somewhat in our painting of Shah Jahan in accordance with Mughal taste, which was exerted by the Mughal Viceroys of the Deccan from their base in Aurangabad. References Hurel, R., Miniatures et Peintures Indiennes: collection du DÊpartement des estampes et de la photographie de la Bibliothèque nationale de France, Editions BnF, Paris, Vol. I, 2010


A Muslim clothed in a blue robe and a blue cap is kneeling at worship outside the iwan of a mosque with the Koran on a stand beside him. A woman dressed in normal Hindu south Indian costume is standing behind him, looking rather puzzled. Small gravestones are situated on the plinth of the mosque, while the buildings surrounding the courtyard are visible behind with trees beyond. The place is identifiable through what is visible beyond the trees, i.e. the top of the famous rock of Trichinopoly, modern day Tiruchirapalli, in Tamil Nadu state. The mosque is a typical south Indian one of an arcaded prayer hall with two small minarets rising from the corners of the faรงade.

LOT 23

Muslim divine praying at a mosque in Trichinopoly gouache on paper folio 38 x 28 cm. painting 35 x 25 cm. Tanjore or Trichinopoly, c. 1820

US$ 1,000 - 1,500 PROVENANCE Private collection, USA

The painting looks as if it ought to be part of a set of castes and occupations done by a Tanjore artist in the early 19th century, which normally show a man and woman together with the tools or their trade or occupation, but these have neutral backgrounds and are rarely localised to this extent. However, a painting from an album of trades and castes from Tanjore in the British Museum from around 1830 (Dallapiccola 2010, cat. no. 15.31, p. 192) shows the same scene with praying Muslim, Koran and mosque but with the woman in a Muslim type of costume, so it would seem that our painting was once in such an album. Other sets from Tanjore can be more place specific, such as a set in the V&A Museum of ten paintings in landscape format from Tanjore c. 1800 of festivals and processions, and indeed one of these shows the same mosque with people praying and with the Rock rising behind (AL 8802, Archer 1992, no. 21(4), p. 54, unillustrated, but see the V&A website). References Archer, M., Company Paintings: Indian Paintings of the British Period, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1992 Dallapiccola, A., South Indian Paintings: A Catalogue of the British Museum Collections, British Museum Press, London, 2010

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A Brahmin and his wife stand in a landscape, he dressed in a white red-fringed dhoti with a red shawl over his shoulder and carrying a palm-leaf manuscript, she in a red and green sari and yellow blouse. She of course wears the heavy gold jewellery of south India, while he has large gold hoops in his ears. His tilak mark on his forehead, the Urdhva-pundra, indicates he is a Shri-Vaishnava. Albums illustrating the various castes and occupations of the people of south India were a speciality of the Tanjore muchis, originally leather-workers, who became the predominant caste of artists in south India in the British period. The albums were produced from about 1770 to 1820 and generally showed couples standing side by side, a man and his wife, carrying the implements of their profession or trade. They remained essentially static, although at a later period the figures were assembled into grander groups or processional scenes.

LOT 24

A Shri-Vaishnava Brahmin and his wife gouache on paper folio 36 x 25 cm. painting 34.5 x 23.5 cm. Tanjore, c. 1800

The style of the page with plain blue sky enlivened by clouds diving through it and a ground sloping back a to tree-covered horizon indicates a date after 1800, when more picturesque types of landscape were introduced into Tanjore painting. U-shaped shadows become ubiquitous at this date. For paintings of comparable date from Tanjore, see Archer 1972, pl. 4, and Archer 1992, no.2 (14), p. 56.

US$ 1,000 - 1,500

References Archer, M., Company Drawings in the India Office Library, HMSO, London, 1972

PROVENANCE H. Kevorkian collection, no. 1111 Private collection, USA

Archer, M., Company Paintings: Indian Paintings of the British Period, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1992

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A male acrobat stands bracing himself to support on his chin an upright pole with a little platform at the top, on which stands a woman balancing herself on one foot. A male musician stands beside them beating a drum. She is dressed in a stitched-up red sari and a blue and white blouse as well as decked with the heavy gold jewellery of the south. The two men, both of them with moustaches, wear red drawers and Maratha-style turbans in white or blue, along with necklaces of gold and red beads and large gold hooped earrings. They also wear conspicuous Shaiva sectarian marks on their foreheads. Albums illustrating the various castes and occupations of the people of south India were a speciality of the Tanjore muchis, originally leather-workers, who became the predominant caste of artists in south India in the British period. The albums were produced from about 1770 to 1820 and generally showed couples standing side by side, a man and his wife, carrying the implements of their profession or trade. They remained essentially static, although at a later period the figures were assembled into grander groups or processional scenes.

LOT 25

Acrobats gouache on paper folio 36 x 25 cm. painting 36 x 25 cm. Tanjore, c. 1800

The style of the page with plain blue sky enlivened by clouds diving through it and a ground sloping back to a tree-covered horizon indicates a date around 1800, when more picturesque types of landscape were introduced into Tanjore painting. U-shaped shadows become ubiquitous at this date. For paintings of comparable date from Tanjore, see Archer 1972, pl. 4, and Archer 1992, no.2(14), p. 56. In later decades the drawing and colouring became coarser but here the subject is treated freshly with particularly good faces. The pole bearer gazes up at the woman intently, gauging her movements to keep his pole in balance, while the drummer looks out at the viewer with an almost sardonic expression on his face. For a more elaborate later scene of tumblers and acrobats from Tanjore, see Dallapiccola 2010, cat. 14.11, p. 182). References Archer, M., Company Drawings in the India Office Library, HMSO, London, 1972

US$ 1,000 - 1,500

Archer, M., Company Paintings: Indian Paintings of the British Period, Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 1992

PROVENANCE H. Kevorkian collection, no. 1114 Private collection, USA

Dallapiccola, A., South Indian Paintings: A Catalogue of the British Museum Collections, British Museum Press, London, 2010

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MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY South Asian Art lots 26 - 60

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lots 26 - 35

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LOT 26

K. LAXMA GOUD (b. 1940) Untitled (Shiv Parivar) acrylic on canvas 60 x 48 in. (152.4 x 121.9 cm.) painted in 2016 Signed and dated in Telugu (lower centre right)

US$ 30,000 - 50,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. Property of a private collection based in Dubai

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LOT 27

Ram Kumar (b. 1924) Untitled acrylic on paper 20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2 cm.) painted in 2004 Signed and dated ‘Ram Kumar 2004’ (on the reverse)

US$ 8,000 - 12,000

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PROVENANCE Sothebys / Sale # L15500 / Lot 106 / Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art / London / October 2015


LOT 28

SYED HAIDER RAZA (1922 - 2016) Vistar acrylic on canvas 23.5 x 23.5 in. (60 x 60 cm.) painted in 2005

US$ 70,000 - 100,000

Signed and dated ‘Raza ‘05’ (lower right) Further signed, initialed twice, titled, dated and inscribed ‘Raza / “Vistar” / 2005 / 60 x 60 cm. / acrylic on canvas’ (on the reverse) Further titled in Hindi and inscribed ‘Paris, 19th April 2005 / “’Vistar’ means expansion, an unfolding. It is through Vistar that one reaches the still centre that is the highest reality.” Charles Correa (on the reverse) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. PUBLISHED Alain Bonfand, Raza, Paris, 2008, p. 245 (illustrated)

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LOT 29

A. Ramachandran (b. 1935) Untitled watercolour on paper 10.75 x 14.75 in. (27.3 x 37.4 cm.) painted in 2002 Signed and dated ‘Ramachandran 2002’ (lower left) Bearing artist’s stamp (lower left)

US$ 6,000 - 8,000

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PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai.


LOT 30

Thota Vaikuntam (b. 1942) Pandit with women acrylic on canvas 72 x 48 in. (182.8 x 121.9 cm.) painted in 2006 Signed and dated in Telugu (lower centre left)

US$ 50,000 - 70,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner. PUBLISHED Aditi De, Krishen Khanna, SH Raza, Rustic Ragas: Inner Melodies of Thota Vaikuntam, Timeless Books, New Delhi, 2008, p. 141 (Illustrated)

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LOT 31

Laxman Shreshtha (b. 1939) Untitled oil on canvas 59 x 59 in. (149.8 x 149.8 cm.) painted in 2003 Signed and dated ‘Laxman 2003’ (lower right) Further signed ‘Laxman Shreshtha’ (on the reverse)

US$ 20,000 - 30,000

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PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai.


Following years of experiments with European culture and aesthetics, Raza was keen on bringing his Indian identity to his works. The unambiguous and immediate character of Pollock’s and Willem de Kooning’s works inspired him at this time. He began to freely apply nonfigurative aspects in his works. His palette transitioned to a pronounced use of colour — featuring fervid tones of red and yellow, for instance. He had a particular liking for inflamed colours — inspired from Rajasthani and Jain miniatures — and abandoned himself in their use. ‘Rajasthan’ depicts a seamless movement that plays out through an eloquent melange of paint. Shape, as such, is not inferred. The influence he drew from miniatures are made unique through his own unique interpretation. It does not serve to liberate but to bind — to return him to the sources which he had once known, to shapes and colours experienced at an earlier age. For him these forms are not a novelty with which to experiment, but primordial forms which he can replicate. He focuses not on the anecdotal but the essential, or rather the essence of India, imbibed into his work from the mid-60’s.

LOT 32

Syed Haider Raza (1922 - 2016) Rajasthan acrylic on paper 25.5 x 19.75 in. (65 x 50 cm.) painted in 1977

US$ 45,000 - 65,000

Signed and dated ‘Raza ‘77’ (lower right) Further signed, titled, dated and inscribed ‘Raza / “Rajasthan” / 1977 / acrylic on paper/ 65 x 50 cm’ (on the reverse) Initialed twice and further titled in Hindi (on the reverse) PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. PUBLISHED Alain Bonfand, Raza, Paris, 2008, p. 96 (illustrated)

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When Hussain painted the horses for the first time in the 1950s, it was certain that he sought much more in the piece than a mere aesthetic exercise. A personal meditation plays out on the canvas and Husain’s desire to universalise a personal and intimate relationship with the animal is evident. “The horse as a multidimensional symbolic motif was itself to interest Husain deeply. During his travels in China in 1952 he studied the Sung dynasty renderings of horses. Later, in Europe, whereas he found the Renaissance horses unexciting, he was strongly attracted by Franz Marc’s work and by Marino Marini’s archaic equestrian sculpture, with its balance between horizontal and vertical lines to achieve a feeling of solitary and monumental anguish. Husain’s own use of the horse motif has been, however, even more intuitive and complex [...] (Richard Bartholomew and Shiv S. Kapur, Husain, Harry N. Abram, New York, 1971, p. 39) The horses are not considered as static structures, amenable merely to posture and style. Instead, they are painted as sensuous and pulsating creatures, each alive and distinct in its own right. The unabashed use of impasto emphasises the untamed majesty of a herd of horses in the wild.

LOT 33

Maqbool Fida Husain (1913 - 2011) Untitled (Horses) oil on canvas 48 x 72 in. (121.9 x 182.8 cm.) painted in 2002 Signed and dated ‘Husain 9.V.002’ (lower left)

US$ 300,000 - 500,000

PROVENANCE Bagash Art Gallery, Dubai. Acquired from the above by the present owner, based in Dubai.


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LOT 34

Jogen Chowdhury (b. 1939) Couple mixed media on paper 22 x 28 in. (55.8 x 71.1 cm.) painted in 2003

US$ 50,000 - 70,000

Signed and dated ‘Jogen / 2003’ (lower centre left) Dated in Bengali (lower centre right) Signed in Bengali (upper centre right) Initialed in Bengali (upper left) Dated and inscribed in Bengali (upper right) PROVENANCE Sotheby’s / Lot 76 / Indian Art / New York / September 2007

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LOT 35

Jamil Naqsh (b. 1938) Arrival oil on canvas 48 x 30 in. (121.9 x 76.2 cm.) painted in 2015 Signed ‘Jamil Naqsh’ (lower left edge)

US$ 15,000 - 25,000

PROVENANCE Albemarle Gallery, London. EXHIBITED AND PUBLISHED Jamil Naqsh: An Artist Between Three Cultures, Albemarle Gallery, London, 2016, p. 19 (illustrated)

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lots 36 - 45

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Born in 1924, Francis Newton Souza grew up in the Portuguese Catholic colony of Goa. It is needless to say that his unique upbringing loomed substantially over the artist and his early themes. For Souza, the church remained a constant source of inspiration and imagery, which he deliberately and extensively used in his still life paintings. Geeta Kapur recounts his still lifes as consisting ‘of things used in liturgical practice. They are mostly ornate vessels and sacred objects. These objects retain their ritual aspect both on account of the visual description and composition [...] They are moreover, clustered formally as if on the shelf of the sacristy [...] His objects belong neither to the intimate comforts of a home nor to the grandeur of the market-place, both environments being specifically bourgeois in their origins. Very curiously in the object-world he reclaims the sense of the sacred that he so consciously drains from the human being and from God.’ (Geeta Kapur, Contemporary Indian Artists, New Delhi, 1978, p. 29-30).


LOT 36

Francis Newton Souza (1924 - 2002) Still Life oil on canvas 42 x 40 in. (106.7 x 101.6 cm.) painted in 1963 Signed and dated ‘Souza 63’ (lower centre left)

US$ 100,000 - 150,000

PROVENANCE Saffronart / Lot 70 / December Auction / 2006

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LOT 37

Sakti Burman (b. 1935) Untitled watercolour on paper 19.5 x 25.25 in. (49.25 x 64.1 cm.) Signed ‘Sakti Burman’ (lower centre left)

US$ 2,500 - 3,500

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LOT 38

Jogen Chowdhury (b. 1939) Untitled ink and pastel on paper 27.5 x 19.5 in. (69.8 x 49.5 cm.) painted in 2007 Initialed ‘J’ (upper right) Initialed in Bengali (upper left) Dated ‘2007’ (lower right)

US$ 8,000 - 12,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai.

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LOT 39

K.G. Subramanyan (1924 - 2016) Still life with smiling cat reverse painting in gouache and oil on acrylic sheet 11.75 x 8.25 in. (30 x 21 cm.) painted in 2003

US$ 3,000 - 5,000

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Signed in Tamil (lower right) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed ‘K.G. Subramanyan / ‘Still Life With Smiling Cat’ / 2003 / Reverse painting on plastic sheet in gouache and oils. (on the reverse) Further inscribed ‘Please keep this paper in place as it protects the painted surface.’ (on the reverse) Numbered ‘13’ (lower left, on the reverse) PROVENANCE The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai. EXHIBITED AND PUBLISHED K.G. Subramanyan: Recent Works, The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2003, p. 15 (illustrated)


LOT 40

K.G. Subramanyan (1924 - 2016) Table against a banana tree reverse painting in gouache and oil on acrylic sheet 11.75 x 8.25 in. (30 x 21 cm.) painted in 2003

US$ 3,000 - 5,000

Signed in Tamil (lower centre left) Signed, titled, dated and inscribed ‘K.G. Subramanyan / ‘Table Against a Banana Tree’ / 2003 / Reverse painting on plastic sheet in gouache and oils. (on the reverse) Further inscribed ‘Please keep this paper in place as it protects the painted surface.’ (on the reverse) Numbered ‘5’ (lower left, on the reverse) PROVENANCE The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai. EXHIBITED AND PUBLISHED K.G. Subramanyan: Recent Works, The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2003, p.8 (illustrated)

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‘Theorama’ is a ten panel series that was influenced by Husain’s past preoccupations with theosophy and his experiences as a billboard painter. Composed in the early 90s, Theorama tributes ten different faiths — highlighting what Husain sees as the finer aspects in each; these are strung together in the series to symbolise a sense of unity or a common thread. ‘Islam’ is Husain’s masterly depiction of the Muslim faith. To the left is a Sufi saint with his finger of ‘Kalema e Shahadah’ raised. The black and majestic cube of Kaabah, inscribed with the Arabic ‘Kaaf’, is positioned at the heart of the image, emphasising its prominence in no uncertain terms. A circle beside the Kaabah represents the dome of The Prophet’s mosque in Madinah and is inscribed with the alphabet ‘Meem’. ‘Al-buraq’, the lightning horse, gallops across the sky to the right while the ‘Al-Shaqqul Qamar’, the splitting moon — an Islamic symbol of the scientific temper — watches over. ‘Al-Loh-al-Mehfooz’, the book of Judgement Day, also sits prominently to the right. This simple yet substantial homage to Islam is brought about through a keen use of colour and line. These, along with tasteful use of religious motifs and symbolism, assembled together with an intimacy and personal reverence, lends this painting the distinctness for which it is known.

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LOT 41

Maqbool Fida Husain (1913 - 2011) Islam acrylic on canvas 78 x 139 in. (198.1 x 353 cm.) painted in 1992

US$ 500,000 - 700,000

Signed, dated and inscribed ‘Husain/’92/ LONDON’ (lower right) Further inscribed with a punjabi poem by Baba Farid along the lower stretcher bar (on the reverse) PROVENANCE Sotheby’s / Sale # L12222 / Lot 64 / Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art / London / June 2012 This lot will be shipped in a roll


South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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“There is a feeling of tranquility in my works which is born out of the influence of the environment around me. As a painter and sculptor I am conscious of the nuance of colour caused by the changing light and the tremendous potential it holds in awakening beauty in us all.” - Senaka Senanayake “Senaka’s versatility becomes apparent in the manner in which he manipulates the various mediums of oils, water colours, mixed media, pencil drawings and pen and ink. The rich narrative he thus weaves is a direct result of his pride in his heritage, a pride rooted in the flora and fauna of his tropical nation which he so ardently strives to protect. In thus working towards the goals which he has set for himself, his work has evolved into a highly pictorial and decorative style. The judiciously worked palette of colors coupled with vivid juxtapositions, allows for a romantic ambience and utopian idealism. The world of nature he articulates is a verdant tropical one which remains unsullied by the atrocities of mankind. And his rich pictorial language serves to represent this utopian land which promises harmony, peace and tranquility. Moving away from any narrative overtures, his paintings seek to confront the viewer with a forthrightness and simplicity.” (Natasha Baruah, Senaka Senanyake: Paradise lost?,Exhibition catalogue, Art Alive Gallery, New Delhi, 2009, p.3)

LOT 42

Senaka Senanayake (b. 1951) Shanthi oil on canvas 48 x 36 in. (121.9 x 91.4 cm.) painted in 2009 Signed and dated ‘Senaka Senanayake 2009’ (lower left)

US$ 12,000 - 18,000

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EXHIBITED AND PUBLISHED Senaka Senanyake: Paradise lost?, Exhibition catalogue, Art Alive Gallery, New Delhi, 2009, p.5 (illustrated)


LOT 43

A. Ramachandran (b. 1935) Untitled oil on canvas 18 x 18 in. (45.7 x 45.7cm.) painted in 2006 Signed and dated ‘Ramachandran 2006’ (lower left)

US$ 10,000 - 15,000

PROVENANCE The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai.

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“Padamsee’s figures and heads attest to a subtle articulation of public concerns. Here we find the heads of saints and martyrs, their features crystallising slowly, as though emerging from water or forming on a wet shroud. Padamsee’s protagonists are often composite figures, suggestive now of a medieval monk, now of Tarkovsky’s Stalker or a survivor from a prison camp. Their eyes do no rest on us; nor are they fixed on any external object. They do not communicate suffering in the raw, so much as suffering overcome by fortitude. They resemble Padamsee’s ‘Prophets’ of the 1950’s, but unlike those radiant apostles, confident envoys of eternity, these are pilgrims of survival who bear testimony to the splendour of knowledge, but have also wrestled with the daemons of the flesh, been broken by pogrom and holocaust” (Ranjit Hoskote, “The Ricochet of the Line”, Akbar Padamsee: Drawings, Watercolours, Photographs, Pundole Art Gallery exhibition catalogue, 2004, p.4).

LOT 44

Akbar Padamsee (b. 1928) Untitled watercolour on paper 22.75 x 15 in. (57.8 x 38.1 cm.) painted in 2006 Signed and dated ‘PADAMSEE 2006’ (lower right)

US$ 7,000 - 10,000

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PROVENANCE The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai.


LOT 45

Paritosh Sen (1918 - 2008) Girl in tears mixed media on paper 29 x 24 in. (73.7 x 61 cm.) painted in 2005 Signed and dated ‘Paritosh Sen ‘05’ (lower left)

US$ 8,000 - 12,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. PUBLISHED Mrinal Ghosh, Paritosh Sen: IXth Decade, Neovision, New Delhi, 2006, p. 205 (illustrated)

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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lots 46 - 55

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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In his meditations on colour and their emotive qualities, Raza was taken back to his childhood. It was a voyage, so to speak, back to the moist and pregnant ground where experiences were naked and free from the shell of words. This apprehending of the ‘source’ — the point of emergence — is a spiritual element captured best in the Bindu. This is arguably why it has remained pivotal to Raza’s repertoire. Drawing from Raza’s own words: “The point, the Bindu, symbolises the seed bearing the potential of all life, in a sense. It’s also a visible form containing all the essential requisites of line, tone, colour, gesture, and space.” Since the 1970s, Raza began to visibly emphasise his Indian identity. This is evidenced in his frequent visits to India. His concepts and colours at the time were distinctly akin to Indian spiritual thought but their plasticity, however, remained their most striking quality. The Bindu figured prominently in his paintings in this period. It was a starting point that brought together geometry, colour, space and several aspects of Indian aesthetics. The circle, one recalls, is a figure within which every geometric shape can be featured. The late 1970s witnessed a considerable change in his style of painting. He preferred basic geometric figures and the primary palette in his compositions. The Bindu was reinstated in ‘Emergence’ (1988) as the centre of his contemplations: a radiant circle emerging from within a square, flanked by distinct carves of bright colour. The Bindu is black but illumined — a sighting of the source in the silent minute of meditation.

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‘In Emergence, a deep black circle is transfixed in a sea of black and its variegated hues. Lightly flickering lines dissect this surface, charging it with movement. The horizontal current of colours and the white flickering lights run concurrently while diagonal lines intersect, forming triangles pointing towards the centre. The circular disc is crossed by horizontal and vertical lines forming quarters that meet at the centre.’ Understanding Raza: Many ways of looking at a Master, Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, 2013, p. 52

S.H. Raza at his exhibition with ‘Emergence’ in the background

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LOT 46

Syed Haider Raza (1922 - 2016) Emergence acrylic on canvas 31.5 x 31.5 in. (80 x 80 cm.) painted in 1988 Signed and dated ‘Raza ‘88’ (lower centre left) Further signed, titled, dated and inscribed ‘Raza / “Emergence” / 1988 / 80 x 80 cm. / acrylique sur toile’ (on the reverse) Initialed and further inscribed ‘Certified my own painting, dated 1988 entitled “Emergence”’ (on the reverse)

US$ 200,000 - 300,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist. PUBLISHED Alain Bonfand, Raza, Paris, 2008, p. 131 (illustrated on Front cover) LITERATURE Understanding Raza: Many ways of looking at a Master, Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, 2013, p. 52

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 47

Krishen Khanna (b. 1925) Bandwallas oil on canvas 40 x 30 in. (101.6 x 76.2 cm.) painted in 2003 Signed, titled, dated and inscribed ‘KKhanna / “Bandwallas” / Aug 2003 / KRISHEN KHANNA / Oil on canvas / painted at The Taj’ (on the reverse)

US$ 25,000 - 35,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai.

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LOT 48

Maqbool Fida Husain (1913 - 2011) Untitled watercolour and ink on paper 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101.6 cm.) painted in 1983 Inscribed and dated ‘Mc Bull New York ‘83’ (lower right)

US$ 25,000 - 35,000

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PROVENANCE Christie’s / Sale # 12174 / Lot 655 / South Asian Modern and Contemporary Art / New York / September 2016


LOT 49

Badri Narayan (1929 - 2013) Chandidas and Rami Dhoban watercolour on paper 21.75 x 24.75 in. (55.2 x 62.8 cm.) painted in 2004 Initialled in Hindi (lower centre right) Signed, titled, and inscribed ‘Badri Narayan / “Chandidas & Rami Dhoban” / Water colour / Rang Panchami / 11th/12th March 2004’ (on the reverse)

US$ 8,000 - 12,000

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 50

Manu Parekh (b. 1939) Untitled acrylic on masonite board 20.25 x 29.25 in. (51.4 x 74.3 cm.) painted in 2006 Signed and dated ‘Manu Parekh ‘06’ (lower left)

US$ 6,000 - 9,000

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PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.


LOT 51

Jogen Chowdhury (b. 1939) Untitled pen and ink on paper 9 x 7.5 in (22.8 x 19 cm)

US$ 10,000 - 15,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 52

Senaka Senanayake (b. 1951) Untitled oil on canvas 36 x 36 in. (91.4 x 91.4 cm.) painted in 2004 Signed and dated ‘Senaka Senanayake 2004’ (lower left)

US$ 10,000 - 15,000

100

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PROVENANCE Private collection, Singapore.


LOT 53

Lalu Prasad Shaw (b. 1937) Untitled tempera on board 21 x 15 in. (53.3 x 38.1 cm.) painted in 2012 Signed and dated in Bengali (lower centre right edge)

US$ 6,000 - 9,000

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 54

Krishen Khanna (b. 1925) Untitled mixed media on paper 29.5 x 21.75 in. (74.9 x 55.2 cm.) Signed ‘KKhanna’ (lower right)

US$ 5,000 - 7,000

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PROVENANCE The Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai.


LOT 55

Sakti Burman (b. 1935) Untitled oil on canvas 10.5 x 8.5 in. (27 x 22 cm.) painted in 2013 Signed ‘Sakti Burman’ (lower right)

US$ 10,000 - 15,000

PROVENANCE Private collection, Dubai.

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lots 56 - 60

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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The progress of Sujata Bajaj, whose work I have been faithfully following for twenty years, is exemplary. She has maintained her vision while expanding it, and her technique has followed... Every time we see her work, characterized as it is by a mix of dash and control, we feel it transmits an energy that is akin to a sense of well-being. This color springs from her as if by surprise. It is her need, her necessity, her deepest nature. When I look upon some of her works, I feel she invented the color red. Or even, shades of red. Her unmistakable concern is not to make something new but to make something come alive. - Jean-Claude Carriere. 106

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LOT 56

Sujata Bajaj (b. 1958) Untitled acrylic on canvas 19.75 x 19.75 in. (50 x 50 cm.) Signed in Hindi and English (lower left) Further signed in Hindi and English and inscribed ‘Sujata Bajaj / acrylic on canvas / 50 x 50 cm’ (on the reverse)

US$ 4,000 - 6,000

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LOT 57

Paresh Maity (b. 1965) Waterlogging watercolour on paper 40 x 40 in. (101.6 x 101.6) painted in 1998 Signed and dated ‘Paresh Maity ‘98’ (lower left)

US$ 12,000 - 18,000

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PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.


LOT 58

Ram Kumar (b. 1924) Untitled oil on canvas 36 x 35.5 in. (91.4 x 90.2 cm.) painted in 2001 Signed and dated ‘Ram Kumar / 2001’ (on the reverse)

US$ 40,000 - 60,000

PROVENANCE Saffronart / Lot 17 / Winter Online Auction: Modern Indian Art / December 2012

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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LOT 59

Maqbool Fida Husain (1913 - 2011) Untitled (Dallas) mixed media on paper 21.75 x 14.5 in. (55.2 x 36.8 cm.) Signed in Bengali (lower right) Inscribed ‘Dallas’ (lower left)

US$ 10,000 - 15,000

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PROVENANCE Bagash Art Gallery, Dubai. Acquired from the above by the present owner based in Dubai.


Painted for the first time in 1980, the Mother Teresa series has frequently resurfaced, and in varied mediums, in Husain’s repertoire. Its distinctness and accessibility has earned the series significant interest and popularity. Often shown as a faceless figure, the woman in this series is not limited to the historicity of her theme; she manifests distinct points in a spectrum that includes, for instance, the general notions of motherhood, the Virgin Mary and perhaps even Husain’s own mother who passed away in his early boyhood. Variations in medium aside, a faceless woman, draped in a white sari with a dark blue border, often in the company of children, is a common refrain in the series. “I have tried to capture in my paintings what her presence meant to the destitute and the dying, the light and hope she brought by mere inquiry, by putting her hand over a child abandoned in the street. I did not cry at this encounter. I returned with so much strength and sadness that it continues to ferment within.” (Artist statement, Y. Dalmia, The Making of Modern Indian Art: The Progressives, New York, 2001, p. 116)

LOT 60

Maqbool Fida Husain (1913 - 2011) Untitled (3 M’s) acrylic on canvas 30 x 40 in. (76.2 x 101. cm.) circa 2000’s Signed ‘Husain’ (upper right)

US$ 150,000 - 250,000

PROVENANCE Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner.

South Asian Art | Classical, Modern AND Contemporary

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END OF SALE

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IT’S EASY TO BUY AT ARTIANA Read this simple guide to buying at our auction. If you have more questions, information can be found in the ‘Buying at Artiana’ and ‘Conditions of Sale’ sections in this catalogue, or you can call us to inquire.

1. Browsing

Before Bidding, Clients are welcome to Browse through our Lots and see what we have to offer. Artiana offers a variety of ways to discover more about our Lots, so make the most of your browsing: Auction Catalogue Our catalogues are available on our website, mobile app, as well as in print form, and are a great way for clients to browse through upcoming sales. Our catalogues contain the following: • Images of the work • Descriptions of the Lot, including size, date and age, medium, type, attribution, quantity, etc • Estimates, which are given for all Lots are based on prices recently paid at auction or average market value for comparable property. They take into account rarity, condition, quality and provenance Condition Reports Condition Reports supplement the catalogue description and provide guidance on the item’s condition. These are available upon request. Our Specialists We have in-house auction specialists who will always be happy to discuss an item in greater detail. Just contact our Auction Help Desk at +971 55 815 3030| +971 55 825 3030 | auction@artiana.com Viewing Gallery Artiana is a click-and-mortar hybrid and has a viewing gallery located in Dubai, UAE and we would always recommend coming to the auction viewings and looking at an item for yourself.

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In order to Bid, users must first register on our website, Sign In with their Artiana ID, and request Bidding access for the sale in which they are interested. Once their request has been approved, users can proceed to Bid. Artiana offers you ease and flexibility by providing three ways to Bid on a desired Lot: Online Bids Online Bidding allows you to directly participate in the auction through the Artiana website or mobile app in real time and from anywhere in the world. All you have to do is click to Bid wherever you may be. You will be able to track your Bids through the website and will be alerted if you have been outbid. Visit www.artiana.com to find out more. Proxy/Maximum Bids These are suitable for those Bidders who are not available to follow the Bidding process, or would simply like to reserve a maximum Bid on a Lot. To make a Proxy Bid, you must enter the Maximum amount that you would like to Bid on a Lot, and our auction software will Bid on your behalf up to this amount. If you are the only person to Bid on the selected Lot, then you will purchase it at the lowest possible price (the Reserve Price). Written/Absentee Bids These are suitable for those Bidders who may not be available during the auction, or would prefer to have an Artiana representative complete the online transaction on their behalf. Once you have completed the Written/Absentee Bids form, we will either Bid online directly or place a ‘Proxy Bid’ on your behalf, allowing our auction software to Bid upto this amount. If you are the only person to Bid on your Lot, then you will purchase it at the lowest possible price (the Reserve Price). For more information, please refer to the Written/ Absentee Bids form in this catalogue or contact our Auction Help Desk at +971 55 815 3030 | +971 55 825 3030 | auction@artiana.com

3. Paying & Taking It Home

Congratulations! You are the Successful Bidder. Once you have paid for your purchase, delivery can be arranged. No Buyer’s Premium Ariana does not charge any Buyer’s Premium over and above the hammer price. ‘What You Bid Is What You Pay’. Payment As the successful Bidder, you will only pay the hammer price, along with any applicable charges for additional services availed. Payments for invoices are required to be completed within a period of seven business days from the receipt of the invoice via email. Refer to the ‘Buying at Artiana’ guide in this catalogue for more details. If you have any further questions please contact our Help Desk at +971 55 815 3030 | +971 55 825 3030 | info@artiana.com Storage Purchased Lots will initially be held for collection either at Artiana’s viewing gallery or at the shipper’s warehouse for 15 business days at no charge, after which a daily storage charge will be imposed. Delivery We can help you with all your delivery and shipping requirements whether local or international freight. Please refer to the ‘Storage and collection’ page in this catalogue or contact our Help Desk on +971 55 815 3030 | +971 55 825 3030 | info@artiana.com

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AUCTION CLOSING SCHEDULE For your convenience, particularly if you are bidding on more than one lot, predetermined groups of Lots are scheduled to close at 30 minute time intervals during the Auction. If a Bid is placed within the last 5 minutes, the timer on your screen will be extended by 5 minutes after the scheduled Closing Time of the Lot. The timer will continue to be extended in 5 minute increments for any Bidding received in the 5 minutes prior to the new Closing Time of such Lot. As with a traditional auction house, bidding will continue on each lot until there is no more interest in the room. Lots have been allotted into groups, and the closing schedule for the various Lot Groups are as follows: CLOSING TIMES

UAE UTC +4:00

INDIA SRI LANKA UTC +5:30

US EASTERN UTC -4:00

US PACIFIC UTC -7:00

UK UTC +1:00

WEST AFRICA UTC +1:00

EAST AFRICA UTC +3:00

HONG KONG SINGAPORE UTC +8:00

1 - 10

6:30 p.m.

8:00 p.m.

10:30 a.m.

7:30 a.m.

3:30 p.m.

3:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

10:30 p.m.

11 - 25

7:00 p.m.

8:30 p.m.

11:00 a.m.

8:00 a.m.

4:00 p.m.

4:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

11:00 p.m.

26 - 35

7:30 p.m.

9:00 p.m.

11:30 a.m.

8:30 a.m.

4:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

6:30 p.m.

11:30 p.m.

36 - 45

8:00 p.m.

9:30 p.m.

12:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m.

5:00 p.m.

5:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

12.00 a.m. (March 28)

46 - 55

8:30 p.m.

10:00 p.m.

12:30 p.m.

9:30 a.m.

5:30 p.m.

5:30 p.m.

7:30 p.m

12.30 a.m. (March 28)

56 - 60

9:00 p.m.

10:30 p.m.

1:00 p.m.

10:00 a.m.

6:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m.

8:00 p.m

1.00 a.m. (March 28)

LOT NUMBERS

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WRITTEN / ABSENTEE BIDS FORM SOUTH ASIAN ART | CLASSICAL, MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY, MARCH 23 - 27, 2017

SALE NUMBER: 1701

To enter Written / Absentee Bids, please sign the completed form and email it to auction@artiana.com at least 12 hours before the first closing time of the auction. For additional information, please refer to the ‘It’s Easy to Buy at Artiana’ and ‘Buying at Artiana’ sections in this catalogue or the ‘Frequently Asked Questions’ (FAQ’s) page on our website www.artiana.com. “I request Artiana, without legal obligation on its part, to Bid on the Lots listed below, upto the Maximum Bid Amount I have specified. I agree that my Bid will be treated as an offer and is subject to the Conditions of Sale listed in the catalogue and on the website www.artiana.com. I understand that Artiana is accepting Written / Absentee Bids for the convenience of clients and I will not hold it liable for failure to record my Bid. I understand that the Maximum Written Bid once recorded cannot be cancelled and can only be increased via email confirmation or by completing another Written / Absentee Bids Form, specifying the higher maximum Bid amount/s.” Please mention clearly in capital letters the Lot number and the description accurately (artist name, title). Bidders are requested to provide all invoicing details prior to the sale. The Bidder as registered with Artiana will be invoiced, and no invoices will be changed after the sale. Lot No.

Artist / Description

Name

Maximum Bid Amount in USD

Email

Address

City

Postcode

Tel (mobile)

Tel (landline)

Country

Artiana ID By signing this form you agree that you have seen the catalogue and have read and understood our Conditions of Sale, Bidding Increments and Clauses overleaf and wish to be bound by them, and agree to pay any charges applicable to Bidders. This affects your legal rights. Signature

Place & Date

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BIDDING INCREMENTS Bidding begins below the lower estimate, and increases in steps, or increments. The next valid Bid is based on the increments listed below. If Bidders enter a Proxy Bid online, the next Bid is placed at the minimum incremental value.

USD 1,000 to 2,000

by USD 100

USD 2,000 to 4,000

by USD 200

USD 4,000 to 10,000

by USD 500

USD 10,000 to 20,000

by USD 1,000

USD 20,000 to 40,000

by USD 2,000

USD 40,000 to 100,000

by USD 5,000

USD 100,000 to 200,000

by USD 10,000

USD 200,000 to 400,000

by USD 20,000

USD 400,000 to 1,000,000

by USD 50,000

USD 1,000,000 and upwards

by USD 100,000

All Bids for Artiana’s auctions are placed and accepted in United States Dollars.

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BUYING AT ARTIANA Estimates • Estimates are based on prices recently paid at auction or average market value of the Lot as determined by Artiana’s specialists. • These Estimates are prepared well in advance of the sale and are subject to revision. • Estimates are provided only as a guide for buyers and should not be relied on as a prediction of actual price. Reserves • The Reserve Price is the minimum price at which the Lot shall be sold. • The Reserve Price is confidential and will not be disclosed. • The Reserve Price is always lower or equal to low estimate. Customs Duty, Buyer’s Premium, Service Tax & Sales Tax / Value Added Tax • Customs duty of 5% will be applicable for GCC wide delivery of certain Lots that have been temporarily imported into the UAE for re-export. These Lots will be identified in the catalogue accordingly. • Artiana does not charge any Buyer’s Premium. • No taxes such as Service Tax, Sales Tax or Value Added Tax are applicable on any Winning Bid, as Artiana is based in UAE, where such taxes are not levied. Pre-Auction Viewings • Pre-auction viewings will be held at Artiana’s viewing gallery in Dubai at the dates and times printed in the front of the catalogue. • Artiana’s auction specialists will be available to provide advice regarding Lots on display. • Artiana encourages prospective buyers to examine Lots thoroughly before the auction. Pre-Registration & Bidding Access • Prospective Bidders are asked to register with us before Bidding. This simple, one-time process will allow users to create a unique Artiana ID and password, which will be required in order to Bid in all our auctions. • After creating an Artiana ID and password, prospective Bidders will still need to request for Bidding access for a particular Lot by clicking on the ‘Register for Sale’ button. • Bidders will still need to request for Bidding access for a particular Lot by clicking on the ‘Register for Sale’ button. • Once this request has been processed by the Artiana Auction Desk, the Bidder will receive an email confirmation of Bidding access. • In the event that additional information is required for approval, the Bidder will be directly contacted by an Artiana representative. • Please note that if this process has not taken place, you shall not be granted Bidding access. • It is recommended that all Bidders register at least 24 hours before the auction. Personalised Notifications • After signing into Artiana and accessing the ‘My Account’ page, you may select artists of interest and request to be notified when they become available at auction. Proxy / Maximum Bids • Proxy or Maximum Bids can be placed on any Lot by going to ‘Upcoming Auctions’ or ‘Current Auctions’, selecting the catalogue of interest, and clicking the ‘Proxy Bid’ button next to the Lot on which you wish to Bid. • Please note that you must be registered and Signed In to place a Bid at any time. Written / Absentee Bids • Written or Absentee Bids can be placed on any Lot by contacting the Artiana Auction Desk in person, or by email at auction@artiana.com. • You may place a Written / Absentee Bid by filling out, signing and submitting the Written / Absentee Bids form available online and in the printed catalogue. • It is recommended that all Bids come in at least 12 hours before the first Closing Time of the Auction. Starting Bid • Starting Bid is the value at which the auction house opens the Bidding on each Lot. • Starting Bid can sometimes be lower than the value of the lower estimate. Bidding Online • Once you are signed in and granted Bidding access, you may proceed to Bid. • After you have identified the Lot on which you would like to Bid, click on ‘Place Bid’ and confirm your Bid at the next valid Bid value listed. • Now, you will be able to participate in the Bidding process by entering the next valid Bid each time you are out-bid. • Each new Bid will increase in steps or increments over the previous valid Bid.

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Bidding Increments • Bidding Increments will be calculated as shown in the Bid increment table in this catalogue. Bid History • All Lots have Bid History available, which can be viewed by clicking on ‘View Bid History.’ • Bid History indicates the values recorded for each Lot since the start of the auction. • Bid History will not be displayed once the auction has closed. Auction Closing Schedule • Predetermined groups of Lots will close simultaneously in Lot order every 30 minutes. • If a Bid is placed within the last 5 minutes, the timer on your screen will be extended to 5 minutes after the scheduled Closing Time of the Lot. • The timer will continue to be extended in 5 minute increments for any Bidding received in the 5 minutes prior to the new Closing Time of such Lot. • As with a traditional auction house, Bidding will continue on each Lot until there is no more interest in the room. • For more information on the closing times for this sale, please refer to the Auction Closing Schedule in the catalogue. Winning / Successful Bid • Winning or Successful Bid is the last and highest Bid at which the Lot has closed. • No new Bids can be placed after the close of a Lot. • The closing Bid is considered the Winning Bid only if the Bid exceeds the Reserve Price. • Artiana reserves the right to publish all Winning Bids on the website after the close of the auction. Currency of Bidding • All Bids are placed in US Dollars (USD). • Payments received in any other currency will be converted to USD as per the bank’s sheet rate on the day of transaction. Bid Cancellation • Once any Bid has been placed, it cannot be cancelled. • Artiana reserves the right to cancel any Bids in order to protect the efficacy of the Bidding process. After the Sale • If a Bidder is successful, he shall be informed via email after the auction has closed and will also be able to view his winning Bids under ‘Successful Bids’ on the ‘My Account’ page on the website. • The Bidder will then receive an email with the invoice for the Lot. • If a Bidder is the winning Bidder, he is legally bound to purchase the item from Artiana. • Please note that purchases will not be shipped out until full payment has been received and cleared. Invoicing & Payment • All details for the invoice are to be provided and verified prior to the auction. • After the sale, the Buyer, as invoiced, is required to pay the amount in full (including the hammer price and any applicable charges for additional services availed). • Buyers will be required to complete payment within a period of seven business days from the receipt of the invoice via email. • Artiana shall only release Lots once the payment is made in full. • Bank Transfer:You may electronically transfer funds to our account in US dollars. When doing so, please quote the sale details along with the Lot number and invoice number as the reference. Our account details are as follows Account Name: Artiana Limited Bank: Emirates NBD Branch: Business Bay Branch, Dubai, UAE USD Account No.: 1025213528602 SWIFT: EBILAEAD IBAN: AE970260001025213528602 For payments made by bank transfer, all bank charges are payable by the remitter. • Credit and Debit Cards: Visa and Mastercard only. Please note that as Artiana does not charge any Buyer’s Premium to the Buyer, for any payments made by Credit or Debit Cards a service charge of 3% on the total invoice amount will be charged to the Buyer. It may be advisable to notify your card provider of your intended purchase in advance to reduce delays caused by us having to seek payment authorisation. Delivery / Collection of Purchase & Insurance • Price estimates and/or the Winning Bid price do not include any packing, insurance, shipping or handling charges, all of which will be borne by the Buyer. • Works will be shipped within 7 days of the payment being cleared.

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• Artiana offers free delivery in Dubai and can recommend our affiliated shipping company for deliveries outside the UAE. For more information, please refer to the ‘Storage and Collection’ page in this catalogue. • Alternatively, Buyers may choose to collect their purchase from Artiana in Dubai within seven days from the date of the sale. • Buyers who have not completed payment formalities and have not taken delivery of their art works from Artiana within fifteen days of the auction closing date, will be charged demurrage @ 2% per month on the value of the artworks and the charges for storage of the property. • Artiana provides insurance coverage on sold Lots for seven days after the Closing Time of the auction. After that period, or once a Lot has been collected (whichever is earlier), the Lot will be entirely at the buyer’s risk. Participate in our next auction • If you would like to stay informed of Artiana’s upcoming events, please register with us online at www.artiana.com Consign for our next auction • If you are interested in consigning works from your collection to our next sale, please contact us at the Artiana Auction Desk on • +971 55 815 3030 | +971 55 825 3030 | auction@artiana.com

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CONDITIONS OF SALE 1. DEFINITIONS Artiana: Refers to Artiana Limited, a company duly incorporated in Dubai International Financial Centre, bearing DIFC registered number 2249. Artiana acts as a representative of either itself, any of its affiliates, assigns or any of its Sellers.

• For Precious Objects: Any other features or characteristics of the Property mentioned in the Auction Catalogue.

Artiana Server: The system(s) that provides computer devices with access to resources shared on computer networks, including Artiana data, application files and printers.

Lot Groups: The Properties grouped together for Auction that will close at a particular time.

Auction: An auction of Property(ies)/Lot(s) to be conducted by Artiana on www.artiana.com or any other website on the date indicated in the Auction Catalogue. Auction Catalogue: The catalogue as published by Artiana, whether in print, on the Mobile Application, or on the Website, including the Print Auction Catalogue, the MobileApp Auction Catalogue, the Online Auction Catalogue, and the eCatalogue with respect to an Auction, containing details of the Auction along with the description, price and other details of Properties to be offered for sale at such Auction. In case of any discrepancy between the Print Auction Catalogue, the MobileApp Auction Catalogue, the Online Auction Catalogue and/or the eCatalogue, the Online Auction Catalogue, as modified by Artiana from time to time, shall take precedence. Auction Closing Schedule: The schedule specifying the closing times for Bids for each Lot to be sold through the Auction as specified in the Auction Catalogue. Bid: The price offered by a Bidder to purchase a particular Property offered for sale at an Auction. Bidder: A person making a Bid for the purchase of one or more Property(ies) offered for sale at an Auction in accordance with the terms and conditions set out in the Conditions of Sale and such person shall be deemed to have entered into all applicable contracts under the governing law. Buyer: The Bidder making the Winning Bid with respect to a Property(ies), who has thereby agreed to pay/ has paid the Sale Price payable with respect to such Property(ies). Closing Date: The date specified in the Auction Closing Schedule on which the Auction closes. Closing Time: The time at which the Auction for any of the Lot Groups listed in the Auction Closing Schedule closes. Conditions of Sale: The Conditions, which are published in any of the Auction Catalogues and are applicable to every Bid and every sale of Property made through an Auction. In case of a conflict between the Conditions published in the Online Auction Catalogue and in the Print Auction Catalogue or eCatalogue, the Online Auction Catalogue version, as modified by Artiana from time to time, shall take precedence. Cultural Artifacts: Antiquities and items of historical interest or significance designated as Cultural Property. Description: All the details of a Property as set out in the Auction Catalogue and may include, without limitation, the name of the artist, designer or manufacturer, the title of the Property, and the following additional details: • For Artworks: The signature of the artist/date of the Property (if any), the surface, medium, edition number (wherever applicable) and dimensions of the Property.

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eCatalogue: An electronic reproduction of the Print Auction Catalogue that may be made available on the Website for certain auctions.

Mobile Application: Refers to Artiana’s proprietary mobile auction application, as updated from time to time, and available for download from the Apple App Store or Google Play, for the purpose of viewing the Auction Catalogue, placing Bids, viewing Auction results, accessing other information related to Artiana or the Auction, and receiving push notifications on a mobile device. MobileApp Auction Catalogue: The screens within the Mobile Application relating to the Auction, as may be amended from time to time. Notices: Information included in the Auction Catalogue by Artiana - whether in print or online or on the Mobile Application - to correct errors and omissions in the Auction Catalogue. Although these are provided for the Bidders’ convenience, the Online Auction Catalogue, as modified by Artiana from time to time, shall take precedence in all cases of discrepancy. Online Auction Catalogue: The web pages on the Website relating to the Auction, as may be amended from time to time including web pages accessible via the link “Auction Catalogue” (including all pages providing details related to the Property(ies)), as well as additional pages containing details of the Auction accessible via the link “About the Auction.” Precious Objects: Jewellery, watches, loose precious stones and any other objects offered for sale within the context of an Auction. Print Auction Catalogue: The printed version of the Auction Catalogue. Property/Lot: The Artworks, Precious Objects, and any other items offered by Artiana for sale, either individually or collectively (as a single unit), through the Auction. Proxy Bid: Refers to any Proxy/Maximum Bid placed by a buyer on the Website authorising the auction software to automatically Bid on his behalf, until such Maximum amount is reached. Reserve Price: The minimum price, as determined by Artiana and the Seller, acceptable for the sale of the Property through an Auction. Seller: The party consigning the Property to Artiana as its agent for sale through Auction. Technical Downtime: The time period during which the Artiana Server or the Website is not operational due to a malfunction or planned maintenance. Terms of Business: The terms of business executed between Artiana and the Seller including but not limited to the consignment agreement. Website: The collection of HTML and/or internet data and media located at the URL www.artiana.com and/or any other URL linked to the Website. Winning Bid/Sale Price: The highest Bid offered with respect to a Property at the Closing Time, where the Winning Bid shall either be higher than or equal to the Reserve Price.


Winning Bidder: The Bidder who has placed the Winning Bid.

Bids, Bidders are advised to assign Bidding nicknames to themselves.

Written Bid: Refers to any Written/Absentee Bid recorded with Artiana upon submission of the completed Written/Absentee Bids form at least 12 hours before the first Closing Time.

The Website and Mobile Application shall contain: • The Bid history for each Lot, being the last 5 Bid amounts that have been recorded until and including the current highest Bid; and • A countdown clock indicating the amount of time available for placing Bids before the Closing Time.

2. General Terms By participating in this Auction, you acknowledge that you are bound by the Conditions of Sale as listed below and on the Website. 2.1. Artiana’s role as the agent of the Seller: Artiana undertakes to sell the Properties through Auction as the agent for and on behalf of the Seller. 2.2. Making a Bid constitutes an irrevocable offer to purchase the Property, and the acceptance of a Bid as the Winning Bid by Artiana shall result in an enforceable contract of sale between Artiana, acting solely as the agent of the Seller, and the Winning Bidder. 2.3. Artiana is authorised by the Seller to exercise its complete discretion in: • determining the form and content of the Descriptions in the Auction Catalogue, • g ranting Bidding access to a Bidder, • recording, rejecting or accepting Bids, and • deciding which Bid constitutes the Winning Bid, if any. (Bidding access shall be given at Artiana’s discretion and Artiana may set limits on the total value of all Bids made and/or the number of Bids that may be made by a Bidder. Artiana may also require payment guarantees and/or deposits as a condition precedent to giving Bidding access to a Bidder. Bidders will be informed of the limits on the total Bid value and/or the number of Bids that they may make, if any, and will not be allowed to Bid further if either of such Bidding limit has been exhausted. Bid updates and time extensions, if any, shall be updated on the Website and Mobile Application. On both the Website and the Mobile App, Bidders may refresh their Bidding pages by clicking on the “Refresh Now” icon or the re-load/refresh buttons on their browsers, where applicable. Artiana shall evaluate the Bid histories of specific Lot Groups periodically to preserve the efficacy of the Auction process. This exercise may be conducted by Artiana internally or through third parties solely at the discretion of Artiana.) 2.4. Closing Times For the convenience of Bidders, particularly those who are placing Bids on more than one Lot, Lot Groups are scheduled to close at 30 minute time intervals during the Auction. The Bidding for various Lot Groups shall be closed in accordance with the Auction Closing Schedule. However, in the event that Artiana records any Bidding activity in the 5 minutes prior to the closing of a Lot, the Closing Time for such a Lot shall be extended by 5 minutes from its originally scheduled Closing Time. The Closing Time shall continue to be extended in 5 minute increments for any subsequent Bidding received in the 5 minutes prior to the closing of such Lot. In the event that the Closing Time is extended in accordance with this Clause, bidding on the Lot shall only end if no Bidding activity is recorded by Artiana during the last 5 minutes of extended time. Bidders are advised to click on the “Refresh Now” icon on the Website page or in the Mobile Application at regular intervals in accordance with the provisions of Clause 2.5 for updates on latest Bids and time extensions if any. 2.5. Tracking Bids The Website shall contain a link titled ‘Lots I Bid On’ within the page ‘Current Auction’ and the Bidder may click on this link to access information on all Bids made on various Lots. For ease of tracking

The Bid history, current Bid, and countdown clock shall be accurate at the time of downloading of those values, provided that such information has not changed during the time taken for this information to reach the Bidder’s computer or mobile device from the Artiana Server. The most updated Bid values shall be shown only when the Website page or the Mobile Application page containing the information on Bid values is refreshed; which shall happen either automatically at regular intervals (Every 5 minutes prior to one hour before the closing time of the first Lot/Lot Group and every 1 minute within the last hour of the closing time of the first Lot/Lot Group and shall continue refreshing every minute till the close of the last Lot/Lot Group) or when a Bidder clicks on the ‘Refresh Now’ icon on the Website page or in the Mobile Application page. When the countdown clock counts down to zero, in the case where the Closing Time with respect to a particular Lot has been extended by a further 5 minutes pursuant to Clause 2.4 above, the countdown clock may not reflect such extension. As such, the Bidder may wait for the values on the page to refresh automatically on the Website, or click on the ‘Refresh Now’ link on the page or in the Mobile Application to determine whether the Closing Time has been extended for that Lot. The countdown clock combined with the current highest Bid as shown in the Bid history on the Website shall only be an indication of the highest Bid amount at the time when the values on the Website or Mobile Application were refreshed in the manner set out in Clause 2.5 above. Should bidders want more frequent updates, they are advised to refresh values as described in Clause 2.5 in order to view the most updated Bid history and countdown clock. Due to the nature of internet and/or mobile traffic, there may be an unpredictable time lag between a Bidder placing a Bid, and that Bid being received by Artiana. Therefore, although a Bidder may have placed his/her Bid prior to Closing Time, Artiana may receive the Bid after the Closing Time for the Lot with respect to which the Bid has been placed and shall, in such an event, be rejected. In order to prevent Bids being rejected in such a manner, Bidders may set Proxy Bids/Maximum Bids for Lots on which they wish to Bid. Written/Absentee Bids may be recorded with Artiana 12 hours prior to the first Closing Time, subject to the other provisions of these Conditions of Sale, including any limits imposed by Artiana on the number of Bids that might be placed by a Bidder. 2.6. Bidders are advised to keep their Artiana ID and password secure at all times. Artiana will hold the Bidder responsible for all Bids placed using their Artiana ID and password, whether via the Website or a mobile device. Bidders using the Mobile Bidding Application are advised to keep their mobile devices secure and set passwords for them to prevent unauthorised use. 2.7. Artiana reserves the right to withdraw any Property(ies) before, during or after the Auction, if it has reason to believe that the authenticity of the Property(ies) or the accuracy of the Description is in doubt, or if there is a breach of the Terms of Business, or if Artiana otherwise believes, at its sole discretion, that it would be improper to include the Property(ies) in the Auction.

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2.8. All Property(ies) shall be sold subject to the Reserve Price. If the Winning Bid is below the Reserve Price, the Property shall be considered unsold except in such case where the Winning Bid is a Proxy Bid and the maximum limit on the Proxy Bid either matches or is higher than the Reserve Price. In such cases the Property(ies) shall be sold at Reserve Price to the Proxy Bidder. The Reserve Price on each Property shall be confidential and Artiana shall have no obligation to disclose the same to any Bidder. 2.9. Artiana will invoice the Buyer for the Sale Price (Hammer Price/Winning Bid Price) and any additional charges that may be incurred by Artiana or are applicable on the sale, including shipping and handling of the Property. 2.10. The title to the Properties purchased shall pass to the Buyer at the Closing Time for those Properties and said Buyer assumes full risk and responsibilities for the Properties thereafter. Properties purchased will not be released or shipped out to the Buyer or his representative until the Buyer has fulfilled his payment and other obligations as described in these Conditions of Sale. Artiana may exercise a lien on the Properties under the conditions described in clause 2.17. 2.11. Bidding Increments will be calculated as shown in the Bidding Increment table below. USD 1,000 to 2,000 USD 2,000 to 4,000 USD 4,000 to 10,000 USD 10,000 to 20,000 USD 20,000 to 40,000 USD 40,000 to 100,000 USD 100,000 to 200,000 USD 200,000 to 400,000 USD 400,000 to 1,000,000 USD 1,000,000 and upwards

by USD 100 by USD 200 by USD 500 by USD 1,000 by USD 2,000 by USD 5,000 by USD 10,000 by USD 20,000 by USD 50,000 by USD 100,000

2.12. The Auction is conducted in United States Dollars (USD) and, for any transaction in other currencies, the exchange rate will be calculated as per the sheet rate of the bank specified by Artiana on the date of either receiving the funds from the Buyer or remitting the funds to the Seller. In the case of payments for purchases being made in UAE Dirhams (AED), a standard conversion rate of 1USD = 3.675 AED will apply. 2.13. All Bidders are required to provide complete and accurate invoicing details to Artiana at the time of registration for the Auction. Invoicing details, once registered, will not be changed. The Bidder shall be invoiced based on details provided at the time of registering for the Auction. 2.14. The Winning Bidder shall pay the Sale Price in full (including any additional charges, if applicable) within seven business days from the Closing Date. No shipment or delivery of the Property will be made to the Winning Bidder if the Sale Price, and any other additional charges that may be payable by the Buyer, are not received by Artiana and until all proper documentation in connection with the sale of the Property has been completed. Payments will not be accepted from any parties other than the Winning Bidder as recorded on the invoice. 2.15. Non payment The Winning Bidder shall ensure that invoices provided by Artiana are paid in full and all remittance of amounts due under said invoice is made within seven business days from the date of the invoice. In the case that payments are not received within such period, it shall be

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treated as a breach of contract of sale by the Buyer and, in such an event, Artiana is authorised at its sole discretion to cancel the sale upon expiry of this stipulated period of seven business days without being obliged to inform the Buyer of the same, and the Seller authorises Artiana to take any steps (including reporting the late payments, missed payments, or other defaults on the account to any credit bureau and the institution of legal proceedings), as deemed appropriate, to enforce the full or any differential payment due by the Buyer. In addition, the Buyer will be charged demurrage @ 2% of the total value (Winning Bid) per month until the date of actual payment. 2.16. Failure to collect If the Buyer informs Artiana that he wishes to collect the Property(ies) from Artiana in person and such Property(ies) is not collected by the Buyer within 15 days from the auction closing date, Artiana shall arrange for storage of the Property(ies) at the Buyer’s expense, and shall only release the Property(ies) after payment has been made, in full, including demurrage @ 2% of the total value (Winning Bid plus any other additional charges, if applicable) per month for all payments due and the charges for storage of the Property(ies), if any. 2.17. Artiana shall be entitled to exercise a lien on the Property(ies) for payment of any sums receivable from the Buyer, including the Sale Price and costs relating to storage and insurance where they are to be borne by the Buyer, in relation to any Property(ies) purchased by the Buyer. 2.18. Artiana reserves the right to not award the Winning Bid to the highest Bidder at the Closing Date if it deems it necessary to do so. 2.19. The Buyer acknowledges that Artiana will abide by any export restrictions that may apply in the countries from where specific Property(ies) will be shipped. The Buyer shall also be responsible to ensure that the Property(ies) is freely importable into the country where such Property(ies) is intended for delivery (as specified by the Buyer). In the event the Buyer or Artiana become aware of any restrictions to such import subsequent to the completion of the Auction, the Buyer may provide an alternate delivery destination to Artiana. (Such restrictions on import of any Property/Lot purchased by a Buyer shall not qualify as grounds for the Buyer to cancel such sale under any circumstances). All costs associated with the process of delivery and storage (when required) of the Property(ies) shall be borne by the Buyer. The Property(ies) shall be handed over to the Buyer, or his nominee, only upon full payment of all such costs. 2.20. Artiana has the right to exercise reasonable discretion in setting Bid increments as per Clause 2.11 or otherwise, refusing any Bid, advancing the Bidding, withdrawing or dividing any Lot, combining two or more Lots; and in the case of error or dispute, during or after the sale, determining the successful Bidder, continuing the Bidding, cancelling the sale or reoffering and reselling the item in dispute. If any dispute arises after the sale, then, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary, the sale record maintained by Artiana will be conclusive. 2.21. Written Bids are accepted from Bidders once they have been given Bidding access for the Auction. These are entered as online direct or Proxy Bids by Artiana, and may not be stopped or altered by the Bidder once the Auction has commenced. Written Bids are accepted until twelve hours prior to the first Closing Time. 2.22. Artiana employees may not Bid in the Auction once the Auction has started. They may however submit a Written Bid for an amount that may be equal to or above the lower estimate of a Lot before the Auction commences and have a Proxy Bid placed on their


behalf. Once the Auction has begun, they may only increase their Proxy Bid.

• to not rely on an illustration of any Property(ies) given in the Catalogue

2.23. Artiana employees may Bid in charity auctions that are held on the Artiana Auction platform.

3.4. Neither Artiana nor any of its affiliates, agents, representatives, employees or directors shall be liable for errors or omissions in any of the representations made in the Auction Catalogue or otherwise with respect to authenticity, description, or condition of any Property(ies) for sale through the Auction.

2.24. Sellers are not allowed to Bid on the particular Lot(s) they have consigned. 2.25. Artiana does not place or allow any Bids to be placed on behalf of the Seller. All of the Bids recorded at Artiana are from registered Bidders. 2.26. Once a Bid is registered in our system, whether placed by an active Bidder or by Proxy, it is immediately and automatically displayed for all registered users to see. 2.27. Technical Downtime In the unlikely event that the Website is inaccessible to Bidders worldwide due to Technical Downtime within the half hour prior to the scheduled Closing Time for any of the Lot Groups, the Closing Time of that Lot group and subsequent Lot Groups will be extended by the duration of the Technical Downtime. In case the Technical Downtime extends beyond the Closing Time for a particular Lot Group, the Website shall, after the Technical Downtime, show the Auction for the particular Lot Group as closed. However, the Closing Time for such Lot Group and subsequent Lot Groups shall be extended by the duration of the Technical Downtime and appropriate details of the extension shall be published on the Website shortly after recovery from the Technical Downtime. Note that any malfunction in the Mobile Application does not constitute Technical Downtime. In the event of such malfunction, Bidders should use the Website to place Bids. 2.28. Bids recorded prior to any Technical Downtime will be treated as valid according to the Conditions of Sale. Artiana shall not be liable for any loss of information due to the Technical Downtime. The data logs of the Artiana Server will determine the duration of the Technical Downtime and any determination made by Artiana in respect of extension of the Closing Time shall be final. 3. Catalogue Description and Condition of Property 3.1. Artiana offers all Property(ies) for sale at the Auction “as is”, which means that the Property(ies) are sold with all existing faults and imperfections. Measurements are given as Height x Width x Depth in decimal inches (rationalized to the closest 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) and in decimal centimetres. Artiana encourages all potential Buyers to inspect each item carefully before Bidding. 3.2. Any statements made by Artiana about any Property(ies), whether orally or in writing concerning attribution to, for example, any school of art or craftsmanship, country or origin, history or provenance, are only expressions of Artiana’s own opinion or belief Such opinions or beliefs including the estimate values of the properties have been formed honestly in accordance with the standard of care expected of an auction house. However, Artiana does not in anyway represent that it has carried out exhaustive research or analysis, and it is therefore recommended, especially in cases of Property(ies) of high value, that potential Buyers seek advice on such matters from their own professional advisors. 3.3. The Buyer undertakes: • to inspect and satisfy himself prior to the Auction as to the condition and description of the Property(ies); • to rely on his own judgment as to whether the Property(ies) matches its description; and

4. Authenticity Guarantee 4.1. Artiana provides an assurance on behalf of the Seller that each artwork offered at auction, is a genuine work of the artist listed. Artiana guarantees the authenticity of such artwork for a period of six months from the auction closing date. Authenticity in relation to artworks shall mean compliance of the artwork with the description provided on the website, particularly with reference to the name of the artist, title (if any) of the artwork, date, the school of art (if mentioned), dimensions, medium, etc. In the unlikely event that within six months from the close of an auction, it is proved by the Buyer, to the reasonable satisfaction of Artiana, that the item was not authentic and if, in Artiana’s opinion, this would have significantly impacted the Winning Bid for the item, Artiana shall be entitled to rescind the sale. In such an event, the Seller will be liable to refund the payment for the item to the Buyer, through Artiana. The item in question will subsequently be returned to the Seller. All such claims will be handled on a case-by-case basis, and in the case of an authenticity claim in relation to an artwork, examinable proof, clearly demonstrating that the item is not authentic, will be required. Such examinable proof should be provided by an established and acknowledged authority. Artiana’s decision, with regards to such claims, shall be final and binding. 4.2. The above guarantee given in clause 4.1 shall be subject to the following conditions: • The claim is made by the Buyer as registered with Artiana (the benefit of the claim is not assignable to any subsequent owners or others who may acquire or have an interest in any of the Properties) • The Property is returned in the same condition that it was in at the time of delivery of the Property to the Buyer • The Property was indisputably purchased through Artiana 4.3. In the case of Properties which have been categorised by Artiana as Precious Objects, Artiana provides an assurance, on behalf of the Seller, that each piece shall comply with characteristics or features mentioned in the Description of the Property in the Auction Catalogue for as long as the Property is in the possession of Artiana. All colored stones unless certified may or may not be treated for enhancements. It is therefore advisable for Buyers or potential Buyers of such Properties, to inspect the Property prior to Bidding or prior to shipment or Buyer pickup from Artiana. In the unlikely event that during such inspection, the Buyer is able to prove to the reasonable satisfaction of Artiana that the Property does not match the details in the Description, and if, in Artiana’s opinion, Bidders being aware of such error or omission would have Bid significantly less than the actual Sale Price, Artiana shall be entitled to rescind the sale and the Seller will be liable to refund to the Buyer the Sale Price paid for the Property; and Artiana shall hand over the Property to the Seller upon refund of the Sale Price paid to him for the Property. Once Artiana obtains the refunded amount from the Seller, it shall forward the same to the Buyer. This guarantee will not

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be applicable where the Property is being shipped to the Buyer by Artiana. 4.4. In the case of Properties such as antiquities or items of historical interest which have been categorised by Artiana as Cultural Artifacts, Artiana provides an assurance, on behalf of the Seller, that each object of antiquarian or historical interest or significance has been acquired without violating any local or international laws. In the unlikely event that it is proved that the acquisition, provenance and/or ownership of such Cultural Artifacts offered at our Auction is subject to a legal dispute, the Buyer shall keep Artiana indemnified from any such legal proceedings. 4.5. In all cases Artiana retains the right to consult with, at the expense of the Buyer, up to two recognized experts in the field (such experts being mutually acceptable to Artiana and the Buyer), to examine the Property under question before deciding to rescind the sale and offer the refund under the above guarantee. The opinion of the experts shall not be binding on Artiana. 4.6. In the event of the Seller’s failure to refund the proceeds as stated in this clause, the Buyer shall return the Property to Artiana and authorise Artiana as its agent to initiate legal proceedings against the Seller. Any such steps taken or legal proceedings instituted by Artiana, against the Seller, shall be at the cost of the Buyer and Artiana’s liability shall be limited as per Clause 5.1. 5. Extent of Artiana’s Liability 5.1. Artiana has an obligation to refund the Sale Price to the Buyer only upon recovery of such amounts from the Seller and in the circumstances described in Clause 4 above (Authenticity Guarantee). The Buyer indemnifies Artiana from any non-recovery of such amounts and agrees that they shall not hold Artiana responsible in case such amounts are not recoverable from the Seller. Artiana provides insurance coverage on sold Lots for seven days after the Closing Time of the auction. After that period, or once a Lot has been collected (whichever is earlier), the Lot will be entirely at the buyer’s risk. Damages, losses or loss in value of any artworks (including frames) incurred during shipping and transit are not covered as per the insurance policy taken by Artiana. In case the Buyer opts for transit insurance coverage arranged for by Artiana by any of their insurance providers, Artiana shall not entertain any direct claims for damage or loss during shipping and transit and these would have to be directed to such insurance providers; Subject to the authenticity guarantee above, neither Artiana’s suppliers nor Artiana, nor any of Artiana’s employees or agents, shall be responsible, either for the correctness of any statements as to the authorship, origin, date, age, attributes or genuineness of any Property in the sale, or for any mistakes in the Description, or for any faults or defects in the Properties, or for any other act or omission, whatsoever. Artiana offers no guarantee or warranty other than the limited assurance contained in the authenticity guarantee above. 5.2. It is stated and agreed that the rescission of the sale and the refund of the total Sale Price paid by the Buyer is the sole remedy that may be sought by a Buyer, and such remedy is exclusive and in lieu of any other remedy which may otherwise be available under law. Artiana shall not be liable for any incidental or consequential damages incurred or claimed. 6. Copyright All content of the Print Auction Catalogue, eCatalogue and on the Website and Mobile Application are copyright protected in favour of Artiana. All trademarks, names, brand names, etc. used in the Print

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Auction Catalogue and on the Website and Mobile Application are trademarks of Artiana. Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved. No image, illustration or written material may be used or required without the prior written permission of Artiana. Artiana and the Seller(s) make no representation or warranty that the Buyer of a Property will acquire any copyright or other reproduction rights in it. 7. Legal Notices, Language, Third Party Involvement AND MEDIATION 7.1. Artiana may validly serve the Bidder/ Buyer with legal notice, if required, under these Conditions of Sale by: • Sending an email to the email address disclosed by the Bidder/ Buyer to Artiana; or • Sending a courier to the address disclosed by the Bidder/ Buyer to Artiana. 7.2. Such legal notice shall be deemed to have been properly served: • In the case of email transmission - on the date of the transmission; or • In case of transmission by courier - 2 business days after the dispatch of the notice by courier. 7.3. The notices and contract language shall be English. 7.4. Artiana is at all times entitled to involve third parties for ensuring the Buyer’s compliance and performance as per these Conditions of Sale, and the Buyer hereby grants his consent in this regard. 7.5. In the event of any dispute arising out of or in connection with these Conditions of Sale or related thereto in any manner whatsoever, the parties shall first seek settlement of that dispute by mediation in accordance with the Mediation Rules of the DIFC-LCIA Arbitration Centre, which Rules are deemed to be incorporated by reference into this clause. The Buyer irrevocably submits to the jurisdiction of the Dubai International Financial Centre (“DIFC”) Courts and waives any objection it may have to refer the disputes arising out of or in connection with these Conditions of Sale to the DIFC-LCIA Arbitration Centre on the grounds that it is an inconvenient forum (forum non conveniens). If the dispute is not settled by mediation within 60 days of the commencement of the mediation, or such further period as the parties shall agree in writing, then the parties agree to refer and resolve the dispute by arbitration in accordance with Clause 9. 8. Severability If any part of the Conditions of Sale between the Buyer and Artiana is found legally invalid, illegal or unenforceable, that part may be discounted and the rest of the conditions will remain enforceable to the fullest extent permissible by law. In such cases, the Buyer and Artiana undertake to replace the wholly or partly legally invalid, illegal or unenforceable provision with one which is legally valid, legal or enforceable and whose economic purpose most closely reflects that of the legally invalid, illegal or unenforceable provision. 9. Law and Jurisdiction If the dispute is not settled by mediation in accordance with Clause 7.5 then the dispute shall be referred to and finally resolved by arbitration under the Arbitration Rules of the DIFC-LCIA Arbitration Centre, which Rules are deemed to be incorporated by reference into this clause. In any arbitration commenced pursuant to this clause, (i) the number of arbitrators shall be one; and (ii) the seat, or legal place, of arbitration shall be the DIFC. The language to be used in the arbitration shall be English. The governing law of the contract shall be the substantive law of England and Wales.


ARTIANA GUARANTEE Aim of the Artiana Guarantee All artworks offered for sale by Artiana are authentic to the best of Artiana’s knowledge. Scope of the Artiana Guarantee Artiana provides the following assurance to buyers on behalf of the seller who may be a collector, dealer, retailer or gallery, that each artwork offered for sale on the site is a genuine work of the artist listed. Artiana guarantees the authenticity of the artwork for a period of six months from the auction closing date. Authenticity in relation to artworks shall mean compliance of the artwork with the description provided on the web site, particularly with reference to the name of the artist, title (if any) of the artwork itself, date, the school of art (if mentioned), dimensions, medium etc. In the unlikely event that within six months from the close of an auction, it is proved by the buyer to the reasonable satisfaction of Artiana that the item was not authentic and if, in Artiana’s opinion, this would have significantly impacted the price a buyer would have been willing to pay for the item, Artiana shall be entitled to rescind the sale, and the seller will be liable to refund to the buyer the price paid for the item. Once the buyer returns the item to Artiana it shall be handed over to the seller by Artiana. All such claims will be handled on a case-by-case basis, and in the case of an authenticity claim in relation to an artwork, such claim will require that examinable proof, which clearly demonstrates that the item is not authentic, is provided by an established and acknowledged authority. The decision of Artiana in respect of such claims shall be final and binding. This guarantee shall be subject to the following conditions: 1. The claim is made by the buyer as registered with Artiana (the benefit of the claim is not assignable to any subsequent owners or others who may acquire or have an interest in any of the items). 2. The Property is returned in the same condition that it was in at the time of delivery of the item to the buyer. 3. The Property was indisputably purchased through Artiana. Artiana retains the right to consult with, at the expense of the buyer, two recognised experts in the field, (such experts being mutually acceptable to Artiana and the buyer), to examine the item under question before deciding to rescind the sale and offer the refund under the above guarantee. The opinion of the experts shall not be binding on Artiana. In the event of the seller’s failure to refund the proceeds as stated above, the buyer shall return the item to Artiana and authorise Artiana as its agent to initiate legal proceedings against the seller. Any such steps taken or legal proceedings instituted by Artiana against the seller shall be at the cost of the buyer.

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STORAGE AND COLLECTION STORAGE Please note that Lots in storage can be collected only by prior appointment from the Freight Systems Co. Ltd. LLC warehouse, Plot no. M00539, 732C Street, Jebel Ali Free Zone (JAFZA). Preeti Suri: +971 50 655 1667 Office Hours: 8.00 am - 4.00 pm

Method

COLLECTION Lots will only be released from the Freight Systems Co. Ltd. LLC warehouse upon presenting a collection order issued by Artiana. Lots will not be released until all outstanding charges due to Artiana and Freight Systems Co. Ltd. LLC are settled.

Where

CONTACT ARTIANA Help Desk: +971 55 815 3030 +971 55 825 3030 T: +971 4 429 0077 F: +971 4 428 6677 E: info@artiana.com Office Hours: 10.00 am - 6.00 pm

Charges Due

Packing / Costs

Onsite Delivery & Local Delivery in Dubai

Artiana Viewing gallery: 903, The Metropolis Business Bay Dubai, UAE

5% Customs duty on Low Estimate & Customs Documentation Fee USD 95 per invoice (on applicable Lots) Art Handler(s): USD 40 per art handler (if required) Local Delivery: Offered without any charge within Dubai

Bubble wrap provided complimentary

Collection of Lots (By prior appointment)

Freight Systems Co. Ltd. LLC Plot no: M00539 732C Street Jebel Ali Free Zone (JAFZA) Dubai, UAE

5% Customs duty on Low Estimate & Customs Documentation Fee USD 95 per invoice (on applicable Lots) Handling Fee: USD 40 per Lot Art Handler(s): USD 40 per art handler

Bubble wrap provided complimentary Soft wrap (if required) will be chargeable based on size and materials

Local Deliveries (With fine art cool truck, soft wrapping and accompanied by a fine art handler)

Artiana Viewing gallery: 903, The Metropolis Business Bay Dubai, UAE

5% Customs duty on Low Estimate & Customs Documentation Fee USD 95 per invoice (on applicable Lots) Handling Fee: USD 40 per Lot plus Transit Insurance, if desired Art Handler(s): USD 40 per art handler Delivery To: Dubai USD 150 Sharjah USD 200 Ajman USD 250 Abu Dhabi USD 300 Other Emirates USD 350

Same as above for Bubble and Soft wrap Wooden crates (artworks wrapped in soft wrap and placed inside the crates) chargeable depending on size

International Deliveries (Based on confirmed shipping instructions from buyers)

Within GCC Countries

5% Customs duty on Low Estimate & Customs Documentation Fee USD 95 per invoice (on applicable Lots) Handling Fee: USD 40 per Lot plus Transit Insurance, if desired Airfreight depending on weight and destination Insurance Coverage, if desired

Wooden crates packing is mandatory (artworks wrapped in soft wrap and placed inside the crates) chargeable depending on size

Outside GCC Countries

As above but 5% Customs duty exempt

As above

Important Information • All Lots will be stored free of charge for 15 days from the auction closing date either at Artiana’s viewing gallery or at the shipper’s warehouse at Jebel Ali Free Zone (JAFZA). • After 15 days from the closing date of the auction, Lots shall be subject to a daily storage charge of USD 4 per Lot plus an administrative fee of USD 50 payable to Artiana. • As set out in the Conditions of Sale, risk and responsibility for the sold Lots (including frames or glass where relevant) passes to the Buyer at the Auction Closing Time. Artiana provides insurance coverage for sold Lots for seven days after the auction. Buyers are reminded that it is their responsibility to arrange adequate insurance for purchased Lots thereafter. • Lots sold at auction may be subject to import restrictions/taxes of foreign countries. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any relevant import license into the buyer’s own country of residence and settle any taxes and destination clearance charges due. • Shipments can only be made once full payment of all shipping charges is received by the logistics service provider.

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ARTIST PROFILES AND INDEX Bajaj, Sujata (b. 1958) Born in Jaipur, Sujata Bajaj received her Master’s degree in painting in Pune and later received her Ph.D from there. In 1988 she received a scholarship from the French government to study at the Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts, Paris. She has also worked at Studio Claude Viseux, Paris. She is the recipient of several awards including the Bombay Art Society Award and the Maharashtra State Art Award. She has had shows in India, the UK, France, Norway including the ones with Saffronart and The Guild Gallery, Mumbai, 2004. Sujata Bajaj spends her time between Pune, Norway and Paris. Lot 56

Burman, Sakti (b. 1935) Born in Kolkata, Sakti Burman graduated from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Kolkata, in 1956 and then went on to study at the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux Arts in Paris, where, in 1956, he won the Prix des Etrangers. Some of the most recent solo shows of his work include a retrospective at the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai, Victoria Memorial Hall, Kolkata, and DakshinaChitra, Chennai, in 2012; at Apparao Galleries, Chennai in 2011; Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2011, 2006, 2001, 1990, 1988, 1977, 1970 and 1967; Aicon Gallery, London and New Lot 37 Lot 55 York, in 2009; Art Musings, Mumbai, in 2009; and Maison de I’Unesco, in 2008. Burman’s works have also been featured at Saffronart’s exhibitions in Los Angeles in 2001 and in New York in 2002; at the Rand Palais, Paris, in 1975 and 1994; and at the French Biennales in 1963, 1965 and 1967. The artist lives and works in Paris.

Chowdhury, Jogen (b. 1939) Born in 1939 in erstwhile Bengal, now Bangladesh, Jogen Chowdhury studied at Government College of Arts and Crafts, Kolkata, the Studio Academy of Fine Arts, Kolkata, and the Ecole Nationale Superieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris. His most recent solo exhibitions include ‘Jogen Chowdhury: Formative to Recent’, Centre of International Modern Art (CIMA), Kolkata, in 2014; ‘Lignes de Meditation’, Gallery Veda, Chennai, in 2012-13; ‘A Calligraphy of Touch and Gaze’ by Kalakriti Art Gallery at ICIA, Mumbai, in 2008; Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2007; the Centre of International Modern Art (CIMA), Kolkata, in 2006; and Bose Pacia, New York, in Lot 34 2002. Chowdhury’s works have been exhibited in several group shows including ‘Ideas of the Sublime’, presented by Vadehra Art Gallery at Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, in 2013; ‘Figure / Landscape: Part Two’, Aicon Gallery, London, in 2010-11; ‘Dali’s Elephant’, Aicon Gallery, London, ‘Paper Trails’,Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, ‘Pretty Ugly’, Bose Pacia, Kolkata, ‘Image and Symbol: Painters Perception’, Aakrit Art Gallery, Kolkata, in 2010; ‘Modern Continuous’, Galerie 88, Kolkata, in 2009; ‘Inverting, Inventing, Traditions’, Grosvenor Vadehra, London, in 2007; Drawing Show an Act of Art II’, Priyasri Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2006; those by Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery, New York, in 2002 and 2001; the ‘Festival of India’ Geneva, in 1989; the II Havana Biennale, in 1986; and the Sao Paulo Biennale, in 1979. He was awarded the Kalidas Samman by the Madhya Pradesh State Government in 2001, the Shiromani Award, Kolkata, in 1997, and the Prix le France de la Jeune Peinture in 1966. The artist lives and works in Shantiniketan, West Bengal.

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Goud, K. Laxma (b. 1940) Born in Andhra Pradesh, Laxma Goud studied at the College of Fine Arts and Architecture in Hyderabad and at the Faculty of Fine Arts of M.S. University in Baroda. Goud has exhibited widely, both within and outside India. His solo shows include ones held at Art Alive Gallery, New Delhi in 2012; Art Musings, Mumbai in 2011; the Aicon Gallery, London, in 2009; Gallerie 88, Kolkata, in 2009; Indian Contemporary Art (ICA), Jaipur, in 2008; Gallery Space, Hyderabad, in 2008, and the Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2006 and 2003. His works have been part of group exhibitions including those held at Sakshi Gallery, Mumbai in 2012; Aicon Gallery, New York in 2011-12; Art Musings at Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2008; Galerie 88 Kolkata, in 2007; Priyasri Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2006; by Saffronart and Apparao Galleries, Los Angeles, 2001; Saffronart Hong Kong 2001, Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery, New York, 2001 and 2002; Centre of International Modern Art (CIMA), Kolkata, and the National Gallery of Modern Art (NGMA), New Delhi, Lot 26 1993; ‘Festival of India’, Geneva, 1987; and Worcester Art Museum, 1986. Goud received the Andhra Pradesh State Lalit Kala Academy awards in 1962, 1966 and 1971. The artist lives and works in Hyderabad.

Husain, Maqbool Fida (1913 - 2011)

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Born in Pandharpur, Maharashtra, in 1913, Husain moved to Mumbai in 1937 where he sustained himself by painting cinema hoardings and designing furniture and toys. A self-taught artist, Husain was invited to join the Progressive Artists Group in 1947 by F.N. Souza after his first public exhibition of paintings. Most recently, his work has been featured in solo shows including ‘M.F. Husain: Early Masterpieces 1950s-1970s at the David Winton Bell Gallery, Providence in 2010; ‘Epic India’ at the peabody Essex Museum, Salem, in 2006-07; and ‘Early Masterpieces 1950-70s, at Asia House Gallery, London, in 2006. Husain was nominated to the Rajya Sabha, India’s Upper House of Parliament in 1986-92, during which he pictorially recorded its events, which were then published in 1994. The Government of India awarded him with a Padma Shri Lot 59 Lot 60 in 1966, a Padma Bhushan in 1973 and Padma Vibhushan in 1991, all high civilian honours. In 1971, Husain was invited to exhibit as a special invitee with Pablo Picasso at the Sao Paulo Biennale, Brazil. In 2004, he was awarded the Lalit Kala Ratna by the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi. Husian passed away in London in 2011.

Khanna, Krishen (b. 1925) Born in 1925, in Lahore, Krishen Khanna worked as a banker while he studied painting as a part-time programme at the Mayo School of Art. A job transfer brought him in close proximity with the members of the Progressive Artists’ Group in Mumbai, where he chose to pursue a fulltime career as an artist. In 1962-63 Khanna received a fellow-ship from the Rockefeller Council, NewYork and was artist-in-residence at the American University, Washington DC. In 2010, Saffronart hosted a retrospective of his work at the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi. His other solo exhibitions include those held by Saffronart in association with Osborne Samuel and Berkeley Square Gallery at the Royal Academy, London, in 2007; Saffronart Lot 54 and Berkeley Square Gallery, London, in 2005; Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai 2004; Vadehra Art Lot 47 Gallery, New Delhi, 1994; and Kumar Art Gallery, New Delhi, 2001, 1966, ’64, ’60, ’59 and ’58. His works were also included in exhibitions held by Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery, New York, in 2001 and 2002. In 2011, the Government of India awarded him with the Padma Bhushan; in 2004 he received the Lalit Kala Ratna from the President of India; and in 1997 he received the Kala Ratna from the All India Fine Arts and Crafts Society, New Delhi. Khanna lives and works in New Delhi.

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Kumar, Ram (b. 1924) Born in Simla in 1924, Ram Kumar studied art while working on a Master’s degree in Economics from St. Stephens College, New Delhi. In 1949 he left for Paris to study painting under Andre Lhote and in 1950 he joined Atelier Fernand Leger, returning to India three years later. In 1970 he received the J.D. Rockefeller III Fund Fellowship. Since 1949, Ram Kumar has exhibited regularly in India Lot 58 and internationally. Some of his solo shows include those at Aicon Lot 27 Gallery, New York, in 2013; Chemould Prescott Road, Mumbai in 2008;Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi in 2012, 2010-11, ’09, ’08, ’06, ’05, ’03, ’01, ’00, 1993 and ’92; Aicon Gallery, New York in 2013 and 2007, Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai in 2005, 1999, ’92, ’90, ’86, ’84, ’83, ’78, ’76, ’73 and ’71; Arks Gallery, London in 1997; and Grosvenor Gallery, London in 1966. In 2002, Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery organised a show of his work in Mumbai, New Delhi, San Francisco and New York. Other retrospectives of his work have been held at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi in 1994 and 1993; Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai in 1993; and the Birla Museum, Kolkata in 1980. In 1972 the Government of India awarded him with the Padma Shri, one of its highest Civilian honours.The Madhya Pradesh State Government awarded him with the Kalidas Samman in 1985, and for his writing, he received the Uttar Pradesh State Government award in 1975. Ram Kumar lives and works in New Delhi.

Maity, Paresh (b. 1965) Born in 1965, he studied at the Government College of Arts & Crafts, Kolkata, and the College of Art, New Delhi. A very skilled artist, he wields a rugged palette, and is extremely versatile in his treatment of colour and texture. He has held many solo shows, including exhibitions at Jehangir Art Gallery in Mumbai, Gallerie Ganesha in New Delhi and Gallery Katayun in Kolkata. He has participated in various group shows like the National Art Exhibition in Jaipur, Kala Mela, Lalit Kala Academy in New Delhi, and the Citibank Group Show in Mumbai. Besides other accolades, he has also received the National Scholarship from the Government of India and the All India Mini Sculpture Exhibition Award from AIFACS. He gradually moved from atmospheric scenery to representations of the human form. His more recent paintings are bold and graphic, with a strong color and unusual cropping. His works are in a number of collections, including the British Museum, and the National Gallery of Lot 57 Modern Art, New Delhi. In early years he did many watercolors of different location.

Naqsh, Jamil (b. 1939) Born in 1939, in Kairana in Uttar Pradesh, India, Jamil Naqsh moved to Karachi in Pakistan following the partition of the sub-continent in 1947. In 1953, he enrolled at the National College of Arts (then Mayo College) in Lahore, but did not complete his education there, leaving after two years to study art on his own. Naqsh’s mature style is a blend of cubism – in the way he treats form and texture – tempered with fluidity and a subtle use of colour. Naqsh has painted the female form in many of his canvases replete with poise and grace. In another series of paintings, he pairs pigeons and doves with the female form, symbolic of love, peace and gentleness. One more series is inspired by the Italian sculptor Mario Marini, who captured the beauty of the horse in his work, combining the elegance of the nude female with the sturdy grace of the equine figure. Naqsh’s work has been exhibited extensively in Pakistan, India, the UK and the UAE. Between 1960 and 1968, he served as Co-Editor of Seep, an Urdu literary magazine, and between 1970 and 1973, as President of the Pakistan Painters Guild. Among the artist’s many honours are medals Lot 35 and awards from the Pakistan Art Council, Karachi; the Ministry of Culture, Pakistan; and the Arts Council of Pakistan. In 2009, Naqsh was awarded the Sitara-e-Imtiaz by the Government of Pakistan, and in 2003, a retrospective of his work was held at the Mohatta Palace Museum in Karachi, a rare honour for a living artist. Naqsh lives and works in London, and is considered the only living modern artist from Pakistan.

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Narayan, Badri (1929 - 2013) Born in Hyderabad, Badri Narayan is a self-taught artist. He has held over fifty solo exhibitions in various cities in India and internationally, the most recent being at the Viewing Room, Mumbai, in 2012; Mon Art Gallerie, Kolkata, in 2007-08; Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2006, 2004, and 2002 and Galerie 88, Kolkata in 2002. Narayan has also represented India at the Bharat Bhavan Biennale, Bhopal, in 1992; the VII and II International Triennials, New Delhi, 1991 and 1971 respectively; the Festival of India, Moscow, in 1987; the V Biennale of Prints,Tokyo, in 1966; and the II Paris Biennale in 1961. He has exhibited with Saffronart in Hong Kong in 2001. He has written and illustrated several books since 1977, and taught art to school children. Narayan was awarded the Padma Shri by the Government of India in 1987; a Senior Fellowship for Outstanding Artists from the Government of India in 1984-86, and the National Award from the Lot 49 Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, in 1965. Badri Narayan passed away in Bangalore in 2013.

Padamsee, Akbar (b. 1928) Born in Mumbai, Padamsee received a Diploma in Fine Arts from the Sir J.J. School of Art in 1951 and moved to Paris the same year. In 1965 he received the J.D. Rockefeller III Fund Fellowship and worked as artist-in-residence at the Stout State University, Wisconsin. His most recent solo shows include those held at the Priyasri Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2013; the Loft, Mumbai, in 2010; Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai in 2010, ’03, ’02, 1999, ’97, ’96, ’94, ’93, ’86 ’75, ’74 and ’72; Galerie Helene Lamarque, Paris, in 2008; Aicon Gallery, New York and Palo Alto, in 2006-07; and the Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2006. Retrospective exhibitions of his works were organized by Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2004 and Art Heritage, New Delhi and Mumbai, in 1980. His group shows include those held at Sovereign FZE, Dubai, in 2013; Art Alive Gallery, New Delhi; Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2012; Grosvenor Gallery, London; Aicon Gallery, New York and London, in 2010-11; The Museum of Fine Art, Boston, in 2009; Grosvenor Gallery, London, in 2009; Nehru Center, London, in 2005; and Lot 44 Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery New York, in 2001 and 2002. In 1969-70, Padamsee was awarded the prestigious Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship and made four short films. In 2004 he was awarded the Lalit Kala Ratna by the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, and in 1997-98, he received the Kalidas Samman from the Madhya Pradesh State Government, Padamsee lives and works in Mumbai.

Parekh, Manu (b.1939) Born in Gujarat, Manu Parekh studied at the Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai. He has been exhibiting since 1967 and his most recent solo shows include those held at Art Alive Gallery, Gurgaon 2012; Tao Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2010 and ‘09; Berkeley Square Gallery, London, in 2006;Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2004, 1994 and 1991; Jehangir Art Gallery and Tao Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2003; Sakshi Gallery, Bangalore, in 1999; ARKS Gallery, London, in 1997; Bose Pacia, New York, in 1996; and Dhoomimal Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 1988, ’85, ’81, ’76, ’75 and ’74. A retrospective of his work was held in 1992 in Kolkata, New Delhi and Mumbai. His works have also been featured in several group shows including those held at Art Alive Gallery, Gurgaon in 2012; Gallery Threshold, New Delhi, in 2011 and ’10; Tao Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2010, ’09 Lot 50 and ’08; Nature Morte, New Delhi, in 2004; Saffronart, Hong Kong, in 2001 and Lakeeren Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 1977. He has also participated in the III and IV Triennales of New Delhi, in 1975 and 1978. The Government of India awarded him the Padma Shri in 1990. He received the National Award from the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, in 1982, and the President of India’s Silver Plaque in 1972. Manu Parekh lives and works in New Delhi.

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Ramachandran, A. (b. 1935) Born in Kochi, Kerala, Ramachandran graduated with a Degree in Malayalam Literature from Kerala University before going on to study art at Viswa Bharati University at Santiniketan. His most recent shows include ‘Dhyanachitra’ and ‘Bahurupi’ at Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2012 and 2009 respectively; and those held by Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, at Jehangir Art Gallery, in 2008; Grosvenor Vadehra Gallery, London in 2008; the Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai Lot 43 and New York, 2007-08;Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, 2006, 2005, and Lot 29 2001; Nami Island, South Korea, 2005; Art Heritage, New Delhi, 2002; and Sridharani Gallery, New Delhi 1998. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions, including those hosted by Saffronart, Hong Kong and Los Angeles, 2001; the Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, 1982; the Royal Academy of Arts, London, 1982; and the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, 1977. He was honoured with a Padma Bhushan from the Government of India, in 2005, and has also received the Nama Conquers Award in 1980 and 1978, for the children’s books he wrote and illustrated. Ramachandran lives and works in New Delhi and Kochi.

Raza, Syed Haider (1922 - 2016) Born in 1922 in Babaria, Madhya Pradesh, Raza graduated from the Nagpur School of Art in 1943 and the Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai in 1947. He was one of the founding members of the Progressive Artists’ Group in 1948. After receiving a French Government Scholarship in 1950 he left for Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts, Paris, where he was awarded the Prix de la Lot 28 Lot 32 Lot 46 Critique in 1956. In 1962 he served as a visiting lecturer at the University of California in Berkeley, USA. Raza has several solo exhibitions to his credit, including ‘Paysage: Select Works 1950s-1970s’, Dubai, ‘Parikrama: Around Gandhi’, Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2014; ‘Shabd-Bindu’, Akar Prakar, Kolkata, in 2013; ‘Vistaar’, Art Musings and Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai, in 2012-13, ‘Bindu Vistaar’, Grosvenor Gallery, London, in 2012; ‘Punarangman’,Vadehra Art Gallery and Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi, in 2011; ‘Ones’ at Vadehra Art Gallery, New Delhi, in 2011 and 2010; Tao Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2008 and 2006; and Saffronart and Berkeley Square Gallery, London and New York, 2005. In 2007 Saffronart held a major retrospective of his work in New York. Raza’s work has been exhibited in several group exhibitions including those at Aicon Gallery, New York and London, in 2014, ’13, ’12, ’11 and ’10; the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, in 2009; Grosvenor Gallery, London, Mumbai, 2004; Saffronart and Pundole Art Gallery, New York, 2001 and 2002; and Saffronart, Hong Kong and Los Angeles, 2001 among several others. Raza received a Lalit Kala Ratna from the Lalit Kala Akademi, New Delhi in 2004, and a Padma Bhushan and Padma Shri from the Government of India in 2007 and 1981 respectively.The Madhya Pradesh State Government also awarded him with the Kalidas Samman in 1996-97. Raza lived and worked in Paris and Gorbio, France, till 2011, and moved back to India, where he currently works.

Sen, Paritosh (1918 - 2008) Paritosh Sen was born in 1918 in Dhaka. After completing his diploma in Fine Arts from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Chennai, he moved to Calcutta in 1942, where he and a group of friends formed the Calcutta Group, an association of artists that sought to incorporate contemporary values in Indian art. In 1949, he left for Paris to study further, attending, among other institutes, the Ecole des Beaux Arts. He received a Fellowship from the John D. Rockefeller III Fund for 1970-71. A prolific writer, Sen has published many works in both Bengali and in English, including a series of autobiographical vignettes titled Jindabahar Lane. His works have been exhibited in India and internationally, in Paris, London, Germany, Tokyo and in USA. Sen passed away in October 2008. Lot 45

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Senanayake, Senaka (b. 1951) A Sri Lankan by origin, Senaka attained fame early in life as a prodigy for his works of art. He held his first international solo exhibition at the age of ten, in New York. Although he painted copiously and held many shows both in his native country as well as abroad, it was only after he went to Yale school for graduation in Art and Architecture did he realize that his true calling lay in the field of art. For the past decade, Senanayake has concentrated his art as a medium for environmental advocacy: depicting beautiful scenes from the rainforest to promote public awareness of environmental degradation in his native Sri Lanka and around the Lot 52 world. Senanayake’s work shows a fervent passion for nature’s beauty and a great knowledge Lot 42 of the flora and fauna of the rainforest. His work has been shown at most parts of Europe and South Asia with critical acclaim. Till date he has more than 100 solo shows to his credit, and numerous group shows in the countries of Europe, China, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Czechoslovakia, Korea and Egypt to name a few. His work has been documented by Metro Goldwyn, British Movietone News, BBC TV, London,Yeo Soo TV, South Korea, TV Austria, and Star TV, India.Various journals, magazines and newspapers such as The New York Sunday Times, Washington Post, London Times, Weser Kurier, Germany, UNESCO Features, Paris, National Geographic Magazine, Asia Week and many others, have devoted their mediums to document Senaka’s work. He lives and works in Sri Lanka.

Shaw, Lalu Prasad (b. 1937) Born in 1937, in erstwhile Bengal, Lalu Prasad Shaw received a Diploma in painting from the Government College of Arts and Crafts, Kolkata, in 1959. He has exhibited extensively in India and abroad since 1956, and some of his most recent solo shows include ‘Looking in’ at Galerie 88, Kolkata, in 2011-12; ‘Graceful Silence’ and ‘Sepia Notes’ at Art Musings, Mumbai, in 2011 and 2007; ‘The Myriad Minded Artist’ at Gallery Sanskriti, Kolkata, in 2008; and ‘Painting’ at the Centre for International Modern Art (CIMA), Kolkata, in 1995. His work has also been featured in several group shows, and he has participated in art festivals and fairs all over the world since 1956. Shaw has received many awards, including the West Bengal State Lalit Kala Akademi Award in 1959, and the Birla Academy Award, Kolkata, in 1975-78. The artist lives and works in Kolkata. Lot 53

Shreshtha, Laxman (b. 1939) Laxman Shreshtha was born in Nepal in 1939. After securing a degree at the University of Patna, the aspiring artist moved to Mumbai to join the Sir J.J School of Art where he did a diploma in painting (1957-62). Later he went to Europe to further hone his skills at the Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts in Paris followed by a stint at London’s Central School of Art (1970). He also studied at the Academie Grande Chaumiere, S.W. Hayter’s Atelier 17, Paris (1964-67) apart from undertaking a study tour to Baltimore and San Francisco in 1971. His debut exhibition took place at Mumbai’s Taj Art Gallery (1963), which led to several shows in India and internationally. Among his selected solo exhibit are the ones at Jehangir Art Gallery, Mumbai (2008, 2003, 1994); ‘Elaborations’, Recent works in Black and White, Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai (2007); ‘Inaugural Show’, Prithvi Art Gallery, Mumbai (1994); Gallery Chemould, Mumbai (1968); and a show at Tribhuwan College, Kathmandu, Nepal almost Lot 31 five decades ago. His selected group shows are ‘Aqua’, Gallery Beyond, Mumbai, ‘One Eye Sees, the Other Feels’, The Viewing Room, Mumbai (both in 2012); ‘Point and Line to Plane VI’, Gallery Beyond (2008); ‘Tribute to Picasso’, Guild Art Gallery, Mumbai (2002); ‘Aspects of Modern Indian painting’, courtesy Saffronart and Pundole, Metropolitan Pavilion, New York (2002, 2001); ‘Ideas and Images – Part IV’, NGMA, Mumbai (2002); ‘The Search’, Apparao-Wallace Galleries, New York (1997); ‘Image Beyond Image’, Glenbarra Art Museum Collection, Japan, NGMA (1997); ‘50 Years of Freedom of Expression’, Jehangir Gallery (1997); 25 Years of Indian Art, Rabindra Bhavan, Delhi (1972); Baltimore and San Francisco (1971); Maisons des Beaux Arts, Paris (1966); Salle de la Presse, French Foreign Ministry, Paris (1966); and ‘Inaugural Exhibition’, Gallery Chemould (1963). Shreshtha’s abstract works are both sensuous and meditative in their shifts and balances of colour.Though abstract, his paintings have a sense of intrigue in them, that leaves the observer, and Shreshtha himself, as he confesses, trying to understand the shades of meaning they present. The artist lives and works in Mumbai.

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Souza, Francis Newton (1924 - 2002) Born in 1924 in Saligao, Goa, Souza was expelled from the Sir J.J. School of Art, Mumbai, in 1942 for taking part in the ‘Quit India’ freedom movement. He went on to found the Progressive Artist’s Group in 1948, before leaving for London a year later. In 1955 Souza held a one-man show at Gallery One in London and also had his autobiographical essay ‘Nirvana of a Maggot’ published. He was awarded the John Moore Prize at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool in 1957 and received an Italian Government Scholarship in 1960. In 1959 a collection of his autobiographical essays, ‘Words and Lines’, was published, and in 1962 a monograph on his work by Edwin Mullins was published as well. In 1967 Souza migrated to New York where he received the Guggenheim International Award.Two retrospectives of his work were organized by Art Heritage, New Delhi, in 1986 and 1996. Souza also participated Lot 29 in a work-live programme in Los Angeles, hosted by Saffronart in 2001. Souza passed away in Mumbai 2002. Some Lot 36 important posthumous exhibition of his work include, ‘F.N. Souza’ at Saffronart and Grosvenor Gallery, New York, in 2008; ‘F.N. Souza: Religion & Erotica’ at Tate Britain, London, in 2005-06; ‘Self-Portrait: Renaissance to Contemporary’ at the National Portrait Gallery, London, in 2005; and ‘Francis Newton Souza’ at Saffronart and Grosvenor Gallery, New York and London, in 2005.

Subramanyan, K.G. (1924 - 2016) Born in Kerala in 1924, Subramanyan received his art education at Kala Bhavan, Santiniketan, and the Slade School of Art, London. He continued painting and teaching over the next few decades, and was appointed a fellow of the National Lalit Kala Akademi in 1985, and a Christensen Fellow at St. Catherine’s College, Oxford, in 1987-88. Subramanyan also served as Dean at the Faculty of Fine Arts, M.S. University, Baroda, and in 1989 was appointed Professor Emeritus at Santiniketan. He has had numerous solo and group exhibitions, and participated in several major Biennales and Triennales. A retrospective exhibition of his work was held in 2003 at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi and Mumbai. Subramanyan was awarded the Padma Bhushan by the Government of India in 2006. In recognition of his varied contributions to Lot 39 Lot 40 the development of Indian art he was awarded the Shiromani Kala Puraskar by the Government of India in 1994. In 1966 Subramanyan was awarded the John D. Rockfeller III Fund Fellowship. Subramanyan lives and works in Baroda.

Vaikuntam, Thota (b. 1942) Vaikuntam was born in 1942 in Andhra Pradesh. He studied at the College of Fine Arts and Architecture in Hyderabad. In 1971, he won the Lalit Kala Akademi Fellowship to study at the M.S. University, Baroda. He has had several solo and group shows internationally and in India, including New Delhi, Mumbai and cities in South India. His recent solo shows include the 2011 ‘Metamorphosis: The Changing World of Thota Vaikuntam’ at the Art Alive Gallery in New Delhi, as well as the 2011 ‘Memoire du passe 1979-1999’ at the Latitude 28 gallery, New Delhi. His works have also been exhibited in New York, London, Birmingham and Kassel. His work was shown at the VII Triennale, New Delhi, and he has also exhibited with Saffronart in Los Angeles and Hong Kong in 2001.Vaikuntam won the Bharat Bhavan Biennale Award, Bhopal in 1988, as well as the National Award for Painting from the Government of India in 1993. The artist lives and works in Hyderabad. Lot 30

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