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This is what arthritis looks like

Annual Review 2020


It is often called an invisible condition

Arthritis affects:

 

all ages - from children to the elderly all ethnicities – with MÄ ori and Pacific having high rates of gout arthritis due to genetic factors more women than men, but men are more likely to have gout arthritis

 

It impacts people from  all walks of life By 2040 there will be one million people in New Zealand with arthritis

       

  

Half of the people who have arthritis are of working age, so it is a condition that can affect a person’s ability to stay in paid employment

It is a leading cause of disability in New Zealand

Many people with arthritis look healthy but suffer from long term pain and have difficulty with tasks of everyday living such as dressing, cooking and even opening doors

Children with arthritis report being bullied and told they are too young to have arthritis

  

 

It can be a real struggle to keep working, especially if people in the workplace do not understand that arthritis is not just a condition affecting the elderly retired population

This report outlines the key features of our services over the 2019–2020 year. It shows how we:

 

  transform lives

build communities

share expertise

find solutions


This is what arthritis looks like

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COVID-19 When the Prime Minister announced New Zealand was going into a strict lockdown from March 26th that meant Arthritis New Zealand could not operate from their offices. Virtually overnight we changed to ensure systems were in place to enable all staff to work from home and maintain services and activities - albeit with changed methods of delivery. Our Board established a COVID-19 response committee which met weekly and oversaw our continuing operations. • Digital services became a major focus as the whole world adapted to a new reality. Our increased digital reach saw us produce a range of webinars, increase online discussions using Zoom and Facebook, setting up a range of online support groups and sending out an e news bulletin every week. • We know that digital education and services do not work for everyone, so we also used telephone support to reach out and call clients to stay in touch with them and provide information and support. • Advocacy for people with arthritis was also an important activity for us. We were delighted with the introduction of an Essential Workers Payment Scheme which provided financial support for people who worked in essential services but were deemed to be at risk. People with immunocompromised conditions were included in this scheme which enabled them to stay home and minimise their risk of being infected at work. • Another feature of our COVID-19 response was community testing and contact tracing. Our Arthritis Educators assisted with in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin. 2

RIGHT: Arthritis staff assist at CBAC

with testing for COVID-19.

As New Zealand navigates the winding pathway of a post COVID-19 world, we continue to adapt to changing circumstances while maintaining our mission to improve the lives of everyone affected by arthritis. Of particular concern is the impact COVID-19 will have on our donation income as the economic impact will continue to be significant.


Statement of Service Performance for 2019–2020 Transforming Lives Face-to-face and telephone services

 

 

4,175 client interactions at clinics - either face-to-face or telephone

Sharing Expertise 259 events organised

Finding solutions

calendar-star

10 caregiver/support worker users-class training sessions

smile

3,474 client interactions at school community group events

85 people attended our 2 annual camps for children campground and teens with arthritis

Online support and information 72,636 website users

video

laptop

13,867 video and webinar views

Building Communities National network of 2,376 volunteers

trophy-alt

3 Summer Scholarship award Research awards Research on Gout Management co-funded with Pharmac and search-dollar Health Quality Safety Commission

phone

700 outward calls made to clients to check their welfare during COVID-19 lockdown

14 active partnership projects with handshake-alt health agencies and community groups

Sponsorship of Accessible Packaging Award as part of the Australasian Packaging Innovation and Design Awards

hands-helping

23 local support groups users around New Zealand

Stamford 6X self-efficacy poll-people questionnaire in use to measure client outcomes

1,587 members of private online support groups phone-laptop

phone-alt 3,471 calls to our 0800 line 7,443 social media followers share-alt-square 3


Stock image used for illustrative purposes

Some of the stories behind these services “Advice and support has improved my quality of life” Merle has osteoarthritis in her hands, neck and knees. After her brother had a bad fall, she developed a fear of going walking, doing gardening, attending dance classes or anything that posed a risk of a fall. Fortunately, she phoned an Arthritis Educator to seek help. After that call she felt optimistic that she could improve her symptoms and she now does regular exercises, attends Tai Chi and English country dancing classes.

Transforming Lives Arthritis New Zealand provides information, education and support for people with all forms of arthritis. This support includes: • phone and individual face-to-face clinics for individuals and groups • online information and connections • expertise on up-to-date research and management of arthritis • camps for teens with arthritis and families who have children with arthritis. 4

“I learned how I could better manage pain through exercise, pacing physical activities, using heat for pain relief and improving my diet” She was also sent booklets on exercise, physical activity, joint protection, pain management and nutrition. Her neck is still a problem, but she now has strategies to help manage her pain and discomfort.

“All of this advice and support from Arthritis New Zealand has improved my quality of life”


“Knowing there is a helpline I can call if I need to is great”

Tobie is fortunate to have ‘great’ doctors and medications that help her after trying other medications and doctors that weren’t so great.

“It’s been a real roller coaster ride!” Tobie spent 11 years (from age 12) seeing different doctors and specialists. It took 11 years before she was diagnosed. She was relieved when her symptoms finally had a name – Ankylosing Spondylitis. Tobie has pain every day. Many different kinds of pain, sometimes shooting down body parts, sometimes dull and aching, sometimes a warm pain, or heavy pain, and sometimes she can’t walk. “A flare-up for me is small amounts of pain that start in a familiar place, gradually getting worse throughout the day. Then it gets so bad by the evening that I can’t sit without hurting, can’t walk without holding every wall and doorframe to get to where I need to go. It’s a heavy pain that feels like your legs are magnetised to the floor. I also get sharp, radiating pain that goes from my sternum to my armpit and down my arm, and it’s sudden enough to make you think it’s your heart, but I know it’s not. The pain is exhausting, but it won’t let me sleep.” “Sometimes, it’s difficult to find the motivation to keep moving or get up when the fatigue is heavy. Sometimes you just carry on for as long as you can, then a small thing will hit you, and you realise how much you are dealing with. It’s a real battle between wanting people to know all that you are dealing with, and have them understand that you are still doing so much considering your pain levels. Most people don’t understand something until they have experienced it, so it’s easier to hide how you feel and keep going. I don’t want to be treated differently because of it.”

“Arthritis New Zealand’s online events and discussions about medications, exercise, and coping methods have helped me a lot. Also knowing there is a helpline I can call if I need to is great. Having a support network is a huge thing for everyone.”

Why people value Arthritis New Zealand - feedback from consumers “As an organisation you combine being very professional and having an impressive wealth of knowledge and expertise with a friendly style of communication which makes you feel that someone is listening and can actually help” “If I have a concern or question about arthritis it is my “go-to place” “I feel like I’m not the only one with this horrible disease” “You put a public face to sometimes invisible illness and disability”

“You understand” 5


Expanding Digital Services During the year a Digital Services Educator position was created to enhance our digital service delivery. This includes regular webinars, posting video clips on all aspects of managing arthritis for social media, monitoring of online discussions and evaluation of all posts and social media for accuracy.

Online support We run a number of closed Facebook support groups with online support and guidance provided by an Arthritis Educator. These groups are an opportunity for people to connect with each other and share experiences, tips, support, and motivation. Being available online is convenient and accessible and with oversight of these groups from Arthritis Educators also enables a connection and opportunity to access professional support. More and more clients as well as sharing their own experiences also refer others to Arthritis NZ resources and the 0800-phone line to speak to an Arthritis Educator.

Some examples of common issues and conversations include:

Client 1 Client 1

Grateful to have support from this group. Would appreciate advice on exercises for the hands, sore and stiff especially in the morning

Bad night last night, lots of pain not much sleep. Nothing worked even my usual pain medicine  





 

4 comments

Several helpful supportive messages followed from other clients and an Arthritis educator including

Client 2

Have you tried magnesium? Client 3

Pool therapy is good… Client 4

If you can get in a bath a hot soak can be good… Arthritis Educator

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Questions around exercise are common:

Please also check out this link for more information and tips for pain and sleep management and/or you could phone our 0800 663 463 and speak to an arthritis educator for more support

 ♥ 





3 comments

Client 2

These exercises are great Arthritis NZ home-based exercise DVD for people with arthritis

Client 3

Excellent info here also Arthritis NZ website article & Video Clip – Top Tips for managing arthritis in your hands

Client 1

Thankyou much appreciated


Children and teens with arthritis One of the persistent myths about arthritis is the perception that it only affects old people. In fact, arthritis affects all age groups including very young children and teenagers. Arthritis New Zealand provides a Child and Family Advice service and works closely with the National Paediatric Rheumatology Team to provide support for families learning to manage arthritis in children and teenagers. We run 2 annual camps – one for teenagers with arthritis and another for families of children who have been recently diagnosed with arthritis. These camps provide information, education and a chance to meet others who know just what it is like to live with arthritis as you are growing up.

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Sharing Expertise We have significant and extensive expertise and sharing this with clients, health providers, and other agencies is an increasingly important aspect of our work. We know that arthritis can be but one of the health conditions that clients are managing and close alignment with other providers is essential. Other initiatives sharing our expertise have been:

Partnership projects include: • a gout arthritis management project with Whanganui Health Network and Gonville practice which is clinically based. It has involved health professional training, internal audit and registrar involvement • delivering programmes to the Pacific community in Porirua run in partnership with 3 community pharmacies • close co-operation with the National Paediatric Rheumatology Service in running our camps and developing services for children and teenagers • Cycle Forward exercise and education programme with Sport Whanganui and the Whanganui Council • working with the Heart Foundation and Diabetes New Zealand to develop integrated education programmes • the development of online training resources utilising the Open Polytechnic “iqualify” learning platform.

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• the development of a new Nutrition and Arthritis booklet developed with a nutritionist to add to our extensive selection of brochures on different forms of arthritis • participating or organising 269 events (seminars, workshops, health expos, selfmanagement courses) • running 10 caregiver/support worker training sessions.

Focus on osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in New Zealand and yet its management is dominated by perceptions that joint replacement surgery is the inevitable and best path for its management. David Hunter is an Australian based rheumatologist who is an acknowledged world expert on the management of osteoarthritis and Arthritis New Zealand organised a national speaking tour for him to lead discussion on optimum management of osteoarthritis. He presented to consumers, health professionals and funders from the Ministry of Health and spoke in Whangarei, Auckland, Hamilton, Wellington and Christchurch. He focussed on the significance of developing early intervention services that can delay or prevent the need for joint replacement surgery. An evaluation of a programme he led in New South Wales showed a 10% reduction in numbers requiring knee replacement surgery by providing an opportunity to target patients much earlier in their pathway before they need to see an orthopaedic surgeon. This approach sparked significant interest in how services for people with osteoarthritis can be improved.


Partnership in action – Māori and Pacific gout arthritis education We are working collaboratively with the local community and five pharmacies in Porirua to develop a collaborative and pharmacy led programme. This programme is intended to create improved awareness the causes and management of gout arthritis for Māori and Pacific. The emphasis is very much on developing relationships with consumer groups – using language and terminologies that fit culturally and help communities understand why medication is so important in the management of gout arthritis. Kas Govind is one of the pharmacists involved and he is committed to community education as the key to improving understanding of gout arthritis. “Living long and living well” is his focus with consumers. Graeme Blanchard, another pharmacist we have been working with emphasises the need for good patient support especially helping people understand how they can improve their health outcomes. Both pharmacists are passionate about improving the management of gout arthritis in Porirua and welcome the working partnership with Arthritis New Zealand.

ABOVE: Sila Aliva and Okesene Faraimo presented their group's health

promotion concept ideas to support people with gout and their whānau.

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Active partnerships We are working in active partnership with: • Mahitahi Hauora • Pharmac • Health Quality and Safety Commission • Open Polytechnic of New Zealand • National Paediatric Rheumatology Service • Gonville PHO • Cannons Creek Pharmacy • Waitangirua Pharmacy • Porirua Mungavin Pharmacy • Whanganui DHB • Whanganui City Council • Diabetes New Zealand • National Heart Foundation New Zealand

Building Communities We know the importance of building communities to support and engage with people who have arthritis. Volunteers are an essential building block for this work and a significant focus for us. Our engagement with volunteers takes many forms but all have the common linkage of working to build links with others who have the same condition and know what it is like to have arthritis - or as one of our support groups put it “surround yourself with others who get it”. “Getting it” means sharing experiences, helping people feel they are not alone and reducing the isolation and loneliness many feel - whether they are newly diagnosed or have lived with arthritis for many years. • Our support groups provide face-to-face support and meet in their local areas. • Our online closed Facebook groups provide an online network. Most of these groups are condition-specific and we saw great growth in these groups during lockdown. • We also have an Instagram group focused on a young age group for whom Instagram provides the best online platform. Many of those who post on this page have been to children’s camp or teen’s camp.

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Rachel Callear and Nicola Gray from the National Paediatric Rheumatology Service – one of our valued partners.


Stephanie Grummit is convenor of the newly set up Wellington Support Group.

Hannah Barnes is the Co-ordinator of one of our online support groups.

Tessa is one of our Youth Leaders and she is our volunteer Instagram administrator.

“I am hoping that my work as a volunteer in a support group will mean that when someone in Wellington needs help, we can be there to make them feel they are not alone in their struggle. I want to empower people to learn how to manage their arthritis and have support to make changes that will improve how they feel.

“I was keen to put my hand up to help out when I read Arthritis NZ was in need of an online support group coordinator as I had personally received a lot of support when I was first diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis nearly 2 years ago, and I am always keen to give back to the community I am very much a part of.

“I think my activity as a youth leader and Instagram admin has made an impact to help others – we can reassure teens that they are not alone and we know just what it is like to have arthritis when you are a teenager.

Having arthritis does not stop us from experiencing adventures or achieving what you are passionate about.”

Volunteering and helping people in need fits well with my own personal ethos and it seemed like the role was written for me, given my experience in moderating large professional Facebook groups and providing support for cancer patients in my day to day work. I was keen to ensure the group kept providing the service I found so helpful when I was first diagnosed.”

Talking to someone who has walked in your shoes is invaluable. It means you have someone to turn to when things aren’t going too well. Sometimes our mental wellbeing can be tested and having others who know what it can be like makes all the difference.”

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Stock image used for illustrative purposes

Finding Solutions Co-funding research into gout arthritis management An evaluation of two gout arthritis management programmes with the purpose of looking at:

This research identified the following core components of effective programmes to be:

• what an effective response to gout arthritis looks like

• easy access to medication

• how to achieve equitable outcomes for Māori and Pacific people. The two programmes evaluated were ‘Gout Stop’ run by Mahitahi Hauora PHE in Northland and ‘Owning My Gout’ a pharmacist- and nurseled collaboration based in Counties Manukau DHB area. Both programmes had a high proportion of Māori and Pacific people involved but around a quarter of the participants dropped out soon after their painful acute symptoms of gout arthritis had eased. Barriers to effective treatment were identified as: • old beliefs about the causes of gout arthritis and the whakamā associated with the beliefs that gout arthritis is caused by eating the wrong food and drinking too much alcohol • lack of understanding that gout arthritis is a long-term condition and that Māori and Pacific people have high rates due to genetic make up • cost and availability of primary care • reduced motivation to complete the programme once the pain fades. 12

• activities to build understanding of the causes and treatment of gout arthritis • accessible gout arthritis information resources. Suggestions for improving systems included: • DHBs developing targets for improved access to medication • developing on-going training and learning for providers • implementing a common framework and measurement model for gout education programmes. The full report is available on our website at arthritis.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/ Gout-programmes-evaluation-report-. FINAL_.-200228.pdf


Measuring outcomes for clients of Arthritis New Zealand How do we know our services are improving people’s lives? We know anecdotally that people find our services very helpful but over the past year we have looked at how we can objectively measure improved outcomes for clients. The internationally-utilised Stamford 6x point self-efficacy questionnaire has been piloted with a selection of clients and it shows a clear statistical improvement in their management of arthritis. It surveys changes in confidence about such factors as managing physical discomfort and pain, emotional stress and fatigue and ability to do the things that are important to the client. Survey scores of 31 clients showed a statistically significant increase in confidence.

Sponsorship of Accessible Packaging Award

Funding of three Summer Scholarship programmes

In conjunction with Arthritis Australia we co-sponsor the Accessible Packaging Award made at the Australasian Packaging Innovation and Design Awards. The Award winner in 2020 was Eco-clean – a flexible pouch for chilled and pasteurised goods.

Programmes funded in 2019 were: • foot problems and physical activity in people with rheumatoid arthritis • investigating a function for the gout susceptibility gene ABCG2 • co-production and pilot testing of a Living well with arthritis pain video.

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Philanthropy Our Philanthropic income is our major income stream and it is the crucial factor in maintaining the sustainability of Arthritis New Zealand. To all who have supported us in the last year we give sincere thanks. The activities outlined in this report can only happen because of your support- it is deeply appreciated. Our fundraising activities have been impacted severely by COVID-19 and activities such as our “bucket collection� have had to be cancelled for 2020. We also expect that the economic impact of COVID-19 will potentially reduce the availability of funds from our traditional supporters, trusts and sponsors. We are also aware that the phasing out of cheques by banks by July 2021 will have an impact on our donor mail programme and we need to make sure we provide donors with alternative ways to give through regular giving, credit card and online donations. Again thank you to all those who continue to support Arthritis NZ so that we can improve the life of every person affected by arthritis. We acknowledge the support of our sponsors:

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Bequests

Grants

Estate Albert A Roberts

Advance Ashburton Community Foundation

Milestone Foundation

Estate Basil D Kruse

Ara Lodge No 348 I.C. Charitable Trust Board

Mt Wellington Foundation Ltd

Estate Beatrice M Gallagher

Auckland Airport Community Trust

Napier City Council

Estate Desmond P C Levins

Bay Trust

Nikau Foundation

Estate Donald Stewart Malcolm

Beatrice Georgeson Trust

NZ Lottery Grants Board

Estate Dorothy Ashbolt

Bill Blackadder Trust

Oxford Sports Trust

Estate Dorothy H Thompson

Canterbury Arthritis Support Trust

P H Vickery Trust

Estate Douglas A Tooth

Central Lakes Trust

Page Charitable Trust

Estate E L Felicity Tompkins

Central Lakes Trust

Pub Charity Ltd

Estate Florence Q Davies

CERT Your Local Gaming Trust Ltd

R G & E F MacDonald Trust Board

Estate Gordon Lindsey Isaacs

Community Trust South

Rodmor N0 2 Charitable Trust

Estate Jenepher Press

D V Bryant Trust Board

Rotorua Energy Charitable Trust

Estate Joan Robertson

Disability Community Trust Inc.

Roy Owen Dixey Charitable Trust 2019

Estate John Freeman JOHNSON

Disability Community Trust Inc.

Shacklock Charitable Trust

Estate June Bell

Doris M Partridge Charitable Trust

Silver Living Charitable Trust

Estate Leslie I McGreevy

Dunedin City Council - Community Grants

Taranaki Apepsi Trust

Estate Margaret O D Malcolm

Estate Gordon Lindsey Isaacs

Ted and Mollie Carr Endowment Fund

Estate Marie-Therese Brown

Fenix Foundation

The Blue Door Opportunity Shop

Estate Murdoch J FALK

Four Winds Foundation

The Guy Anson Waddel Charitable Trust

Estate of Hazel M Christie

H & K Reynolds Charitable Trust

The JBS Dudding Trust

Estate Patricia J Edbrooke

Helen Graham Charitable Trust

The Sutherland Self Help Trust Board

Estate Phyllis F Garton

Hilda Curtis Charitable Trust

Upper Hutt City Council

Estate Robin F Cameron

Hutt Mana Charitable Trust

Waipa District Council - Community Grants

Estate Ronald W Somers

Jack Jeffs Charitable Trust

Whanganui Community Foundation

Estate Vera Malcolm

Margaret & Huia Clarke Trust Fund

Zelda Roberts Charitable Trust

Prize Winners Trust - Estate

Masterton District Council

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Chair’s Report COVID-19! Has anything else happened this year? This event has impacted every one of us in some way, some more than others. While we will all have stories of how we have been affected, Arthritis New Zealand – Kaiponapona Aotearoa, has weathered this event extremely well. We are still not through this, but as an organisation the sound structure that we have built up over the past 54 years has stood us in good stead. We have had to rapidly adapt our services, business practices and public engagement. I am very proud to say that the team at Arthritis NZ managed this very well and seamlessly moved from operating from our offices to working from home and provided adapted support to those with arthritis. This included increased online programs and information and using our team to proactively phone our clients to make sure they were ok. We received some great feedback including:

“Philip is self-managing his arthritis, and was emailed exercises he could do at home. He felt alone in his bubble and I was the first person he had spoken to in over a week. Made his day that we cared!” During the lockdown, the Board formed a committee to review staff wellbeing, activities and issues with management. This allowed us to use the skills and expertise we have on our Board and management team to help navigate through these turbulent times. We also questioned what “post COVID” might look like and management provided us with several options going forward. We reviewed these options and have adjusted our strategy to account for expected changes in the economy and health provisions in the future.

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We are pleased to see that Arthritis NZ is developing new ways of engaging with those who are suffering from arthritis. The increased focus on online programs, learning and support will be essential to reach more people. This combined with new training programmes for clinical and non-clinical staff will expand the reach of Arthritis NZ. We are also pleased to see the increased collaboration opportunities including shared research with PHARMAC and HQSC and joint funding of roles within the community with other NGO’s and health providers. We are continuing to develop a closer relationship with the Ministry of Health. These are important developments that will ensure we are committed to improving the life of every person affected by arthritis in New Zealand. I want to thank all those who support Arthritis NZ – from those who generously donate or leave us a bequest, to the variety of roles volunteers play in ensuring we provide the best support for those with arthritis. I want to acknowledge the valuable work of our Board of Trustees, committees and the Electoral Council. They continue to guide our organisation with professionalism and astuteness that ensures Arthritis NZ is a robust and progressive organisation. Special thanks also to our staff and volunteers who ensured that we maintained services in the face of unexpected and extraordinary challenges. We know the future will hold challenges but I am confident we have the ability to meet these as we have done so this last year and that our organisation will continue to grow.

Peter Larmer Chair, Board of Trustees


CEO’s Report 2019–2020 has been a financial year of two halves, and no one could have predicted that the COVID-19-related pandemic would have such an impact. We were forced to accept a new normal for our lives, communities, the nation of Aotearoa and the world. In periods of significant change, there are always silver linings, and indeed, we at Arthritis New Zealand have captured these opportunities. We have increased our reach and identified new openings to support and inform over 700,000 with arthritis and their wider whanau. With this emphasis, we are developing several programmes that can be delivered to clinical and non-clinical support staff. Under the banner of “Know It All” we will be launching these courses later in 2020. With lockdown, we provided more webinars, Facebook discussions, Zoom cafés, video clips and resources about pain management, nutrition, exercise, mental wellbeing, different types of arthritis and how to manage various arthritis conditions. We have looked to work more collaboratively with community health providers and other NGO’s. In this year, we have funded two roles in partnership with Mahitahi PHE (Northland - osteoarthritis) and with the DHB in Whanganui (Gout arthritis). These roles are community-based and work collaboratively with other health professionals to improve the wellbeing of those with arthritis. We are also looking to work closely with the Heart Foundation and Diabetes NZ, as many of those with gout arthritis also have comorbidities including heart disease and diabetes. Arthritis NZ also partnered with PHARMAC and the Health Quality and Safety Commission to commission an extensive research report in two gout arthritis programmes in Northland and Counties Manakau. This report provides an opportunity to share the outcomes and learnings from these programmes to other health providers across the country.

This year we also hosted Professor David Hunter in our Abbvie Speakers Tour. A world-leading Rheumatologist, David has worked extensively in NSW around developing non-surgical interventions for osteoarthritis. On the back of the recent government-funded Mobility Action Programme, we want to find new, less invasive ways of treating osteoarthritis. From a staff point of view, the sudden change to working from home in March went seamlessly. Over the last few years, we have progressively moved to more flexible systems that allow us to work from anywhere in the country. Our staff are passionate about helping those with arthritis, and I want to thank them for all their incredibly hard work in very changing and challenging conditions. Our funding continues to come from generous donors, bequests and trusts, and we thank them so much as we could not continue to operate without this vital ongoing support. We expect this to be impacted in the short term as the economic impact of COVID-19 takes its toll in New Zealand and the rest of the world and have planned accordingly. Our volunteers continue to provide valuable support throughout the country. I would like to acknowledge the exceptional advice and encouragement that our Chair and the Board have provided us throughout the COVID-19 period. Their wise counsel has provided a strong platform for us to tackle what lies ahead and continue to improve the life of every person affected by arthritis.

Philip Kearney Chief Executive

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Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona Aotearoa) Summary Financial Statements for the year ended 30 June 2020 Summary Annual Report This is a summary of Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona Aotearoa)’s (the Trust’s) audited financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2020 which were authorised for issue on 17 September 2020. The summary financial report has been extracted from the full audited financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2020. The summary financial statements have been prepared in accordance with FRS-43 – Summary Financial Statements. The full financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice and they comply with Public Benefit Entity International Public Sector Accounting Standards (PBE Standards) and other applicable Financial Reporting Standards, as appropriate for Tier 2 not-for-profit public benefit entities. The Trust has made an explicit and unreserved statement of compliance with Public Benefit Entity International Public Sector Accounting Standards (Tier 2 PBE Standards) in note 1 of the full financial statements. The financial statements are presented in New Zealand dollars because that is the currency of the primary economic environment in which the Trust operates.

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The summary financial report cannot be expected to provide as complete an understanding as provided by the full financial statements of financial performance, financial position, recognised income and expenses and cash flows of the Trust. A copy of the full financial statements can be obtained from the website www.arthritis.org.nz or by writing to Arthritis New Zealand at PO Box 10020, The Terrace, Wellington 6143. The Trust is a not-for-profit organisation. The auditor has examined the summary financial report for consistency with the audited financial statements and has the opinion the information reported in the summary financial report complies with FRS-43 summary Financial Statements and is consistent in all material respects, with the full financial report from which it is derived. The going concern basis of preparing the financial statements has been used. In preparing the financial statements on a going concern basis, the Trust has continued to apply the measurement, recognition and disclosure requirements of the PBE Standards.


Statement of Comprehensive Revenue and Expense for the Year ended 30 June 2020

2020 $000’s

2019 $000’s

2,591

2,017

594

613

-

1

671

298

3,856

2,929

629

584

1,212

1,155

932

1,068

Governance Costs

18

18

Research grants awarded

81

30

Depreciation and Amortisation

71

70

2,943

2,925

913

4

(357)

351

556

355

Contributions from the Community Income from Services and Programmes Depreciation Recovered Net Finance Income Fundraising Costs Expenditure on Services and Programmes Administration expenses

Operating Surplus (Deficit) Net change in fair value of investments Total Comprehensive Revenue and Expense for the year Statement of Changes in Equity for the Year ended 30 June 2020 Opening Equity Balance Surplus (Deficit) for the year Other Comprehensive Revenue & Expense Total Comprehensive Revenue and Expense Closing Equity Balance

2020 $000’s

2019 $000’s

7,931

7,576

913

4

(357)

351

556

355

8,487

7,931

Statement of Financial Position as at 30 June 2020

2020 $000’s

2019 $000’s

481

551

8,008

7,270

Trade and Other Receivables

106

105

Cash and cash equivalents

336

332

8,931

8,258

Employee Benefits

158

120

Trade and other payables

176

115

Revenue in Advance

110

92

Total Liabilities

444

327

Trustees Funds

1,154

639

Research Funds

3,453

3,059

Other Special Purpose Funds

1,705

1,701

Investment Fair Value Reserve

2,175

2,532

Total Equity

8,487

7,931

Total Equity and Liabilities

8,931

8,258

2020 $000’s

2019 $000’s

429

(403)

(425)

421

4

18

Assets Property, Plant and Equipment Investments

Total Assets Liabilities

Equity

Statement of Cash Flows for the year ended 30 June 2020 Net Cash Flows from Operating Activities Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities Net increase (decrease) in cash held

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Report on the summary financial statements

Opinion

In our opinion, the accompanying summary financial The accompanying summary financial statements Opinion our opinion, the accompanying summary financial The accompanying summary financial statements statements of In Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona comprise: statements of Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona comprise: Aotearoa) (theIn‘trust’) on pages our opinion, the18-19: accompanying summary financial The accompanying summary financial statements Aotearoa) (the ‘trust’) on pages 18-19: — the— summary statement of financial position as at thecomprise: summary statement of financial position as at statements of Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona 30 June30 2020; i. Have been i.correctly derived fromderived the audited June 2020; Have been correctly from the audited Aotearoa) (the ‘trust’) on pages 18-19: — statements the summary statement of financial position as at financial statements the yearfor ended on that date; financialfor statements the year ended on that date; — the— summary of comprehensive the summary statements 30 June 2020; of comprehensive and i. and Have been correctly derived from the audited revenuerevenue and expense, changes in equity andand cash and expense, changes in equity cash financial statements for the year ended on that date; thethen yearended; thenstatements ended; —for the summary flows forflows the year and and of comprehensive ii. Are a fair summary of the financial statements, in ii. Are a fair summary of the financial statements, in and accordance PBE FRS 43Financial Summary Financial revenue and expense, changes in equity and cash accordance with PBE FRSwith 43 Summary —explanatory other explanatory information. — other information. Statements. flows for the year then ended; and Statements. ii. Are a fair summary of the financial statements, in accordance with PBE FRS 43 Summary Financial — other explanatory information. Statements.

Basis for opinion

Basis for opinion

We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standard on Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 (Revised),

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toaccordance Report on Summary Financial Statements. We conductedEngagements our audit inBasis with International Standard on Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 (Revised), for opinion Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements. We are independent of the trust in accordance with Professional and Ethical Standard 1 International Code of Ethics for We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standard onZealand) Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 (Revised), Assurance Practitioners (Including International Independence Standards) (New issued by the New Zealand We are independent of the trust in accordance with Professional and Ethical Standard 1 International Code of Ethics for Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements. Auditing and Assurance Standards Board and the International Ethics Standards Board for Accountants’ International Code Assurance Practitioners (Including International Independence Standards) (New Zealand) issued by the New Zealand of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including International Independence Standards) (‘IESBA Code’), and we have Auditing and Assurance Standards Board the Ethics Standardsand Board for Accountants’ InternationalCode Codeof Ethics for We are independent of theand trust in International accordance with Professional Ethical Standard 1 International fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements and the IESBA Code. Assurance Practitioners (Including International Independence Standards) (‘IESBA (New Zealand) the New Zealand of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including Code’), issued and weby have Auditing and Assurance Standards Board with and the International Ethics fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance these requirements andStandards the IESBABoard Code.for Accountants’ International Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including International Independence Standards) (‘IESBA Code’), and we have this Independent Auditor’s Report fulfilled ourUse otherofethical responsibilities in accordance with these requirements and the IESBA Code. This report is made solely to the beneficiaries as a body. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the Use of this Independent Auditor’s Report

beneficiaries those matters we are required to state to them in the Independent Auditor’s Report and for no other purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law,Our we audit do notwork accept or been assume responsibility anyone other state than the This report is made solely to the beneficiaries as a body. has undertaken so to that we might to the

Use of this Independent Auditor’s Report


Report

Engagements to Report on Summary Financial Statements.

We are independent of the trust in accordance with Professional and Ethical Standard 1 International Code of Ethics for Assurance Practitioners (Including International Independence Standards) (New Zealand) issued by the New Zealand Auditing and Assurance Standards Board and the International Ethics Standards Board for Accountants’ International Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including International Independence Standards) (‘IESBA Code’), and we have To the beneficiaries of Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance withAotearoa) these requirements and the IESBA Code. Report on the summary financial statements

Use of this Independent Auditor’s Report Opinion

This report is made solely to the beneficiaries as a body. Our audit work has been undertaken so that we might state to the In our opinion, the accompanying summary financial The accompanying summary financial statements beneficiaries those matters we are required to state to them in the Independent Auditor’s Report and for no other statements of Arthritis New Zealand (Kaiponapona comprise: purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the Aotearoa) (the ‘trust’) on pages 18-19: the summary statement beneficiaries as a body for our audit work, this report, or any of— the opinions we have formed.of financial position as at 30 June 2020; i. Have been correctly derived from the audited financial statements for the year ended on that date; — the summary statements of comprehensive and revenue and expense, changes in equity and cash Responsibilities of the Trustees for the summary financial statements flows for the year then ended; and ii. Are a fair summary of the financial statements, in accordance with PBE 43 Summary Financialfor: The Trustees, on behalf of FRS the trust, are responsible — other explanatory information. Statements. — the preparation and fair presentation of the summary financial statements in accordance with PBE FRS 43 Summary Financial Statements; and — the preparation and fair presentation of the summary financial statements in accordance with PBE FRS 43 Summary — Financial implementing necessary Statements; andinternal control to enable the preparation of a summary set of financial statements that is © 2020correctly KPMG, a Newderived Zealand partnership and audited a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member from the financial statements. firms with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. — affiliated implementing internal control to enable the preparation of a summary set of financial statements that is Basis necessary for opinion correctly derived from the audited financial statements. We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standard on Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 (Revised), EngagementsAuditor’s to Report onResponsibilities Summary Financial Statements. for the summary financial statements We are independent of theResponsibilities trust in accordance with and Ethical Standard 1 International Code of Ethics for Auditor’s for Professional the financial statements Our responsibility is to express an opinion on whether thesummary summary financial statements are consistent, in all material Assurance Practitioners (Including International Independence Standards) (New Zealand) issued by the New Zealand respects, with (or are a fair summary of) the audited financial statements based on our procedures, which were conducted Auditing and Assurance Standards and International Ethics financial Standards Board for are Accountants’ Code Our responsibility is to express an Board opinion onthe whether the summary statements consistent,International in all material in accordance with International Standard on Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 (Revised), Engagements to Report on of Ethics for Professional Accountants (including International Standards) (‘IESBA Code’), andwere we have respects, with (or are a fair summary of) the audited financial Independence statements based on our procedures, which conducted Summary Financial Statements. fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in on accordance with these requirements and (Revised), the IESBA Code. in accordance with International Standard Auditing (New Zealand) (ISA (NZ)) 810 Engagements to Report on We expressed an unmodified audit opinion on the financial statements in our audit report dated 17 September 2020. Summary Financial Statements. The summary financial statements not contain the disclosures required a full set of financial statements under We expressed an unmodified auditdo opinion on theall financial statements in our for audit report dated 17 September 2020. generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand. Reading the summary financial statements, therefore, is not a The summary financial statements do not contain all the disclosures Use of this Independent Auditor’s Report required for a full set of financial statements under substitute for reading the audited financial statements of the trust. generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand. Reading the summary financial statements, therefore, is not a This report for is made solely the beneficiaries as a body.of Our substitute reading theto audited financial statements theaudit trust.work has been undertaken so that we might state to the beneficiaries those matters we are required to state to them in the Independent Auditor’s Report and for no other [KPMG signature] purpose. To the fullest extent permitted by law, we do not accept or assume responsibility to anyone other than the beneficiaries as a body for our audit work, this report, or any of the opinions we have formed. [KPMG signature] KPMG Wellington KPMG Responsibilities of the Trustees for the summary financial statements 17 September 2020 Wellington The Trustees, on behalf of the trust, are responsible for: 17 September 2020

© 2020 KPMG, a New Zealand partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity.

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Arthritis NZ Annual Review 2020  

Arthritis NZ Annual Review 2020