__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

artguidemag.com presents

Volume 3

Artist Directory

www.artguidemag.com

$8.99 U.S.


Rinat Goren

Individuals. Connections. Groups., 2016, Encaustic, 48” x 36”

RinatGoren.com


Deborah R Hill contemporary impressionism

Midnight Scent, oil, 48� x 48�

Deborahrhillpaintings.com


NEXT COLLECTORS ISSUE July-December 2020 artguidemag.com presents

Volume 3

Artist Directory

www.artguidemag.com

$8.99 U.S.

Featuring your art to collectors nationwide Prices starting at $75

More Information at artguidemag.com


TABLE 08 OF CON28 TENTS

INSIDE THE ARTIST’S STUDIO

Read about what makes artists’ work unique and learn about their stories!

Featuring William Jameson, Eloa Jane, Arlon Rosenoff

THE ARTIST EXPERIENCE

Learn about what experiences shaped artists’ artwork!

Featuring Deborah R. Hill, Jennifer Bain, Rinat Goren

07 EDITOR’S NOTE 41 ARTIST DIRECTORY 98 ARTISTS FROM ACROSS THE US

COVER IMAGE artguidemag.com presents

36

Volume 3

38

ARTIST PROCESS

How do artists create their art?

Madeline Sugerman, Melissa Payne Baker, Cecile Picard, Dan Goldberg

ARTIST INTROS Introducing 17 artists from across the nation.

Artist Directory

41 www.artguidemag.com

$8.99 U.S.

Deborah R Hill, Polo Series, oil on linen, 10” x 8”

6

NATIONAL ARTIST DIRECTORY

98 Artists from across the US and Canada!

Paintings Mixed Media Ceramics/Glass Drawing Photography Artisan/Craft


EDITOR’S NOTE

“The best way to connect with art is to get to know the creator. Each piece of art has a history and story that enhances your relationship with that work of art and this history and story starts with the artist.”

KEEP UP WITH US

Welcome to the third Volume of the Artist Directory brought to you by artguidemag.com. The amazing art that gets submitted by artists across the country never ceases to amaze me. Each issue we construct has its own unique feel and we feel very blessed to have the current group of artists. Every 6 months we print a new issue of the national Artist Directory and every 6 months it feels as if we are stepping into a beautiful art exhibit. Artwork from 98 artists grace the pages of Volume 3 of the Artist Directory. Artists from all across the country are featured and their art varies in medium and subject, from mixed media collage abstracts to realist landscapes of desert scenes - there is something for every art lover! And it’s not only in print! Hop on artguidemag.com to check out each artist’s biography and more images of their amazing art. Looking for a genre? medium? or geographic area? It’s all online and easily searchable. We at artguidemag.com and the Artist Directory want to thank the many artists who submitted artwork for Volume 3. And we want to thank all the subscribers - both individual and business who are supporters of not only the Artist Directory, but the artists inside the pages as well.

There are many different ways that you can keep up with and enjoy Artist DIRECTORY. Even though the magDIRECTORY azine only comes out twice a year, we send subscribers e-newsletters with inside interviews, and featured artist histories and stories. You can sign up for print/digital subscriptions or digital-only subscriptions by visiting www.artguidemag.com. When you visit artguidemag.com, you can also sign up for our monthly websites e-newsletter that gives you the latest top exhibit information from museums and galleries across the country.

STAY INFORMED FOLLOW US

Enjoy the art!

@artguidemag Thomas Gilanyi Publisher Artist DIRECTORY Co-Founder artguidemag.com

@artguidemag

© 2019-2020. Artist DIRECTORY is published by Art Guide Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproductions, sale, or use without written consent is strictly prohibited. Contact: artguide@artguidemag. com. If you are interested in how you can feature your art or business in the Special Collector’s magazine you may contact us via the email address provided above.

@artguidemag

7


Inside the Artist’s Studio

1


2

Simply Light by William Jameson When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? As a small child, I was drawing anytime I could and sometimes when I shouldn’t be! Teachers would chastise me for drawing when I was supposed to paying attention in class. As I grew, sports entered my life. Baseball and tennis became important but, after the practices and games, I was always found back in my room drawing and experimenting with paint. I loved to investigate things with my pens and brushes and was fortunate to have the encouragement and support from friends and family. My father taught me to draw barns and animals while I was sitting on his knee. My great, great uncle was Arthur Dawson, one of the early members of the Old Lyme School in Old Lyme Connecticut.

Arthur’s son, John Dawson, also a painter, would critique my drawings and paintings through the mail. His comments and encouragement were instrumental in building my confidence. He shared stories of his time in Paris at the Julien Academy following his service in World War One. It always amuses me when people say, “Oh, no wonder you are an artist with your uncles having been professional painters. Your talent is inherited”. I laugh and reply, “Well, actually they were family in-laws and not blood relatives.” How would you describe your art and style? I can best describe my art and painting as contemporary realism. I try to never overwork a piece, keeping my brushwork

“loose”. My motif is often described as “light/dark dominant”. What is your process and what tools do you use to create your unique artwork0? My process is first seeking unique dynamic compositions which involve strong lights and darks. The main tools that I use are envisioning and working out the composition. As I paint I work very quickly, stepping back often, thinking only at first about composition, then concentrating only on the darks looking for a rhythmic pattern with the darks. I have always preferred painting “large” and as a student at Ringling College of Art and Design, I wanted to always be working on the largest canvas in the painting studios. One of my favorite workshops, which I regularly teach, is called “Working Large Without Fear”.

9


3

How has your technique evolved over your career? The main change in my work in recent years is a steady increase in use of impasto, using texture to shape subject matter as opposed to hard edge delineation. I am more and more drawn to using a variety of

10

palette knives. What was the first piece of art that you ever sold and how did it make your feel? I won 1st prize at the County Fair while in 6th grade and the prize was $5.00 (a handsome sum in 1955). The first piece I

actually sold was an oil portrait of a friend, commissioned by his mother. I think I was 16 at that time. Thinking back, it was terrible and I think she commissioned it more to encourage me to continue painting but the $65.00 was huge at the time. It made me feel quite good!


4

What message do you hope to convey to the viewer of your art? I love nature! I love the play of light and the changes of the seasons. Ideally, I am inclined to think about the landscape without the intrusion of man and his continual need to build something; to tear up and rearrange the earth. On the other hand, it’s man’s presence that sometimes provides the provoking subject. My love for the natural landscape of the South is inherited culturally and geographically. I love the land for its history, its harshness and its beauty. My passion for nature allows me to create introspective landscapes embodying the full range of local color and timeless contrast whether the setting captures the brilliant warm or cool colors heralding the arrival of each season in the North Carolina mountains. I attempt to create compositions that

go beyond mere depiction of the surface beauty offered by the environs. By exploring my subject matter in detail, the process reveals the mystery and profound power of nature. The effect is a literal and sentimental interpretation of nature; each painting is a reflection of the relationship between man and nature; painter and observer. What is your favorite and least favorite color? We all have a palette inside us and tend to be drawn to and return to the same groups of color. If I have to pick a favorite color, it’s probably blue. I love all colors and there is a place for every color and hue. I have found through experience that mixing color is always trial and error but the more one paints, the more quickly the painter arrives at the shade or hue needed. In the trial and error process, new mixes are constantly discovered. What is “mud” in one place is a beautiful and vibrant color in another place.

What is your favorite tool? Brushes! I am a brushaholic! I love brushes and have a huge collection of every size and shape. My palette table is 36” x 69” with a glass palette that is 26” x 42” and on the table, are 15 jars, primarily wine coolers, holding approximately 450 brushes. There are more unused brushes in table drawers! I have a collection of long handle brushes, one is 34”, purchased years ago at the Paris-American Art Supply Store while on a painting trip to France. To my students, I constantly preach, “big brush to little brush”. What part of art do you love, hate? I love everything to do with art with exception of framing, titling, and marketing. Although I have learned from experience, in order to survive, artists must learn skills of marketing. There was a time that I said, “I live to paint”. There was another time when

11


5

I said, “I paint to live”. Now I think both things are equally true. Relationships with galleries can be challenging but in my experience over the years, my gallery owners and dealers have become some of my closest friends. I’m often asked how to get into galleries. The best way, of course, is to be invited by the gallery. That happens when an artist who is already exhibiting in the gallery recommends you to the gallery. If you could see your artwork displayed in any venue in the world where would it be? I have been fortunate to travel and see many of the world’s great art museums. I could easily answer, The Louvre, The Metropolitan in New York City or The Prado in Madrid but as an American painter, The Whitney would be it. www.williamjameson.com

12

1. On The Overmountain Trail, 2015, oil, 84” x 60” 2. Woodland Light IV, 2019, oil, 46” x 64” 3. Carolina Winter, 2007, oil, 36” x 36” 4. Appalachian Textures XV, 2015, oil, 60” x 84” 5. November in Jones Gap, 2019, oil on canvas, 40” x 60” 6. Appalachian Textures XIV, 2015, oil, 84” x 60”


6

13


Inside the Artist’s Studio

1

Environment Art by Eloa Jane When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? There was never a specific moment but a gradual evolution of my involvement with art. As a child I used to admire my sister’s paintings and try to recreate on paper. My father also had a very creative side. He played the violin and was really good at building all sorts of things like toys or furniture out of essentially found materials. He was very resourceful. As a teenager I delved deep into an array of different creative activities like playing music, sewing, knitting, painting, and drawing. I was

14

part of Bossa Nova quartet where I sang and played the guitar. I would sew or knit clothes for myself and all my five sisters. So I was swimming in creativity and art from an early age. I went on to graduate with a degree in Architecture since it allowed me to express myself creatively to some degree while at the same time pursuing a career that offered more promising financial prospects than one in the Arts. I was an Architect for 25 years before, through a turn of events, I found myself living in America looking for a fresh start.

1. Dogs and Chickens Squirrels and Birds, 2019, relief, 42” x 48” 2. Picasso The Pet Pig, 2019, relief, 24” x 30” 3. The Boat Ramp, 2019, relief, 24” x 18” 4. Moonlight Paddle, 2019, relief, 30” x 24” 5. The Casual Walker, sculpture, 2019, 26” high


2

That was when the artistry of my youth started to become a bigger and bigger part of my life again. It was in 2009 that I decided for the first time to actually sell some of the art that I had already produced so I joined a Gallery and started participating in Art Shows. I received some very positive feedback which built up my excitement and encouraged me to continue to produce. It was when my first award came that I began to think of myself as a professional artist. I have not stopped since. How would you describe your art/style? I am not sure that my art falls neatly into any very specific category. As with every artist, it takes a long time to form an artistic identity. For a long time my signature was paper. I was the “Paper Lady.� And it is true that the variety of things I do with paper is a

big part of my technique. However, as I became more and more technically proficient, technique shifted further and further into the background of my art, allowing artistic and creative expression to come to the fore and be the main driver of my pieces. As such, in as much as I try to express particular emotional states, dreams or experiences, it can be said that my work is expressionist. As expression played a bigger role in my art, I called upon Surrealism more and more often as an aid to expression. At the same time, the fact that I use paper tubes, coils and weave patterns means that my arts at times involves building pictures from textured building blocks, which is in a way what the Impressionists were doing with their visible brushstrokes. So in that sense my work has an impressionist bent. My style is not set in stone. This is just where I am now.

What is your process and what tools do you use to create your unique pieces of art? I usually start by photographing whatever I am trying to portray and bringing the photos into the computer. I use CorelDraw to plan my composition. I cut out all the elements and rearrange them to taste. I play with the picture resolution to find where I can use straight lines. That’s what I need in my work - straight lines. I then separate the elements into different layers which is what helps me to figure out what goes on the bottom and top of the relief. I print out each layer and fill it in with the different textured paper. The way I achieve different textures and colors is by finding them in magazines, office paper, even coffee filters, which I then roll into tubes. I assemble the layers onto a wood panel. Assemblage can take very long be-

15


16

3


cause each layer needs to dry before I can start working on the next one. That’s why I usually work on more than one piece at a time. In order to eliminate the busyness of the patterns, I use acrylic paint to make the blocks uniform and achieve more definition. Then I use varnish for finish and protection. For sculptures I affix a metal bar to a wood base and construct a core before I start wrapping it with paper tubes. Sculptures take mostly office paper because it is sturdier than other types. As far as tools, I have had to create my own. For making the tubes I have a set of dowels numbered from 0 to 12 based on width. Other than that, I just use what you would expect when working with paper like PVA glue, scissors, tweezers, etc. How has your technique evolved over your career? My career has certainly been marked by constant experimentation. I can see the evolution so clearly when I compare older and newer works. I have tried all sorts of things with paper to learn about its behavior. I once put magazines out in the sun to test how long it would take for the colors to fade. Last year I made sculptures and put them on the tree outside my studio. They resisted the weather but I’m afraid not the squirrels. I started making jewelry and pottery to observe how the paper would hold together so I could learn how to approach bigger pieces. Then I started venturing into different patterns and weaving techniques. As I said, there is constant, ongoing experimentation. I had a good grasp on what I could do with paper and was now curious about how to incorporate paints and dyes. I tried wood stains on paper and learned that whatever works on wood also works on paper. I now often use a water based stain that works well. A combination of plain paper, woven paper, paint, stain, dye, and varnish gives me a rich palette of options to choose from. For example, I experimented a lot with varnish and found that different types work best for different pieces. As an experiment, I placed varnished coils of paper in water for more than a year to study the effects. Polyurethane, for example, would allow the paper to uncoil in water but not ceramic glaze or epoxy. For vases and sculpture I use ceramic glaze because it takes fewer coats and has a nice glossy finish. For wall art I use polyurethane because it protects against yellowing, hardens the surface, and does not look too shiny. For jewelry I use epoxy resin because it makes the piece waterproof. There’s another, less solitary, aspect of evolving technique that I also find import-

ant. When you work with galleries you have to sharpen your skills in order to meet deadlines and the themes that a lot of galleries ask us to work in. On top of that, being immersed in a network of artists, seeing their work and sharing experiences is a great source of motivation as well as information. Lately I have been working in series. I’m creating collections of works that belong together, that share the same language. Naturally my next series will also involve some experimentation and my technique will probably undergo some changes as a consequence. For instance, I think that as an environmental artist I can still go beyond paper and incorporate other reusable materials. I have my eyes set on plastic, in specific, grocery bags. But that project is still in its infancy. There’s still a lot of experimentation to do. What was the first piece of art that you ever sold and how did it make you feel? My actual first was not a very remarkable experience. It was not a very remarkable piece for that matter. So let’s talk about the second piece I ever sold. That piece was named Explosion. It was a composition that involved an egg carton sewed onto a canvas. It was an expanding explosion of color, hence its name Explosion. This piece had particular personal significance to me because it represented a shift from a strict black and white phase in my career to indulgent, unashamed use of colors. I did not expect to sell. It was on the floor, in the back of the booth when a lady spotted it and asked for it specifically. To this day, whenever a piece is sold, I experience the same feeling I had that day. It is not mere excitement for the financial compensation. It is a humbling mix of accomplishment and excitement about the fact that the work that is meaningful to me is also meaningful to someone else. It motivates me to keep creating. What message do you hope to convey to the viewer of your art? My work in general, due to the nature of the materials I use, always carries with it a level of consciousness about our relationship to waste and therefore the environment. We are not very good stewards of nature. Hopefully my work can inspire other people to be aware and active in caring for the environment. Moreover, I believe art can be an invaluable tool for emotional, psychological healing. I put a lot of myself into my art. If one were to look at the development of my work over time they would be able to notice the transformation of my internal landscape. That is because I used art not simply as a hobby or

a career, but as an outlet on which I could find some respite from a season of depression and emotional distress. There are specific themes that accompany each series I produce. In my latest, Neighbors and Neighborhood, awarded in 2018 by Mid-America Art Alliance, I sought to promote the integration of rural residents and the city-dwelling art community. Since moving to the country, I experienced a kind of inclusion that I find to be sorely lacking in the city. Hopefully the message that people can draw from that series is that we are worse off apart. What is your favorite and least favorite color? I love yellow and I am not a big fan of beige. Most yellows are transparent, meaning literally, see-through. That makes yellow the perfect color for my work because it reveals the prints of magazines. Yellow is a joyful color. Beige, on the other hand, makes dark paper look faded and light paper look old. What is your favorite tool? My cup of coffee. My second favorite tool is my set of tweezers. It allows me to finish details in small pieces and sculptures. I keep a collection of them always close at hand. What part of art do you love / hate? I love the creation process from conception to final product. I cannot pinpoint exactly why I love it so much, but there’s something about being alone in the studio pouring myself into the art that keeps drawing me back. The least interesting, though totally necessary, part of my work is keeping an accurate inventory of my pieces, with high quality pictures and all the relevant information. If you could see your artwork displayed in any venue in the world where would that be and why? As an artist, it would be an incredible honor to have my work displayed at Tate Modern in London or MoMa in New York. It would be a landmark in the career of any artist to have their work recognized in that way. By the same token, it would give me great joy and fulfillment to be able to share my art in underserved communities that do not often come in contact with the arts, hopefully serving as an inspiration for using art as a way to overcome difficult circumstances. www.eloajane.com

17


4

18


5


Inside the Artist’s Studio

1

Texture and gesture by Arlon Rosenoff When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? I think my parents realized before I did. As a young child, some of my earliest memories are memories of drawing.

20

How would you describe your art/style? I would describe my style as a contemporary form of impressionism, with an expressionistic flair. Although I follow my own internal compass, I love being compared to

Vincent Van Gogh. For what my work lacks in sophistication or cleverness of most “modern art”, I think it makes up for it in the genuineness of instinctive, self-taught and passionate work.


2

What is your process and what tools do you use to create your unique pieces of art?

to interact with paint in a very tactile, expressionistic way. I use M. Graham oil paint straight from the tube without any medium.

I build all of my own cradled panels and always paint on a prepared smooth hard surface. I paint exclusively with the palette knife because it gives me the opportunity

How has your technique evolved over your career? My technique has gotten looser over my

career. I’ve gotten away from sketching and doing underpaintings and have migrated toward a more cubist application of the first layer of paint to establish the primary geometry of the painting. I then apply oil paint with the palette knife wet on wet until completion. I finish every piece in one sitting, regardless of size.

21


3

What was the first piece of art that you ever sold and how did it make you feel? I started painting small studies and selling from a tent in an outdoor farmers market. I love the market atmosphere and developed an appetite for painting with an audience and being connected with the people who collect my artwork. Some of those very first collectors continue to collect and follow my work, which is a fantastic feeling of connection. What message do you hope to convey to the viewer of your art?

22

Because of my loose style and highly texturized work, viewers have different experiences when they view the work at different angles and distances. People’s first reaction is to want to touch it, because of the highly texturized relief nature of the work. Up close, everything just looks like globs and strokes of paint, but as a viewer steps back, the image becomes more realistic, and if they step to the side, they see the texture in a sort of relief. I want my viewers to enjoy the abstract nature up close, the texture at any angle, and the aesthetic pleasure of an impressionistic image at a distance.

What is your favorite and least favorite color? My favorite color is lavender. It finds its way into virtually all of my paintings. My least favorite color is black, and I don’t use that pigment at all. In fact, black isn’t a color at all, but merely the absence of color or light, which I find unrealistic and empty. What is your favorite tool? Oh, I exclusively use the palette knife. I have different sizes, and for detail on smaller paintings, I customize my smaller point-


4

ed palette knives by bending the tip. What part of art do you love / hate?

1. Patience, 2018, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 40” x 40”

I love the creation process, love painting with an audience, love engaging children, who are all natural artists. I dislike any form of competitiveness in art.

2. Santa Monica Cruiser, 2018, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 36” x 36”

If you could see your artwork displayed in any venue in the world where would that be and why?

4. Beach Lavender Bloom, 2019, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 27” x 36”

I would like to see my art in a small to medium size museum, with large white walls and high ceilings, with abundant natural indirect light, but a museum small enough to not overwhelm the viewer and one that is accessible to everyone in a community.

3. Kitchen Tulips, 2018, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 17” x 18”

5. Lakefront Path, 2019, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 32” x 43” 6. Just Pleasure, 2019, palette knife oil on cradled panel, 19” x 32”

www.ArlonRosenoff.com

23


5

6

24


NEXT COLLECTORS ISSUE July-December 2020 artguidemag.com presents

Volume 3

Artist Directory

www.artguidemag.com

$8.99 U.S.

Featuring your art to collectors nationwide Prices starting at $75

More Information at artguidemag.com 25


Madeline Sugerman madelinesugerman.com

Empathic 1 (detail), oil and cold wax on cradled board, 36” x 48”

Dan Goldberg www.dangoldbergart.com

The Dreaming Maya, 2017, oil on canvas, 36” x 48”

26


27


The Artist Experience

1

28


2

3

4

Contemporary impressionism by Deborah R Hill What is your journey in art. In many ways, the things I do for my career are not any different from what other people do for their vocation. It is a job I work at each day, striving to achieve an efficient way of representing my art - to deliver a visual meaning that the viewer can relate to. I explore methods, I hone my skills and I research others in my field. What/Who do you consider to be your greatest influence and why? Past artists that have influenced my work- I would have to say Sargent for his use of economy of brushwork and genius in representing the figure. Andrew Wyeth and his underlying use of symbolism and attention to detail. Current artists I look to are Alex

Kanevsky with his development of colour and how it relates to his subject; Tibor Nagy for his outdoor scenes; Christian Hook and his expertise in quickly developing his subject under pressure and time constraints. What is your goal as an artist? To continue to work as a professional artist. Artist Statement I consider myself a contemporary Impressionist painter. I find my inspiration in the depth of colour in the natural world, rural vistas, beach and marsh although I am equally inspired working from a still-life in the studio. I am a classically trained painter having earned a BFA with a concentration in painting. Working in studio & plein air, di-

viding my time in studios in upstate NY & Charleston SC. COLLECTIONS: Palm Beach FL/New York NY/Washington DC/Houston TX/Charleston SC/Charlotte NC/Dallas TX/Saratoga Springs NY/Annapolis MD/Savannah GA/ Myrtle Beach SC/Newbury VT/Junction TX/ Atlanta GA/Long Is NY/Michigan/Massachusetts/Brunswick MA/INTERNATIONAL England/Canada/Capetown SA Deborahrhillpaintings.com 1. A Bold Beauty, 48” x 60” 2. Polo Series, oil on linen, 8” x 10” 3. Storm on Beach, oil, 18” x 24” 4. Delft, oil on board, 24” x 48”

29


The Artist Experience Abstract Lines by Jennifer Bain What is your journey in art. I was born in New York City to parents who were both artists. My mother and father emigrated from Canada after World War 2 to pursue their respective art careers. The booming excitement of post war American Art was embedded in my childhood. The world was a place of great optimism, new ideas, and a break from the past. Those were the retorts or lessons I learned at home, mostly by example. I saw Andy Warhol’s Brillo boxes and Campbell’s soup can works when I was quite young. The later gave me nightmares for years! At some point I realized my parents might be what people called “beatniks” and that we lived in a world very different from the families I saw on T.V. Never having a birthday party was explained to me by my mother as “we don’t that kind of thing – we are artists”. She was trying to save my feelings from getting hurt, as a majority of my classmates would not have attended a party in my neighborhood. I took it in stride because I drew, painted, and created things everyday myself, as did both my brothers. We were allowed to draw on our bedroom walls, and create anything we wanted in our rooms. There was one long hallway wall in our apartment we all shared that was a canvas in motion. We would “outdraw” each other, alter images, paste over things, and redo or re draw what was there at any time. It taught us to share, be respectful or each other and be open minded visually. I attended The Rudolph Steiner School (Scholarship), which allowed me a huge variety of expression, and ways to learn. The school was based on education through art, and I was a perfect fit. This is where I absorbed the world of ideas and philosophies. But the caveat of such a rich cultural life had the downside of monetary instability, and my brothers and I felt the pinch of this uncertainty. Because of this I had no desire to follow in my parents footsteps after high school. A life of insecurity was out, and so I decided to get a degree in a practical art – fashion! I felt being a fashion designer would be creatively satisfying and earn me a steady paycheck, and so I got an A.A. degree and plunged into that field. It was a natural transition as I had been making cloths for all my friends and myself since junior high school. I got good jobs right out of design school, and worked my way up to assistant designer in junior sportswear, and I did make a good salary. I was living

30

independently in Los Angels, had a decent apartment in West Hollywood, good friends and lots of museums around me, but I was desperate for time to paint. I took this desperation right onto my apartment walls and painted murals on them. Then suddenly I was struck down with legionnaires disease when I was 24. I was gravely ill and spent twenty-one days in the ICU unit at Cedars - Sinai Hospital, Los Angeles. I survived, but I was changed. Somewhere far away in the middle of this experience, or as a result of it, I realized I was not living the right life. It took several months to get my strength back but I knew I had to pursue art and leave my comfortable life behind. I paired down my belongings, broke my wedding engagement, and drove up to Northern California to attend The California School of the Arts. I then continued on to get a Masters degree in painting from The San Francisco Art Institute. I lived the ideal difficult life of a student, and later an artist, living happily below the margins and honing my craft. I was able to fall back periodically on my training in fashion and worked part time as an assistant in the men’s shirt division at Levi Straus & Company. I also taught dance exercise and aerobics to support myself. My life was also enhanced greatly by my marriage to a fellow artist. We supported and encouraged each other, and both found our own success in our practices. I lost him to cancer in 2016. He was a young 66. I experienced commercial success for many decades, working with many galleries, and art consultants. I erased my childhood fears of instability with my success and long run practice. I am now exploring my work with a different focus, and that is the idea of exploration itself.

waterways and used careful observation to bring back to the studio to translate by action. I did not do any drawings in the field, but instead would observe and sometimes meditate at the sites to absorb the essence of what I perceived. The work that was created from this process was not a literal depiction, but rather a synthesis of observation and experience. Both the idea and the result exist in the ephemeral. My work that followed was influenced by the idea of the then new current culture of the Internet. In this work I explored how to appropriate disparate images and make them coexist in a convincing way. I would say the catalyst for this work was the barrage of images and speed at which visuals are forced on us through the Internet. The paintings read like filmstrips or scrolled web pages. But conclusively, my biggest influence is really the idea of the spiritual in art. This was introduced to me through The Rudolph Steiner School teachings based in Anthroposophy. It’s not the teachings themselves that had a big impact. It’s the notion that there is a larger connection to the here and now, this has propelled my life’s work. What is your goal as an artist? To continue to explore and do the best job I can with my work. I have painted many decades, and have been rewarded by freedom from doubt. I think all creative work is a desire to communicate and connect to others and the world at large. My hope is to stay in that flow, and continue to explore. www.jenniferbain.com

What/Who do you consider to be your greatest influence and why? Apart from the discovery that happens in the art practice itself, I have been influenced by ideas, concepts, and philosophies that have a link to what I am exploring in the studio. One example: for about a decade my work focused on abstractions relating to Daoism’s Dao de Jing. The idea of water being an entity that is shapeless, flowing, and takes the path of least resistance. These were characteristics I was applying to my yoga practice. In practical ways for translation of this I hiked many streams and

1. Flandrian, 2019, acrylic, ink on panel, 20” x 16”


1

31


The Artist Experience

1

Colors, shapes, and textures by Rinat Goren What is your journey in art. My journey in art started early as a girl and teenager. I loved to create and was always busy with arts and crafts. As an adult I abandoned my call for a more ‘practical’ profession but the call did not leave me. Much later in life, I had an experience that made it obvious that art is what I need to do. I literally dropped everything and started to paint. In short: the journey took me to

32

answering an urge and to keep answering the call better and better. What/Who do you consider to be your greatest influence and why? I am influenced mostly by abstract artists who’s colors, shapes, and texture tug at my heart. Artists such as Henry Matisse, David Smith, and Eva Hesse are of great influence and inspiration.

What is your goal as an artist? My goal is to better connect with my self and produce the most authentic art that is a reflection of me as well as connecting with people around me and draw a wonderful response from them. rinatgoren.com


2

1. Beautiful Moments, 2019, encaustic, 36” x 36”

3

2. Individuals. Connections. Groups., 2016, encaustic, 48” x 36” 3. Connecting The Dots, 2019, encaustic, 72” x 30”

33


THE ARTWORK OF

Salvatore Tomasello

www.stomasello.com stomasello@newmexico.com

DESERT LANDSCAPES O I L S O N C A N VA S

Garden of Happiness, 2018, acrylic and gels, 36” x 36”

Chuck Caplinger www.DesertArtStudio.com

34

Fran Mann Goodman franmanngoodman.com


NEXT COLLECTORS ISSUE July-December 2020 artguidemag.com presents

Volume 3

Artist Directory

www.artguidemag.com

$8.99 U.S.

Featuring your art to collectors nationwide Prices starting at $75

More Information at artguidemag.com 35


Artist Process - How They Create Madeline Sugerman Madeline’s cold wax paintings are inspired by the world around her. “Simplistically, the world around me enhances my spiritual connection, not to material things, but to the larger expanse of questions relative to our world, our universe, and our very existence.” By adding cold wax to oil paint Madeline feels the work is more fluid and allows her to achieve various techniques that are not possible with oil paint alone. Cold wax extends the paint and shortens the drying time but more importantly, it enables her to include a translucence to the painting, and allows her to scrape back through many layers to reveal what is underneath and add veil-like glazes to the surface. Madeline believes it is these components that enhance her creativity, yielding the unique result that describes her work. Madeline’s work endeavors to bridge the gap between fantasy and reality and to portray that window which connects mankind to our environment and indeed to our universe. Her paintings portray not what she sees but what she dreams to be real.

Empathic 1 (detail), oil and cold wax on cradled board, 36” x 48”

madelinesugerman.com

Melissa Payne Baker Melissa Payne Baker is best known for her abstract paintings that convey emotions or feelings that touch the viewer. From traditional interiors to contemporary, her abstract artwork creates the perfect pop to any decor. The heart and soul of her work is derived from her everyday life and experiences. Melissa spends her days chasing her dreams as well as her young son, both keeping her creativity in full bloom. This Southern artist found her passion for art early in life, learning from generations of artisans. Melissa’s new collections can be found in fine art galleries across the United States. Melissa lives and creates in Atlanta with her husband Rick, their son Payne and their cat Gesso. www.melissapaynebaker.com

Glow, 2019, acrylic on canvas, “40 x 40”

Volume

3

Volume

3

Volume

3

Volume

3

ory ory ory ory Direct rtist Direct rtist Direct rtist Direct Artist A A A ts

sen com pre

demag.

artgui

ts

sen com pre

demag.

artgui

36

idemag.co

m

m

idemag.co

www.artgu

ts

sen com pre

demag.

artgui

$8.99 U.S.

$8.99 U.S.

www.artgu

ts

sen com pre

demag.

artgui

$8.99 U.S.

m idemag.co www.artgu

$8.99 U.S.

m idemag.co www.artgu


Artist Process - How They Create Cecile Picard Each Painting is a meditation generated from a peaceful place. I start with a circular shape defining an interior and an exterior. In the form of a seed, heart, cell, planet or egg , a drop of magenta watercolor pigment takes life to become a flower, a landscape, an embryo or a... The magenta color symbolizes for me true love in the Universe. A respiration between the inside and the outside takes place, helping the opening of my heart. My intention is to bring beauty, to elevate & to trigger a heavenly feeling in us, to uplift us. www.cecilepicard.com

The color of Love in the cosmos is magenta # 20, 2018, mixed media (watercolor, graphite, oil paint, salt) on Arches paper, 16” X 12”

Dan Goldberg I believe there is more to being an artist than just creating. This belief incorporates seeing, feeling, and doing in a more humane and ethical way. During my decade’s long career, I have been inspired by the truths of nature. Nature never lies. My role as an artist is to take those truths and interpret them in a personal and profound way through the dramatic use of color, movement, and texture. Oil paint with its rich and lush consistency allows me to explore and transform the canvas into a vibrant abstract language. Artists who have had an impact on my work are Gerhard Richter, Howard Hodgkin, Mark Rothko, Franz Marc, Henri Matisse and Georgia O’Keefe. www.dangoldbergart.com Koyaanisqatsi, 2019, oil on canvas, 72” x 60” x 2”

SIGN UP TODAY 37


Artist Intros

Tina Alberni’s current body of works bring awareness of current events, often underscoring how urbanism, climate change, and info glut threaten living organisms and existence as we know it. www.colordesignstudio.com

Vanishing, 2019, acrylic and ink, 36” x 48”

Reinstated, 2019, acrylic, pastel and graphite on panel, 25” x 25” x 1 ¼”

Dean Anecki, past decade of oil painting has been much influenced by his living primarily in India. He paints Realistic art of life in India. mnartists.org/anecki

Yuan Chen’s artwork reflects what is accessible in the present moment, embracing a desire to realize the tangible beauty which lies beyond the momentary and impermanent. Yuan seeks to enrich and enlarge the perception of the inner reality. www.yuanartist.com

Cochin Boats, 2018, oil, 30” x 24”

Many of Liz Armstrong’s paintings reflect local geography from her home on an island in Maine. Her paintings offer the viewer a moment of serenity in a specific place and time. lizarmstrongpainting.com

Casco Bay Reflection, 2019, Oil, 12” x 9”

Motion, 2018, 48” x 48”

The paintings of Jane Bloodgood -Abrams explore the evocative light, atmosphere and personal connection she finds in nature. Working over time in layers of paint and glazes, the artist creates timeless landscape imagery. www.janebloodgoodabrams.com

Transmigration, 2017, oil on canvas, 48” x 60”

38

Reed Dixon tends to get inspired by many things from realistic to abstracts. Most of his work involves mixed media combinations. In these three pieces MOVEMENT is the key inspiration along with lots of colors. reeddixonart.com


Artist Intros

Complicated Conversations, 2015, mixes, 48” x 48”

Mary Lynn Engel’s media of choice is the floorcloth, a canvas-backed floor covering used since Revolutionary times in the US. Floor cloths give her the opportunity to create practical custom pieces by combining paint, fabric, paper, ribbon, photographs, and neckties. www.designbymle.com

Cameron E. Gerhold. Organic themes of water, land, and cosmos merge throughout Cameron’s artwork. Cameron is inspired by natures vibrant drama and intense complexity. He moves from highly detailed mixed media paintings, capturing those details with macrophotography, and finally sampling those photos and remixing them digitally. From the atoms, cells, planets, galaxies, and beyond his intermedia process is a visual metaphor for these different levels of magnification and perspective as an art form www.cegart.com

Her Majesty, 2018, oil, 24”x24” (Bighorn Canyon Plein air)

Carol Hartman. Large 48”x48” oil paintings depicting homesteading journeys both overland and via waterways define the main concept of Carol’s artwork. Multiple artist residencies provide inspiration for many of her solo exhibitions, which usually number three per year. Finger painting allows her direct involvement in the process. www.carolhartman.biz

Coral Bay Afternoon, 2019, photography, 11” x 11”

Bibby Gignilliat. Bibby loves bold colors, geometric shapes and text which come alive with whimsy on wood panels and paper. She is happiest when she is drawing outside the lines on the canvas and in life. BibbyArt.com

Surrendering to Miracles, 60”x60”

Slow Drift to the Grotto, 2019, oil on panel, 24”x24”

Nicole White Kennedy has been painting professionally for over 25 years. Her distinct impressionist style portray numerous subjects from figurative to water to street scenes with a narrative flair. Her works have been juried into numerous prestigious national art organizations like Oil Painters of America. In 2017 she was awarded signature membership of American Impressionist Society. To View Nicole’s artworks and scheduled workshops from Raleigh to Tuscany please visit www.nicolestudio. com and/or follow on FB and Instagram. www.nicolestudio.com

39


Artist Intros

Sandy Nelson has been a professional artist for many years. She studied Fine Art and painting at the University of Kentucky and the Scottsdale Art School. Her portraits and landscapes have been accepted to national juried competitions from Maine to California, many winning national awards. www.sandynelsonart.com Watermelon and Silver, 2017, oil on canvas 16” x 20”

Beeautiful Conectedness, 2019, acrylic on wood panel, 48” x 48”

Charles Nivens enjoys painting winter scenes because he feels they are different and he sees more in the scene than just white snow.bn nbbbbbbbbkak Charles paints these scenes so you can feel the cold and hear the children playing and just remember those carefree days. www.charlesnivensart.

Leslie Rowland. Leslie has had a long career with many solo shows, group exhibitions, and public acquisitions and has owned galleries in Las Vegas and Asheville. Much of Leslie’s work focuses on ecological concepts. Many of her paintings condense relatively complex scientific scenarios into single images. lrowlandart.com

Snowned In, 2015, acrylic, 24” x 30”

MoonJi Pickering. MoonJi’s Artworks are filled with whimsical patterns and vibrant colors to make your day lighter and brighter. Many people have told her when they see her art it either calms them down or it cheers them up! www.moonjilee.com

Sunrise, 2019, colored pencils, 9” x 12”

Chitra Ramanathan. Ramanathan’s unique, intuitive style of painting is distinct with her treatment of fresh, bright colors executed with rapid brush strokes. Often combined with varied intricately interwoven textural materials interwoven into the paint rather than stand-alone collages, they visually create the aura of extending beyond their two-dimensional surfaces. www.chitrafineart.com Pulsating Rhythms, acrylics and mixed media on canvas, 58” x 75”

40

In Transit, 2018, oil on canvas, 40” x 30”

Riley Waite. Riley’s artwork is currently centered around his two different cultures of Ireland and California, focusing on the duality of the two by painting representational figurative portraits of his friends and family of both cultures in backgrounds inspired by the romantic period. www.rileywaiteart.com


national artist directory 98 artists from across the us

Paintings Mixed Media Ceramics/Glass Drawing Photography Artisan/Craft

42 50 52 52 53 53


PAINTINGS

MIrror of reality?, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 36” x 48”

Adrian, Arias

Changing Stripes, 2019, acrylic & ink, 40” x 30”

John Singer Sargent 1856-1925, 2016, 40” x 30”

Oakland, CA www.AdrianArias.com

Huntersville, NC www.colordesignstudio.com

Alberni, Tina

Allakhverdov, Andrey

Cherokee & Bison are Endangered, 2018, oil on canvas, 36” x 48”

Buna in the Market, 2015, oil, 35” x 23”

Casco Bay Reflection, 2019, oil, 12” x 9”

West Palm Beach, FL www.susanandreasen.com

Anecki, E. Dean

New Brighton, MN mnartists.org/anecki

Armstrong, Liz

Yarmouth, ME lizarmstrongpainting.com

Newfound Creek, 2018, oil, 12” x 12”

Loess, 2019, acrylic on board, 16” x 20”

Goddesses, 2011, mixed media

Artus, Gray

Bain, Jennifer

Andreasen, Susan

Asheville, NC www.grayartus.com

42

Santa Fe, NM www.jenniferbain.com

Boston, MA www.allakhverdov.com

Baker, Jill

Louisville, KY JillBaker.com


PAINTINGS

Inspiration, 2018, acrylic, 42” x 54” x 2”

Cloud Lift, 2019, oil on panel, 16” x16”

Bernstein, Donna

Bloodgood-Abrams, Jane

Summer Rainshower, 2014, oil on canvas, 24” x 36”

Caplinger, Chuck

Scottsdale, AZ www.donnabernstein.com

Kingston, NY www.janebloodgoodabrams.com

Twentynine Palms, CA www.desertartstudio.com

Sea Shell’s Embrace, 2018, printmaking monotype collograph 1/1, tryptic, 24” x 18” Center 24” x 24”

Searching for Lost Wing, 2019, acrylic, pastel and graphite on panel, 25” x 25” x 1 1/4”

Carnival, 2016, acrylic, 48” x 24”

Prescott, AZ www.donnacarver.com

San Rafael, CA www.yuanartist.com

Manassas, VA www.jimmyclarkjr.com

To See It Burn, 2019, oil and wax, 24” x 36”

Beyond the Bend, 2015, oil, 16” x 20”

Cox, Nicholai

Curry, Debra

2018, Rose, poured oil on canvas 48” x 65” (Private Collection, Delray Beach, FL)

Carver, Donna

Bloomington, IN thedreamscapes.net

Chen, Yuan

Nampa, ID www.heartlandstudiosart.com

Clark, Jimmy

Cuscana, Lisa Stamford, CT lisacuscuna.com

43


PAINTINGS

Liberty Bridge, 2019, oil on canvas, 12” x 12”

Starry Fields, 2019, watercolor 25 1/4” x 35”

Demidovich, Vladimir

Diederich, Ellen Jean

Foresta Incantata, 2019, acrylic and collage, 30’’ x 24’’

Fabrizio, Michael

Greenville, SC www.demidoart.com

Fargo, ND www.EllenJeanDiederich.com

Richmond, MA fabrizioartwork.squarespace.com

A Moment to Reflect, 24” x 24”

Reflections, 2019, oil, 4” x 4”

The Dreamer, 2019, acrylic, 30” x 24”

Forrest, Carla

Gansrow, Tracy

Fakhoury,Sahar Fletcher, NC www.sahar-art.com

Albuquerque, NM www.carlaforrest.com

Granite Falls, NC www.ArtVision1.com

Articulation No.1, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 24” x 24”

Fluidity of Grace, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 56” x 72”

Tower of Babel, 2018, oil on canvas, 72” x 60”

Garnett, Judith Quinn

Gerard, Jonas

Goldberg, Dan

Portland, OR www.blackdogdesignpdx.com

44

Asheville, NC www.jonasgerard.com

Arlington, MA www.dangoldbergart.com


PAINTINGS

Venus Rising, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 30” x 30”

Beautiful Moments, 2019, encaustic, 36” x 36”

Opposites Attract, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 24” x 24”

Golembe, Carla

Goren, Rinat

Harland, Sara

Lone Guardian of the Pass, 2017, oil, 48” x 48”

Horse and Rider series, 2019, oil, 8” x 10”

Hartman, Carol

Hill, Deborah R

Boardwalk on the Sound, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 22” x 28”

Delray Beach, FL www.carlagolembe.com

Woodside, CA rinatgoren.com

Alexandria, VA saraharland.com

Irwin, Chris

Red Lodge, MT www.carolhartman.biz

Charleston, SC Deborahrhillpaintings.com

Parkville, MD www.cirwindesign.com

Schools Out, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 36” x 36”

Woodland Light IV, 2018, oil on canvas, 46” x 64”

Suspension Bridge, 2018, acrylic, 30” x 40”

Irwin, Chris

Jameson, William

Kaufman, Romaine

Parkville, MD www.cirwindesign.com

Saluda, NC www.williamjameson.com

Boca Raton, FL www.romainekaufman.com

45


PAINTINGS

2019, Abbazia Sant’Eustachio, Nervesa, Veneto, Italy, mixed media water color on paper, 30” x 23”

Ribbons of Night, 2018, mixed media, 30” x 40”

Alfred, NY yuljalauer.art

Chapel Hill, NC www.neryslevy.com

Levy, Nerys

Mann Goodman, Fran Boca Raton, FL franmanngoodman.com

All Along The Watchtower, 2019, oil on panel, 9.675” x 12”

Before The Dance, mixed media, 24” x 36”

Cascae, 2019, original acrylic on canvas, 96” x 60”

Hadlyme, CT charlesmarburg.com

“the butterfly project”, 2018, 6 layer reductive, hand carved woodblock on cotton rag paper, 22” x 30”

Lauer, Julia

Marburg, Charles

Metsker, Annell Charlotte, NC www.annell.com

West Bloomfield Township, MI www.antoniomolinariart.com

Jump, oil, 36” x 36”

Winter Fun, 2009, acrylic, 20” x 24”

Nelson, Sandy

Nivens, Charles

Rockland Window, 2019, watercolor, 22” x 18 1/2” framed

Wilmington, NC www.sandynelsonart.com

46

Carrollton, GA www.charlesnivensart.com

Molinari, Antonio

Palmer, Elizabeth

Nobleboro, ME elizabethpalmerart.com


PAINTINGS

Cloud, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 60” x 60”

Self portrait, 2018, acrylic plus, 6’ by 8’

Payne, Melissa Baker

Plimack, Ardith

The Organ Mountains of Las Cruces NM, oil on canvas, 12 “ x 36”

Pratt, Susan

Smyrna, GA www.melissapaynebaker.com

Greenbrae, CA Ardithplimack.com

Naples, FL www.snardinepratt.com

Feeling Glam..., 2019, acrylic on canvas, 60” x 48”

Mellifluous dreams, acrylic on one of series on wood panels, 9” x 12”

Verdant, 2019, acrylic, 36” x 24”

Greensboro, NC www.paintingsbyapb.com

Atlanta, GA www.chitrafineart.com

Jacksonville, NC www.bfreedfinearts.com

Morning, Sunshine, oil, 30” x 24”

Testing the Waters, 2019, oil/acrylic, 36” x 36”

Sidewalk Rain, 2017, palette knife Oil, 38” x 38”

Rees, Vicki

Richards, Sherri

Rosenoff, Arlon

Preston-Brame, Agnes

Raleigh, NC VLRees.com

Ramanathan, Chitra

Atlanta, GA www.sherrisart.net

Reed, BF

Coeur d’Alene, ID www.ArlonRosenoff.com

47


PAINTINGS

Sacred Synergy, 2019, acrylic on wood panel, 36” x 48”

Afternoon in the Park, 2019, oil on canvas, 75” x 51”

Awakening, 2019, oil, 24” x 36” x 1.5”

Asheville, NC lrowlandart.com

West Bloomfield Township, MI www.konstantinsavchenkoart.com

Savchenko, Konstantin

Sessoms, Janet B.

Past to Present, 2018, oil, 36” x 36”

Calm Trilogy, 2019, oil, 30” x 40”

Stormy Beach, 2019, acrylic, 11” x 14”

Shomaker, Dianna

Rowland, Leslie

Wilmington, NC janetbsessoms.com

Placitas, NM www.diannashomaker.com

Sinclair, Angie

Wilmington, NC www.angiesinclairart.com

Stillwagon, Marianne

Exterior 110: Eclipse of the Moon, watercolor, 6” x 4.25”

Empathic !, oil and wax on cradles board, 2019, 36” x 48”

In Conversation with Custard’s Scouts, pastel, 24” x 14”

Carmel, IN www.JenniferSugarmanArtist.com

Naples, FL madelinesugerman.com

Medanales, NM http://stomasello.com/

Sugarman, Jennifer

48

Sugerman, Madeline

Hardeeville, SC mstillwagon.faso.com

Tomasello, Salvatore


PAINTINGS

Burney Falls, California, 2018, oil on canvas, 36” x 36”

San Miguel Memories, 2019, acrylic, 48” x 48”

Fairfax, CA expressionsbykarin.com

Wilmington, NC www.peggyvineyardart.com

San Franscisco, CA www.rileywaiteart.com

Trumps’ Ode to George Bellows

Sun on my skin, 2019, acrylic, 18” x 24”

Passion, 2019, acrylic, 24” x 24”

Walton Reitz, Diane

Willes, Katie

Williams, P.K.

Urquhart, Karin

Tierra Amarilla, NM dianewaltonreitz.com

Vineyard, Peggy

Sandy, UT www.katiewillesart.com

Ian Was Here, 2019, oil on canvas, 48”x36”

Waite, Riley

Placitas, NM pkwfineart.com

Just Now, 2018, oil, 40” x 36”

Willy, April

Indianapolis, IN aprilwilly.art

49


MIXED MEDIA

Welcome Home Mr. Spock, acrylics/mixed media, 24” x 30”

Event Horizon, 2018, 36” x 36”

Medanales, NM SacredStructures.org/art

Raleigh, NC www.ClappArtStudios.com

Boynton Beach, FL www.reeddixonart.com

Town, 2019, mixed media, 60” x 60”

Road Trip, 60” x 60”

Engel, Mary Lynn

Gignilliat, Bibby

Wish-Fulfilling Jewel, 2018, acrylic, oil, wood panel, gold leaf on canvas; 40” x 40”

Sausalito, CA www.bibbyart.com

Andes, NY www.roshanhoushmand.com

Conversations With Color: Into the Hills, 2019, mixed media on canvas and wood, 30” x 30” x 1.5”

#778, 2018, fiber, 10” x 12” x 12”

The Kind Mowers, 2019, mixed media, 24” x 24”

Sebastopol, CA www.barbarajacobsfineart.com

Kramer, Catherine

Hillsborough, NC www.treehouse-gardens.com

Pereira, Eloa Jane

Jesucristo

Baker, Jim

Yarmouth, ME designbymle.com

Jacobs, Barbara

50

Clapp, Allen

Dixon, Reed

Houshmand, Roshan

Fayetteville, AR www.eloajane.com


MIXED MEDIA

The color of Love in the cosmos is magenta, 2018, mixed media on paper, 20” x 16”

In the Midst of the Flurry, 2019, pastel on paper, mounted photographs

Good Cheer, 2019, encaustic mixed media on paper, 11” x 15”

San Fransisco, CA www.cecilepicard.com

Princeton, NJ www.nancystaublaughlin.com

Portland, ME fineartamerica.com/profiles/ann-tracy

La Luna, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 40” x 30” x 1”

October Surprise, 2019, acrylic photo, 27” x 30” x 1/2”

Inspriration, 2019, mixed media on canvas with Swarovski Rhinestones, 52” x 40” x 4”

San Diego, CA www.mzlocki.com

Boynton Beach, FL stevenzwirn.com

Picard, Cecile

Zaragoza, Peter San Diego, CA

Staub Laughlin, Nancy

Zlocki, Michael

Tracy, Ann

Zwirn, Steven

51


CERAMICS/GLASS

Copper Matt Reduction, 2019, alternative raku, 8” x 12”

Fireside, 2018, glass, 20” diameter, 7” deep

Branchville, NJ www.kilndredspiritsclaystudio.com

Sedona, AZ http://amusinglass.com/

Garrabrandt, Linda

Rainbow Lady, Pilisa

Protector, 2019, pencil & liquid pencil, 36” x 24”

Early Spring Clearing, 2018, pastel, 30” x 34”

Giaco, Annette

Goldberg, Wendy

DRAWING

Nervous, 2016, graphite/Flashe on paper, 22” x 30”

Hartzell, Skip

Port St Lucie, FL skiphartzellgallery.com

52

Pauline, SC www.agiacoart.com

Fairfax, CA www.wendygoldbergart.com

California Golden Hills, 2016, Colored Pencils, 9” x 12”

Pico de Gallo 2, relief print, 11” x 9”

Berkeley, CA www.moonjilee.com

Mattapoisett, MA adrianrtio.com

Pickering, MoonJi

Tio, Adrian R


PHOTOGRAPHY

HUNTING ISLAND XIX, 2018, limited edition silver getatin photograph, 4” x 5”

Seaside, archival color photograph

Eliza’s Cabin, Middleton Place Plantation, 2018, selective hand painted of black/white photograph on canvas, 40” x 40”

Beaufort, NC bashergallery.com

Ginandes, Carol

Watertown, MA www.carolginandes.com

Vournakis, Karen A

Basher, Mike

Charleston, SC www.karenvournakis.com

ARTISAN / CRAFT

Collection

Nickerson, Nick

N.Chatham, MA chathamcoastalcreations.com

2019, ceramics, covered jar, red/celadon crackle glaze

Toussaint, Joe Saint Paul, MN

Wearable Art

Valentina, Valerie San Francisco, CA valerievalentina.com

53


Order online and save 75%!! $2.95 Volume ts

esen com pr

demag.

artgui

t s i t r A

3

y r o t c Dire Madeline Sugerman madelinesugerman.com

Empathic 1 (detail), oil and cold wax on cradled board, 36” x 48”

Dan Goldberg www.dangoldbergart.com

The Dreaming Maya, 2017, oil on canvas, 36” x 48”

28

$8.99

m mag.co

tguide www.ar

artguidemag.com 54

U.S.


2

Simply Light by William Jameson When did you realize you wanted to be an artist? As a small child, I was drawing anytime I could and sometimes when I shouldn’t be! Teachers would chastise me for drawing when I was supposed to paying attention in class. As I grew, sports entered my life. Baseball and tennis became important but, after the practices and games, I was always found back in my room drawing and experimenting with paint. I loved to investigate things with my pens and brushes and was fortunate to have the encouragement and support from friends and family. My father taught me to draw barns and animals while I was sitting on his knee. My great, great uncle was Arthur Dawson, one of the early members of the

Old Lyme School in Old Lyme Connecticut. Arthur’s son, John Dawson, also a painter, would critique my drawings and paintings through the mail. His comments and encouragement were instrumental in building my confidence. He shared stories of his time in Paris at the Julien Academy following his service in World War One. It always amuses me when people say, “Oh, no wonder you are an artist with your uncles having been professional painters. Your talent is inherited”. I laugh and reply, “Well, actually they were family in-laws and not blood relatives.” How would you describe your art and style? I can best describe my art and painting

as contemporary realism. I try to never overwork a piece, keeping my brushwork “loose”. My motif is often described as “light/dark dominant”. What is your process and what tools do you create your unique pieces of art?

PAINTINGS

My process is first seeking unique dynamic compositions which involve strong lights and darks. The main tools that I use are envisioning and working out the composition. As I paint I work very quickly, stepping back often, thinking only at first about composition, then concentrating only on the darks looking for a rhythmic pattern with the darks. I have always preferred painting “large” and as a student at Ringling College of Art and Design, I wanted to always be working on the largest canvas in the paint-

11

2

Venus Rising, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 30” x 30” Contemporary impressionism by Deborah R Hill

Beautiful Moments, 2019, encaustic, 36” x 36”

Opposites Attract, 2014, acrylic on canvas, 24” x 24”

Goren, Rinat

Harland, Sara

Lone Guardian of the Pass, 2017, oil, 48” x 48”

Horse and Rider series, 2019, oil, 8” x 10”

Hartman, Carol

Hill, Deborah R

Boardwalk on the Sound, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 22” x 28”

Golembe, Carla

What is your journey in art. In many ways, the things I do for my career are not any different from what other people do for their vocation. It is a job I work at each day, striving to achieve an efficient way of representing my art- to deliver a visual meaning that the viewer can relate to. I explore methods, I hone my skills and I research others in my field. What/Who do you consider to be your greatest influence and why? Past artists that have influenced my work- I would have to say Sargent for his use of economy of brushwork and genius in representing the figure. Andrew Wyeth and his underlying use of symbolism and attention to detail. Current artists I look to are Alex Kanevsky with his development of colour and how it relates to his subject; Tibor Nagy for his outdoor scenes; Christian Hook and his expertise in quickly developing his subject under pressure and time constraints.

Delray What is your goal as an artist?

Beach, FL Deborahrhillpaintings.com www.carlagolembe.com

To continue to work as a professional artist.

Woodside, CA rinatgoren.com

Alexandria, VA saraharland.com

Artist Statement I consider myself a contemporary Impressionist painter. I find my inspiration in the depth of colour in the natural world, rural vistas, beach and marsh although I am equally inspired working from a still-life in the studio. I am a classically trained painter having earned a BFA with a concentration in painting. Working in studio & plein air, dividing my time in studios in upstate NY & Charleston SC. COLLECTIONS: Palm Beach Fl/New York NY/Washington DC/Houston TX/Charleston SC/Charlotte NC/Dallas TX/Saratoga Springs NY/Annapolis Ml/Savannah GA/ Myrtle Beach SC/Newbury Vt/Junction TX/ Atlanta GA/Long Is NY/Michigan/Massachusetts/Brunswick Ma/INTERNATIONAL England/Canada/Capetown SA

1. A Gold Beauty, 48” x 60” 2. Storm on Beach, oil, 18” x 24”

31

Irwin, Chris

Red Lodge, MT www.carolhartman.biz

Charleston, SC Deborahrhillpaintings.com

Parkville, MD www.cirwindesign.com

Schools Out, 2019, acrylic on canvas, 36” x 36”

Woodland Light IV, 2018, oil on canvas, 46” x 64”

Suspension Bridge, 2018, acrylic, 30” x 40”

Irwin, Chris

Jameson, William

Parkville, MD www.cirwindesign.com

Saluda, NC www.williamjameson.com

Kaufman, Romaine

Boca Raton, FL www.romainekaufman.com

47

55


National Artist Directory Read Full Artist Biographies and View More Images

• • •

Full artist biographies Images of artwork Contact information

www.artguidemag.com/artist-directory

Profile for artGuide

Artist Directory Volume 3  

Artist Directory Volume 3 showcases new artists from across the United States. Enjoy these artists!

Artist Directory Volume 3  

Artist Directory Volume 3 showcases new artists from across the United States. Enjoy these artists!

Profile for artguide9
Advertisement