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SPRING 2018


TAKE CENTER STAGE WITH EVERY TURN

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F E A T U R E

THE FOOD + WINE ISSUE

W H AT I S N O R T H E R N F O O D ? Writer Steve Hoffman explores.

ARTWORK BY MARY JO HOFFMAN

134


“ L O O K G O O D , F E E L G R E AT W I T H B E AU T I F U L S K I N ”

FAC E OF A T OP M I N N E SOTA DER M ATOLOGIST

Recognized by physicians and nurses as one of the nation’s best dermatologists, Charles E. Crutchfield III, MD’s countless honors include the Mayo Clinic’s Karis Humanitarian Award and being named to Minnesota Medicine‘s “100 Most Influential Health Care Leaders in Minnesota.” Dr. Crutchfield is a physician, teacher, author, patented inventor, entrepreneur, and philanthropist who mentors the next generation of physicians. Whether for medical or aesthetic concerns, if you or a loved one deserves the highest quality skin care from a leading dermatologist, Crutchfield Dermatology is the right call.

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C O N T E N T S

Culture

Compass

The season’s hottest happenings.

The Grand Bohemian Charleston is an oasis for oenophiles.

37 AG E N DA 42

FA R E A smorgasbord of seasonal Northern snacks.

46 F O L K LO R E In search of Minnesota 13 moonshine.

50

L I B AT I O N Erik Eastman offers three cocktail recipes.

55 C H E F

84 D E S T I N AT I O N 89 I S L A N D Admiring the beauty of small but mighty Captiva Island.

93 W I N E R Y Salvestrin Winery’s vines are deeply rooted in history.

96 E S C A P E Four Seasons Resort Bora Bora is a tropical paradise.

102

A conversation with chef Jeremiah Tower.

ITINERARY Exploring Japan with chef John Sugimura.

Style

TO U R Desirable destinations the Artful Living way.

62 S PA

74

109

Experiencing an après-ski oxygen facial.

64 W E L L N E S S How defining good health changed one man’s life.

68

GUIDE What to buy now.

74

FA S H I O N Top trends from the 2018 resortwear collections.

96

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CAMILLE LIZAMA, RUNWAY MANHATTAN/MONDADORI, PETER VITALE

50


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I N C L U D E S D E S T I N AT I O N


C O N T E N T S

Home

Intel

D E TA I L S Updated hardware makes for an instant makeover.

An old beer learns new tricks.

188

192 D E S I G N Bruce Kading revamps a historic Manhattan brownstone.

199 R E M O D E L I N G An essential guide to remodeling done right.

229 B U S I N E S S 235 T R E N D Top restaurants are serving up inspired design.

241 H I S TO R Y Three of the grand dames of Lake Minnetonka.

249 N O R T H N OTA B L E S

220

The regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best and brightest.

Adventure

211 E XC U R S I O N Barnsley Resort combines luxe amenities and summer-camp classics.

216

SPORT Luxury garages offer premium trackside living.

In Every Issue

148 P R O P E R T Y G A L L E R Y 256 B AC K PAG E

220

PA S T I M E Teaching a teenager the art of trout fishing.

235

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER VONDELINDE, MARY JO HOFFMAN, ANTHONY TAHLIER

199


F R O M

T H E

P U B L I S H E R

The Northern Food Scene There has been a lot of talk lately about how the enterprising sons of the Minnesota governor have effectively rebranded our area as the North. This movement is mostly about embracing our cold weather and articulating cultural differences to cleverly market our region to the rest of the world. One thing the North has not typically been known for is its cuisine. It’s often thought of as lackluster and one-dimensional, stereotyped by bland offerings like lefse, lutefisk and hotdish. We historically have been underserved by a subpar epicurean scene (with a few exceptions) and a lack of culinary sophistication. It’s somewhat akin to craving caviar and Champagne in a bread and water market. But over the past decade, there has been a major sea change in our culinary landscape. Suddenly, the North is being heralded as a bastion of foodie consciousness. Minneapolis in particular has been called out as a must-visit foodie city. The James Beard Foundation has even helped out by realigning its regions to separate the North from the great food town of Chicago. This shift has no doubt been a boon to our chefs as they compete for what are often considered the Oscars of the food world. Welcome to the spring issue of Artful Living. Our feature, “What is Northern Food?” written by Steve Hoffman, examines the complex dynamics of our food scene and explains why our region is having an important food moment. It has become customary for this magazine to present you with beautiful covers along with timeless, compelling content that lives on for ages in our readers’ homes. Our cover image, captured by Minneapolis food photographer David Paul Schmit, is sure to elicit a strong response and provide springtime inspiration for home chefs. Congratulations to the farmers, chefs, restaurateurs, inventors and many other contributors who are shaping the new Northern food scene. It’s a melting pot of robust offerings, from food markets and unexpected eateries to craft breweries and spirits distilleries. A remarkable gastronomic movement is happening right before our eyes. Cheers,

Frank Roffers Publisher + Editor-in-Chief


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O U R

T E A M

Publisher + Editor-in-Chief FRANK ROFFERS Managing Editor HAYLEY SAUNDERS Executive Editor KATE NELSON Creative Director MANDY EBERT Director of Sales EMMA CUTLER Director of Marketing GENEVIEVE COSSETTE Assistant Art Director MARGARET COOPER Project Manager KATHLEEN GILDEA Style + Product Coordinator JILL ROFFERS Contributors W R I T ERS : Alyssa Ford, Katie Dohman, Amber Gibson, Bette Hammel, Marguerite Happe, Steve Hoffman, Brian Kevin, Wendy Lubovich, Michael Nagrant, Chris Plantan P H OTO G RAPH E RS : 2nd Truth, Mary Jo Hoffman, Camille Lizama, Roy Son, Spacecrafting

Advertising Sales Contact Emma Cutler at 612-803-1910 or ecutler@artfulliving.com.

Subscriber Services Contact Kathleen Gildea at 952-230-3133 or kgildea@artfulliving.com.

Artful Living 218 Washington Avenue North, Suite 220, Minneapolis, MN 55401

Artful Living is published by Roffers Group, LLC, all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reprinted without permission. Roffers Group, LLC cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions. Artful Living is committed to preserving the environment and demonstrates this by printing efficiently and sustainably. In consideration of environmental impact, this magazine is 100-percent recyclable.


GRATE EXPECTATIONS

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I N

P R I N T

On the Cover Gracing our spring issue cover are two branzino, procured from Coastal Seafoods and photographed by Minneapolis creative David Paul Schmit. The image is an homage to both epicurean pursuits and the highly anticipated fishing opener. Schmit, who got his start in photography back in high school, is particularly drawn to food photography, which combines two of his passions. He enjoys the whole process, from shopping local markets to preparing and styling the food to setting up the composition of the shot.

About Artful Living, the Magazine of the North, is an elegant, intelligent publication highlighting art, culture, travel, fashion, home, food, wine and profiles meant to inspire and entertain. Founded in 2008, this quarterly magazine features beautiful design and engaging original content, bringing the best of the North to an affluent audience with impeccable taste. The Artful Living lifestyle brand is headquartered in Minneapolis.

Distribution Artful Living is mailed to a select group of homes and businesses in the North. It is also distributed through a number of key marketing partners, including Coldwell Banker Burnet, Delta Sky Club, Galleria and International Market Square. You can find Artful Living exclusively for sale on newsstands at Barnes & Noble and Kowalskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Markets.

Subscriptions To subscribe to Artful Living or order back issues, visit ArtfulLiving.com. For bulk copies, contact Kathleen Gildea at 952-230-3133 or kgildea@artfulliving.com.


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ArtfulLiving.com

Visit the recently redesigned Artful Living website to read previous issues, dig through the archives and enjoy our online-exclusive content, including interviews with Northern influencers like Melissa Coleman of the Faux Martha and Johnna Holmgren of Fox Meets Bear, both of whom have cookbooks coming out this spring.

The Artful Note

Get the best of the North delivered right to your inbox with our bimonthly newsletter.

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CULTURE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARY JO HOFFMAN

37 A G E N D A

42 F A R E

46 F O L K L O R E

50 L I B A T I O N

55 C H E F

55 artfulliving.com

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Culture A G E N D A

The

AGENDA IMAGERY BY JACK BARKLA

THE SEASON’S HOTTEST HAPPENINGS. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

SPRING IS IN THE AIR MARCH 25–APRIL 8 • EDINA A new floral tradition is blooming thanks to Bachman’s and Galleria Edina, who have partnered to create a fully immersive experience to celebrate the arrival of spring. Festive floor-to-ceiling vignettes will be installed in the shopping destination’s public spaces, free for all to enjoy. Botanicals on display include hyacinths, tulips and other seasonal favorites, all specially prepared to bloom early under the care of Bachman’s garden pros. galleriaedina.com

artfulliving.com

Spring 2018

37


Culture A G E N D A

APRIL 20–22 • ST. PAUL Featuring the works of hundreds of artists from across the country, the American Craft Show returns to the St. Paul RiverCentre with two popular programs centered around interior design and fashion, highlighting how art can be enjoyed and worn every day. Make Room challenges four Twin Cities interior designers (including Sally Wheaton Hushcha, right) to tell a color story by bringing together décor items from the show, while Style Slam showcases models decked out in handcrafted clothing, accessories and jewelry as styled by four local stylists (including Christina Fortier, left). craftcouncil.org/stpaul

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Artful Living

Magazine of the North

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOSEPH D.R. OLEARY | VETO DESIGN

AMERICAN CRAFT SHOW


EDWARD HOPPER (1882-1967), LE PAVILLON DE FLORE, 1909. OIL ON CANVAS, 23 5/8 × 28 13/16 IN. (60 × 73.2 CM). WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NEW YORK; JOSEPHINE N. HOPPER BEQUEST 70.1174. © HEIRS OF JOSEPHINE N. HOPPER, LICENSED BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

EDWARD H OPPE R: SELE CT ION S F ROM T H E WH ITNE Y M USEUM O F AM ERICAN ART, NEW YORK THROUGH MAY 20 • CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA The Cedar Rapids Museum of Art’s exhibition of 13 seminal Edward Hopper works, all drawn from the Whitney Museum of American Art, traces the early career of the celebrated American realist painter and printmaker. He is known for depicting what he saw as the isolation of modern life, often placing solitary contemplative figures in austere interiors, moody cityscapes and stark rural landscapes. crma.org

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Spring 2018

39


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Culture F A R E

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Artful Living

â&#x20AC;˘

Magazine of the North


Northern Nosh THIS SMORGASBORD OF SEASONAL SNACKS IS A LOCAVORE’S DELIGHT. B Y C H R I S P L A N TA N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY 2 N D T R U T H

Come March, we are admittedly winter-weary and craving the chance to reconnect with friends over delectable food and drink. This made us wonder: What would an early spring menu composed exclusively of regional foods look like? We turned to our robust local maker scene and enlisted the help of area chefs to create a spread not only of the North, but made in the North. Seasonality is something to be embraced here; after all, our seasons are what make the North unique and beloved. With that in mind, we created a colorful blend of winter root vegetables and vibrant springtime produce. Next, we gathered up the finest canned, dried and otherwise preserved fare that’s so characteristic of our region. And last but certainly not least, we assembled a selection of artisanal meats and cheeses, a must for a decidedly Northern smorgasbord. 1. Roth Prairie Sunset Cheese

Monroe, Wisconsin • rothcheese.com

2. Lucille’s Kitchen Garden Minnesota Mead Jelly St. Paul • lucilleskitchengarden.com

3. Amana German-Style Mustard Amana, Iowa • amanashops.com

4. Northstar Kombucha

Minneapolis • northstarkombucha.com

5. Gedney Hot & Sweet Baby Pickles Chaska • gedneyfoods.com

6. Eau Galle Dill & Garlic Cheese Curds

Durand, Wisconsin • eaugallecheese.com

7. Potter’s Crackers Cranberry Hazelnut Crisps Madison, Wisconsin • potterscrackers.com

8. Cherry De-Lite Dried Door County Cherries Forestville, Wisconsin • countryovens.com

9. Amana Roasted Field Corn

Amana, Iowa • amanashops.com

10. La Quercia Prosciutto Americano Norwalk, Iowa • laquercia.us

11. Old Wisconsin Beef Snack Sticks

Sheboygan, Wisconsin • oldwisconsin.com

12. Rushing Waters Smoked Rainbow Trout Palmyra, Wisconsin • rushingwaters.net

artfulliving.com

Spring 2018

43


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Culture F O L K L O R E

A NIP OF MINNESOTA 13 ALYSSA FORD GOES IN SEARCH OF STEARNS COUNTY’S FABLED PROHIBITION MOONSHINE.

A nice stiff drink was hard to come by during Prohibition. If you were lucky, you got home-batch whiskey or bathtub gin that burned hot as hair spray. If you were unlucky, you ended up poisoning yourself with industrial-grade alcohol laced with methanol. The Minneapolis Morning Tribune called this the “blue death,” because people literally turned blue from the poison, ingested by accident or out of sheer desperation. The newspaper reported on one man found unconscious on 11th Avenue North in Minneapolis in 1920: “His face and hands were blue in spots. The spots were then light blue, but last night they had spread over his entire body, until it was impossible to tell whether the man had been white or [black].” It wasn’t terribly uncommon to die this way during the temperance plague. Prohibition went into effect on January 16, 1920. By March 7 — not even two months later — 15 St. Paul men had died attempting to get drunk off poisoned industrial alcohol. By the end of Prohibition, hundreds of Twin Cities residents would meet the blue death. But rumor has it there was a safe harbor from bad booze: Stearns County. Supposedly the moonshine out of this area was so good it was deemed too good for midsize metropolises like Minneapolis. Al Capone’s rum runners went right to Stearns County to load up on corn, rye and raisin liquor. They then ferried the liquid gold to New York City, Los Angeles and Miami to be served at the hottest, hippest speakeasies. So pure, safe and smooth was this alcohol that it even had a trade moniker: Minnesota 13, named for the type of seed corn favored by some of the Stearns County moonshiners. Some 85 years after the end of Prohibition, there remains an oft-told tale about the fabled Minnesota 13. It goes something like this: An old Stearns County moonshiner traveled to Europe during Prohibition. In Scotland, he spotted a tavern with a big sign in the front window that read “Any drink in the world.” The moonshiner walked in, plunked down a $20 gold piece and challenged the bartender: “Give me three fingers of Minnesota 13.” The barkeep took the money, placed a glass on the bar and replied, “What’ll it be: Albany, Avon, Melrose or Holdingford?” This old chestnut may be nothing more than hot air wrapped in local pride. In fact, late St. Cloud State University professor Elaine Davis, who penned the 2007 book Minnesota 13: Stearns County’s Wet Wild Prohibition Days, noted that there’s no evidence that Stearns County moonshine was ever exported. Still, she wrote, the Minnesota-made whiskey was well-known and requested by name on the coasts during Prohibition. Today, Stearns County is better known for electing Michele Bachmann than for crafting high-grade hooch. But back then, it was well-populated with German immigrants who took Prohibition as a personal affront to their culture and heritage. (And in a way, it was: Prohibition followed closely on the heels of World War I, when anti-German sentiment was white-hot. Temperance advocates used that to their keen political advantage.) When farm prices plummeted in the 1920s, making moon was just the next logical step. Davis explained that the entire county was in on the action. “Hardware stores sold copper tubs and tubing, jars, bottle tops, charred kegs, and owners made some of the stills; grocers sold sugar, yeast; corn

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Artful Living

Magazine of the North


PHOTOGRAPHY BY CANARY GREY

farmers sold heaps of corn to moonshiners; car dealers sold autos to moonshine distributors; and loans were paid back to local bankers who were known to use stills as collateral on farm loans,” she wrote. “Moonshining grew into a huge industry with hundreds of county people working in various capacities, from brewing, hauling supplies, transporting the alcohol, tinsmithing to guarding at illegal taverns.” She noted that even the Catholic clergy was in on it and that several of the monks at Saint John’s Abbey in Collegeville assembled the fine copper stills and taught Stearns County folk how to properly use them. Davis’ book left me with a yearning. I wanted to know: Could someone still get a taste of real Minnesota 13 all these decades later? Was it really something special? Or was it just like the fiery white lightning I grew up drinking in the Ozark Mountains? So I did my homework, mapped out a plan and drove the 85 miles to Stearns County to get my answer. My first stop was Spiritz Liquor just off I-94 in Melrose. I brought in my copy of Minnesota 13, and the girl behind the counter held up her hand as if to say, Don’t even bother. “People are in here all the time asking when they should put in their order for moonshine,” she told me, rolling her eyes. “I tell ’em to try New Munich.” On my way out the door, she hollered, “We are mighty proud of that book, though!” I took the Spiritz Liquor girl at her word and drove down to New Munich, a teeny village with a towering Catholic church, a meat market and a promising-looking hofbrau with lit-up beer signs. German-crafted moonshine, had I found thee? Alas, the whole town was shut up tight, including the bar. Over the next six hours, I bounced from bar to bar, accosting old men on their stool perches, interviewing annoyed bartenders, peeking into the windows of cafés and stores. I even laid down a pair of twenties at the Hunter’s Bar in Myrtle, thinking my generosity would produce a fount of hot leads. But the men only tipped their seed hats in appreciation then went back to the serious business of drinking beer. Holdingford was the breakthrough. First, the town immediately felt like the kind of place where a person could get a drink served in a cork-stopped jug. And second, there’s a sizable café right on the main drag called Minnesota 13: A Prairie Home Tavern. I drifted to it like a hypnotized moth to a summer porch light. I sat at the counter and gingerly ordered a coffee. Ever so quietly, I slipped my book out from under my arm and asked the waitress if she knew where I could get some real Minnesota 13. “Hey,” she hollered back to the kitchen. “There’s a lady out here that wants some moonshine.” “Tell her to go to the American Legion,” came a voice from the kitchen. I downed my coffee and walked next door to the Legion, where a group of old-timers was huddled around one end of the bar. I ordered a Hamm’s and pretended to read Minnesota 13. The most outgoing of the bunch took the bait, overcome with curiosity: “Hey there, what’s that you’re readin’?” I slid the book down the bar so he could inspect it. That’s all I needed to do. The old men starting buzzing, flipping through the pages and commenting on the photos. “Oh, that’s so-and-so,” “that’s the Czech place, there” and “that’s the still they have over there at Anton’s.” Two hours and three rounds of beer for my new friends later, I had a name and an address. I rang the bell of a very elegant brick home. A woman came to the door and spotted the book right away. “Ah, I see we have a tourist,” she said. She called down to the lower level for her husband, who came up from his den and asked me who I was and where I was from. They looked at each other for two long seconds, then she asked him, “Think you could help her out?” He shrugged slightly and disappeared back downstairs. When he emerged, he was carrying a massive glass jug of sloshing brown liquid and loose wood detritus. He set out three mugs and poured a nip into each. “Oh, might as well,” said the wife, snagging her mug. “It is Friday, right?” We bottoms-upped, and I understood immediately. Minnesota 13 was homemade, but it was aged with oak: mellow, sultry and woodsy, like something you could sip next to a fire. This wasn’t the clear, fire-breathing stuff I knew back home in the Ozarks. This was fine drinking. “Wow,” I said. “Yep,” said the husband, proud and puffed. “Made it myself on my grandfather’s copper still.” “Now you’ve had the real Minnesota 13 experience,” said the wife. I left for Minneapolis that night with an 8-ounce jar of Minnesota 13 and a new appreciation for Stearns County. They might have voted in Bachmann, but they know how to make quality moonshine. And that I can definitely respect. This article is from the Artful Living archives. It first appeared in our summer 2013 issue.

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Culture L I B A T I O N

Setting the Bar COCKTAIL MAKER ERIK EASTMAN SHARES HIS “ONE EASY MOVE” SECRET. B Y K AT E N E L S O N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY C A M I L L E L I Z A M A I L L U S T R AT I O N B Y M A N DY E B E R T

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Magazine of the North


You’ve probably imbibed one of Erik Eastman’s creations, though you may not know it. A fixture of the Twin Cities food and drink scene, he’s been called in to consult on cocktail menus at notable eateries like Revival St. Paul, Saint Dinette and Octo Fishbar, the latest concept from James Beard Award–winning chef Tim McKee (and where he’s pictured here). And he wants to let you in on a little secret: Making lip-smacking libations doesn’t have to be difficult. “Long before I started making cocktails, I loved to cook,” explains Eastman, owner of Easy & Company and sales director at Minnesota Ice. “I would spend days planning and organizing elaborate meals for friends, and one thing I learned was how much effect could be wrung from a simple twist on a standard ingredient. These days, I love to incorporate those little civilized surprises into the cocktails I make. Premium-quality sherry, salt, Banyuls vinegar, preserved lemon, brown butter: These are not necessarily cocktail ingredients, but with one easy move, you can use these ingredients to create a really memorable cocktail. It’s a form of courtesy, really — a way to tell the people you serve that it matters to you that they be delighted.” Here, he shares recipes for a few of his favorite springtime drinks, each incorporating one easy move that transforms the everyday into the extraordinary.

“Brown butter has a 1 pound Kerrygold salted butter

distinctive nuttiness

750 milliliters 100-proof Knob Creek Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey

and is always on hand

2 cups demerara sugar Angostura bitters

in my refrigerator for

1 Minnesota Pure & Clear ice cube Orange twist

cooking and cocktails.” 1

2

3 4

To make brown butter, heat butter in a small saucepan over low heat without stirring about 1 hour. Remove from heat when a spoonful of butterfat is a pleasant nutty brown color. Let cool. Slowly decant through several layers of cheesecloth, leaving the browned solids in the pan. To make brown butter–infused bourbon, combine ½ cup brown butter with bourbon in a glass jar with a tight-fitting lid and shake to combine. Let steep at room temperature overnight then refrigerate several hours to let butter harden. Poke a hole in the top of the butter cap and strain infused whiskey through a coffee filter. To make demerara simple syrup, combine sugar and 1 cup water over medium heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Let cool. To make cocktail, combine 2.5 ounces brown butter–infused bourbon, .5 ounce demerara simple syrup and 3 dashes bitters in a mixing glass with ice. Stir to desired dilution and decant over ice cube in your favorite lowball glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

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Culture L I B A T I O N

“What follows are two spring-forward interpretations of the classic gin-lemon-honey cocktail called the Bee’s Knees. The first employs a honey-lemon cordial that is steeped (not cooked) to preserve the vibrancy of both the citrus and the honey. The second utilizes peas and mint, one of my favorite spring flavor combinations.”

250 milliliters Beefeater Gin

½ cup sugar snap peas, roughly chopped 2 cups cane sugar 2 large handfuls fresh mint

10 lemons

1 ounce fresh lemon juice

Best-quality honey, gently warmed to thin 2 ounces Hayman’s Royal Dock Navy Strength Gin .25 ounce Averna Amaro

1

2

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To make honey lemon cordial, zest lemons with a microplane and reserve zest. Juice lemons and combine juice with an equal amount by weight of honey. Whisk until combined, add zest and let steep at room temperature 24 hours. Strain through a fine mesh strainer. To make cocktail, combine 1.5 ounces honey lemon cordial, gin and amaro in a shaker with ice. Shake well and double strain through a fine/tea strainer into a coupe glass.

Artful Living

Magazine of the North

1 2 3

To make sugar snap pea–infused gin, combine gin and peas in a Mason jar and shake well. Steep at room temperature at least 3 hours. Strain through a coffee filter. To make mint simple syrup, combine sugar with 1 cup water over medium heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Add mint to warm syrup and steep at least 1 hour. Strain through a fine mesh strainer. To make cocktail, combine 2 ounces sugar snap pea–infused gin, .5 ounce mint simple syrup and lemon juice in a shaker with ice. Shake well and double strain through a fine/tea strainer into a coupe glass.


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Culture C H E F

The Last Magnificent THE INCOMPARABLE JEREMIAH TOWER TALKS FORMATIVE FOOD EXPERIENCES, LAST MEALS AND THOSE DAMN DOTS OF SAUCE. BY STEVE HOFFMAN P H OTO G R A P H Y BY M A RY J O H O F F M A N

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Culture C H E F

Jeremiah Tower first teamed up with Alice Waters to put Chez Panisse on the map then opened one of the best restaurants in the world: Stars in San Francisco. His was the driving vision behind the revolutionary reclaiming of local American food that became known as California cuisine. His tenure at Stars was electrifying and served as the archetype for the chef as celebrity and rock star. A recent Anthony Bourdain film, Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent, chronicles the 75-year-old’s career in the kitchen, his extended retreat in Mexico and his recent re-emergence onto a stage that he helped build. He journeyed to the Twin Cities in January to cook with an old friend, Gianni’s Steakhouse Executive Chef Steve Vranian, who worked at Stars for 15 years. As Tower and I talked at a window table in angled winter light, there was very little rock star on display. In its place were pitch-perfect sartorial elegance, bawdy humor, an inquiring intelligence and a still-unjaded openness to the simple wonders of sensual food experiences.

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Do you have a formative early food experience, something that changed your relationship with food? The moment that was eureka for me was when I was probably 6 or 7. We were in Queensland, Australia, visiting a pineapple plantation, and one of the guys took a pineapple and cut off the top. I expected to have to cut it, peel it, core it, all that sort of thing — what I’d seen my mother do. And he said, “No, use your fingers.” And I just dug into the well of the pineapple with my fingers and ate. I’ve never forgotten that. That pineapple was the benchmark for every piece of pineapple for the rest of my life. I was inoculated for life with the taste of true pineapple.

How do you feel about the era of food shows and celebrity chefs that, in some sense, you had a role in inspiring? I was sitting with Tony Bourdain during the promotional tour for the film, and someone came up and asked how to get a food show. Tony turned to him and said, “Don’t!”

What do you think he meant? I think he meant — at least this is how I feel — that there is a lot of money and clout in hosting a show on Food Network, but it is also a place where an authentic connection to food can die. It’s a culmination but also a graveyard.

What do you love about food right now? That there are places like, for instance, Capri, Italy, or the Amalfi Coast where uniqueness still exists. Where you can get Sorrento lemons. You’d think someone would have stolen seeds or something, but I’ve never seen them anywhere else. You run your fingernail across the skin and smell and you get the lemon moment, the benchmark.

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Culture C H E F

What do you hate about food right now? Dots. Dots of sauce. Dot. Dot. Dot. What am I supposed to do with them? Dip my finger in them? Do I move around the plate clockwise? Does one dot go with one part of the dish and another with another?

How about a last meal? You know you’re going to die tomorrow — what do you eat tonight? There are so many last meals, but let me tell you, I was at a benefit dinner in Dallas years ago, and sitting in an empty side room was a one-kilo can of Petrossian beluga caviar — I mean the real beluga. I silently rounded up three friends, and we sat down, with spoons and some toast, and ate the entire kilo. I want to do that again.

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Magazine of the North


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Style S P A

AIR APPAR EN T EXPERIENCING AN APRÈS-SKI OXYGEN FACIAL AT THE RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH.

In the age of self-care, a spa day isn’t an indulgence — it’s a necessity. Innovative skincare can reverse the damage caused by the stress of everyday life and the elements. The spa at the Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch is a warm oasis nestled in the Alpine splendor of Beaver Creek, Colorado. The expansive space boasts a carefully curated menu focused on renewal and relaxation. And with 19 treatment rooms, a state-of-the-art nail salon, rustic stone grottos with waterfalls, hot and cold plunge pools, steam rooms, saunas, and quiet resting areas, there is something here for every type of wellness seeker. The resort’s oxygen hydration facial is ideal before a big event or simply for rejuvenation. The treatment employs world-renown Australian skincare line Intraceuticals, which calls upon science to deliver striking results. (Beyoncé is big a fan, and thus so are we.) The facial begins with a brush cleanse followed by a gentle enzyme exfoliation. Next comes the delivery of oxygen serum directly into the skin, which pushes antioxidants, hyaluronic acid and powerful nutrients much deeper than a traditional facial can. The finishing touch is the hydration gel application. The result? Plump, ultra-hydrated skin, zero signs of fatigue, and a noticeable dewy glow. Twenty minutes in the oxygen lounge is the best way to top off the experience. Trust us: The compliments will be coming for weeks.

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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY RITZ-CARLTON, BACHELOR GULCH

BY EMMA CUTLER


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Style W E L L N E S S

The BIGGEST Winner DEFINING GOOD HEALTH CHANGED JESSE ATKINS’ LIFE FOR GOOD. B Y K AT I E D O H M A N P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y S PAC E C R A F T I N G

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Before he appeared on The Biggest Loser in 2010, Jesse Atkins weighed more than his home scale could read, but it was somewhere around 375 pounds. So when his mom suggested he try out for The Biggest Loser, he figured he had nothing to lose — and that he likely wouldn’t get selected because he didn’t think he had a very compelling story. “Nobody had died, and I had incredibly supportive parents and a great group of friends,” the 35-year-old attorney explains. “I was just always the fat guy. And at some point, I was so much the fat guy that I felt there was nothing I could do about it, so I just let it go.” Atkins was also resigned to the health issues that dogged him — anxiety, depression, pre-diabetes and sleep apnea — and his lifestyle, which he characterizes as “urban hermit.” But Atkins did get chosen for The Biggest Loser, and he ended up shedding 166 pounds over the six months he was on the show. Though he is grateful for the intervention, he says that afterward he felt immense pressure to keep the weight off — but that he didn’t necessarily have the right tools to do it. “I vacillated between moments of sheer confidence because I had just witnessed myself do it and sheer terror that I had no idea what I was doing,” he notes. A gym buddy recommended he seek out Todd Stebleton of R.A.W. Real Active Wellness for his nutrition background and training philosophy, one not focused purely on dropping pounds. “Working with Todd truly changed my life,” Atkins says emphatically. Together, they tackled nutrition, fitness, mindset and overall health. “He never tells me how to think; instead, he helps me find my own way,” adds Atkins. He forged a bond not only with Stebleton but with the entire R.A.W. community. Stebleton emphasizes a well-rounded wellness plan: “For a lot of us, healthy means 10,000 steps on the Fitbit or managing caloric intake or going to bed on time. But those are just pieces of the puzzle,” he says. “We call it the Super Six: eat right, drink right, move right, think right, sleep right and poop right. How well people implement those things determines the rate at which they can change and the degree to which they can hold on to those changes.” “In order to learn a new skill, you need 300 to 500 repetitions, but it’s even harder to erase a behavior and create a new one,” Stebleton continues. “The real triumph with Jesse is that he rewrote a software program that desperately needed it, not for the sake of winning a show, but for the sake of living a healthy life.” “I’ve gotten to the sweet spot,” notes Atkins. “This will always be a challenge for me, but I have peace so long as I’m living my values. I’m finally good at being healthy, and it feels so good to be able to say that.”

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Style G U I D E

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P R O D U C E D B Y E M M A C U T L E R , K A T H L E E N G I L D E A A N D H AY L E Y S A U N D E R S P H OTO G R A P H Y BY 2 N D T R U T H

WATERFORD SINGLE LIGHT CANDLESTICK, waterford.com, $59.99 • MIKASA CANDLESTICK, mikasa.com, $40 • OLD MILL CANDLES TALL BEESWAX TAPER, The Foundry Home Goods, thefoundryhomegoods.com, $8 each • MAYERON-COWLES VASE, Martin Patrick 3, martinpatrick3.com, $300 • CB2 CHROMA CLEAR DOUBLE OLD-FASHIONED GLASS, cb2.com, $3.95 • ANTHROPOLOGIE GLENNA SIDE PLATE, anthropologie.com, $16 • ANTHROPOLOGIE GLENNA CEREAL BOWL, $18 • CB2 CAPRI CORDIAL GLASS, $1.50 • HASAMI PORCELAIN TUMBLER, The Foundry Home Goods, $24 • HANDBLOWN CURVED GLASS BUD VASE, The Foundry Home Goods, $14 • VINTAGE CHAMPAGNE GLASS, Victory, shopvictory.com, price upon request • JOHN JULIAN HAND-THROWN PORCELAIN CLASSICAL PITCHER, The Foundry Home Goods, $36 • RIEDEL VERITAS SAUVIGNON BLANC WINE GLASS, riedelusa.net, $69 for two • FILT LARGE NET BAG, The Line, theline.com, $18 • SIMON PEARCE HARTLAND SMALL CANDLESTICK, Ampersand Shops, ampersandshops.com, $125 • WATERFORD FLOWER VASE, $99.95 • LIGNE ROSET LUNDI 22/02 MEDIUM VASE, Martin Patrick 3, $125 • HANDBLOWN CURVED GLASS BUD VASE, The Foundry Home Goods, $14 • SIMON PEARCE HARTLAND MEDIUM CANDLESTICK, Ampersand Shops, $160 • JULISKA SIDE DINNER PLATES, Ampersand Shops, $18 each

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Left ANTHROPOLOGIE GRANADA TUMBLER, $10 •

ANTHROPOLOGIE STAR CLUSTER WINE GLASS, $14 • ANTHROPOLOGIE ALPE DESSERT PLATE, $9.95 • CB2 MAJOR LARGE MUG, $4.95 • HENRY DEAN MARY VOTIVE HOLDER, The Foundry Home Goods, $22 • ANTHROPOLOGIE GRANADA JUICE GLASS, $10 • ANTHROPOLOGIE SANGRIA DOF GLASS, $12 • CB2 RUSH GOLD FLATWARE, $89.95 for 20-piece set • ANTHROPOLOGIE WATERFALL FLUTE, $16 • GOLD DISH, stylist’s own • ANNA NEW YORK FORMA CHEESE SPREADER, Martin Patrick 3, $250 for 3-piece set • HENRY DEAN HANDBLOWN COUPE GLASS, The Foundry Home Goods, $24 • GOLD DISH, stylist’s own • VINTAGE CHAMPAGNE GLASS, Victory, price upon request

Right FLOWERS, Indulge & Bloom, indulgeandbloom.com •

PITCHER, stylist’s own • LEON HAPPY SALADS, Barnes & Noble, barnesandnoble.com, $19.99 • GOOP CLEAN BEAUTY, Barnes & Noble, $30 • HEALTHYISH, Anthropologie, $29.99 • THE LOVE & LEMONS COOKBOOK, Anthropologie, $35 • IN THE GREEN KITCHEN, Barnes & Noble, $30 • MATCHA, Barnes & Noble, $25 • COOK BEAUTIFUL, Barnes & Noble, $35 • THE KINFOLK TABLE, Barnes & Noble, $35

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Trusted Tried True Spell Estate is committed to delivering exquisite expressions from great vineyards while embracing the integrity and beauty of the varietal. spellestate.com

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THIS YEAR’S RESORTWEAR COLLECTIONS ARE FULL-ON FLORAL, FRILLY AND HYPER-FEMININE.

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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY RUNWAY MANHATTAN/MONDADORI

IN FULL BLOOM


Left CAROLINA HERRERA Right DIANE VON FURSTENBERG • VICTORIA BECKHAM • OSCAR DE LA RENTA • VICTORIA BECKHAM

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Left CAROLINA HERRERA Right GIORGIO ARMANI • CAROLINA HERRERA

• CHANEL • CAROLINA HERRERA • DIANE VON FURSTENBERG • BLUMARINE

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Compass D E S T I N A T I O N

Southern Charmer THE GRAND BOHEMIAN CHARLESTON IS AN OASIS FOR WINE AFICIONADOS. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY GRAND BOHEMIAN CHARLESTON

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It doesn’t get more charming than Charleston, South Carolina. And the best spot from which to experience all of the city’s Southern comfort is hands down the Grand Bohemian Charleston. Part of the esteemed Kessler Collection, the art-driven boutique hotel has been a favorite among locals and travelers alike since its debut back in 2015. It’s ideally situated in the heart of the stately Historic District, within walking distance of landmarks, shopping and dining. The Grand Bohemian itself is a fully immersive artful experience. Its 50 opulent guest rooms feature bold, eclectically stylish furnishings. Tucked around literally every corner is unique original art from the likes of evocative painter Victor Wang and German neo-expressionist Peter Keil; some of it is straight from venerable hotelier Richard Kessler’s private collection. Patrons and collectors will also enjoy the expertly curated onsite gallery, which highlights artists of local, national and international renown with rotating exhibitions. Wine connoisseurs will feel right at home here. There’s the tasting room, with 32 options on tap, letting aficionados savor a variety of varietals. That lineup is also available up on the fourth floor at inspired eatery Élevé, which excellently pairs the vino (including the exceptional Kessler blend) with its modern American fare. The adjacent rooftop terrace offers plush, vibrant wingback chairs and lounging sofas, prime spots for relaxing while taking in the cityscape.

The ultimate oenophile experience, however, is the unique wine-blending class. It’s so unique, in fact, that the Grand Bohemian is the first standalone hotel to boast such an offering. It’s a thoroughly educational and downright enjoyable take on high-school chemistry. Sommelier and instructor Peter Demarest is as affable as he is knowledgeable. Weaving in wine facts and trivia, he shepherds participants through the process, which involves sampling, nibbling and finally mixing. The end product? A bottle of a one-of-a-kind blend complete with a customized label — a way to bring home a small yet incredibly meaningful token of the Grand Bohemian.

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GET CAUGHT UP ON CAPTIVA ISLAND.

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY SOUTH SEAS ISLAND RESORT

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Situated just off Florida’s Gulf Coast, Captiva Island is home to the 330-acre South Seas Island Resort. Once a key-lime plantation, this sunny snowbird destination today boasts breathtaking Homes of Distinction available for your enjoyment plus plenty of activities to fill your entire itinerary. Whether you’re seeking a relaxing escape or an adventurous expedition, South Seas has you covered.

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Compass I S L A N D

T E S T

T H E

WAT E R S

Learn how to water ski under the guidance of knowledgeable pros from the onsite Sunny Island Adventures. Before long, you’ll be navigating the gulf, exploring the area islands and admiring the architecture of the coastal homes. Next, give kayaking, parasailing or standup paddleboarding a try.

S AL U T E

T H E

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Located within the resort grounds, boutique studio Ambu Yoga offers an array of heated and non-heated classes as well as vinyasa flow right on the shores of South Beach. There’s simply no better place to salute the sun. Afterward, experience some of Captiva’s world-class shelling, with some 400 species washing up on the isle’s white-sand beaches. You’ll find the best selection in the morning.

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The resort is 2.5 miles long and the island 4 miles long, meaning you’ll need some means of transportation. You can rent a bicycle, grab a golf cart or catch a ride on one of the classic trolleys. Bicycling is the best way to take in the fresh sea air — and take a quick trip to Starbucks.

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“Watch for Manatee” signs line the docks surrounding the Yacht Harbour & Marina. Sip your morning coffee or an evening cocktail from the Crooked Snook Tiki Bar while waiting for these gentle giants to congregate at sunrise and sunset. During the day, snag one of the 17 luxe cabanas overlooking the ocean to watch the birds and dolphins make their way by.

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Jump aboard a catamaran and try your hand at sailing with a little help from the U.S. Sailing–certified instructors at Offshore Sailing School. If you’re a beginner, you’ll quite literally learn the ropes; if you’re more experienced, you might be enticed to do a little racing. Either way, you’ll have plenty of opportunities to admire the beauty of this small but mighty island.

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A Family Affair

SALVESTRIN WINERY’S VINES ARE DEEPLY ROOTED IN HISTORY.

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY SALVESTRIN WINERY

BY FRANK ROFFERS

It all started in the 1920s when John and Emma Salvestrin, immigrants from a small town in Northern Italy, became smitten with Napa Valley while visiting friends. In 1932, they purchased part of the historic Dr. Crane Vineyard and the Victorian home on property in St. Helena, California. When Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the Salvestrins started selling grapes to a re-emerging wine industry. They had a son, Ed, who grew up on the vineyard and went on to farm the land along with his wife, Susanne, for three decades, preserving a family legacy. Now in his eighties, Ed still resides on the property and can be seen driving vintage tractors, tending to his fruit trees and helping out in the vineyard. Ed’s son, Rich, earned a degree in viticulture from Fresno State in the late eighties and after college worked at prominent Napa Valley wineries. He eventually returned to the family vineyard and expanded the business to encompass winemaking. In 1994, Rich released the first vintage of Cabernet Sauvignon, a custom crush. Salvestrin is the only estate-grown and -bottled Dr. Crane vineyard wine. In 2001, Rich and his wife, Shannon, built a new winery on the estate marrying traditional Old World methods with state-of-the-art technology for the production of handcrafted Cabernet, Sangiovese, Petite Syrah and Sauvignon Blanc. The flagship is a collectible wine known as Three D Cabernet Sauvignon, made in honor of the couple’s three daughters, Emma, Hannah and Tessa. Several years ago, Rich realized the need to develop an affordable everyday drinking wine for a specific segment of the market. He sourced grapes from three prestigious regions and blended four varietals to create Cult, a handcrafted California Cabernet. It has achieved great success with merchants and restaurants looking to provide their customers with a fantastic wine at a fair price.

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Salvestrin farms all 26 of its acres according to organic guidelines and employs sustainable practices. The family is less concerned about achieving acclaim from critics or competitions and more passionate about making outstanding wines that pair beautifully with food. This is a rarity in todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wine world, with a landscape dominated by corporations and wealthy individuals pursuing pet projects. The 1879 Victorian home has been beautifully restored and now operates as the Inn at Salvestrin. Guests can enjoy the uncommon experience of staying on a working vineyard. The home has been awarded historic designation, and vintage photos prove that the dĂŠcor is reminiscent of turn-of-the-century interior design. Guest rooms boast modern luxuries and private bathrooms. Stays at the inn include complimentary wine tasting and continental breakfast. The prime location is within walking distance of St. Helena, known for its excellent dining and shopping. Visiting Salvestrin and drinking its vinos are authentic experiences that offer a glimpse into the remarkable history of four generations passionately producing world-class wine in Napa Valley.

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Building your new home is easier with the right financing in your plans Thinking about building a home? With a Citizens Construction-to-Permanent Mortgage Loan, you can start putting your plans into action. This special program lets you secure both the construction and permanent financing for your new home at a great fixed interest rate in one process through closing. It’s just one of the ways we’re working to be sure your home financing experience is as smooth and easy as possible. That’s what a good bank does.

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Compass E S C A P E

Paradise Found FOUR SEASONS RESORT BORA BORA IS A TROPICAL OASIS. B Y H AY L E Y S A U N D E R S

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY FOUR SEASONS BORA BORA, MOEAVA DE ROSEMONT, TREY RATCLIFF, BARBARA KRAFT

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Polynesia’s legendary hospitality is evident from the very moment you step off the plane on the island of Bora Bora. The Four Seasons staff greets you with a flower lei and chilled pineapple-infused water and escorts you onto a dedicated boat that whisks you away across the turquoise-blue waters to the idyllic property. The resort is set on a private motu in a beautiful lagoon surrounded by lush foliage and towering coconut palms — a true tropical oasis. The Four Seasons defines laid-back luxury. With 107 accommodations, vacationers have their choice of overwater bungalows or secluded beachfront villas. Guest quarters are made of volcanic stone and have thatched roofs, blending in seamlessly with their surroundings. Inside, you’ll find teak furniture, mother-of-pearl accents, traditional artwork and other décor inspired by local architecture. Bungalows are equipped with plush king beds, oversize soaking tubs and a seating area overlooking the lagoon; some even boast vistas of majestic Mount Otemanu. A private wooden deck beckons you outdoors, where you can take a dip in the South Pacific, snorkel amid colorful fish or simply enjoy the incredible views from your chaise lounge. Begin your morning with guided yoga or a tennis class. Spend the rest of the day lounging on the white-sand beach or in a poolside cabana or exploring the lagoon aboard complimentary kayaks and standup paddleboards. If you’re itching for more adventure, try the Jet-Ski tour, guided catamaran snorkel or on-land ATV tour. For a half-day excursion, board a private boat to take in the scene from the water. Thrill seekers can stop at various points to hand feed stingrays and snorkel above blacktip sharks. At the end of the day, unwind at the spa with the Polynesian massage, whose signature rituals blend essential oils and scrubs made with local ingredients. The resort features four exceptional eateries. Breakfast is served at open-air Tere Nui, which offers both buffet and à-la-carte options that do not disappoint. For a casual post-swim meal, head to seaside Faré Hoa and order the fresh catch of the day, the ceviche and the signature piña colada. Come sundown, sit at the bar at Sunset, take in the spectacular views with a glass of chilled Rosé in hand and look forward to another day in paradise.

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If You Go GETTING THERE Nonstop flights are available from Los Angeles to Papeete, Tahiti, on American Airlines and Air Tahiti Nui. From there, Bora Bora’s sole airport is a short 45-minute flight. WHEN TO GO High season runs May through October. The shoulder months of November and April are considered some of the best times to go, with fewer crowds and temperatures in the 70s. GETTING AROUND Bora Bora resorts are located on motus and are accessible only by boat. Each property has its own shuttle available for guests to access the mainland. Once there, the preferred methods of transportation for tourists are taxi, bicycle or scooter.


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GLOBAL CITIZEN EXPLORE JAPAN WITH ACCLAIMED CHEF JOHN SUGIMURA. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY 2ND TRUTH

Harmony, respect, purity and tranquility: These are the principles that guide Executive Chef and Partner John Sugimura in his craft at PinKU Japanese Street Food in Northeast Minneapolis. Half German and half Japanese, he grew up in the Twin Cities experiencing very little of his Japanese heritage. In part, no doubt, because of the pain surrounding it: His father and grandmother, a skilled cook and restaurateur herself, were incarcerated at Tule Lake internment camp for four and a half years. Every Christmas, three generations of relatives would gather, giving Sugimura a taste (really, an overdose, he says) of Japanese culture â&#x20AC;&#x201D; just enough to whet his appetite. And so Sugimura took it upon himself to learn the ways of his people, deciding for his most recent chapter in life to pursue professional culinary training under master sushi chef Katsuya Uechi. What brought him there was his fascination with how food can bring people together. He experienced that firsthand when he started making sushi for private gigs, afterward bringing


the scraps of leftover yellowtail to his father — something that, unbeknownst to him, Sugimura’s grandmother had done back in her restaurant days. This food experience opened up a new opportunity for an open dialogue, allowing the two to connect in ways they really hadn’t before. Sugimura’s first trip to Japan in 1998 was truly life-changing. He recalls how a hole-in-the-wall dumpling house in Kyoto shifted his perspective: “All of a sudden, every difference was now a celebration,” he says. “I couldn’t have been happier that I was Japanese American, that I was the one who helped my family adopt more Japanese rituals and recipes, that when I made my dad food he would be on the verge of bawling while reflecting back on experiences he literally hadn’t reflect upon for more than 70 years.” And so he was thrilled to create this eight-day Japan itinerary, with time split between metropolitan Tokyo and traditional Kyoto. “I’m obsessed with Japan — the food, culture, temples, technology, architecture,” Sugimura explains. “Every time I travel to Tokyo and Kyoto, I learn something new about my own culture, values and beliefs. These cities are so important to me because they taught me everything I know about my own culture and brought me enormous self-love, which is very important to living well. I hope that, with the help of these handpicked recommendations, you too fall in love with Japan on your first trip there.”

D AY O N E Arrive midday on a Tuesday at Tokyo’s Haneda Airport via a Delta Air Lines nonstop flight from Minneapolis to help minimize fatigue and jet lag. Take the Keikyu Line to the Shimbashi Station, which is just a short walk from your hotel. Check in at B Tokyo Shimbashi, which opened late last year, puts you right at the center of the city and is one of the few hotels where you can catch a cab without setting foot outside. Hotel employees speak both Japanese and English, plus there’s a daily breakfast buffet. Settle in and take a nap. If you’re hungry, head to Torishiki, which takes the art of yakitori (simple grilled meat) to a whole new level. Return to the hotel and rest up for the big day ahead.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY COWARDLION/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, SEANPAVONEPHOTO/ISTOCK.COM

D AY T W O Take a cab over to the Tsukiji Fish Market ticket counter at 1 a.m. to wait in line to get your vest that grants you entry into the market. Just 120 vests are given out, divided into two groups (green and yellow). Afterward, head to nearby café Jonathan’s, which serves Japanese and Western cuisine 24 hours a day, for some nourishment while you wait. At 3:30 a.m., get in line to enter the market for a self-guided tour. Don’t miss the 5:30 a.m. auction, where top international chefs and restaurants outbid each other for the world’s best fish. (I once saw a 600-pound tuna go for $165,000!) Next, move to the outer market for all the fish samples and street food you could ever want. Once you’ve had your fill, retreat to your hotel to rest until early afternoon. When you’re sufficiently rejuvenated, take a cab to Senso-ji, Tokyo’s oldest Buddhist temple. This is where locals and visitors alike come to eat, pray and shop. Marvel at its glory, participate in the incense ritual if you’re so inclined then stroll through the surrounding neighborhood, which is packed with stalls selling everything from food to souvenirs. If you’re craving a more substantial meal, make your way to the two-level depachika (food hall) at Ginza Mitsukoshi, the city’s longest surviving department store. Eat anything and everything your heart desires, from sushi and noodles to smoothies and pastries. While you’re in Ginza, take advantage of the world-class shopping at Ginza Six, a luxury shopping mecca that opened last year. Get inspired by the art that surrounds you and pick out some gifts to send back home. Not quite ready to call it a night? On your walk home, stop at a late-night izakaya to enjoy a craft beer and some people watching.

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D AY T H R E E Grab breakfast then head to the love statue at Shinjuku I-Land Tower, the meeting spot for your immersive, all-day excursion with Japan Panoramic Tours aboard a luxury coach. (Insider tip: Book your ticket at least 21 days in advance.) See the city’s top attractions, meet other tourists and relax in comfort. If you didn’t satisfy your shopping fix yesterday, return to Ginza. Check out iconic boutique Wako for luxury wares, 100-year-old specialty stationery store Itoya for unique paper goods, the 11-story Uniqlo flagship store for affordable travel basics and the Muji flagship shop in nearby Yurakucho for everything from apparel to home goods. And don’t miss the iconic Japanese experience just outside Wako at Ginza 4-chome intersection. You can’t leave Tokyo without having the best ramen in town. For dinner, go to Afuri, my personal favorite. Order at least three to enjoy in combination; I recommend the seasonal vegan ramen, the shoyu ramen, the nitamago and the kara-tsuyu tsukemen.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY PICTURE CELLS/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, SHIHINA/ISTOCK.COM

The time has come to leave Tokyo and move on to Kyoto. After grabbing breakfast at one of the many eateries surrounding the hotel, take a cab to Tokyo Station, where you’ll activate your Japan Rail Pass. (Insider tip: Purchase your JR Pass online before your trip.) Book tickets for both your journey to Kyoto and your return to Tokyo, making sure to get a reserved seat both ways. Take a late-morning train so you arrive in Kyoto in early afternoon. Along the way, enjoy views of Mount Fuji and save your appetite for what’s to come. (Insider tip: Even if you’re an adventurer, don’t plan to climb Fuji on your first visit to Japan; it requires too much time, training and recovery, and overshadows the trip.) When you arrive at Kyoto Station, a major Japanese travel hub and one of the country’s largest buildings, you’ll realize why you didn’t want to waste your appetite. Up on the 10th floor is Kyoto Ramen Street, a corridor offering eight different ramen shops representing eight different regional varieties. Take a cab to APA Hotel Kyoto Gion, your home base for the next few days. It’s all about location, location, location at this hotel, which is within walking distance of major attractions and also boasts a bonus in-house Starbucks. After you’ve had a chance to get settled, explore the neighborhood. Gion is one of the best known geiko (geisha) districts and is home to restaurants and teahouses that date back several centuries. Consider taking the affordable yet informative Viator Gion Walking Tour by Night to become acquainted with this historical district. Walk to the Higashiyama District to take in the amazing architecture, let the kids have some hands-on fun, and savor traditional small bites and matcha soft-serve ice cream. And don’t miss the Starbucks located in what was once a traditional teahouse. Around dusk, take the Viator Rickshaw Tour for a customizable journey through the streets of Kyoto with an affable guide. (Insider intel: Rickshaws can accommodate a maximum of two adults, and tours last from 30 minutes to three hours.) Take in the wonder that is Kiyomizu-dera Temple, one of the country’s signature UNESCO World Heritage Sites and an absolute must-see. Enjoy the beautiful gardens and the Otowa Waterfall. Have dinner at one of the many traditional cafés near the temple before returning to the hotel.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY B&M NOSKOWSKI/ISTOCK.COM, PICTUREPARTNERS/ISTOCK.COM

If You Go WHEN TO GO Late spring (March to May) and late autumn (September to November) are generally the best times to visit Japan, when skies are clear and temperatures are mild. What’s more, the delicate cherry blossoms of spring and the vivid hues of autumn foliage are visually stunning. WHAT TO PACK Self-service laundry in Japan is easy but time-consuming: The washer and dryer are combined into one machine that takes upward of three hours per load. The good news is that you can secure the machine with a password to eliminate the threat of theft. To avoid the issue altogether, pack light and plan to hand wash clothes and to supplement along the way. Also, bring or buy a collapsible bag for keepsakes and souvenirs for the plane ride home.

D AY F I V E Rise as early as possible and get your caffeine fix at the in-house Starbucks. Head to the 400-year-old Nishiki Market for the day for hands-on shopping, edible souvenirs, visual displays and cooking demos. When your stomach starts rumbling, get on the wait list for lunch at Sushi Shin, a small sushi bar in the heart of the market. Once you’re properly nourished, head back into the crowds to shop at Aritsugu for those requisite Japanese knives, Ichihara Heibei Shoten for unique chopsticks and Ochanoko Saisai for custom spice blends. If you’ve worked up an appetite, try nearby Bake Cheese Tart, Chao Chao Gyoza or Ippudo Ramen. Around dusk, take a walk along the Kamogawa (duck river), which runs throughout Kyoto Prefecture. Afterward, explore Pontocho, a narrow, atmospheric alley packed with restaurants of all sorts, making a mental note of where you’d like to return in the days ahead.

GETTING AROUND Much has been made of the Japan Rail Pass for tourists. For about $250, you get a pass that grants you access to any JR line in the country for seven days, including several high-speed Shinkansen trains. When navigating the city, I recommend walking or taking a cab; Japan is very safe and using the GPS on your phone is foolproof. WHAT TO KNOW Outside Tokyo, Japan is a cash-based society. Many stores simply aren’t equipped to take credit cards and usually have a sign out front on the rare occasion that they do. Also, because everything from one to 500 yen (about $5) is coins, I highly recommend bringing a coin purse. After realizing how often I took mine out, I wasn’t surprise to see them for sale at all the tourist shops.

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D AY S I X

D AY S E V E N Make your way out for another half day of sightseeing. This time check out Fushimi Inari Taisha, the head shrine of the god Inari that sits at the base of the mountain of the same name. Marvel at the hundreds of orange gates leading to it, visit the many smaller shrines and enjoy some of the area street food. Next up on the itinerary is UNESCO World Heritage Site Nijo Castle, a preserved fortress boasting interesting history, incredible infrastructure and beautiful gardens right in the heart of Kyoto. Do any final shopping at Teramachi Street, a covered arcade with shops peddling anything you could want: apparel, accessories, food, games and the like. If you still haven’t found that perfect gift, head to chic Kyoto BAL for stylish souvenirs. Stay for lunch at Café & Meal Muji. Head back to the hotel to pack up, along the way stopping at any shops or sites that need revisiting. For dinner, return to Pontocho. If you’re craving something different, try Pizza Salvatore Cuomo & Grill for delectable Italian food and excellent river views.

D AY E I G H T Meet at Starbucks to head to Kyoto Station for your midmorning return train ride to Tokyo. From Tokyo Station, take the Keikyu Line to Haneda Airport for your midafternoon flight back to the States.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN PAVON/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, COWARDLION/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM, KY CHO/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

Embark on a half day of sightseeing. Take a bus to Kinkaku-ji (Temple of the Golden Pavilion), one of Japan’s most popular temples, boasting a tea garden, several prayer stations, gift shops and more. (Insider intel: Family legend has it that my ancestor was the architect of the original pavilion back in the 1400s.) Next, make your way to Sagano Bamboo Forest to walk the paths, take a family rickshaw ride and just get out in the fresh air. Plan plenty of time for picture taking in this natural paradise. For lunch, head to the Ritz-Carlton, Kyoto, between 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. to take advantage of the à-la-carte menu between meal services. There’s an informality during this time, so no sports coat is required, plus it’s typically pretty quiet, meaning the guest-to-staff ratio will be in your favor. Everything here exceeds expectations, from the tempura to the sesame salad. Kyoto has a wealth of museums, among them Kyoto National Museum, the Japan Kanji Museum & Library, and the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto. Choose one to visit as you make your way back to Pontocho for dinner at one of the many restaurants you eyed yesterday before ultimately retreating to your hotel.


Show

Craft like you’ve never seen before

ST. PAUL APRIL 20 – 22

ST. PAUL RIVERCENTRE

2018

Join us for three days of festivities celebrating all things handmade at the American Craft Show in St. Paul. Experience how local designers and stylists put craft in context as you shop more than 230 of the country’s top contemporary jewelry, clothing, furniture, and home décor artists who make exquisite, one-of-a-kind pieces you won’t find elsewhere.

craftcouncil.org/stpaul

Pictured: Designer Sally Wheaton-Hushcha and artist Leon Hushcha Featured ACC artist pieces: table by John Andrew, glass vessels by Fred Kaemmer, scarf by Laura Hunter, and brooch by Judith Kinghorn Wardrobe stylist: Christina Fortier Photo: Joseph D.R. OLeary, Veto Design


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Restrictions apply; registration required prior to flight. Visit flexperks.com/gogo for more information or log in to the FlexPerks PromoSite at flexperkspromos.usbank.com for eligibility details, to register and for full terms and conditions. The creditor and issuer of the FlexPerks Visa Card is U.S. Bank National Association, pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A., Inc. The Card is available to U.S. residents only. U.S. Bank National Association reserves the right to change Card benefits at any time. Use of the FlexPerks Visa Card is subject to the terms and conditions of the FlexPerks Visa Cardmember Agreement, which may be amended from time to time. Š2018 U.S. Bank 180078c 1/18


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TO UR

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IN GOOD TASTE The chefs at Milwaukee’s EsterEv serve up pure inspiration. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

ST AY

THE DARK HORSE Hotel Donaldson bucks any Fargo assumptions. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY HOTEL DONALDSON, HUGE GALDONES

Hotel Donaldson is a long way from Fargo. The film, that is. In terms of the North Dakota city, it sits right in the heart of the revitalized downtown. In fact, the acclaimed hotel has been a driving force of the area’s renaissance since its debut back in 2003. Since then, it’s grabbed the attention of critics and travelers alike, often contradicting their assumptions about its humble home state. Originally constructed in 1893, the structure was one of the first erected after a fire destroyed much of the downtown area. By the 1910s, it officially became Hotel Donaldson. Though the building changed hands several times throughout its history, it always maintained its name. It fell into disrepair and was serving as a flophouse when entrepreneur Karen Stoker purchased the property in 2000. What followed were three years of painstaking renovation to restore the interior spaces yet preserve the original structural elements. Today, the boutique hotel boasts 17 well-appointed guest rooms, each featuring original works from a local or regional artist. Visitors can enjoy the lounge, the rooftop garden and hot tub, and special touches like the daily wine and cheese hour and the delivery of a basket of artisan pastries right to their door each morning. Of particular interest is the award-winning HoDo Restaurant, which has received the coveted Four-Diamond rating by AAA (the only one in the state). Here, creative cuisine and unparalleled service intersect. The menu is broken down by origin of ingredients: from the garden, from the pasture, from the water and the like. It’s a subtle nod to the fact that this world-class eatery is situated in the all too often overlooked breadbasket of America. Hotel Donaldson, 101 Broadway N., Fargo, North Dakota, 701-478-1000, hoteldonaldson.com

Situated inside Milwaukee’s DanDan eatery (more on that later), EsterEv is a fine-dining establishment offering a 10-course tasting menu that draws upon global influences. The restaurant-within-a-restaurant seats 20 and serves one dinner seating Friday and Saturday. Chances are it’ll be tough to get a reservation for the foreseeable future given that owners Dan Jacobs and Dan Van Rite were recently named James Beard Award semi-finalists for Best Chef: Midwest. EsterEv opened in 2016 and takes its name from Jacobs’ great grandmother Ester and Van Rite’s grandmother Evelyn, “women who had a spark of joy about them and a passion for cooking for their loved ones.” That passion lives on today and is evident in dishes like the lobster with pear, tarragon and hemp seed and the kielbasa with corn waffle, sauerkraut and mustard. New this year is a dinner series with visiting chefs like Bradley Day of Minneapolis’s Tullibee, Ryan McCaskey of Chicago’s Acadia, and Alex Seidel of Denver’s Fruition and Mercantile. Back to DanDan. Its name has two meanings: first as an obvious nod to the Sichuan noodle dish and second as a less-obvious nod to “two guys named Dan who grew up eating Chinese food and love cooking it.” On offer are fresh takes on beloved classics, such as schmaltz fried rice, General Tso’s cauliflower and the over-the-top three-course Peking duck service. Between EsterEv and DanDan, there’s plenty of reason to visit Milwaukee’s Third Ward neighborhood. EsterEv, 360 E. Erie St., Milwaukee, 414-488-8036, esterev.com


THE NORTH SH OP

SUSTAINABLE CHIC Hazel & Rose is on a mission to revamp retail. B Y K AT E N E L S O N

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ATHENA PELTON

When Emma Olson founded Hazel & Rose in 2016, she was on a mission to create a destination for shoppers looking to be more thoughtful with their purchases, an opportunity to support sustainable and ethical fashion houses without sacrificing on style. Two years later, it’s safe to say she’s succeeded in that endeavor. Today, Olson has co-owner Bobbi Barron by her side, and together they continue to blaze trails in the Twin Cities retail scene. Their Northeast Minneapolis boutique features women’s clothing, accessories and skincare always from brands that align with the aforementioned intention. Exclusive lines include Esby, Kordal, Megan Huntz, Carla Colour sunglasses and The Stowe handbags, among others. (Bonus for busy fashionistas: Hazel & Rose has a robust online shop.) The duo added vintage clothing to the store’s wares last fall, and they’re actively looking to bring in more plus-size options. In fact, they’re working closely with clothiers Wray, Winsome and Megan Huntz to help these brands introduce plus-size offerings, which will debut at Hazel & Rose. On top of that, Olson and Barron plan to start representing fashion designers looking to break into the industry and also have a podcast about being female business owners in the works. Hazel & Rose, 945 Broadway St. NE, No. 220, Minneapolis, 612-788-4178, shophazelandrose.com

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Compass T O U R

NEW YORK TO UR

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The Whitby Hotel is as fashionable as it is playful. BY W E N DY L U B OV I C H

With the success of the beloved Crosby Street Hotel in SoHo, it was only a matter of time before Firmdale Hotels opened a second New York property, this one right in the heart of Midtown. Think of the Whitby as a younger sister to the Crosby, one with a killer fashion sense and just the right amount of playfulness. All 86 rooms were individually designed by Kit Kemp, who with her husband owns 10 Firmdale outposts. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s known for her colorful, carefree way of arranging spaces that are fun and memorable. Guest quarters feature inspired pattern mixes and thoughtfully placed antiques. Floor-to-ceiling windows allow for plenty of natural light, and some rooms even boast outdoor terraces. Bathrooms are designed in granite or marble, and all suites offer a freestanding tub. The Whitby Bar is the perfect place to meet for drinks. Its hand-hewn pewter bar sets off the striking wall behind it, and above hang 52 baskets collected from all over the world. Onsite eatery the Orangery, with its soothing pink hue, is light-filled during the day and candle-lit at night. The design highlight here is the massive wall of illuminated porcelain vessels, each etched with a different New York landmark. The Whitby Hotel, 18 W. 56th St., New York, 212-586-5656, firmdalehotels.com

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Magazine of the North

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY THE WHITBY

ECLECTIC INN


PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY ANDREW ROWAT, THE GRILL

NEW YORK DI NE

GOLDEN AGE GLORY The city’s most stunning dining room reopens. BY FRANK ROFFERS

American dining institution the Grill has made its glorious return after a $30-million makeover. Formerly the Four Seasons Grill Room, it was once considered the most esteemed dining room in the city and served as the precursor to the New York steakhouse. It’s where the power lunch was born, with every table occupied daily by celebrities, politicians and media icons. The incredible architecture and design are worth seeing. Philip Johnson’s dramatic interior has been beautifully restored, with its landmark elements back and better than ever. The space features walnut walls, two-story windows and polished beaded curtain chains that ripple upward in endless waves, creating the sensation of a waterfall running in reverse. And Richard Lippold’s dangling bronze rod sculpture continues to hold court over the perfectly square wooden bar. The Grill has successfully transformed formal dining into pure theater. Patrons can expect tuxedoed waiters with rolling carts, tableside service, and over-the-top cuisine from steaks to chops to poultry. The Grill is a thrill, especially when someone else is footing the bill. The Grill, 99 E. 52nd St., New York, 212-375-9001, thegrillnewyork.com

SH OP

EYE CANDY The Webster elevates shopping to an art form. BY W E N DY L U B OV I C H

There’s a fresh take on shopping in SoHo with the debut of six-story townhouse-as-boutique The Webster. Having opened four other outposts across the country, founder Laure Hériard Dubreuil decided this time to marry high-end clothing with upscale home furnishings. You can walk in and pick out a dress while scoring that midcentury light fixture at the same time. It’s all about design in its many layered forms. Laid out like a stylish apartment, each floor features a curated selection of clothing surrounded by exquisite art and furniture. Women’s fashions showcase designers like Chloé, Valentino, Sonia Rykiel and The Row, while men’s wares highlight Raf Simons and Saint Laurent. Each piece is carefully chosen and undeniably covetable. The best part: Nearly everything you see is for sale. You’ll find French 1950s sconces along with vintage 1930s wallpaper. You can even buy the art right off the wall. Plush velvet seating is found on every level, and the second story boasts a glorious skylight. It’s a handsome place to take a break from the frenetic SoHo streets and enjoy shopping as an art form. The Webster, 29 Greene St., New York, 212-226-1260, thewebster.us

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LOS ANGELES

Compass T O U R

TO UR

SH OP

FREE AS A BIRD A New York boutique gets a West Coast outpost. BY MARGUERITE HAPPE

Culver City infallibly provides a welcome home for new shops looking to carve out a niche for themselves in an approachable part of town. One of these is Bird, a Brooklyn, New York–based boutique with an accumulating cult following renowned for its keen trend sense and its exciting curatorial approach. Honed by its founder, Jen Mankins, the brand opened its first West Coast outpost last year, during a season when stores were more apt to close than to open. Historians will love the boutique’s delightful locale in a brick building that once housed a bookbindery. Skylights flooding the space in natural light, hand-crafted shelves made from Douglas fir and an outdoor cactus garden are not-so-gentle reminders that we’re not in New York anymore. The products here run the gamut from high to low: $1,000 handbags sit next to $15 accessories. Beloved brands like Rachel Comey and Isabel Marant complement new finds and indie discoveries. Bird represents the type of store that will continue to thrive in the age of Amazon: thoughtful, purposeful and with a story to tell. Bird Brooklyn, 8870 Washington Blvd., Culver City, 310-596-4200, birdbrooklyn.com

ST AY

RED HOT BY MARGUERITE HAPPE

There’s no area of the city quite like downtown these days. Highly anticipated shops, restaurants, galleries and apartments are part of what contractors are calling the heaviest period of construction since the nineties. Slightly outside the chaos is the Ritz-Carlton, Los Angeles’ only incarnation of the household name. Built in 2010, the hotel anticipated the value of its location in a serious way, and today it sits smack dab in the middle of one of the most up-and-coming spots on the West Coast. The Ritz-Carlton has developed programming and amenities to capitalize on its status as a hot spot. Come summer, the Supper + Show Series up on the rooftop boasts classic films, festive libations and catering by in-house eatery WP24 by Wolfgang Puck. The spa’s “working lunch” package, a favorite among locals, includes express treatments like the Rush Hour massage. Not to be overshadowed, of course, are the plush guest rooms, the striking rooftop pool and the elegant lounge. Location may be everything, but an extraordinary in-house experience certainly doesn’t hurt. The Ritz-Carlton, 900 W. Olympic Blvd., Los Angeles, 213-743-8800, ritzcarlton.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY JESSICA ANTOLA, RITZ-CARLTON, L.A. LIVE

The Ritz-Carlton leverages its prime downtown locale.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY SIERRA PRESCOTT

LOS ANGELES

DI NE

BY DESIGN Otium offers an artful dining experience. BY MARGUERITE HAPPE

When a restaurant melds of-the-moment design with mesmerizing cuisine, the result is a truly extraordinary dining experience. Otium does so, but with the enhanced artistic panache culled from a close proximity to the next-door Broad. The museum itself is not to be missed: Collectors Eli and Edythe Broad paved the way for one of the most significant contemporary art institutions in the country, with works from Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Jean-Michel Basquiat and the like on display. After perusing the world-class collections, museum goers can stroll over to Timothy Hollingsworth’s vibrant restaurant. The exterior is a work of art in itself: Glass, steel, stone, wood, copper and ceramic complement the nautical Damien Hirst mural and the sweeping structural lines. Hollingsworth prides himself on crafting cuisine with approachable elegance. The result is a selection of fare sans intimidation but with significant creativity and an impressive alignment with the wine pairings, which are curated by the expert team of sommeliers. Diners will swoon over the octopus with mole and pepitas as well as the Ōra King salmon with tataki, avocado, chicharron and yuzu. It’s safe to say that Hollingsworth has created a masterpiece. Otium, 222 S. Hope St., Los Angeles, 213-935-8500, otiumla.com

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Compass T O U R

CHICAGO TO UR

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY RITZ-CARLTON, CHICAGO

ST AY

RITZY RESURRECTION Marriott brings a grand dame back to life. BY AMBER GIBSON

You won’t even recognize the Ritz-Carlton after its multimillion-dollar renovation. All 90 suites were refashioned, and the indoor water fountain has been replaced by a blue glass floating sculpture inspired by Lake Michigan. Gray marble columns and metal partitions pay homage to Chicago’s architecture. The hotel now boasts the city’s largest luxury ballroom, and the spa received a facelift, too. The Indulgent Drench body massage includes reflexology and a scalp massage for head-to-toe relaxation. Previously, under Four Seasons management, there was no club lounge. Now, the Ritz-Carlton rivals the Langham for the nicest lounge in town, with four enticing daily culinary presentations accompanied by city and lake views. Hors d’oeuvres might include juicy chicken skewers or spanakopita, and dessert always involves chocolate fondue. Just don’t spoil your appetite for dinner at Torali, the onsite modern Italian steakhouse. Broiled Maine lobster is painted with uni butter, and perfectly cooked fillets are served with lardo pesto and black truffle garlic butter. The eatery also delivers an exceptional breakfast in bed. There’s no more relaxing way to start your day than noshing on Sicilian scrambled eggs with eggplant, tomato and Parmesan in your bathrobe in a lakeside suite. The Ritz-Carlton, 160 E. Pearson St., Chicago, 312-266-1000, ritzcarlton.com

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CHICAGO DI NE

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SEAFOOD SPLENDOR

OBJECTS OF DESIRE

Nautical chic Portsmith serves up a touch of whimsy.

Cool Oklahoma cuffs make their Windy City debut. BY AMBER GIBSON

BY AMBER GIBSON

When Oklahoma-based Rustic Cuff opened its Chicago showroom last fall in iconic Water Tower Place, an excited troop of loyal fans road-tripped from Tulsa to celebrate with designer and founder Jill Donovan. She greeted guests warmly, spontaneously taking the silver cuff off her wrist to give to one lucky young woman. She was a creative law professor in a past life before she turned her part-time jewelry-making hobby into a full-time business. Her bracelets have an apparent cult following, and the glittering new Gold Coast store will surely lure in new converts. Rustic Cuff is known for its customized approach to jewelry, making accessorizing a means of personal expression. The eclectic array on offer varies tremendously in price, design and aesthetic. Simple bracelets, meant to be layered, start at $25, while more complex, limited-edition pieces with gemstones, hammered metal and exotic skins cost several hundreds of dollars. The signature collections are most impressive, inspired by exotic tropical destinations with an Ancient Greek feel. The line has expanded into clothing, suede handbags and other accessories, all stamped with Rustic Cuff’s cross logo. There’s even a commemorative-edition Monopoly board game where the object is to collect cuffs and visit showroom locations. Rustic Cuff, 835 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 918-804-8404, rusticcuff.com

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY PORTSMITH, RUSTIC CUFF

Chicago boasts plenty of solid seafood eateries despite being hundreds of miles from the ocean. But none have the imagination of Portsmith, the Fifty/50 Restaurant Group’s fine-dining establishment at Dana Hotel. Purists will approve of the raw and lightly cooked offerings, including a charred shrimp cocktail and hamachi crudo with umeboshi. Executive Pastry Chef Chris Teixeira delivers the best bread service in town; housemade rosemary butter melts into warm squid-ink ciabatta, and black garlic butter sweetens bonito-flake sourdough. For a seafood restaurant, there’s a surprising abundance of foie gras, too. It’s shaved over oysters, paired with a donut in a sweet and savory appetizer, and served seared alongside an ahi tuna steak topped with Luxardo bordelaise sauce. After rich entrées, a jeweled clamshell arrives with a palate cleanser, an elegant prelude heightening anticipation for dessert. Even sweets have a seafaring theme, all inspired by popular international ports of call. Cuba, for instance, is embodied by a baba au rhum cake with compressed pineapple and tobacco ice cream. Diners are invited to inject the cake themselves with a squirt of rum. Here, interactivity and novelty are backed up by undeniably delicious food. Portsmith, 660 N. State St., Chicago, 312-202-6050, portsmithchicago.com

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Builder Preview

On the fifth annual Artisan Home Tour, you�ll see homes designed and constructed by more than 25 of the region�s most exceptional homebuilders and remodelers. These incredible residences combine artistic vision with impeccable craftsmanship—and do it perfectly. And, of course, they�ll feature the latest trends, products, finishes and colors that are sure to inspire.

glimpse of some of their previous projects on the following pages.

JUNE 8-10, 15-17, 22-24, 2018 ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

STONEWOOD, L LC | L A NDMA R K PHOTOG RA PHY

Learn more about our Artisan builders and remodelers and catch a


MEET THE BUILDERS

ASPECT DESIGN BUILD, LLC Tom Preissing & Shaun Winkler

“We are a personal, relationship-driven builder that takes pride in delivering a home tailored to our client�s vision through a collaborative and transparent design-build process.”

BOHLAND HOMES Kassi Mihm, Steve Bohl, Steve Prickett & Mallory Busacker

“Our goal isn�t just to be an industry leader, but to successfully interpret the vision of our valued clients through our design, build, and project completion of their luxury custom home.”

CHARLES CUDD CO., LLC Rick Denman, Charles Cudd, & John Sonnek

“We offer a deeply committed team of experienced architectural design/build professionals that consistently delivers a superior custom home experience through a disciplined process for our discerning homeowners.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

CITY HOMES, LLC Rebecca Remick & Chris Malooly

“We always strive to exceed our clients� expectations by only working with the best architects, designers, suppliers and subcontractors to deliver the highest quality custom home, giving our clients only the best.”

CUSTOM ONE HOMES Todd Polifka

“We proudly build distinctive homes in the Twin Cities� most sought-after neighborhoods, but our central purpose is caring for our clients. Respect is the foundation that guides us. We are intentional about valuing your time, stewarding your resources, and protecting your investment.”

DENALI CUSTOM HOMES, INC. David Bieker

“Denali delivers a personal guided experience through the entire building process utilizing two generations of knowledge and artistic creativity. Our team of highly skilled and talented artisans crafts one-of-a-kind, uniquely different homes that are a true reflection of the client�s personality.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

D E TA I L H O M E S , I N C . Chris Van Klei & Ben Richter Corey Gaffer Photography

“Our passion can be seen in every detail of our projects, from design to construction to the relationship we build together throughout the process. This is the formula for how a truly spectacular home is achieved.”

Corey Gaffer Photography

E L E VA T I O N H O M E S Bill Costello Paul Crosby Photography

“We offer our clients trusted guidance and the ability to translate their unique project vision with an approach that is rewarding and fun.”

Troy Thies Photography

GORDON JAMES CONSTRUCTION, INC. John Quinlivan & Joe McPherson Landmark Photography

“We deliver exceptional quality and service to each of our clients. Our team is dedicated to bringing your ideas and vision to life. You dream. We deliver.”

Landmark Photography

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

G R E AT N E I G H B O R H O O D HOMES, INC. Margaret & Scott Busyn Landmark Photography

“We are a small firm focused on designing and building the home of your dreams in your favorite old neighborhood. Our boutique approach and detailed craftsmanship create a one-of-a-kind home that fits the lifestyle of your family. In-house design resources provide a build process that is simple and fun.”

Parade Craze

HAGE HOMES Kerry & Kate Hage

“Building exceptional homes is in our DNA; Hage Homes has been doing it for nearly 40 years. As a second generation builder, we carry on the tradition as a boutique firm and build only a select number of homes so that, as owners, we are highly engaged in every project.”

Peterssen/Keller Architecture ©Spacecrafting

Charlie & Co. Design Corey Gaffer Photography

JOHN KRAEMER & SONS, INC. Gary, John & Jeff Kraemer

“Our 40 continuous years in business, impeccable reputation, and financial stability give our clients peace of mind. As Minnesota�s only four-time Builder of the Year, we strive to go above and beyond to ensure we exceed the expectations of all our clients.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

KOOTENIA HOMES Steven & David Frosch

“At Kootenia Homes, we meticulously combine quality materials and superior design to create the home of your dreams. Every house is a partnership between homeowner and builder.”

KROISS DEVELOPMENT, INC. Todd Simning ©Spacecrafting

“With 29 years of industry experience, we�ve shaped our business philosophy around four core principles: integrity, honesty, transparency and empowerment. Staying true to these principles has allowed us to gain a loyal base of clients who are confident referring us to their friends and family.”

©Spacecrafting

M I C H A E L PA U L DESIGN + BUILD Michael Laumann & Tara LaRosa

“Our personal, hands-on building style with a designer�s eye for detail includes vintage inspiration to create livable homes beautifully blending modern and traditional design.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

NARR CONSTRUCTION, INC. Greg & Karen Narr

“For more than 50 years, we�ve brought a collaborative approach to building fine homes for your family.”

NOR-SON CUSTOM BUILDERS Matt Holmstrom, Andy Anderson & Eddie Near Scott Amundson Photography

“Celebrating 40 years, we attribute much of our success to our employees. They always hold our clients� best interests before, during and after the entire construction process.”

Scott Amundson Photography

PILLAR HOMES PA R T N E R , I N C . KC Chermak

“Our clients are thrilled to see their ideas brought to life during our unique and creative design process and to then watch our efforts transform their dream into a reality. We passionately focus on personalized design and function to reflect the vision of each client.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

STONEWOOD, LLC Sven Gustafson

“We understand that the experience of building a home is as important as the end product. We�re trusted by our clients to deliver on our promises.”

S U S TA I N A B L E 9 DESIGN + BUILD Ryan & Chad Hanson Landmark Photography

“We provide a unique blend of modern style and our signature stamp of sustainability that inspires our clients to create breathtaking dream homes.”

Landmark Photography

S WA N S O N H O M E S Curt Swanson

Landmark Photography

©Spacecrafting

“Inspiring and serving as a trusted partner to our clients has been our passion for over 60 years. Our novel approach allows us to effectively synchronize all involved from start to finish, turning visions into reality.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE BUILDERS

WOODDALE BUILDERS, INC. Steve Schwieters

“Constant communication, a hands-on approach and attention to detail are the keys to building client satisfaction.”

MEET THE REMODELERS

THE HOUSE DRESSING C O M P A N Y, I N C . Terry & Tim Hughes

“At HDC, we consider ourselves Personal Contractors. We relish the artistic process and sweat the details. On time. On budget. Every last detail accounted for. Your vision realized�”

ISPIRI, LLC Jason Fabio

©Spacecrafting

©Spacecrafting

“We strive to deliver inspired designs, detailed craftsmanship and lasting impressions on every project … our focus on the client experience is paramount to the entire process.”

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


MEET THE REMODELERS

REVISION, LLC John Daly ©Spacecrafting

“Each project is a reflection of the very core of the client—we renovate their home, not just a house.”

©Spacecrafting

SICORA, INC. Ron Sonnek

“Transforming the houses of yesterday into the homes of tomorrow.”

STREETER & A S S O C I AT E S , I N C . Bob Near

“An elevated, artisanal approach is the true hallmark of Streeter Renovation. We ensure that our clients� investments in architectural designs are executed and built by a firm of equal expertise and creativity.”

Karen Melvin

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


GRANDMASTER SPONSORS

Like our exceptional builders and remodelers, these companies provide the highest caliber home products and services. We thank them for their commitment to excellence and support of the Artisan Home Tour.

Wells Fargo Home Mortgage’s Private Mortgage Banking division is your full-service source dedicated to serving the needs of affluent clients which may include complex income or asset management situations. Discover how our selection of home financing options and our exceptional service enable us to deliver the unrivaled experience you deserve including: •

Competitive financing options for primary, second, vacation, and investment properties

A full range of fixed - and adjustable - rate options and larger (jumbo) loans available

Full-service, dedicated source for buyers with complex income or asset management situations

Highly seasoned and dedicated sales team with credit insight and access to the highest level underwriters

Post-closing amenities, including a dedicated service line exclusive to Private Mortgage Banking customers

Local market experience to help you find options that complement your wealth building strategies

Shaw/Stewart Lumber Company has been providing quality products, creative custom solutions and responsive service to their customers since 1886. They serve luxury home builders and remodelers as well as commercial contractors in the Minneapolis/St. Paul market and surrounding area. As a new home buyer or remodeling customer, you can depend on Shaw/Stewart to have the back of your builder or remodeler. And when you’re ready to select windows, doors and cabinetry, you’re invited to meander through the Marvin Design Gallery and confer with the professional design staff. You’ll see the latest offerings from Marvin Windows and Doors in a series of more than 65 window and door displays. Each of the displays features a variety of compatible cabinetry styles, all designed to help you imagine the possibilities for your own home. Visit them online at ShawStewartLumberCo.com

Whatever your home financing goals may be, we are here to help you — with options and service that meet a sophisticated level of needs and preferences. Please visit our local Private Mortgage Banking teams online: www.wfhm.com/Bloomington/Index-Branch.page or www.wfhm.com/ WellsFargoHomeMortgageEdinaBranchMN

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


JOURNEYMAN SPONSORS

Every home deserves the authentic design and uncompromising performance of James Hardie® siding and trim. Over six million homeowners worldwide have chosen James Hardie to achieve instant curb appeal and lasting character.

Whether you’re renovating an outdated bathroom or designing your dream kitchen, Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery can help. Their state-of-the-art showrooms are stocked with beautifully displayed products in a welcoming, hands-on environment where you can see, touch and experience the products. From lighting and appliances, to bath and kitchen faucets, fixtures and accessories, Ferguson’s knowledgeable product experts ensure your selections are perfect for your project. Their passion for customer service is easy to see after just one visit to your local showroom.

America’s #1 brand of siding and the only trim with the strength to complement it are uniquely engineered to perform beautifully, despite what nature brings to Minnesota. Select from a curated collection of colors, textures and styles to authentically capture any home design.

FergusonShowrooms.com Since 1873, Kohler Co. has been improving the level of gracious living among its customers by providing exceptional products and services for the home. As a recognized global brand, Kohler leads the way in design, craftsmanship and innovation. Kohler’s product offering spans across all price points, offering consumers a wide variety of options in kitchen and bath fixtures, faucets, and more.

Visit JamesHardie.com to learn more or to find a dealer near you.

Learn more at Kohler.com

At Fireside Hearth & Home, we recognize that every experience is different—and so are the fireplaces, inserts and stoves that will find a place in your story. As a top fireplace supplier in Minneapolis, our method is simple: we listen to you. Our qualified professionals guide you from beginning to end through the hearth selection process, discovering the details to match you with the perfect product for your home and lifestyle. Visit Fireside.com to learn more and find a showroom near you.

Marvin Windows and Doors is a premier manufacturer of made-to-order windows and doors. Marvin offers unparalleled value with craftsman-quality construction, energy-efficient technology and the industry’s most extensive selection of shapes, styles, sizes and options. For more than a century, Marvin has lived by a simple creed: Never compromise on quality. Their family-owned and operated company takes pride in upholding the timeless values of craftsmanship, innovation and integrity. Marvin.com

Heat & Glo prides itself on leadership in design and innovative technology that give you the ultimate fireside experience. The brand created industry game-changing direct-vent technology and exclusive technologies like fire from water. Heat & Glo is always pushing the envelope with innovation. Built with pride in Lake City, Minnesota. More patents, awards and honors than any other manufacturer add proof to the brand’s promise: “No One Builds A Better Fire.” ®

Find out why at: HeatNGlo.com

Granite-Tops, and its Stone Countertop Outlet selection centers is the Midwest’s premier fabricator of granite, marble, quartz, other natural stone and solid surface countertops. We have enjoyed 21 years of continued growth and success, thus expanding to six locations across Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Dakota. Stone Countertop Outlet offers thousands of slabs and hundreds of colors, as well as sinks and faucets. We are a full service company providing field measurements, complete fabrication, and installation—all in one location. No other fabricator offers so much in just one stop.

Twin Cities Closet Company is an industry leader of custom storage solutions. Having served the greater Twin Cities area for over 17 years, we proudly offer complete customization of every space in the home. From closets to wall beds and home offices to garages, we produce a product of utmost quality with customer service being our main focus. This is achieved by our great team, hand-picked for their unique design abilities, precise manufacturing, quality installation and their overall outstanding customer service. With a wide selection of customizable features, we are always striving for the finest quality while using state-of-the-art equipment. We design, manufacture and install all of our projects. Born and bred locally and we couldn’t be prouder. Visit us at our showroom in Minneapolis or our second location coming soon to Mound. TCClosets.com for more details.

Learn more at StoneCountertopOutlet.com

ARTISANHOMETOUR.ORG

J U N E 8 - 1 0 , 1 5 - 1 7 & 2 2 - 24 · 1 2 - 6 P M


7003 West Lake Street Suite 150 St. Louis Park, MN 55426

952 . 938 . 2599 www.RUBBLETILE.com

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY ALYSEDWARDS®

Patio Season is Right Around the Corner

Terri Huml, Owner

(952) 404-1100 635 E LAKE ST, WAYZATA, MN 55391 GIANNIS-STEAKHOUSE.COM


charlieandcodesign.com | 612.333.2246

Every home has a story.


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What is Northern Food ? WRITER STEVE HOFFMAN EXPLORES. ARTWORK BY MARY JO HOFFMAN

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Consider this: In the past two years, 23 James Beard Award semifinalists have come from Minnesota. Their names are Boemer, Brown, Malone and Roberts. Their names are Guzman, Kim, Nguyen and Yang. When the Super Bowl came to Minneapolis earlier this year, Esquire called the city “the food world’s best kept secret.” In an article entitled “Where to Travel in 2018,” the Wall Street Journal suggested 10 destinations to its readers. Go to Shanghai, it said. Go to Montenegro. Go also, it said, to Minneapolis. Why Minneapolis? For its food. The North is having a food moment. It’s a moment that looks from the outside like a discovery, but from the inside, as all discoveries do, like what has always been. Northern food was and is about four fundamental things: the constraints of northern latitudes. The blessings of fertile soil. The proximity of woods and water, and their wild yield. And the arrivals of people from somewhere else who decided to stay. But of course, it’s a little more complicated than that.

Light and Latitude If you push a pin into the Mississippi River between Minneapolis and St. Paul, attach a string long enough to reach International Falls then make a circle with that string, that’s pretty much the place I’m talking about. Maybe there should be a little more Michigan in there, maybe a little less Iowa. But that’s close. There should be a lot of woods, a lot of water and a lot of farms. A slice of Boreal forest to the north. A slice of Great Plains to the south. It’s not quite the West to the west and not quite the Rust Belt to the east. It’s the North. To be clear, when I say Northern food, I’m not talking about Nordic cuisine, which is a very refined, hyper-local, mostly Scandinavian vision of food in Northern climates. Northern food, as I think of it, is not primarily restaurant food, but kitchen food, lying closer to the peasant cuisines of the major populations who have settled here. It has, like Nordic cuisine, a maritime element — in our case, the freshwater maritime culture of the Great Lakes, based on lake trout, cisco, whitefish, herring, walleye and pike — but it is primarily land-based, created by hunter-gatherer societies and farming cultures who have come here for the water, woods and soil, and stayed despite the weather.

We value what is scarce. In the North, what is scarce is sunlight. Actually, that’s not quite true. For about four months, an endless rain of sunshine pours down with such generosity that it is easy to forget it will end. But we spend the rest of the year trying to capture light and hold on to it. We build fires, light candles and paint our interiors white to grab as much low-angle sun as winter will give. We smoke pork and venison and salmon and lake trout. We dry sausage and jerky and wild mushrooms.

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We pickle cucumbers and beans and onions and turnips and beets, not to mention Northern pike and whitefish and herring. We ferment cabbage and peppers separately (sauerkraut and hot sauce) and together (kimchi). We ferment cider and beer. For much of history, there was no other way to eat all year long. And then gradually, those flavors born of necessity — the acidity of pickling, the tang of fermentation, the salt and soot of smoking — became signatures of Northern cuisine and part of what we craved in what we ate. They became our bacalao, our duck confit, our Parma ham: uniquely flavored delicacies with origins in humble preservation techniques. What we thought we were preserving was food. But what we were really preserving was sunlight, captured in the cells of living things. For three months in the North, we are royalty, spoiled by an opulence of golden light. For the rest of the year, we are misers, counting pennies of summer sunshine we have saved and stored away.

At some point when you get far enough north, there is a circumpolar sameness to the landscape and the food. The subarctic taiga looks the same in Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia and Siberia, and it always looks more like taiga than like any of the more southerly parts of any of those regions. In the same way, cooks in Minneapolis, Milwaukee or Fargo, North Dakota, will often have to solve problems closer to the problems of Swedes, Ukrainians or Mongolians than the problems of Texans or Floridians — or even, to make an important point, the problems of the Kansans and Missourians with whom we Northerners are so often lumped under the misguided term “Midwestern.” We don’t grow peaches here, much less oranges and lemons. Our soil can grow almost anything. But Northern food is still limited, and to that degree defined, by what this latitude can bring to ripeness.


Soil and Fertility St. Paul Farmers’ Market, St. Paul. August. On an airless summer day, everyone’s skin around me has a damp, satin sheen. We slide past each other in sandals and flip-flops in a two-way human current to the sound of bagpipes at one corner of the block and some folky six-string picking at the other. The flat music of mid-continent English mingles with a little Spanish, an occasional drawl and the sounds of children. All of it is accompanied by a persistent melody whose measures sometimes end on notes between notes that sing of Southeast Asia. August is the month when the cycles of ripeness of Northern produce most thoroughly and exuberantly overlap, and the tables we walk past are heaped with an almost unbelievable profusion. A Teutonic-looking blond farm kid shucks sweet corn from the back of a panel truck. A preteen Hmong boy hands over a basket of Thai chilies to a bearded guy in cargo shorts and pockets a $5 bill. We walk past mound after mound of cauliflower, tomatoes, kohlrabi, zucchini, eggplant, carrots, broccoli, sweet peppers, cucumbers, potatoes, onions, shallots, scallions, fennel, radishes, melons, blueberries, lemongrass, Thai basil, sweet basil, mint, mustard greens, collards, kale and chard.

The soil has given this to us. There are only four regions in the world this rich in soil: Eastern Europe, northern China, the Argentine Pampas and here, where glaciers like monumental bulldozers scraped Canada down to shield rock, pushed millennia worth of Boreal forest biomass southward and left behind a thick mattress of silt hundreds of feet thick in places that then drifted all around the North on the wind. It’s called loess (from the German word for “loose”), and it’s full of so many kinds of mineral particles ground up as the glaciers swallowed and pulverized the geology they crossed that it’s a little like the soil version of a multivitamin. Essentially everything a plant needs to grow is available somewhere in a fistful of loess. It means you can grow anything here that this latitude is capable of growing, which is of course a blessing but also something of a curse. No one would opt for scarcity over abundance in theory, and yet, there is something seductive about the cuisines of the Mediterranean Basin, for instance, where the soil is rocky and thin, and water hard to find. Where you can grow a few things easily — olives, grapes, chickpeas, goats and pungent wild herbs — but most things only with great difficulty. Out of these constraints, dishes emerge of limited scope, telling intensely perfumed tales of sunshine and dry, resinous hills. Abundance, in other words, carries with it a certain vagueness of outline, a lack of specific character. Soil that grows everything also grows, by corollary, nothing in particular. The food of the North, at least the food grown here agriculturally, does not tell the very specific tales told in Beirut, in Marseille, France, in Palermo, Italy.

The tale it tells is not one of specific flavors but of the huge swings of temperature that occur in the middle of continents, far from moderating oceans. It’s a tale of intense seasonality, and this is the season of abundance.

The abundance on the farmers’ market tables on this particular high-season Sunday sends up herbal, heat-borne scent clouds that we drift through slowly, luxuriating in our brief annual time of glut, knowing that winter’s leanness will be proportionally extreme. We walk through the entire market once then walk back, debating about dinner, whether it should be spring rolls filled with carrots, cucumbers and mint. Or tacos filled with tomatoes, onions, jalapeños and cilantro. Or herb-roasted chicken, stuffed with fistfuls of garlic, thyme, parsley and rosemary. Beneath our feet, under concrete and cobblestone, the ground is still Mississippi River bank: black, loose, almost garishly rich. A trove. Happening upon it for the first time — if you know what you’re looking at, if the purpose of your life is to grow food, if you have pitted yourself against the soil of almost any other place on earth — must feel as if your life has been a question and here is the answer.

Hunters and Gatherers I’m talking to Sean Sherman, an Oglala Lakota chef and educator who has branded himself and his business the Sioux Chef. We’re talking about acid and salt. He is telling me how pre-contact indigenous cooks would have found acid in sumac and rose hips. And how there are marsh grasses that can pull salt from the ground and that it precipitates on their stems just above the water line. It is difficult to stand across from him and not consider almost every commonplace reference to the food of this region — every reference to lutefisk, potatoes, cabbage, beef and pork — as a kind of mortal insult, offhandedly delivered, to the people who have lived here not for 200 years but for 3,000. Sherman goes on to describe, with soft passion and a patience no one of my ancestry really deserves, a subtle, multivalent web of ingredients that were all here before European arrival, that are all still here now and that somehow most of us who live here don’t think of as our food. As he talks, my imagination wanders through a cuisine based on wild rice, sunchokes, blueberries, blackberries, juneberries, chokecherries, crabapples, cattail roots, arrowhead, wild turkey, venison, shoeshoe hare, ruffed grouse, freshwater fish, morels, chanterelles, fiddleheads, ramps, juniper berries, maple syrup, wild ginger, spruce tips, cedar fronds, yarrow and amaranth, not to mention the three sacred sisters (corn, beans, squash) and salt harvested from the stems of marsh reeds.

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He has published a cookbook, and he’ll be opening a restaurant evocatively located on the Mississippi River. But what he’s really doing is giving us back our true origin food. He’s letting us imagine how it might be a part of the future of Northern food and not just a part of its past.

Deer Camp, Merriman Truck Trail, Iron Mountain, Michigan. November. The cabin is made of vertical white cedar half logs from the swamp down the hill. The logs were felled by handsaws over the course of one 1930s winter then pulled out by teams of Percherons. There are camps like this all up and down the Merriman Truck Trail and scattered across the Upper Peninsula and around the Great Lakes, built by stubborn loggers and iron miners — Swedes, Finlanders and Cornish — who went to work with hot meat pies called pasties in their pockets for lunch and for warmth, who gathered in cabins they called camps to drink whiskey and tell stories, to fish for brook trout and hunt whitetail deer. The interior is half-lit by hanging propane lanterns, and a half dozen of us sit around an oilcloth-covered table. The conversation is vulgar and roughly affectionate. Outside, three deer hang from a two-by-four that is still unsentimentally called what it has always been called: the meat pole. We are not an impressive-looking group. We are ordinary in our careers and ambitions. We don’t spend time together most of the rest of the year. But everyone understands on some level that this is not just a weekend away with the boys. This is one of the last vestiges of the village hog killing, a harvest-time coming together that acknowledges the lean months ahead and acknowledges, more symbolically than in the 1930s perhaps, that the only way to survive a Northern winter is to be part of a community. Intermittently through the day, we have heard the cracks of .30-30s and the booms of .30-06s. But they have all quieted now as the hunters have sifted back through the woods toward the pale light of camp windows. On a platter in the middle of the table are two slender tenderloins, seared on a hot grill, and slices of heart, unrolled and soaked in water before being sautéed briefly in butter and salted. The heart is my favorite cut. It is tender for such a powerful muscle, and it tastes of iron and blood and survival.

Somewhere, I’m Not Saying Where, Western Wisconsin. September. Brook trout need the coldest, cleanest water of any of the trout that now grow here. They also happen to be the only ones that have been here from the very beginning. Browns and rainbows are 19th century immigrants brought from Europe and the American West, and for whatever reason, they can stand a little more civilization than brookies. Because cold water is usually remote water — up near the first spring-fed trickles of streams that later join forces with each other, before joining forces with Lake Superior or the Mississippi — brook trout fishing is, almost by definition, beautiful fishing. Brook trout refuse to grow in ugly places.

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I’m thinking this as I stand in the barely knee-deep current of a tiny ribbon of water in western Wisconsin, water that, sometime after it passes me, will make up part of an enormous muddy plume emptying into the Gulf of Mexico. The stream is maybe as wide as a sidewalk, overgrown with prairie grasses and lined with treacherous wild angelica, making it almost impossible to land a cast. None of which matters in the least, because the adjacent prairie is an explosion of goldenrod and coneflowers, and the trout are just beginning to eat as if winter really is on its way, and I’m pretty sure I will catch something before the end of the day, and if I do it will be my dinner, sweetly pink-fleshed and clean-tasting, and if I don’t, I will after all have spent the day like this. The North is a place where water, including the Father of Waters, begins. Not the middle of nowhere, but, in some sense, the center of everything. I could drive a few hours north and stand in water that was headed for the St. Lawrence Seaway by way of Lake Superior. I could drive a few hours west and stand in water that was headed up the Red River, bound for the Arctic Ocean by way of Hudson Bay. We are a land of three watersheds, and we reserve the best of them for ourselves, where their waters are young and remote and cold and clear.

Culture and Community Strasburg, North Dakota. October. Gary Grad has black hair, cropped short with short bangs, and close-set eyes. He has a trim waist, a broad chest and the arms of a high-school football player, which he is. His last name is pronounced “Grahd.” It’s 1990, and Grad is in the school secretary’s office on the phone with his grandmother, Magdalena Silvernagel, part of a German Catholic Silvernagel clan so vast that one branch of the family has changed its name to Silbernagel to try to keep everyone straight. Grandma Silvernagel spends summers near her farm then moves in with Grad and his family for the cold-weather months. He is calling her because he has thought of what he wants for dinner. “Knoephla soup,” he says, and then, prompted by his teammates, he wonders aloud whether she might also make some of her white rolls before practice. The answer, as always, is yes. And so his football team will eat warm white rolls in the locker room this afternoon, and after practice, he will walk through the back door of his house into a steamy kitchen filled with the lingering smells of carrots, celery, onions and stock, and he will go to the stove, where a thick chicken and potato soup with dumplings sits in a pot, its surface shimmering with butterfat, waiting for the grandson who ordered it earlier in the day.

Port Edwards, Wisconsin. September. Yia Vang comes home from his first day of eighth grade. His mother sets out a snack of just-made sticky rice and a bowl of hot pepper sauce, made by


grinding Thai chilies with Hmong cilantro, garlic, fish sauce and tomatoes in a mortar. A pot full of chicken and bones has begun to simmer on the stove, scented with lemongrass, garlic and ginger. It will be served over rice with sautéed mustard greens and more chili sauce. Vang resignedly scoops up a bright clump of the sauce with a warm hunk of sticky rice, talking about his day and dreaming of McNuggets and fries. Years later, chef Yia Vang will serve this same dish to sold-out Twin Cities crowds at his pop-up restaurant, Union Kitchen.

Upton 43, Minneapolis. June. In the basement kitchen of his restaurant, Chef Erick Harcey stands in front of two six-foot-long walnut appetizer boards balanced precariously on a prep counter. Today he is welcoming maybe the most famous Nordic chef in the world, Magnus Nilsson of Fäviken restaurant in Åre, Sweden. Harcey is wearing a black XXL Motörhead “Everything Louder than Everything Else” t-shirt, and there is a tattoo of a meat cleaver on his massive right forearm. His fingers shake slightly as he balances a finely shaved wafer of truffle on a slice of cured salmon wrapped around rich, airy egg butter. His grandparents ran Kaffe Stuga in the Minnesota hamlet of Harris. His grandfather before he died told Harcey he should stop cooking like other people and should cook from his soul, from his heritage. And so he created a menu for his restaurant that opened its heart to the humblest and most taken-for-granted Northern ingredients — among them kohlrabi, beets, turnips, carrots, greens, spruce tips, whitefish, pork chops and eggs — then glorified them with technique. In the process, he created a new vision of what 21st century Northern food could look like at its most refined. And now here he is, cooking for Magnus Nilsson. Upstairs, Nilsson sits at a chef’s table, long-haired, scruffy-bearded, surrounded by a small entourage. He too is wearing a black t-shirt. It takes two servers to carry the appetizer board upstairs to the dining room, and before Harcey launches into his tableside presentation, he pauses to adjust his camo Bass Pro Shops cap with a familiar nervous tic: “So here you have whitefish rillettes encased in dill, Gouda croquettes on lingonberry sauce, salmon-wrapped egg butter with shaved truffle, pickled lamb heart, smoked herring tacos with tortillas made of thinly sliced kohlrabi held together by a clothespin…” Both chefs recognize, without having to say anything, that they are looking at something that is exactly like and entirely unlike a traditional smorgasbord. After lunch, they go fishing on a central Minnesota lake that Nilsson says looks disorientingly like Sweden, and together they catch a few pretty nice bass.

Polk Street NE, Minneapolis. July. Five of us sit around a fire pit in a Northeast Minneapolis backyard. One of us is the chef of a high-end eatery who trained in New York City. One of us is a hunter, cook and author of a nose-to-tail venison cookbook, just back from a successful chanterelle hunt in

his home state of Wisconsin. One of us is a mixologist experimenting with ingredients he finds close at hand, like rhubarb cordials, snap pea–infused gin and carbonated basil water. One of us is the editor of a beer-centric magazine, who has recently seen an explosion of craft brewing in the very neighborhood where we sit. One of us — myself — is a food writer carrying on a simultaneous love affair with his cultural home in the Great Lakes North and his spiritual home in Mediterranean France. We are telling Boundary Waters camp stories, stories about good dogs and stories about Twin Cities restaurants that have come and gone. We’re halfway through 125 raw oysters and some eight-hour pork shoulder with Caribbean mojo sauce prepared by the chef. We’re drinking some of the editor’s favorite Minnesota beer, some gin that the mixologist has infused with the shells of our discarded oysters, and some French wine from the food writer. There are hunters, foragers and anglers among us, and there is talk of game and wild food and freshwater fish. There is a love of lakes and streams and woods. There is a quiet sophistication to the topics that make their way around our circle. We are passionate nerds talking deep into corners of the food world that don’t get visited often. We have spent all day outside, in that nearly compulsive way that Northerners celebrate the very few weeks of sunshine we are granted each year. We are not eating lutefisk or potatoes or beef or bratwurst or cabbage. Our palates, like those throughout the region, have reached well beyond the bland scarcity diet of the 19th century Northern Europeans who gave our region its unfortunate culinary reputation among those who don’t actually live here. The food we’re eating today, the food we generally think of as our own, requires both a major urban center and a proximity to wilderness. We need our cities to keep us looking outward, toward the regeneration that comes from new influences, new cultures and new ingredients. But we need our woods and waters to keep us looking inward, to reground us in our own peculiar, non-coastal form of sanity, to return us to the landscapes and ancestral wild foods that are the true basis of our regional cuisine and to remind us that, for most of the history of our species, who we were was where we lived, and where we lived was what we ate. It should be said that all of us present have gone somewhere else for a part of our lives and come back. The North is a place people come to unwillingly then leave unwillingly, if they leave at all. If we are experiencing a food moment, it’s not because of the prairie kitsch, the dimwitted Elmer Fudd congeniality, that is often ascribed to us nationally (and that, to our shame, we sometimes ascribe to ourselves locally). We don’t actually spend much time anymore eating Jell-O in Lutheran church basements or wrapped in plaid flannel or talking like characters from the film Fargo. We are experiencing a food moment for the more or less straightforward reason that we have a food community as enlightened and creatively hungry as any on either coast, with members who spend a lot of time together making and talking about food and who will outwork anybody anywhere in a generous, productive, middle-of-the-country spirit that says, When my neighbor wins, I win.

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Today and Tomorrow Northern food is glacial till. Northern food is what can grow between the 42nd and 49th parallels. Northern food is who has come here and stayed: Anishinaabe, Lakota, Northern and Central European, African American, Somali, Latino, Hmong, Southeast Asian. My children’s comfort food is pasta and pizza. But it’s also spring rolls, sushi, tacos, tamales, salsa, hummus and tandoori chicken. The next generation will grow up on all of that, plus who knows? Korean kimchi and gochujang? Ethiopian roast goat and injera bread? Moroccan couscous and harira soup? Alex Roberts of Alma, one of the Twin Cities’ foundational chefs, says that as food cultures move from scarcity to abundance, they also gravitate toward stronger flavors. So it’s natural that Southeast Asian and Central and South American food cultures are considered less and less someone else’s food and more and more our food, not just because the people who have come from those regions have swiftly become an integral part of the overall culture but because, with abundance, all of us have begun to crave food like that. James Beard winner Gavin Kaysen’s Spoon and Stable, named a global dining destination, sells out of late-night Ramen every Saturday. Eddie Wu’s most popular breakfast dish at Cook St. Paul is eggs Benedict with Korean short ribs. James Beard semifinalist Jorge Guzman plans to incorporate more of his native Yucatán into his next Twin Cities eatery. Yia Vang has created the Minnesota Hmong hotdish using braised pork, Northern Thai curry and tater tots. James Beard semifinalist Thomas Boemer is experimenting with yakitori-style snapping turtle. James Beard semifinalist Ann Kim’s Young Joni finds itself among the most admired restaurants in the country. Its most-served pizza is Korean barbecue. James Beard semifinalist Christina Nguyen is serving Southeast Asian street food in Northeast Minneapolis. Right now, this is what the future of Northern food looks like. It looks more flavorful, more inventive, more open to the world. It looks, on the surface, like a departure. But winter still comes early here. The soil is a primeval gift. Morels start showing up in May. And people come from other places and consent to stay. This is the future. This is how it has always been. This is the story we are writing, in the alphabet of climate, of soil, of landscape, of people. Let’s tell it well.

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6 2 0 0 L O C H M O O R D R I V E EDINA

4 6 0 4 M E R I L A N E EDINA

Superbly renovated and expanded with amazing wooded views near Braemar.

Wonderful Rolling Green value as is or as a building site overlooking golf course.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$998,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,595,000

4 6 1 5 M O O R L A N D A V E N U E EDINA

4 6 0 4 G O L F T E R R A C E EDINA

One of Country Club’s most admired homes with great yard and terrace.

Handsome brick Colonial overlooking fairways of Edina Country Club.

BEDROOMS: 6

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$2,795,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$2,100,000

2 1 4 0 C A R R I A G E L A N E ORONO

2 4 4 0 O L D B E A C H R O A D ORONO

Sophisticated Stinson-designed rambler on 2+ acres with extraordinary light.

French-inspired architecture with open floor plan on picturesque Lafayette Bay.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,195,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 4

$3,295,000

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JOHN MCWHITE 6 1 2 - 8 0 5 - 1 5 7 7 | J K M C W H I T E @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

3 9 2 7 W. 4 9 T H S T R E E T EDINA

5 7 1 7 C H O W E N A V E N U E S . EDINA

New-construction twin home by Traditions by Donnay just 1 block from 50th & France.

This 2-story with high-end finishes by Traditions by Donnay is across from Chowen Park.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,275,000

4 1 1 7 A B B O T T A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

Build your dream home just steps from Lake Harriet. Spectacular views.

This delightfully updated 2-story sits on an oversize lot in the heart of Linden Hills.

BATHROOMS: 5

$875,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,099,000

1 9 3 0 I R V I N G A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

3 8 3 7 B E A R D A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

This fully updated architectural gem in the heart of Kenwood sits on a double lot.

This classic 2-story is located in the Linden Hills neighborhood 3 blocks from Lake Calhoun.

BEDROOMS: 4

Artful Living

$849,000

4 1 1 6 Q U E E N A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

BEDROOMS: 5

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BATHROOMS: 4

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BATHROOMS: 5

$1,595,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

PRICE UPON REQUEST

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MICHAEL WILLE THE WILLE GROUP

EXPERIENCED ADVOCATE. RESULTS-DRIVEN LEADER.

6 1 2 - 8 6 0 - 7 0 4 0 | M J W I L L E @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

2 1 0 0 E M E R S O N A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

7 1 1 W. 4 6 T H S T R E E T MINNEAPOLIS

Completely updated home combines today’s amenities with original charm. Stellar walkability.

Major addition and remodel. Main-floor family room, awesome master suite. Great location.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 3

$699,000

BATHROOMS: 4

$899,000

2 0 1 6 K E N W O O D PA R K W A Y MINNEAPOLIS

1 3 0 3 M O U N T C U R V E A V E N U E MINNEAPOLIS

Updated Kenwood home. 2 blocks from Lake of the Isles. Main-level family room and finished carriage house.

Extraordinary craftsmanship and timeless elegance. Downsize to perfection. Elevator.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 4

$974,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,995,000

6 8 0 0 I R O Q U O I S C I R C L E EDINA

1 7 8 0 L U C Y R I D G E C O U R T CHANHASSEN

Gorgeous kitchen remodel with professional appliances. New bathrooms. 3-stall garage.

Incredible custom home with Lake Lucy views and access. $150,000 in recent updates.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$997,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,099,000

artfulliving.com

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3 2 2 0 W. C A L H O U N PA R K W A Y, # 3 0 2 MINNEAPOLIS

3 0 0 8 W. 4 0 T H S T R E E T MINNEAPOLIS

Stunning Lake Calhoun condo with sweeping views of the lake and city lights.

Stunning modern farmhouse in the heart of Linden Hills. Summer completion.

BEDROOMS: 3

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,300,000

DAVID AZBILL GROUP

DAVID AZBILL GROUP 612-925-8402 | DAVID@DAVIDAZBILLGROUP.COM

3 5 1 5 C E D A R L A K E A V E N U E MINNEAPOLIS

1 6 4 0 K E N W O O D PA R K W A Y MINNEAPOLIS

Stately home with well-appointed public spaces and mezzanine-level family room faces Cedar Lake.

Exceptional architect-designed twin home with 10-foot ceilings overlooking Kenwood Park.

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,095,000

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,345,000

FRAN AND BARB DAVIS AND WENDY PONTE

BOB KESSLER AND JOSE KOSAR

612-925-8408 | FDAVIS@CBBURNET.COM

612-386-6148 | RKESSLER@CBBURNET.COM

1 8 1 7 K N O X A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

2 6 0 1 E U C L I D P L A C E MINNEAPOLIS

Located in the most prestigious quarter of Lowry Hill.

Beautiful home just a stone’s throw from Lake of the Isles.

BEDROOMS: 5

Artful Living

$899,900

612-925-8402 | DAVID@DAVIDAZBILLGROUP.COM

BEDROOMS: 5

156

BATHROOMS: 2

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,295,000

BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 6

$2,200,000

THE FOGEL GROUP

THE FOGEL GROUP

612-889-2000 | THEFOGELGROUP@CBBURNET.COM

612-889-2000 | THEFOGELGROUP@CBBURNET.COM

Magazine of the North

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7 6 0 8 P E LT I E R L A K E D R I V E LINO LAKES Stately Peltier Lake home beautifully remodeled in 2017. Picture-perfect setting. Spectacular sunset views on a large, level lakeshore lot complete with updated pool. BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 4 $749,000

DREW HUELER

612-701-3124 GAHUELER@CBBURNET.COM

4 8 0 1 B Y W O O D S T R E E T W. EDINA Relaxed warmth and impeccable style infuse this commanding Rolling Green residence. Featuring the finest and most distinctive finishes with gracious living spaces. BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 7 $4,700,000

ELLYN WOLFENSON

612-644-3033 EJWOLFENSON@CBBURNET.COM

1492 HUNTER DRIVE MEDINA Private estate on Mooney Lake geared for fun. 5-star amenities include indoor and outdoor pools, golf hole, tennis court, and indoor sport court. BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 9 $4,975,000

MEREDITH HOWELL AND MARK SCHILL

952-476-3692 MHOWELL@CBBURNET.COM 612-859-4507 MASCHILL@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

artfulliving.com

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157


MEREDITH HOWELL 9 5 2 - 4 7 6 - 3 6 9 2 | M H O W E L L @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

2 1 5 C H I C A G O A V E N U E N . WAYZATA

4 4 0 W. PA D D O C K C I R C L E MEDINA

Wayzata Village living at its best. Fresh and sun-filled with private fenced backyard.

Estate-like home built with high-end detailing and updating. Gourmet’s delight kitchen.

BEDROOMS: 5

$1,150,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,299,000

4 9 0 7 S U N N Y S L O P E R O A D E . EDINA

Quietly tucked away just across the bay from Wayzata. High-end finishes and open floor plan.

Charming 2-story on the creek in premier Sunnyslope neighborhood. Incredible sport court.

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,650,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,875,000

7 3 6 5 H I G H W A Y 1 2 INDEPENDENCE

1 6 7 0 0 G R A Y S B A Y B O U L E V A R D MINNETONKA

A most magical country estate just west of Maple Plain. Every view is captivating.

Sunsets and sandy beach. Lakeside pool overlooking Grays Bay of Lake Minnetonka.

BEDROOMS: 4

Artful Living

BATHROOMS: 4

1 7 8 7 5 B R E E Z Y P O I N T R O A D WOODLAND

BEDROOMS: 6

158

WITH EXPERIENCE COMES SUCCESS

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BATHROOMS: 8

$1,950,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$3,380,000

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2410 OAKLAND ROAD MINNETONKA Meticulously manicured Birdsong is privately located near the intersection of I-494 and I-394. Beautifully sculpted and dotted with mature trees and ponds. Easy access to Wayzata and downtown Minneapolis. Ready for development or to be purchased as a singular estate with a unique Lloyd Wright–designed home (son of Frank Lloyd Wright). BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5 $4,700,000

MEREDITH HOWELL AND JEFF MARTINEAU

952-476-3692 MHOWELL@CBBURNET.COM 952-210-2626 JMARTINEAU@CBBURNET.COM

1400 BRACKETTS POINT ROAD ORONO Steeped in history and lovingly restored, Southways (the Pillsbury Estate) is one of the last remaining icons of Lake Minnetonka. Sweeping views both west and east across Bracketts Point and Lake Minnetonka. Inquire with listing agents about the adjacent buildable lot. BEDROOMS: 7

BATHROOMS: 13 $7,900,000

MEREDITH HOWELL AND BRIAN BENSON

952-476-3692 MHOWELL@CBBURNET.COM 612-227-8629 BKBENSON@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

artfulliving.com

Spring 2018

159


JOHN F. ADAMS 6 1 2 - 7 2 0 - 4 8 2 7 | J A D A M S @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

4 6 1 5 M E R I L A N E EDINA

5 4 4 R I C E S T R E E T E . WAYZATA

Incredible opportunity to build on a 1.8-acre hilltop setting in sought-after Rolling Green.

Landschute-built with timeless details, 2-plus-bedroom suites, elevator and rooftop deck with lake views.

$1,695,000

$2,095,000

2 8 1 2 0 B O U L D E R B R I D G E D R I V E SHOREWOOD

New construction by highly acclaimed John Kraemer & Sons. Only 1 unit remains available.

Historic Grand View Lodge–like estate on a wooded 4-acre setting with westerly lake views.

BATHROOMS: 3

$2,095,000

BEDROOMS: 7

BATHROOMS: 9

$3,995,000

3 3 2 0 R O B I N S O N S B A Y R O A D DEEPHAVEN

6 8 6 F E R N D A L E R O A D W. WAYZATA

Built by Landschute on a .81-acre setting with 100 feet of west-facing lakeshore and a sandy beach.

Private 1-acre setting with 150 feet of south-facing lakeshore and panoramic views throughout.

BEDROOMS: 4

Artful Living

BATHROOMS: 4

2 4 0 M I N N E T O N K A A V E N U E S . WAYZATA

BEDROOMS: 2+

160

BEDROOMS: 2+

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BATHROOMS: 5

$3,995,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 8

$4,995,000

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5445 BLACK OAKS LANE N. PLYMOUTH Artfully designed home with a modern vibe in prestigious O’Donnell Woods and Wayzata schools. Sport court, pool, cabana, 3-season porch and more. Perfect for entertaining. BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5 $1,595,000

MIKE STEADMAN

612-296-0900 MBSTEADMAN@CBBURNET.COM

3 4 1 R A M S E Y R O A D W. WAYZATA Built by one of Minneapolis’s founding families, this completely remastered 1949 estate sits high at the end of a wandering private drive inside Harrington Gates. BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 8 $3,195,000

DECKER AND BONNIE VELIE, VELIE REAL ESTATE 612-747-5097 DECKER.VELIE@CBBURNET.COM 612-964-7865 BJVELIE@CBBURNET.COM

9 7 5 H E R I TA G E L A N E ORONO Tanager Estates features this luxurious modern custom home by Stonewood. Property-only option priced at $2.65 million with 3.6 private acres, 350 feet of shoreline and expansive views. BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5 $5,235,000

BONNIE VELIE AND MIKE STEADMAN

612-964-7865 BJVELIE@CBBURNET.COM 612-296-0900 MBSTEADMAN@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

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161


GREGG LARSEN 6 1 2 - 7 1 9 - 4 4 7 7 | G L A R S E N @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

7 7 6 6 L O C H M E R E T E R R A C E EDINA

2 8 6 2 N O R T H V I E W R O A D MINNETONKA BEACH

Dewey Hill town home in convenient Edina location. Rare 3-car garage. Edina schools.

Main-level living overlooking 9th fairway of Lafayette Club Golf Course. Dock slip.

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 3

$579,900

$689,900

4 2 1 2 W. A R M D R I V E SPRING PARK

Private estate setting in Medina. 10-acre lot with marshland views. Orono schools.

Rare town-home offering on Lake Minnetonka. Level shoreline and miles of lake views.

BATHROOMS: 3

$829,900

BEDROOMS: 2

BATHROOMS: 3

$895,000

3 9 3 5 C O U N T Y R O A D 4 4 MINNETRISTA

2 5 5 L A K E V I E W A V E N U E TONKA BAY

Lake Minnetonka building site with 170 feet of west-facing lakeshore. Use your own builder.

Stunning lakeshore home in Tonka Bay. 125 feet of shoreline with a true sand beach.

$939,000

Artful Living

BATHROOMS: 3

2 3 1 8 T A M A R A C K D R I V E MEDINA

BEDROOMS: 3

162

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BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$2,699,000

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


TRUST IN OUR EXPERIENCE

PATTY NAPIER / CARRIE FLEISCHHACKER PARTNERS 9 5 2 - 4 7 6 - 3 6 0 3 | PAT T YA N D C A R R I E @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

8 8 5 0 C O U N T Y R O A D 2 6 MINNETRISTA

5 7 5 N A V A J O R O A D MEDINA

10 acres of wooded privacy on Ox Yoke Lake. Cottage charm. Completely renovated. Pool.

Beautifully renovated home with spectacular sunset views set on 6 acres. Pool. Tuckborough Farm.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$885,000

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,425,000

7 5 0 N A V A J O R O A D MEDINA

2 4 7 2 PA R K V I E W D R I V E MEDINA

Stunning main-level living with new chef’s kitchen. 10 acres. Pool. Tuckborough Farm.

Totally private 20-acre setting. Main-level living. Amazing views. Pool and guesthouse.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,445,000

BATHROOMS: 7

$1,558,000

3 7 5 0 M E R I D I A N A V E N U E S . FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP

3 0 0 0 W I L L O W D R I V E MEDINA

90-acre, state-of-the-art equestrian facility with every imaginable feature and amenity.

40-acre country estate. One of the most admired properties ever offered for sale.

BEDROOMS: 6

BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 4

$2,800,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 10

$4,985,000

artfulliving.com

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163


ZINN FAMILY REALTORS 9 5 2 - 4 7 4 - 4 4 4 4 | C Z I N N @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

6 4 1 5 L A N D I N G S C O U R T EXCELSIOR

7 9 0 P L E A S A N T V I E W R O A D CHANHASSEN

Rich one-level living on premier lot in executive neighborhood of Minnewashta Landings.

Christmas Lake offers an up-north experience less than 30 minutes to downtown Minneapolis and MSP airport.

BEDROOMS: 4

$1,175,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,690,000

3 6 6 5 N O R T H O M E R O A D DEEPHAVEN

Large lakeside lawn with south-facing grade-A lakeshore on Lake Minnetonka’s St Albans Bay.

1.5-acre heavily wooded site on Lake Minnetonka’s St. Louis Bay in the Northome neighborhood.

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,850,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 6

$2,235,000

3 1 5 L A K E V I E W A V E N U E TONKA BAY

5 7 9 0 C H R I S T M A S L A K E P O I N T SHOREWOOD

The Hamptons on Lake Minnetonka. 100 feet of south-facing lakeshore on A-rated Gideons Bay.

2+ acres with 600 feet of sandy lakeshore and a 300-degree view of close-in Christmas Lake.

BEDROOMS: 4

Artful Living

BATHROOMS: 4

5 1 7 5 Q U E E N S C I R C L E GREENWOOD

BEDROOMS: 5

164

ZINN SOLD MINE

Magazine of the North

BATHROOMS: 4

$2,699,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$4,350,000

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STICKNEY REAL ESTATE 9 5 2 - 4 7 6 - 3 6 9 4 | G S T I C K N E Y @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

2 4 0 3 H I G H O V E R T R A I L CHANHASSEN

2 6 3 0 C O U N T R Y S I D E D R I V E W. ORONO

Gorgeous 2-story home offering an open floor plan and .68-acre, quiet cul-de-sac setting.

Beautifully updated home with grand entertaining spaces, spectacular wine cellar and pool.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$774,900

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,749,000

2 1 7 2 H O M E S T E A D T R A I L MEDINA

9 1 5 T O N K A W A R O A D ORONO

Extraordinary countryside retreat set on 21+ acres. High-end finishes. Bring your horses.

Build your Lake Minnetonka dream home. Stunning 2.1-acre setting with 191 feet of west-facing shoreline.

BEDROOMS: 5

$2,085,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,999,000

2 8 0 3 6 W O O D S I D E R O A D SHOREWOOD

2 2 0 0 H O L LY B U S H R O A D MEDINA

Incredible Steiner & Koppelman home offering 175 feet of west-facing Lake Minnetonka shoreline.

Elegantly remodeled estate tucked away on 10 private acres in the Orono School District.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$3,150,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 6

PRICE UPON REQUEST

artfulliving.com

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165


JEFFREY DEWING 6 1 2 - 5 9 7 - 0 4 2 4 | J D E W I N G @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

3 0 O R C H I D L A N E N . PLYMOUTH

2 1 2 2 P O R T I C O G R E E N MINNETONKA

Gorgeous home filled with natural light. Open floor plan. 4 bedrooms on 1 level. Premier setting.

Beautifully updated executive residence with modern finishes and gorgeous wetland views.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,649,900

1 4 9 5 M E D I N A R O A D MEDINA

2 0 5 7 0 PA R K P L A C E DEEPHAVEN Breathtaking modern home with rustic influences and high-end finishes. Cottagewood setting.

BATHROOMS: 7

$1,799,900

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$2,797,000

2 4 7 1 0 T H A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

2 6 5 0 N O R T H V I E W D R I V E MINNETRISTA

Long-admired private residence in the heart of downtown Minneapolis. Steps to U.S. Bank Stadium.

Like-new Whaletail Lake estate offering 975 feet of shore, a guesthouse and manicured trails.

BEDROOMS: 3

Artful Living

$899,000

Impeccably built and maintained estate on 24 acres. Top-of-the-line finishes. Orono schools. BEDROOMS: 6

166

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BATHROOMS: 3

$2,995,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 6

$3,575,000

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CINDY REDMOND

REAL-ESTATE WARRIOR. EXPERIENCED. TRUSTWORTHY.

612-850-7015 | CINDY@CINDYREDMOND.COM

4 4 7 8 D U N I B A R R I D G E R O A D MINNETONKA

2 1 4 B Y R O N D A L E A V E N U E WAYZATA

The perfect family home located in the heart of Minnetonka on private lot with impressive sport court.

Stunning new villa by Wooddale Builders. Walk to Lake Minnetonka and downtown Wayzata.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 5

$989,900

BATHROOMS: 3

$965,000

1 9 5 C R Y S TA L C R E E K R O A D ORONO

1 2 3 0 0 R I V E R V I E W R O A D EDEN PRAIRIE

Charming custom cottage home on 5-plus-acre lot. Great family home in Orono school district.

Charming home sits peacefully on the edge of the Minnesota River Bluff. Turnkey ready.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

PRICE UPON REQUEST

BATHROOMS: 3

PRICE UPON REQUEST

3 7 0 F E R N D A L E R O A D W. WAYZATA

4 3 0 F E R N D A L E R O A D W. WAYZATA

Showstopper on Ferndale has resort-style pool on private 1-acre lot. Walk to Wayzata.

Exquisite Lake Minnetonka estate with astonishing views. Walk to vibrant downtown Wayzata.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 5

PRICE UPON REQUEST

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 15

PRICE UPON REQUEST

artfulliving.com

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167


ERIC AND SHARLA STAFFORD 9 5 2 - 4 7 0 - 2 5 7 5 | I N F O @ S TA F F O R D FA M I LY R E A LT O R S . C O M

PROFESSIONAL REPRESENTATION

5 4 7 5 L O S T L A K E L A N E MOUND

6 8 2 2 M I N N E H A H A C O U R T MINNETRISTA

This new-construction town home offers main-level living and a dock on Lake Minnetonka.

A well-appointed home with stunning spaces on a wooded lot. Shows like new construction.

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 3

$635,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$669,000

3 7 6 4 W O O D L A N D C O V E PA R K W A Y MINNETRISTA

9 8 6 0 R A S P B E R R Y H I L L CHANHASSEN

Build your dream home on the lake with 116 feet of level shoreline on Lake Minnetonka.

A Lecy-built home sited on 2+ acres offering privacy and main-level living at its finest.

$699,000

Artful Living

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$799,000

4 2 0 6 L I N D S E Y L A N E MINNETONKA

7 4 0 1 F R O N T I E R T R A I L CHANHASSEN

A gorgeous, finely finished custom home with a backdrop of pristine ponds and wetlands.

A beautiful 1.9-acre subdividable building site with 230 feet of shoreline on Lotus Lake.

BEDROOMS: 5

168

UNPARALLELED

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BATHROOMS: 7

$1,099,000

$1,499,000

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INTEGRITY. KNOWLEDGE. EXPERIENCE.

KRISTI WEINSTOCK THE WEINSTOCK GROUP 6 1 2 - 3 0 9 - 8 3 3 2 | K D W E I N S T O C K @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

6 4 1 2 L A N D I N G S C O U R T CHANHASSEN

1 8 3 3 4 K Y L I E C O U R T MINNETONKA

Detailed design, open floor plan and main-level living. Deeded access to Lake Minnewashta.

Stunning custom-built home situated on a private cul-de-sac with lovely wetland views.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$975,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,050,000

4 2 0 5 E N C H A N T E D L A N E SHOREWOOD

5 3 5 0 Y E L L O W S T O N E T R A I L MINNETRISTA

Wonderful home or retreat located on 140 feet of level, south-facing Minnetonka lakeshore.

Beautiful custom home by Denali offers deeded access and a boat slip on Lake Minnetonka.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,095,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,495,000

3 3 4 5 H A R D S C R A B B L E R O A D N . MINNETRISTA

1 9 4 0 0 A Z U R E R O A D DEEPHAVEN

Premier setting at the end of a point. Offering long panoramic views of Lake Minnetonka.

Nantucket-like views from this exceptional lakeside retreat offering main-level living.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,999,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 4

$2,150,000

artfulliving.com

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9 2 5 0 C O U N T Y R O A D 1 5 MINNETRISTA

4 6 3 0 L I N W O O D C I R C L E DEEPHAVEN

40+ acres of privacy with fabulous views, pole barn, wetlands, trails and more.

Linwood beach in Deephaven. The location will draw you in; the setting will make you stay.

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$949,000

BATHROOMS: 6

$3,200,000

TONY JEWETT, DEHAVEN TEAM

TONY JEWETT, DEHAVEN TEAM

612-963-8851 | TJEWETT@CBBURNET.COM

612-963-8851 | TJEWETT@CBBURNET.COM

1 4 8 7 S H O R E L I N E D R I V E ORONO

2 9 9 0 S U S S E X R O A D ORONO

Breathtaking views from a rare Browns Bay location. Open plan with stunning details.

Prime Orono estate with cutting-edge design features, amazing grounds, pool and pool house.

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$2,595,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 6

$2,995,000

GARY PETERSEN AND ELLEN DEHAVEN

ELLEN DEHAVEN

952-451-0284 | GARYPETERSEN@CBBURNET.COM

952-476-3646 | EDEHAVEN@CBBURNET.COM

2 8 1 7 W E S T W O O D R O A D MINNETONKA BEACH

4 9 0 0 M E A D V I L L E R O A D GREENWOOD

Spectacular vistas on Lafayette Bay. Prime opportunity to build in a premium location.

Private sunsets and long views. 197 feet of northwest-facing lakeshore. Walk to Excelsior.

$1,380,000

170

BEDROOMS: 4

Artful Living

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$3,250,000

GARY AND IAN PETERSEN

MELISSA JOHNSON

952-451-0284 | GARYPETERSEN@CBBURNET.COM

612-670-3456 | MELISSA.JOHNSON@CBBURNET.COM

Magazine of the North

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


7 5 4 8 W A L N U T G R O V E L A N E N . MAPLE GROVE

1 6 6 1 5 5 5 T H A V E N U E N . PLYMOUTH

Creek Hill custom home with sport court in the Woods at Rush Creek. Build sites available.

Exquisite new open-concept rambler on wooded site constructed by Creek Hill Custom Homes.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

PRICE UPON REQUEST

BATHROOMS: 4

$925,000

LISA PIAZZA AND ERIK MYHRAN

LISA PIAZZA AND ERIK MYHRAN

612-751-0976 | LISA.PIAZZA@CBBURNET.COM

612-751-0976 | LISA.PIAZZA@CBBURNET.COM

1 8 3 2 2 K Y L I E C O U R T MINNETONKA

2 0 6 7 5 PA R K V I E W L A N E SHOREWOOD

Exceptional craftsmanship. Walkout 1-story overlooking woods and marshlands. Minnetonka schools.

Gorgeous custom-built home nestled in the heart of South Lake Minnetonka area.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,100,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,199,000

CRAIG MOEN

TRACI COLWELL

612-850-7639 | CMOEN@CBBURNET.COM

651-308-0816 | TRACI.COLWELL@CBBURNET.COM

1 9 0 5 C O N C O R D I A S T R E E T ORONO

1 3 7 6 3 W O O D L A N E MINNETONKA

Lake Minnetonka shoreline with west-facing views. Great homesite and renovation opportunity.

Exquisite Steiner & Koppelman–built ranch with great room and manicured yard in Minnetonka.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 3

$1,195,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,199,900

JEFF MARTINEAU

JEFF MARTINEAU

952-210-2626 | JMARTINEAU@CBBURNET.COM

952-210-2626 | JMARTINEAU@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

artfulliving.com

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171


1 3 0 1 1 B R E N W O O D T R A I L MINNETONKA

1 0 1 I N T E R L A C H E N R O A D HOPKINS

Beautifully updated Connecticut Colonial with open chef’s kitchen in a fantastic location.

Spectacularly updated Interlachen Park home features open chef’s kitchen and family room.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$799,000

RUTH WHITNEY BOWE

RUTH WHITNEY BOWE 612-805-7412 | RWBOWE@CBBURNET.COM

4 6 1 6 B A Y S W AT E R R O A D SHOREWOOD

1 7 2 9 5 A C O R N R I D G E EDEN PRAIRIE

Charming end-unit town home recently updated top to bottom. Private views from all rooms.

Stunning walkout on large, flat lot surrounded by trees and preserve. Great combination.

BATHROOMS: 4

$775,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$824,000

DIANE BLOEM

DIANE BLOEM

612-801-8105 | DMBLOEM@CBBURNET.COM

612-801-8105 | DMBLOEM@CBBURNET.COM

5 0 5 E V E R G R E E N L A N E N . PLYMOUTH

1 8 6 8 7 M E L R O S E C H A S E EDEN PRAIRIE

Impressive renovation on tree-covered nearly .5-acre lot. Sought-after Wayzata school district.

Custom Colonial in gated Bearpath Golf and Country Club. Exquisite updates and open flow.

BEDROOMS: 5

Artful Living

$575,000

612-805-7412 | RWBOWE@CBBURNET.COM

BEDROOMS: 2

172

BATHROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$645,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,350,000

PATRICK AND MICHELLE MORGAN

JOSIE PATTERSON AND BRACE HELGESON

612-803-2339 | MORGANREALESTATE@CBBURNET.COM

952-212-5107 | JPATTERSON33@COMCAST.NET

Magazine of the North

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


7 6 8 9 N O T T I N G H A M PA R K W A Y N . MAPLE GROVE Unbelievable views that will just have you pause so you can simply enjoy. Open floor plan with all the finishes. Beautiful, easy-to-maintain landscaping. Backyard landscaping flows to the creek. Very private setting with perfect fire-pit area. Offers the feeling of being with nature yet is within minutes of shops and restaurants. BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 4 $649,735

LANA COOK

612-747-2300 LMCOOK@CBBURNET.COM

1105 TONKAWA ROAD O RONO Build your Lake Minnetonka dream home. This rarely available, park-like 1-acre estate setting features panoramic water views and stunning sunsets. The site offers 166 feet of prime sandy shoreline on serene North Arm Bay and is priced separately at $1,950,000. Construct this 6,600-square-foot concept provided by Stonewood, LLC, for approximately $3,950,000. (Price varies with selections.) BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 6 $3,950,000

KATHY SAWICKI, SAWICKI FAMILY REALTORS 612-270-1001 KSAWICKI@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

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7 0 7 W I L L O U G H B Y W A Y W. MINNETONKA

8 9 4 1 H I G H V I E W L A N E WOODBURY

Beautifully finished end unit with views of nature. 10 minutes west of downtown Minneapolis.

Main-floor master suite, elevator, sauna, wine cellar, dream garage, amazing sunset views.

BEDROOMS: 3

$519,900

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 3

$539,900

CAROLYN H. OLSON

DARIN BJERKNES, BJERKNES REALTY GROUP

952-270-5784 | CHOLSON@CBBURNET.COM

612-702-5126 | DARIN@DARINBJERKNES.COM

3 9 0 0 V I N C E N T A V E N U E S . MINNEAPOLIS

1 8 4 0 0 9 T H A V E N U E N . PLYMOUTH

Stunning modern 2-story set in the heart of Linden Hills. Blocks to the lakes.

Nestled in a quiet neighborhood with wooded views and privacy minutes to downtown Wayzata.

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$875,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,299,900

CYNDI JOHNSON

JULIE M. GREEN

612-964-5989 | CYNDI.JOHNSON@CBBURNET.COM

952-994-2609 | JMGREEN@CBBURNET.COM

9 4 7 7 S T O N E B R I D G E T R A I L N . STILLWATER

1 1 9 1 0 PA R T R I D G E R O A D C O U R T N . STILLWATER

Impressive spaces for entertaining yet comfortable setting for everyday living on acreage.

A tranquil home on 5.45 wooded acres with 358 feet of frontage on Little Carnelian Lake.

BEDROOMS: 4

174

BATHROOMS: 3

Artful Living

BATHROOMS: 5

$589,900

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$789,900

CHERYL LARSON TEAM

CHERYL LARSON TEAM

651-270-0213 | CHERYL@CHERYLLARSON.COM

651-270-0213 | CHERYL@CHERYLLARSON.COM

Magazine of the North

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


TRUSTED ADVISOR. MARKET LEADER.

NICK LEYENDECKER 952-222-SOLD | INFO@NICKLEYENDECKER.COM

1 6 4 8 1 7 7 T H C I R C L E N . MAPLE GROVE

1 4 9 0 0 C O P P E R F I E L D P L A C E MINNETONKA

Open-concept walkout 2-story on a private lot in the desired Nottingham neighborhood.

Updated, open-concept 2-story with 3,500+ square feet in the coveted Copperfield neighborhood.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

PRICE UPON REQUEST

BATHROOMS: 4

$549,900

9 6 6 5 J O N AT H A N L A N E EDEN PRAIRIE

1 5 7 7 5 J U N I P E R R I D G E D R I V E N W RAMSEY

Beautifully updated walkout 2-story with backyard pond views in a great subdivision.

Beautiful Victorian on resort-style acreage with 300+ feet of frontage on the Rum River.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 6

BATHROOMS: 4

$584,900

BATHROOMS: 5

$674,900

8 6 6 W O O D L A N D D R I V E LITTLE CANADA

5 4 0 6 A B B O T T P L A C E EDINA

2011 Hanson-built walkout 2-story with 4,500+ finished square feet on private .5 acre.

Walk to 50th & France from this 2-story, boasting 5,000+ square feet, completely rebuilt by Orfield in 2014.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$699,900

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,499,900

artfulliving.com

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5 1 0 9 V A L L E Y V I E W R O A D EDINA

5 8 2 8 L O N G B R A K E T R A I L EDINA

Sophisticated modern house with high-end finishes. Walkout rambler in heart of Edina.

Lush, private, elevated setting surrounded by nature. Quality and attention to detail.

BEDROOMS: 4

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$950,000

HYOUNSOO LATHROP

MARYANNE GROBE 612-308-2090 | MGROBE@CBBURNET.COM

6 6 2 5 D A K O TA T R A I L EDINA

5 3 0 9 W O O D D A L E A V E N U E S . EDINA

Amazing 2-acre lakeshore teardown opportunity on Indianhead Lake. Approximately 250 feet of frontage.

South Harriet Park 1.5-story with beautiful open-concept kitchen and light-filled space.

BATHROOMS: 2

$995,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$1,299,000

ROD HELM

JAMES HAAG

612-720-9792 | RHELM@CBBURNET.COM

612-964-0686 | TAYLOR.CROISSANT@CBBURNET.COM

4 7 0 8 G O L F T E R R A C E EDINA

6 0 1 6 L E S L E E L A N E EDINA

Beautiful all-brick Georgian Colonial on the 16th fairway of Edina Country Club.

Exquisite Greg Narr–built masterpiece. Entertainer’s dream. Finest materials throughout.

BEDROOMS: 6

Artful Living

$625,000

651-233-8527 | HLATHROP@CBBURNET.COM

BEDROOMS: 3

176

BATHROOMS: 2

BATHROOMS: 6

$2,225,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$2,350,000

STELLA AND JERRY REZAC

STEVE SCHMITZ

612-720-6942 | SREZAC@CBBURNET.COM

952-484-6045 | STEVESCHMITZ@SELLSHOUSES.COM

Magazine of the North

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


68 TRAILSYDE GRAND MARAIS Most beautiful lakeshore on Lake Superior. Unique opportunity to complete existing home or build new. 1,000+ feet of secluded shoreline and 37 acres. One of a kind. BEDROOMS: 9

BATHROOMS: 9 $995,000

CATHERINE WERSAL

612-597-6661 CRWERSAL@CBBURNET.COM

2531 MANITOU ISLAND WHITE BEAR LAKE Magical Manitou Island. Exclusive 1-plus-acre island setting. Walking distance to historic downtown White Bear Lake. Private wooded lot with 150 feet of sandy shoreline. BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5 $2,250,000

PATRICK MCGRATH

651-653-2449 PMCGRATH@CBBURNET.COM

XX CEDARLEAF POINT MAHTOMEDI 9 wooded and lakefront lots in the Mahtomedi school district. Custom design and build with award-winning DeWitt Homes. Home and land packages from $900,000. PRICE UPON REQUEST

PATRICK MCGRATH

651-653-2449 PMCGRATH@CBBURNET.COM

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

artfulliving.com

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177


O’FLANNIGAN GROUP

RESIDENTIAL, WATERFRONT AND

6 5 1 - 4 3 0 - 7 7 5 9 | S O F L A N N I G A N @ C B B U R N E T. C O M

1 8 3 3 7 S T. C R O I X T R A I L N . MARINE ON ST. CROIX

1 4 5 6 0 M O R G A N A V E N U E N . MARINE ON ST. CROIX

6 acres of seclusion with charming rustic-flavored home with access to St. Croix River.

Impeccable executive home with 5 acres overlooking wildlife pond assuring total privacy.

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 3

$595,000

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 3

$715,000

1 6 0 2 2 O A K H I L L R O A D N . SCANDIA

3 1 2 3 5 B I R C H G R O V E R O A D WASHBURN, WISCONSIN

78 acres of total privacy with award-winning architect-designed home in St. Croix Valley.

Lake Superior gated estate overlooking Chequamegon Bay with stunning new home.

BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 3

$1,200,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,750,000

4 7 5 8 5 C H A P I N W O O D R O A D CABLE, WISCONSIN

1 6 2 0 0 4 5 T H S T R E E T S . AFTON

Historic Chapinwood estate offers 24 acres of total wooded seclusion on Diamond Lake.

Private 12-acre estate with unlimited views of St. Croix River and 175 feet of riverfront.

BEDROOMS: 5

178

RETREAT PROPERTIES

Artful Living

Magazine of the North

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,699,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 5

$1,895,000

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


STEVE AND PARKER PEMBERTON 6 1 2 - 3 8 6 - 8 5 7 0 | S T E V E @ P E M B E RT O N H O M E S T E A M . C O M

13815 GROTHE CIRCLE APPLE VALLEY Private wooded cul-de-sac. Granite and stainless kitchen, updated master bathroom, sunroom with gas fireplace, and finished walkout lower level with kitchen. BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4 $575,000

23372 WOODLAND RIDGE DRIVE LAKEVILLE Magnificent country setting on 2.5 acres. Minutes to Twin Cities and airport. Open floor plan, large kitchen and walkout lower level. BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4 $735,000

4 3 5 E . C R Y S TA L L A K E R O A D BURNSVILLE Prime south-facing shoreline on Crystal Lake. Former Remodelers Showcase home. Incredible master suite plus views from nearly every large, sun-filled room. BEDROOMS: 3

BATHROOMS: 3 $885,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

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DANIEL AND JULIE DESROCHERS DESROCHERS REALTY GROUP 6 1 2 - 5 5 4 - 4 7 7 3 | D A N I E L @ D R E A LT Y G . C O M

1 4 4 5 6 W I L D S PA R K W A Y N W PRIOR LAKE

7 6 2 1 P R A I R I E G R A S S PA S S PRIOR LAKE

Dramatic custom build with spectacular panoramic, south-facing golf course and lake views.

Impeccable home with indoor sport court, gourmet kitchen, and laundry and 4 bedrooms up.

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$850,000

BATHROOMS: 5

$850,000

X X M U R P H Y L A K E B O U L E V A R D CREDIT RIVER TOWNSHIP

1 8 8 9 6 B R O O K W O O D R O A D CREDIT RIVER TOWNSHIP

Great investment/development opportunity. 2 large lots along Murphy-Hanrehan Park.

Amazing 9,500-plus-foot custom home on Legends Golf Course. Theater and indoor sport court.

$595,000–$995,000

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 7

$1,648,500

9 1 3 0 1 9 5 T H S T R E E T E . CREDIT RIVER TOWNSHIP

2 0 2 1 3 C H I P P E N D A L E A V E N U E FARMINGTON

Unbelievable 9,000-plus-square-foot custom home with guesthouse, pool, tennis court and more.

Amazing investment opportunity. 76 acres of raw land with 2 homes and 2 detached garages.

BEDROOMS: 5

180

BEDROOMS: 5

Artful Living

Magazine of the North

BATHROOMS: 8

$1,899,900

$2,360,000

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


AT DESROCHERS REALTY GROUP, WE DON’T JUST BUY AND SELL REAL ESTATE — WE BUILD RELATIONSHIPS. WE PROVIDE A HIGHER STANDARD OF SERVICE FOR YOUR HIGHER STANDARD OF LIVING.

7 3 6 1 M I N N E W A S H TA PA R K W A Y CHANHASSEN

6 5 1 3 R I D G E V I E W C I R C L E EDINA

Beautifully updated walkout with gourmet kitchen, fireplace and surrounding lake views.

Fabulous 2-story with 4 bedrooms up, hardwood floors, a fireplace and tranquil pond views.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 4

$500,000

BATHROOMS: 3

PRICE UPON REQUEST

7 1 0 8 L A N H A M L A N E EDINA

5 0 2 9 N O B H I L L D R I V E EDINA

Inviting home with expansive spaces, 4 bedrooms on 1 level, a large sun porch and deck.

Magnificent 2-story with an in-law suite and a 5-car garage on a gorgeous cul-de-sac lot.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$850,000

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,100,000

6 5 1 9 D A K O TA T R A I L EDINA

5 9 0 1 O L I N G E R R O A D EDINA

Exquisite custom walkout with wine cellar, 5 fireplaces and room for nanny quarters.

Gorgeous custom build on a half acre with a gourmet kitchen, 4 fireplaces and great room.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 8

$1,400,000

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 6

$1,850,000

artfulliving.com

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181


DANIEL AND JULIE DESROCHERS DESROCHERS REALTY GROUP 6 1 2 - 5 5 4 - 4 7 7 3 | D A N I E L @ D R E A LT Y G . C O M

1 7 5 6 2 7 8 T H P L A C E N . MAPLE GROVE

1 2 9 1 7 G R E Y S T O N E A V E N U E N . HUGO

Beautiful 2-story walkout with exceptional detail, 4 bedrooms up, 2 fireplaces and a pool.

Custom walkout on 2.9 acres with 4 bedrooms, laundry and bonus room up. Mahtomedi schools.

BEDROOMS: 5

$575,000

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$650,000

5 9 6 6 B L A C K B E R R Y T R A I L INVER GROVE HEIGHTS

1 4 4 5 0 N I C O L L E T C O U R T BURNSVILLE

Remarkable 6,400-plus-square-foot rambler with heated floors, theater and wine cellar.

Fantastic centrally located 1.67-acre commercial lot at the junction of I-35E and I-35W.

BEDROOMS: 3

182

BATHROOMS: 4

Artful Living

$1,399,900

$1,499,000

8 6 8 2 A M B E R G AT E D R I V E VICTORIA

2 0 4 8 S H O R E W O O D L A N E MOUND

Stunning, like-new 5,000-plus-square-foot walkout rambler with main-level living.

Lake living at its finest. West Arm Bay new construction with 50 feet of sandy shoreline.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

Magazine of the North

BATHROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 3

$825,000

BATHROOMS: 7

$1,650,000

COLDWELL BANKER GLOBAL LUXURY℠


AT DESROCHERS REALTY GROUP, WE DON’T JUST BUY AND SELL REAL ESTATE — WE BUILD RELATIONSHIPS. WE PROVIDE A HIGHER STANDARD OF SERVICE FOR YOUR HIGHER STANDARD OF LIVING.

7 0 P I N E T R E E D R I V E LUTSEN TOWNSHIP

W 7 3 0 0 B E C H E R E R D R I V E MINONG, WISCONSIN

Custom-built home with 200 feet of private lakeshore, numerous upgrades and gated entrance.

Outstanding home on Horseshoe Lake with 4 fireplaces and a babbling brook on 16 acres.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 4

BATHROOMS: 5

$750,000

BATHROOMS: 4

$650,000

2 3 4 1/2 A V E N U E CLAYTON, WISCONSIN

X X 3 3 0 T H A V E N U E FREDERIC, WISCONSIN

Turnkey 36-acre professional horse farm with fantastic home and great outbuildings.

Own your own private lake with 250+ acres. Open to builder of your choice.

BEDROOMS: 3

$774,900

BATHROOMS: 5

$694,900

2 4 0 3 7 C O U N T Y R O A D X SHELL LAKE, WISCONSIN

2 7 7 5 8 L E E F R O A D WEBSTER, WISCONSIN

Beautiful log home with 2 master suites privately nestled on 40 acres with great views.

Luxury lake home on Sand Lake in Burnett County with billiards, bar, spa room and dock.

BEDROOMS: 5

BEDROOMS: 5

BATHROOMS: 4

$774,900

COLDWELL BANKER BURNET DISTINCTIVE HOMES®

BATHROOMS: 4

$799,900

artfulliving.com

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HOME

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNIE SCHLECHTER

188 D E T A I L S

192 D E S I G N

199 R E M O D E L I N G

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Home D E T A I L S

Finishing Touches UPDATED INTERIOR

HARDWARE MAKES FOR AN INSTANT MAKEOVER. B Y C H R I S P L A N TA N P H OTO G R A P H Y BY 2 N D T R U T H

Replacing door, wall and cabinet hardware is one of the fastest, freshest and most well-intentioned ways to upgrade your home’s décor. It’s also a wonderful opportunity to take stock of the latest trends in finishing touches — what’s flourishing and what’s fading. For a relaxed feel, I lean toward living metals that show someone actually lives in the home. Finishes like unlacquered brass, which develops a patina over time, are richer and more substantial than their polished counterparts. “There’s something nostalgic about metals that have warmth and evolve with the oils of someone’s hands,” interior designer Chad James of Nashville, Tennessee, recently told the Wall Street Journal. You need only a screwdriver and a little inspiration to accomplish this remarkable makeover.

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MANHATTAN PROJECT DESIGNER BRUCE KADING BRINGS MINNESOTA MIGHT TO THE BIG APPLE. BY W E N DY L U B OV I C H

Minneapolis interior designer Bruce Kading has put his talents to work on a handsome historic brownstone in the heart of New York City. And after a three-year overhaul, the seven-story jewel is ready for its close-up. “This is surely one of my dream projects,” he notes. “It’s a rare chance to preserve history and tell a story.” The clients also own a home in the Twin Cities as well as properties in Florida and Europe. When they purchased this 1850s row house near Gramercy Park, it was divided up into apartments. Kading and his team completed a full-scale renovation — gutting, preserving and refurbishing the space inside and out — to make it a single-family residence once more. The idea was to create a home that looked layered over time, mixing antiques and period details with modern-day amenities. The living and dining rooms are airy and bright, painted a steely blue green (Sherwin Williams Escape Gray, to be exact). Completed with dark woods and a gilt mirror, the look is elegant and polished. “The dining room is my favorite space,” explains Kading. “It has enough zing to it, but it looks like it’s been there forever.” And while the aesthetic is New York chic, much of the custom furnishings came from Minnesota. The many vintage light fixtures were sourced from Antique Manor and Architectural Antiques, while the handsomely aged oriental rugs were handpicked from Legacy Looms and Woven Arts. And the custom cabinetry and woodwork throughout the home were produced by Tischler Wood of Avon. “I find the craftsmanship is better in Minnesota,” Kading says. “It’s a sensitivity to quality.” Walking from room to room, there is much to admire. A massive brass and glass chandelier dangles down five stories, adding great drama to the seven-story stairway. In the kitchen, an 18th century French fireback adds a European pedigree to the stovetop. The antique mirrored backsplash reflects light around the room with its quatrefoil motif, while the textured tin ceiling above lends a vintage charm. The center island is fitted with a striking pewter top that will gracefully age over time. “The first scratch may shock you,” Kading warns, “but then little by little, it develops the most beautiful patina.”

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANNIE SCHLECHTER

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Home D E S I G N

Because the owner is a bit of a history buff, not one but two sets of presidential portraits adorn the walls. Federalist-style mirrors bring historical glamour, and the very same Schumacher silk lampas fabric that Jackie Kennedy used in the White House has a special place in the library, where it covers a favorite pillow. Collecting antique clocks is another passion, and so Kading has placed them throughout the residence. Several tall case clocks offer a warm welcome near the entryway. The antique ones that sit along the living-room mantle are set and balanced once a year by experts brought in from Europe. The clock in the dining room, meanwhile, plays organ music. Situated on the second floor above the tree-lined street, the master bedroom is a quiet retreat. A lower-level game room is a favorite for friends and family. And the in-house theater gives the owners’ eight grandchildren great delight. But the biggest surprise is up on the top floor, where Kading created a stylish rooftop escape. With nearly 360-degree views of the city, it feels like a secret treehouse right in the middle of Manhattan. The historic church next door provides a dramatic backdrop, its massive Romanesque tower looming large. When the homeowner learned that the seven clocks on the towers were no longer in working order, he offered to cover the cost of repairing them. But he had a request: At least once a year, they have to play Jingle Bells and Stairway to Heaven — a bit of philanthropy coupled with some playful spirit. It’s just one of the many wonderful surprises Kading encountered while building this Manhattan beauty with Minnesota might.

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Home R E M O D E L I N G

PROVEN PROCESS to take your PROJECT from START to FINISH. A

1

DREAMING ABOUT A PROJECT Finding inspiration gets you one step closer to actualizing your dream home. Many homeowners turn to books, magazines, and websites like Houzz and Pinterest to get inspired. Whatever your reason for remodeling, think carefully about what you dislike about your home and what improvements will help you overcome these challenges. Be sure to look to the future, envisioning how you and your family will live in your home five, 10 and 20 years from now.

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NAR I Remodeling Guide AL PROMOTION

2

4

BUDGETING FOR A PROJECT

WORKING WITH A PROFESSIONAL

One of the most important aspects of remodeling is managing your budget. These five things affect the cost of remodeling:

Communication is key to the success of any remodel. Here are five tips to ensure you’re prepared:

Size and scope. Location, space size and specific features all affect cost. Note that square footage alone is not the indicator of cost.

Before work begins, ask your contractor what

Structural changes. Modifying your home’s structure typically costs more because it requires additional design and engineering work.

Keep a job file, including contracts, plans,

Product selections. Finish and product choices affect cost

Ensure your contractor creates a written

as there’s a wide range of price points and quality levels.

change order, signed by both parties, if your project gets modified.

Age of the infrastructure. The age and condition of your home matter because existing structural issues have a great impact on cost. Craftsmanship and quality. Like all things in life, you get what you pay for. High-quality craftsmanship and custom workmanship cost more.

3

SELECTING A PROFESSIONAL Finding a qualified professional for your remodel doesn’t have to be overwhelming. These five guidelines will make the selection easier:

Get local. Local remodelers are compelled to perform quality work to help their businesses thrive. Local firms can be checked through references and your local National Association of the Remodeling Industry chapter.

Get compliant. Another advantage of hiring local professionals is that they will know the building codes and permit requirements. Building codes can vary considerably by jurisdiction and even from year to year.

Get papers. Many states require contractors to be licensed, bonded and/or insured. Contact state or local licensing agencies to ensure the contractor meets all requirements. Most states require a contractor to carry worker’s compensation plus property damage and personal liability insurance.

Get complaint violations. Check with the Better Business Bureau to ensure there are no complaints on record for the contractor.

Get comparable estimates. If you solicit estimates from more than one contractor, ensure everyone is working off the same scope and quality of work. Discuss variations in prices and beware any estimate that comes in substantially lower than others.

inconveniences might occur and plan accordingly. specifications, invoices, change orders and all correspondence.

When you make final payment, request a final affidavit and release of lien as assurance that you will not be liable for any third-party claims for nonpayment. Most importantly, keep the lines of communication open at all times.

5

COMPLETING A PROJECT As your vision is becoming a reality, keep in mind these five final steps:

During the final stages of the project, walk through the space and make a list of any necessary adjustments, known as a punch list, to bring up to your contractor. Look over the contract and ensure you have all of your signed permits, receipts, change orders, lien waivers, warranties and manufacturers’ guides for your products. If new appliances or systems are installed, ask your contractor about any required maintenance and related schedules.

Understand your contractor’s guarantees of quality and warranties. Ensure you know exactly what is covered and the length of time it is covered. Reward a job well done by providing a testimonial, having your space photographed or showcasing your home in a tour.

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Home R E M O D E L I N G

FA KE NEWS

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Busting

FOUR

COMMON MYTHS when it comes to

a

SELECTING

REMODELER.

There’s a reason that bathroom remodel took so long, cost too much and wasn’t exactly what you wanted: you. Or, more specifically, the flawed way you chose a contractor. For decades, homeowners have been using the same selection criteria with mixed results. Why do we continue to use the same methods then act surprised when things don’t work out? Here, we dissect four common myths that plague homeowners in hopes of making your remodeling experience a smashing success.


NAR I Remodeling Guide AL PROMOTION

Three bids will do the trick. The three-bid myth may be the most insidious of them all. It starts with the dynamic set: reducing a service to a dollar value. If you prioritize price, you’ll be unhappy with the result every time. The larger problem lies in the request itself. If you’ve got a full set of construction drawings and a full set of specifications, the bids will be very similar. When your project is fully developed and thought-out, you’re going to get extremely accurate estimates. More typically, though, homeowners have a loose idea of what they want. In the absence of a fully detailed plan, contractors offer guestimates, which can double by the time your project is complete.

Crowdsourced referrals are reliable. The guy who fixed a friend of a friend’s roof probably isn’t the right person to remodel your kitchen. In this day and age, any respectable professional has a website with a portfolio, is engaged in the community, and is a member of a trade association like the National Association of the Remodeling Industry. This is a mini marriage of sorts, so do your due diligence: Review a contractor’s work, process and company culture, and talk with past clients who’ve completed projects of a similar scale and scope.

The customer is always right. When retailer Harry Gordon Selfridge coined this phrase in the early 1900s, it was meant to convince customers that they would get superior service with his company and to convince his employees to deliver on that promise. But over time, the expression has become a twisted weapon. As it turns out, the customer is seldom right, especially when it comes to the highly technical materials and methods used in modern construction. You wouldn’t tell your surgeon how to do her job; don’t tell your remodeler how to do his. You will have far better success if you extend appreciation for his expertise and talents.

Remodelers are out to get you. The remodeling industry is plagued by a bad reputation, and not without cause. Fortunately, in the past two decades, increased licensing efforts, strict insurance requirements and complex building codes have helped weed out the unsavory characters. On top of that, trade associations like NARI have worked hard to elevate the professionalism of the industry. It’s important to remember that the remodeling industry is ultimately a service industry, and that client satisfaction is paramount. Remodelers don’t have the luxury of constructing your project in a private warehouse; they must perform the work right in your living room, where it can be scrutinized daily. Admittedly, this can be difficult to watch from a front-row seat, which is why you should enter into this relationship from a position of trust.

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Home R E M O D E L I N G

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER VONDELINDE

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NAR I Remodeling Guide AL PROMOTION

BEFORE +

AFTER

HAGSTROM BUILDER crafts a sleek NAUTICAL-THEMED LAKE HOME. Nestled on the shores of Lake Minnetonka was the perfect residence for this sailor and father of young boys with a shared love of the open water. The house didn’t know it yet, but it would soon become a contemporary nautical-themed home with the care, detail and precision millwork consistent with water-going vessels. The abode required a radical transformation, but Hagstrom Builder and NewStudio Architecture were up for the task. “After looking at all the options, I ended up diving into the deep end and remodeling the whole house at the same time,” recalls the owner. “I was in over my head, but the Hagstrom team made the process stress-free from start to finish.” The first order of business was reworking the main-floor layout to provide generous lake views. This wasn’t without its challenges, namely removing walls without disrupting the home’s structure. The Hagstrom team deftly eliminated the sight-blocking offenders and dressed the remaining load-bearing walls in white oak, which was wire brushed to give it a slightly weathered appearance then sealed in a three-part marine varnish. A previously sequestered kitchen was relocated to a more prominent part of the home where the family could spend time together without losing sight of the lake. The new cabinetry was given a crisp nickel-gap treatment reminiscent of shiplap siding and painted a sharp white. The contrasting walnut island brings the perfect amount of rich wood tone to the space and eases the transition to the slate floors, which extend to the adjacent mudroom and foyer. Hidden in plain sight are jamb switches tucked into the door hinges that activate flush-mounted LED lights, keeping the clean design free of clutter. The foyer and main staircase underwent their own transformations. First, the bearing structure was manipulated to open up the stairwell, which was then flanked with custom welded handrails and warm walnut treads. At the same time, the foyer ceiling was lowered to a more appropriate height, creating a hidden playroom for the boys. A round portico skylight was installed along with a door disguised as a bookcase — a magical touch a child of any age can appreciate. The Hagstrom team also created something for the adults’ enjoyment: a hidden wine room accessible via a disguised hatch, much like that of a sailing vessel. The automated two-piece hatch springs open from the mudroom floor to reveal a circular steel staircase. On descent, one might notice the hydraulic rams that provide stability and manage the weight, allowing for either mechanical or manual operation of the doors. Unseen are the infrared sensors in the ceiling that prevent an accidental opening and the linear pressure switch that prevents an inadvertent closing. At the bottom of the stairs awaits a wine room with tasting bar and climate-controlled storage. Not to be forgotten, the bathrooms were restructured and refinished in the same nautical theme. One boasts a floating vanity and contrasting Brazilian cherry and maple wood walls reminiscent of a Chris-Craft boat. The spaces were outfitted with the requisite features: waterfall counters, steam showers and elegant fixtures that echo the clean finishes and textures of the home. “It’s a real gift when you have a client who is so clear and passionate about the direction their home should take,” says President Peter Hagstrom. “You want to do a great justice to their imagined outcome.” The transformation complete, the owners now live in their dream home, able to while away the day together watching the lake change throughout the year. And despite the ravages of winter, they never have to leave their boat.

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An hour outside Atlanta in Adairsville, Georgia, sits Barnsley Resort. This 3,000-acre plantation is reminiscent of a beloved childhood summer camp — only better. At Camp Grownup, as I like to call it, tents are replaced by luxury cottages, hot chocolate is swapped for bourbon and s’mores are topped with bacon. Rooted in rich history, the property was once known as Woodlands, the estate prominent businessman and cotton broker Godfrey Barnsley built as a gift for his wife, Julia. Today, the updated and widely expanded resort holds true to many of the traits and traditions instilled by Barnsley himself. A trip here is destined to be full of adventure and relaxation, delicious food and drink, and true Southern hospitality. Like any great summer camp, Barnsley offers activities fit for every interest. Golf aficionados can spend the day on the Jim Fazio–designed course, with PGA pros on hand for lessons and tips. Hunters rave about the sporting clays and SpringBank Plantation, a 1,800-acre sister property hosting annual dove, quail, pheasant and turkey hunts. Other endeavors include fly-fishing, horseback riding and, my personal favorite, visiting the Barnsley Barnyard. Those who aren’t feeling particularly adventurous will find themselves right at home at the spa. The fun is fueled with delicious bites from the resort’s garden-to-table restaurants led by Executive Chef Joseph Elliott. Epicureans will enjoy the open-air Jeep tour through SpringBank Plantation, culminating with an alfresco meal — think homemade fried chicken and red velvet cake — savored in true summer-camp fashion. Come evening, the campfire is the ideal spot to reflect on the day, nibble on s’mores with all the fixings, and sip on a glass of Barnsley’s custom barrel of Woodford Reserve.

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Brainerd International Raceway has come a long way since its debut in 1968, when the sporting complex operated without grandstands, restrooms or safety barriers. But those omissions did little to deter racers and spectators, who have long been drawn to the North’s largest racetrack for love of speed and sport. Today, owners Jed and Kristi Copham are making die-hards feel truly at home at the modern sports facility. With the development of BIR Luxury Garages, devotees can now own a custom residence with unprecedented access to the raceway. “We have 10 trackside sites on the end of the drag strip that overlook turns one and two of the road course,” explains BIR developer Dave Copham, whose family enjoys its own luxury garage. “The three-story houses all have observation decks. You can store your cars inside, and if you want to race, you can drive directly out onto the track.” While some sites in the development remain available for purchase, the unusual setup means that the rare opportunity to own a luxury garage won’t last forever. “There isn’t another facility or project like this that provides such unique access,” says Andy Anderson, president of custom building company Nor-Son. “For my family and me, our luxury garage has been a wonderful opportunity to experience the track in a variety of ways, whether entertaining clients, attending concerts or events, or just enjoying the lakes area in a special way.” Each house can be tailored to the interests — and the autos — of its owner. Dave Copham chose a contemporary aesthetic, incorporating special touches like tile sourced from the Lamborghini factory in Italy, while the Andersons opted for a more rustic blend of garage and living space. “Sliding glass doors let you showcase your vehicles right in the living area of the home,” notes Anderson. “Between all the events and races at the club, there are about 40 days a year when you can come up and drive. For someone with track cars, there’s simply no easier way to do what you love.”

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My son, Joseph, is standing thigh deep in a cold wash of current that sounds like endlessly pouring a bucket of water onto a pile of stones. His half of the stream is shaded by a grove of old black walnut trees, from which a kingfisher has just dropped then swooped directly over Joe’s head, although he hasn’t noticed it. Just upstream, our friend Paul lifts his fly rod, his line jumping from the taut surface of a deep run. The bright line forms an arc behind him, straightens, forms an arc ahead of him then falls like a tender whiplash back onto the water. It is a moment filled with attentiveness and longing, and an accumulation of devoted practice that in another context might be considered prayerful. Joe’s head is bowed, although he is not praying. In fact, he is almost certainly cursing, in whatever inward language 13-year-old boys use to curse. Somewhere below the dark surface of the stream, a gold-bladed Mepps spinner hangs in the current, one hook sunk into a submerged branch.

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Somewhere near his feet lies a scattering of brand-new lures and swivels that fell from his mini tackle box as he tried to simultaneously steady himself against the heave of the water, hold his fishing rod in his armpit and finger through the tiny compartments of sharp hooks in search of something to tie onto his snapped line. My love for him is never more acute than when he is suffering, even the shallow suffering of errant casts and lost lures. He means his frustration to look black and threatening, but all I see is my boy, forlorn and a little embarrassed. Joe stares sulkily at the lures that remain, which seem to have lost all the speculative magic they had just last night, when he laid them out on his bed, removed them one by one from their packages and chose the precise compartment where each belonged. Paul raises his arm high, and the tip of his rod bends and shivers for the fifth or sixth time today. Half a minute later, he crouches, lifts a wriggling brown trout from the water, twists the hook quickly from its jaw and lets it slide out of his hand. I catch Joe glance up at this then drop his head back down to his tackle box. Of course what I want most in the world is to wade over to him. To stand next to him while we pick out his next lure together. To quickly tie it on for him and give him an I’ve-been-there shoulder pat. To walk him through all the steps that lead from his 13-year-old frustration to Paul’s elegant yet playful adult competence. But one of those steps, it turns out, is this moment: its frustration and disappointment, its real-life incoherence, its requirement that he pick from among his sadly diminished set of spinners and make the best of it. It’s a tiny step in the direction of resilience, a step away from the natural entitlement of childhood. As it turns out, we’re not really here to fish, when all is said and done, at least not entirely. We’re here to put in one day’s work in the raising of an American boy. In the end, Joe picks a black and yellow Panther Martin that Paul gave him earlier in the day as he explained that he used to make $2 an hour babysitting and that after an evening of watching the neighbor kids, he could afford two Panther Martins, which he would use on this very stream until he lost them in trees or on underwater snags or sometimes in a big fish’s jaw when a badly tied knot failed. “How’s it going, Joe?” Paul calls over the rush of the current. Joe is absorbed in tying on his inherited lure — slowly, clumsily, carefully, but by himself. “Good,” he replies without looking up. A minute later, he resumes casting. Later that day, he will catch his first fish. It will be a small brook trout, pulled with some skill from a complicated deadfall. He will hold it up, his stoic expression clenching down on a smile, as the fish twists acrobatically, a Panther Martin hooked in its lower jaw.

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AN OLD BEER LEARNS NEW TRICKS — AND RISKS AN IDENTITY CRISIS. BY BRIAN KEVIN P H OTO G R A P H Y BY 2 N D T R U T H

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Craig Long sets his beer on the counter of the bratwurst stand while showing off an iPhone photo of a deer he shot last fall. It’s the start of a two-night festival to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Jacob Leinenkugel Brewing Co., based in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. The 67-year-old from Kewaunee, Wisconsin, is enjoying a Märzen-style lager, brewed for the occasion with just four ingredients — barley, hops, yeast and water — in accordance with a 500-year-old Bavarian beer-purity law. His drinking companion, 52-year-old Glen Bootay of Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, sips a Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy, a tawny wheat beer laced with lemonade flavoring and sucrose syrup. Long puckers his face at his buddy’s sweetened brew then concedes that any fan of Leinie’s is a member of a tribe. “It’s a cult thing,” he says, raising his plastic cup. Leinenkugel’s and its parent company, MillerCoors, would like to make the brand more than just a cult favorite. And they have largely succeeded with Summer Shandy, a breakout hit released in 2007 that has inspired an entire line of flavor-enhanced brews — pomegranate, watermelon, cocoa raspberry — and, for the first time, brought the country’s seventh oldest brewery to taps and store shelves nationwide. But with success has come the kind of identity crisis facing many midsize regional brewers as they jostle for market share with ascendant microbreweries and shelf-hogging mega brands: How do they expand their appeal without losing their patina of authenticity? Leinenkugel’s, now known around the country for its fruity shandies, owes its home-turf reputation to a slate of unfussy heritage lagers that Wisconsinites have long enjoyed at corner taverns and fish fries. When the Miller Brewing Co. bought the brewery in 1988, some 90 percent of its production was dedicated to its flagship beer, known today as Leinenkugel’s Original (“Leinie’s O” to the faithful), a crisp German lager brewed from the 1867 recipe of patriarch Jacob Leinenkugel. The buyout initially ruffled feathers here, but Milwaukee-based Miller won over all but the most absolute of purists by keeping production in this small town and keeping on the Leinenkugel family to manage the brand. Now headed by Dick Leinenkugel, the founder’s great great grandson, the brewery still enjoys a reputation around Wisconsin as a scrappy family enterprise, although some of the beer is brewed in Milwaukee. Miller’s early efforts to sell Leinie’s O on the East and West coasts fizzled. So the company embraced variety as a means of wooing new drinkers in the North, devoting more and more effort to a motley parade of new labels, limited releases and seasonal brews. Today, many breweries have embraced a similar model of quasi-independent corporate partnership and persistent novelty. Summer Shandy is Leinenkugel’s first national success. The style is a take on a radler, a traditional German mixture of beer

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and citrus juice or soda, originally created to sate thirsty cyclists. (“Radler” is German for cyclist.) While some craft beers incorporate fruit into the brewing process, Leinenkugel’s shandies are the products of extracts and sweeteners added to a finished brew. Encouraged by regional demand, MillerCoors pushed Summer Shandy nationally in 2010 as a summer seasonal release. By the summer of 2012, it was outselling all but three craft competitors in supermarkets. A dozen new Leinenkugel’s shandy varieties followed (as did copycats), and the line now accounts for nearly 70 percent of the brewer’s production. As of last year, Leinenkugel’s was the country’s fifth best-selling craft beer brand. But for some longtime drinkers, including many among the 11,000 who have gathered in Chippewa Falls for the anniversary party, watching trendy shandies eclipse the workingman’s beers their grandparents once drank is disorienting. During a Q-and-A session with the company’s brewmasters, one wistful Leinie’s drinker shouts, “When are you going to brew some beer that tastes like beer?” Andy McGrane, a 47-year-old Chippewa Falls resident clad in lederhosen, describes shandy drinkers and fans of his favorite style, Leinenkugel’s Red Lager, as totally different groups. “I had no idea what was going on with Summer Shandy in these other states until friends from Tampa, Florida, told me it was their favorite,” he notes. That schism weighs on the mind of C.J. Leinenkugel, 34, an account executive in the Pacific Northwest who, along with his three siblings and a cousin, is among the sixth generation to work for his family’s brewery. “We’re the shandy people to some folks now,” he says, after posing for a family photo with some 90 members of the Leinenkugel clan. “It does, in a sense, bum you out because we brew so many other beers. The beer that put a roof over my head was Leinie’s O.” Last August, MillerCoors released Leinenkugel’s Original nationwide for the first time as part of a fall sampler pack. Dick Leinenkugel hopes to more than double total production to two million barrels by 2020. And with light-bodied German beers enjoying a resurgence, he sees an opportunity to attract new drinkers to the clean, malty lagers beloved in Wisconsin — particularly the 35 percent of shandy drinkers who, company research suggests, didn’t previously drink beer. It won’t be easy. “That’s a tall order,” says Ryan Schmiege, Wisconsin native and assistant brewmaster at Deschutes Brewery in Oregon. “Shandies are the soda of beer. They’re fun, but I wonder whether they’ll really convince people to try the old stuff.” All the same, he’s glad he can finally buy Leinie’s old brew far from his home state. “It’s like cheese curds or the Packers,” he notes. “It’s fun, it’s nostalgic, it’s Wisconsin. Even though it’s bigger than that now.” This article is reprinted in partnership with The New York Times.


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Intel T R E N D

DESIGN DU JOUR THESE DAYS, TOP RESTAURANTS ARE SERVING UP MORE THAN JUST GREAT FOOD. BY MICHAEL NAGRANT

One of America’s great chefs is also a kleptomaniac. Gavin Kaysen, owner of Twin Cities eateries Bellecour and Spoon and Stable, likes to steal spoons from the best restaurants around the world. His thievery is neither mindless nor malicious. Rather, he liberates the cutlery to serve as a fond reminder of his mentors and the special places where he’s cooked and eaten. He took a spoon from Paul Bocuse when he dined in the kitchen there. In 2005, he pilfered a spoon from Café Boulud, not knowing he’d eventually become chef de cuisine there. His hobby would eventually lead to a central design element (and part of the name) of Spoon and Stable: a piece of driftwood upon which a selection of his collection is mounted.

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Until recently, this kind of detail in restaurant design wasn’t common. Building a restaurant requires a lot of capital in a business where margins are razor-thin. Many eateries are bootstrapped by chefs who, while creative in the kitchen, are light in the wallet. Design budgets suffer all too often in service to food and hospitality. Even when restaurateurs have money, they tend to replicate what’s worked in the past. For many years, good design basically meant a smattering of reclaimed wood, some exposed brick and a chalkboard menu. “We were one of the first to do that look back in 2005, and at the time it was creative,” notes Adam Farmerie, principal and founder of New York City design firm AvroKO. “But eventually there is mimicry and Disneyfication of the idea, and it gets stale.” Firms like AvroKO, Minneapolis-based Shea (which designed Spoon and Stable), and Chicago-based Studio K are revolutionizing restaurant design, creating rich multilayered experiences that are almost as crucial to an eatery’s identity as what’s leaving the kitchen. “Going out to eat is the new night event for people; we are the dinner and the show,” says Kaysen. “But if the space has no energy and no soul, why go back?” Shea principal Tanya Spaulding echoes this sentiment: “In Europe, we go out with our friends and might commandeer a table for five hours,” she explains. “In the United States, they’re always turning tables. But that’s changing; now dining is also entertainment.” A lot of new design is based in what Farmerie calls “hospitable thinking,” the idea that design can make guests feel unthreatened and reduce their anxiety. Designers often start with a focus on the transition from outside to in. At Spoon and Stable, for example, there’s a roll-up garage door, which conveys the restaurant’s conviviality and makes you want to join the party. At GT Prime, a Chicago steakhouse designed by Studio K founder Karen Herold, the aesthetic is that of a magical hunting lodge set amidst a forest. The gigantic front door looks like it’s straight out of Harry Potter, something that might allow entrée into Hagrid’s house. The first time you see it, you wonder what lies inside. Kevin Boehm, partner in Chicago’s Boka Restaurant Group (which has tapped both AvroKO and Studio K), believes increased competition and changing attitudes require a new approach to design. “We live in an ADD world,” he says. “People flip through photos, stories and songs with staggering speed. Creating layers aesthetically within our spaces keeps people interested. It’s deceptively intoxicating, and we think it keeps people coming back.” It’s no secret that attention spans are short in the age of social media. People are consuming content in real time and shifting their focus every second. Which begs the question: If a restaurant’s design isn’t Instagram-worthy, will people even know it exists? Generational shifts and food television have also played a role in dictating modern approaches to restaurant design. Millennials love transparency, and because so many people tune in to cooking shows, they like to see how the sausage is made. “That’s why we have a lot of open kitchens, like at Spoon and Stable,” notes Shea founder David Shea. “People like to see you making the pain au chocolat. We like to lift the veil.” At Minneapolis’s World Street Kitchen, another of the firm’s creations, you can sit at the tasting counter and watch the lamb belly get griddled or the lemongrass meatballs get rolled.

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Something Borrowed

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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY MOMOTARO, ERIN SIMKIN, GARRETT ROWLAND

The aesthetic at Momotaro in Chicago, an AvroKO design for Boka Restaurant Group, is inspired by the Japanese salaryman, an idealized version of the businessmen who shaped the country into a modern-day financial juggernaut. The menu, for example, features yearbook-style photos of corporate workers. The bill of fare is delivered in an interdepartmental mail envelope stamped with Japanese characters. And the back-bar menu is designed to look like a vintage Tokyo stock-exchange trading board. The walls within the bathroom area are adorned with 991,000 individual pen strokes done by local art students, an homage to the obsessiveness of the Japanese salaryman. This ink-stallation also doubles as a tongue-in-cheek nod to bathroom graffiti. The downstairs bar, Izakaya, features a vintage Japanese payphone. You’ll probably notice it on your first visit, but you likely won’t realize that if you pick it up and listen, you’ll hear prerecorded snippets of Japanese conversation.

Dialogue, which opened last year in Santa Monica, California, is poised to become one of America’s best restaurants. Chef Dave Beran, formerly of Chicago’s Alinea and Next, serves a menu that evokes the emotion of the season, riffing on things like the memory of the smell of his mom’s chamomile tea or the tang of classic French onion soup served in the form of a deep-fried croquette brûléed with Gruyere cheese that bursts with soup when you bite into it. Sweet courses don’t come only at the end of the meal but instead are woven between savory courses, a neat trick that keeps the palate interested. You have to punch in a secret code to gain entry to the eatery, which is located on the second floor of a food court above an ice-cream shop. There are a lot of iconoclastic things going on at Dialogue, but one of the quirkiest is a gold spoon mounted on a piece of wood that hangs over the kitchen pass near the tasting bar. It’s a gift from Gavin Kaysen and his brother, Sean. Beran and Gavin developed a friendship working together on the global culinary competition Bocuse d’Or. Beran was an admirer of Sean’s craftsmanship at Spoon and Stable and asked him to do some of the woodwork at Dialogue. As a friend of Gavin’s, Beran knew he needed to keep a close eye on his spoons. Despite his vigilance, he discovered he was short one after Sean completed the job. He called Gavin, saying, “I know you took the spoon. I need it back; we only have 20 of them.” A few weeks later, Beran got his spoon back, but it was mounted on a piece of wood trim left over from the Spoon and Stable buildout. Beran decided to hang the work of art in his new eatery. “Gavin and Sean are very good friends of ours,” he notes. “Gavin is someone who I have always looked to for advice, both personally and professionally. It’s an honor to have a piece of his restaurant in mine.”


Rose. Rabbit. Lie., a Las Vegas supper club designed by AvroKO, features Gatsby-esque finishes and makes you feel as if you’re dining in the manse of a jazz-age millionaire. Bugs and butterflies encased in glass in one room suggest that this particular tycoon was a dilettante entomologist. AvroKO has multidisciplinary teams, made up of architects, interior designers and graphic designers who study the work of behavioral psychologists and scour bookstores and libraries for inspiration. Farmerie says the firm’s approach is grounded in the Bauhausian principle of Gesamtkunstwerk, or looking at a design as a total work of art. “We like to say we work from dirt to spoon, meaning that from the breaking of the ground to when the first spoon is laid on the table, we handle everything in between,” he notes. “We do a lot of research, watch a lot of films and read a lot of books. We live in a Pinterest age, but — not to sound like an angry old man, because I’m not that old — mood boards are just making choices based on aesthetic. If the design is not driven by a more artful point of view, it loses something.” AvroKO also puts its money where its mouth is, creating and operating its own restaurants and bars, like New York City’s Ghost Donkey and Saxon + Parole, where the team tests many of its design theories. In one experiment, they watched

how diners reacted when neighboring tables were placed nine, 12, 15 and 24 inches apart. It turns out the ideal table spacing is somewhere between 12 and 15 inches. Shea starts before the dirt, helping restaurateurs write their business plans, scout locations and select real estate, something the firm did for Spoon and Stable. “We talk more people out of opening restaurants than into opening them,” says Shea. “We don’t want to see our clients fail, so we make sure they understand everything about the business before they start.” There’s a saying that you can eat your worries away. Which is to say that gorging on a fabulous multicourse meal or lingering over a masterful pastry can help you forget the evils of the world. The fastidiousness of these designers adds another layer to that idea. Which is to say that when you enter the restaurant worlds created by these firms, they can be so transformative, so escapist that you almost feel like you’ve become someone else: a friend of a jazz-age tycoon or a hunter of magical beasts. You might even find yourself a little disappointed when you step out onto the curb after your meal. But, more likely, you’ll be grateful for the fantastical experience.

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Intel H I S T O R Y

The GRAND

DAMES of LAKE MINNETONKA BEHIND EVERY GREAT MANSE IS A GREAT WOMAN.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAREN MELVIN

BY BETTE HAMMEL

Downton Abbey was a cultural phenomenon, with huge numbers of fans like myself tuning in to soak up the glamorous atmosphere surrounding that very wealthy family, its staff and its various pursuits. Presiding over them all with a queenly presence was elegant matriarch Violet Crawley, as portrayed by Dame Maggie Smith. When, much to my dismay, the series ended, I started thinking about Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history and realized that Downton Abbey was not the only estate with a matron presiding over it. Lake Minnetonka has had its fair share of grand dames, among them Eleanor Jerusha Lawler Pillsbury, Grace Bliss Dayton and Louise Heffelfinger Bell. As the wives of successful men, these women wielded significant influence with wit, charm and intelligence. They shared many interests in which they delighted: the arts, fashion, travel, sports, philanthropy, and of course decorating and tending to their equally fantastic mansions. These grand dames of Lake Minnetonka will now take their rightful places in Minnesota history.

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Intel H I S T O R Y

PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY THE PILLSBURY FAMILY, KAREN MELVIN, PHIL MELVIN

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Eleanor Jerusha Lawler Pillsbury 1887–1991

§ By all standards, Eleanor Jerusha Lawler Pillsbury was the foremost grand dame of Lake Minnetonka. There was just something about the way she carried herself: elegant, gracious and beautiful. Born in 1887 in Mitchell, South Dakota, Juty lost her beloved father in her early years. Soon after, she and her mother moved to St. Paul, where the widowed Mrs. Lawler met the president of the Soo Line railway, Edmund Pennington, and married again. She insisted on the very best education for Juty and sent her to three different convents, from St. Louis to Rome, where her grandmother wintered. Accompanied by her grandmother, Juty traveled around Europe and acquired knowledge of art and architecture. Upon returning to St. Paul, the 20-year-old entered the debutante scene. Among her many possible suitors was an attractive man nine years her elder, John Sargent Pillsbury. He was immediately dazzled by her intelligence, her reserved nature and of course her striking beauty. Although Juty was hesitant about marriage at first, she soon discovered they shared many interests. They grew to know each other well and were wed in 1911. Juty had opinions, good taste and unfailing determination to build the house of their dreams. She gave birth to six children: John Jr., Edmund, Ella, Charles, Jane and George. At the time, the family lived in an aging South Minneapolis mansion on Stevens Avenue. Come summer, they’d migrate to a small rented farmhouse near the big lake. Knowing their home was too small for their brood, John began searching for lake property. While playing golf, he heard from an investor that the Dunwoody property, a large farm with some lakeshore, was available on short notice. Impulsively, he agreed to buy it. That night, he tossed and turned; he really didn’t want a farm, but he had made a gentlemen’s agreement. Sensing his dilemma, Juty suggested they take out the Packard and see the property for themselves. Upon seeing that the old Dunwoody house sat right on the lakeshore, she came up with a solution for her husband’s quandary: to discuss the situation with his astute friend, Charles Bovey. Bovey thought the farmland was ideal for a much-needed golf course and arranged for its purchase and conversion into what is today the Woodhill Country Club. The Pillsburys, meanwhile, became the happy owners of the Bracketts Point land. Finally, the time came to plan their new home, which Juty decided should be called Southways, because “you have to go south a ways from the country road to approach the house.” Now came the big decision: selecting the architect. Both John and Juty wanted the man who had designed America’s foremost country houses on the East Coast, Harrie T. Lindeberg. Juty and Lindeberg began working on the plans together, but they didn’t always agree. He insisted, for example, that a large living room be built at the center of the house, while she preferred

a smaller drawing room. He won in this case. The room featured floor-to-ceiling windows and elegant oriental rugs over curly pinewood floors. He planned for walls of butternut, but Juty wanted them painted green. This became a matter of great dispute, and Lindeberg finally gave in. Juty sat for hours with a painter to select the perfect shade, settling on a teal color. As for furniture, according to her diary, “I never had a decorator, except for the powder room. And for the rest of the house, I collected furniture from New York City and London.” She was especially proud of the front entryway, designed by top American ironworker Samuel Yellin, with its large wrought-iron peacock adorning the glass. Later, when it came time to decorate the living-room fireplace grill, Yellin’s granddaughter flew to Southways to design it. To the right of the entrance, a long narrow hallway called the gallery served as a backdrop for Juty’s favorite artworks and continued outdoors, culminating in a beautiful garden. Off the gallery were a spacious, mahogany-paneled library and a summer porch, a beloved spot for the whole family. Lindeberg worked from 1916 to 1918 designing the house to be timeless. He claimed that a country house could be elegant without being ostentatious. For the exterior, he used natural materials, expert proportioning and fine craftsmanship. From its long vista, the manse is reminiscent of an English estate, and yet, with beautiful Lake Minnetonka looming in the distance, it remains very Minnesotan. The landscaping was crucial. Trees of all varieties dotted the property, but new gardens had to be planned. Juty, who admittedly didn’t have much of a green thumb, wanted English gardens but knew she would need an expert to tend to them. She found one in Brunnie Mayr, the wife of their superintendent. At first, Juty tried doing some weeding herself but wound up with a rash. Nevertheless, she joined the early Lake Minnetonka Garden Club and won a medal for her collection of blooms. In her diary, Juty wrote of the many games she planned for the children and later of the activities in which they indulged: sailing, swimming and tennis. The Pillsburys enjoyed entertaining, and she excelled at planning very special parties, from jovial athletic affairs to royal visits. After her husband’s death in 1968, Juty sought the advice of a local contractor, thinking perhaps she should shrink or replace the house. He immediately responded that her home could never be replaced; she should enjoy it as is. Which she did, although she did decide to downsize the home in practical, tasteful ways. Juty continued to support her community throughout her life, contributing to such organizations as the Lake Minnetonka Garden Club, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Minnesota Historical Society and the Minnesota Orchestra. She continued her philanthropy and her healthy pursuits, such as swimming, until she died in 1991 at 104 years old.

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Grace Bliss Dayton 1890–1966

§ Grace Caruthers Bliss was enjoying her senior year at Dakota Wesleyan University in Mitchell, South Dakota, when she was formally introduced to George Nelson Dayton in 1911. Properly impressed by the pretty young brunette and her obvious intelligence, the bachelor farmer found himself taking many train trips to visit her, occasions requiring the presence of one parent at all times and ending promptly at 10 p.m. One evening, he overstayed until 10:30 and proposed. Though pleased, Grace insisted she could not marry him until after she graduated. By October 1912, they were wed. Although Grace was a devout Methodist, she agreed to join his church, Westminster Presbyterian. Back in Minneapolis, George arranged for their first home on Blaisdell Avenue next door to his parents, George Draper and Emma Chadwick Dayton. Grace faced a challenging new world in the Twin Cities, which she tackled with dedication and enthusiasm. Having spent his boyhood on the family farm in Worthington, George had an apparent love of farming. Armed with a degree from the University of Minnesota School of Agriculture, he managed the Oak Leaf stock farm in Anoka County for several years. At that same time, his father and brother embarked on a new venture, purchasing Goodfellow’s department store in downtown Minneapolis. Reluctantly, George gave up the farm business to join his family in running what became known as the Dayton Dry Goods Company. In the hectic years ahead, Grace gave birth to five lively sons: Donald, Bruce, Wallace, Kenneth and Douglas. For the five growing boys, the best news came in 1926 when their father bought the 90-acre Rose Farm, the Longyear property on Upper Lake Minnetonka. They promptly renamed it Boulder Bridge Farm for the bridge that crossed the lagoon. A gentleman’s farm, it had all the attributes the boys craved; now they could swim, horseback ride, operate small boats, play with their Newfoundland dog and even work on the farm. Both parents went horseback riding every Saturday and Sunday, too, and Grace became a skilled equestrienne. For his part, George modernized the farm, transforming it into a place to breed 200 champion Guernsey cows, 70 Belgian horses and many other animals. For horse breeding, he procured top-quality stallions and mares, and added more acreage, bringing the property to a total of 900 acres. The house, with its 20 rooms, suited the family quite well. Designed by J.M. Lyton Architects, the enormous wood-frame

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Artful Living

Magazine of the North

Dutch Colonial boasted two gambrel roofs stretching out 125 linear feet over its hillside site. A favorite place for the family was the sprawling open porch that partially wrapped around the house, revealing great views of the lake. Boulder Bridge gave Grace the chance to exercise her green thumb, and she worked with the landscape crew to plan the gardens and greenhouses. Wildflowers were her particular passion, and as such, the stream garden was planted with trillium and violets. In 1956, the Men’s Garden Club of Minneapolis helped organize the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum. Two years later, working with the Lake Minnetonka Garden Club, Grace provided funding for addition acreage for the project. Years later after her passing, her sons established the Grace B. Dayton Wildflower Garden there as a way to honor and memorialize her. Dayton’s, which George oversaw as president, kept growing and growing. Always aware of her position in society, the ever-modest Grace gave substantial financial support to a number of cultural, educational and social-welfare institutions. She was especially active in the church, served as a trustee of both the Dayton and the Dakota Wesleyan University foundations, and during both World War I and World War II spent many hours volunteering for the American Red Cross. Music was one of her many interests, and she joined the advisory board to the Women’s Association of the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra. She also served on boards and committees for such organizations as the American Association of University Women, Friends of the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America and the United Negro College Fund. Seeing the world became Grace’s great passion after George’s death in 1950, as he had never really enjoyed traveling. She and friend Oscar Webber, of the Hudson’s department store of Detroit, would often travel together by ocean liner. And every fall, she visited her niece, Grace Bliss, in New York City, where they enjoyed shopping and theatergoing. Grace Bliss Dayton was, in every sense of the term, a grand dame. Raising five boys who went on to become some of the Twin Cities’ most successful businessmen is just one of the many reasons why. Among the others: her stamina and courage when sorrows arose, her impressive abilities working with all kinds of people, and finally her dignity, stature and beauty that shone wherever she went.


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PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY RUTH STRIKER DAYTON AND KAREN MELVIN


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Louise Heffelfinger Bell 1878–1961

§ Like her friends Juty Pillsbury and Grace Dayton, Louise Heffelfinger Bell married well, becoming Mrs. James Ford Bell in 1902. Her husband was known not only as the founder of General Mills but also for his magnificent library, which he eventually donated to the University of Minnesota. Nevertheless, Louise was far from the glamorous grand-dame type, according to her grandchildren. In contrast, she was known for her engaging personality, her fun-loving disposition and her great parties. Short and stocky, she was a natural athlete, readily vanquishing male opponents on the tennis court. She even learned how to load and shoot a gun to hunt grouse and quail, activities quite unusual for women at the time. Despite developing arthritis later in life, she continued to play tennis with her cane in one hand and her racket in the other. Born in 1878 in Minneapolis, Louise attended a private boarding school for girls in Philadelphia, where she qualified for the girls’ baseball (more likely softball) team. Meanwhile, her brother, William Walter “Pudge” Heffelfinger, a star athlete at Yale, became the first professional football player in the country. Soon after her wedding, Louise gave birth to four children: James Jr., Charles, Samuel and Sally. All four were born at the family home, Belford, where there was plenty of household staff on hand to help, including a nanny, a butler, a cook, maids, a chauffeur and a gardener. Sited high on a hill overlooking Lake Minnetonka, Belford was perfect for outdoor sports: boating and sailing in summer and sledding in winter. When the children were young, neighbors would join them for popular toboggan competitions, pushing off from a tower to pick up speed on the iced track. When conditions were right, they would glide right over to Breezy Point then have to lug their toboggans all the way back. Come summer, Louise liked to take guests out on Loafden, her 44-foot flat-bottomed motorboat. For entertainment, she would bring her little piano out to the boat deck and have popular Twin Cities pianist Sid Williams play their favorite tunes. Her husband decided this was not safe, so she moved her little piano back inside. But they did bring Loafden along to Rainy Lake, a beloved family retreat. In addition to sports, Louise loved theater and music, most of all the performers. During World War II when the circus came to town, she invited the cast to Belford, charging an admission fee of donated cigarettes for the troops. The original estate was built in 1908 by the first Bell, James Stroud Bell, who came to Minneapolis from Philadelphia to head the Washburn-Crosby Company. His architect, William Channing Whitney, created a Mediterranean-style country

manor of gleaming white stucco and red tile. Bell promptly named it Belford, combining his name and that of his wife, Sallie Montgomery Ford. Next to inherit the estate was James Ford Bell, who transformed it from a summer house into a three-story, year-round residence. In 1964, James Ford Bell Jr. became the third Bell to occupy the home, along with his wife, Elinor Watson, a talented pianist and music lover. They decided to remove the third floor, which had been added for the household staff. The still spacious interior offered enough room for two grand pianos and comfortable seating in the drawing room as well as a separate formal dining room, handsome library, sunroom, kitchen and bath. The exterior of Belford retained much of its neoclassical façade, featuring a symmetrical design with two wings projecting out from the center. The lakeside terrace showcased the European influences with its Corinthian columns, balustrade and arched windows. Alongside the house were gardens blooming with Louise’s favorite flower, pink peonies. The upper terrace boasted a series of tall, round columns, reminiscent of a Roman forum, that framed another garden. On the other side of the drive was the large rectangular swimming pool, also framed with tall white columns, as well as a plaza for Louise’s piano and seating for guests. Throughout her life, Louise loved to throw parties, often out by the pool, where Williams would play her piano. For big events, she would invite upward of 75 guests to the cabin in the nearby woods, a special treat and a complete escape from the formality of Belford. There, guests would feast on festive dinners and dance the night away. Above all, Louise was a show-biz fanatic. She often accompanied her husband on business trips to New York City, where she would indulge in the latest Broadway hits and nightclub music. It was said that when Cole Porter was impoverished, she helped keep him alive with financial support. Louise visited Manhattan so often that she established her own circle there, including many prominent New Yorkers. In her later life, she continued her philanthropy and, despite her arthritis, kept right on traveling to Rainy Lake, New York City and other favorite haunts. Enjoying herself as usual, she died suddenly of a heart attack in 1961 just miles from her beloved Belford. And while she might not have called herself a grand dame, Louise Heffelfinger Bell most certainly left a legacy to sing about. Celebrated Wayzata writer Bette Hammel is the author of such books as Legendary Homes of Lake Minnetonka, Legendary Homes of the Minneapolis Lakes and Wild About Architecture.

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NORTH

NOTABLES THE REGION’S BEST AND BRIGHTEST. B Y K AT I E D O H M A N P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y S PAC E C R A F T I N G

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PROMOTION

Katie Stenger, Todd Allen, Rebecca Remick, Chris Malloly, Erich Hastreiter and Dave Remick CITY HOMES

The foundation for City Homes was laid in 2009 when a group of contractors, designers and business developers came together to build a quality home that people could trust. Todd Allen, Erich Hastreiter, Chris Malooly, Dave Remick, Rebecca Remick and Katie Stenger started their homebuilding in Bryn Mawr at an affordable price point. Since that time, the firm’s reach has only expanded to include entire cul-de-sacs and builds that spread into the western Twin Cities suburbs, particularly Edina. “We feel blessed to think of how far we’ve come in this short amount of time,” says co-owner Malooly. Indeed, City Homes has appeared on the Artisan Home Tour, the Luxury Home Tour and the Parade of Homes, holding its own against luxury builders who have spent a lifetime in the industry. The secret to success, co-owner Rebecca Remick explains, is bringing on the right people and not being afraid to go for it. “I love challenges,” she says. And while City Homes loves a good trend, the team is also willing to embrace the unconventional — think a refreshing garden-green or graphic black-enamel kitchen instead of today’s standard white marble — with an eye for solid construction and beautiful materials that often draw raves. “People are excited to see what we’ll do next,” says Rebecca. “I see this going big.”

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Mary Jayne Crocker B R I D G E WAT E R B A N K

At Bridgewater Bank, Executive Vice President and COO Mary Jayne Crocker is known as the integrator, with a reputation for being able to tie everything together. The bank’s first employee in 2005, she joined founder, CEO, Chairman of the Board and visionary Jerry Baack to help create a bank that did business differently. The first step: enlist 125 entrepreneurs to invest in the bank. That unconventional move fundamentally changed the way Bridgewater operates. “The spirit here keeps us really nimble,” says Crocker, who has been named to prestigious Top Women in Business and Top Women in Finance lists. “Entrepreneurs don’t like to hear ‘maybe’ — they want to hear ‘yes’ or ‘no’ upfront. And we’re really good at giving them that.” “Entrepreneurs don’t see obstacles,” she continues. “We see opportunities when other banks shut down.” Case in point: Even during the recession, Bridgewater continued lending and expanding, likely because it was willing to continue the conversation when others weren’t. That generosity of spirit extends to the culture of the bank, too. Crocker cites the low turnover, experienced and empowered staff, and personal connections with clients as benefits of Bridgewater’s unconventional approach. “Our growth isn’t only about the bank growing; it’s about people growing,” Crocker says, noting that that includes everyone from employees to clients, businesses to consumers. She orchestrates all the bank’s departments, helping everyone serve a common goal. “Ultimately, what drives us is the client having the right experience,” she explains. “That’s what drives me. That’s what will ensure our brand and our promise last.”

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Julie and Daniel Desrochers D E S R O C H E R S R E A LT Y G R O U P

Spring has sprung, and popping up alongside tulips are for-sale signs in front yards across the Twin Cities. Don’t be surprised if all the homes on your A list are represented by the Desrochers Realty Group, the go-to agency for luxury real estate. “We are a one-stop shop: full-service, honest and reliable,” says Julie Desrochers. “We cover every aspect of what needs to be done.” “There’s nothing we can’t take care of,” adds her husband and partner, Daniel. “From lenders to inspectors to contractors to dog walkers, you name it, you got it. We have the largest marketing budget and the strongest team, plus we’re truly available 24/7.” “Our life is real estate,” echoes Julie. “We have a really well-rounded understanding of everything it entails.” Indeed, the group’s experience is virtually unmatched, spanning residential, commercial, new construction and more. “When you sell 300 to 400 homes a year — while the average sells only 10 to 20 — you gain so much more experience,” she adds. Plus, the Desrochers understand how hard buying or selling a home can be while maintaining your life. “What I see in the world today is how busy everyone is,” Julie says. “Most people have way too much going on. We can be their advocate and help them take care of all the details.”

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Vanessa Brooks and Luis Leonardo PURE LUX | TRES SPORTS

Vanessa Brooks and Luis Leonardo (plus in-house medical director Merlin Brown, MD) are mastering the art of the human body in their New York City–style loft in Edina. It’s been a nearly lifelong pursuit for both of them. Brooks first learned of laser treatments as a teen, ultimately getting certified to provide 15 different cosmetic laser and skincare services in all their applications. Leonardo, a seasoned endurance athlete and trainer, has run triathlons and performed other athletic feats like bicycling across the United States. So you could say these two know a little bit about the art of sculpting. “Vanessa and I have the same approach, and we understand our niche really well,” says Leonardo. “Plus we always make a person-to-person connection.” Person is the operative word. “I look at the whole body,” Brooks explains. “All my lasers cover the whole body, not just the skin’s surface. I look at my clients as a whole, because what’s going on internally can affect the outside. That’s always been important to me in achieving results for my clients.” Their combined experience allows them to offer results-oriented services (all at one convenient location, mind you) that are largely unavailable elsewhere: the newest technology for laser hair removal, touchless lasers that can treat even the darkest skin tones, body-contouring SculpSure with infrared sauna therapy, and customized workouts that not only develop strength but also endurance, flexibility, mobility and mental capacity. “We talk clients through each step of the way so they feel taken care of throughout the whole process and feel comfortable they made the right decision,” notes Brooks. “Our goal is to make you feel as good as you look and look as good as you feel.”

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Daniel del Prado MARTINA When he was growing up in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Daniel del Prado’s Italian mother made pasta on Sundays. The whole family gathered together in a multigenerational, food-driven conversation. “We cooked a lot at home,” he says, adding that his grandmother and brother are also very accomplished in the kitchen. “It is a very social thing.” Once the right-hand man for Isaac Becker and the former executive chef at Burch, del Prado is paying homage to his Argentinian and Italian roots with his new Minneapolis restaurant, Martina. The seafood-driven, smoke-and-fire-infused menu features some of del Prado’s favorite dishes, like the grilled octopus with bone marrow and the slow-cooked tomato sauce. But it also offers a $5 gnocchi dish on the 29th of each month, a nod to his home country, where budgets get tight come the end of the month as workers await their paychecks. The meal is thought to bring not only affordable sustenance but also good luck. “I wanted to open a restaurant with food that I like to eat,” he says of the daily dinners and weekend brunches served in his warm Linden Hills dining room modeled after Argentinian ranches known as estancias. “This is my comfort food, but I try to speak to everyone with my voice.”

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PHOTOGRAPHY OF BELLECOUR MACARONS BY ELIESA JOHNSON

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Artful Living Magazine | Spring 2018  

Artful Living, the Magazine of the North, is an elegant, intelligent publication highlighting art, culture, travel, fashion, home, food, win...

Artful Living Magazine | Spring 2018  

Artful Living, the Magazine of the North, is an elegant, intelligent publication highlighting art, culture, travel, fashion, home, food, win...