Issuu on Google+

I

!ffi\ ~卤iI

ARGENTINA

T E S O L Vol. 8 N.7

Spring 1995-Fall1996 Personeria Jurtdica IGJ464

i by Anna Uhl Chamot from TESOL Matters. October/November 1995 Editor' s Note: The following is the text ola plenary address delivered in March 1995 in Long Beach, California, at the 19thAnnual TESOL Convention. The oral character 01 the presentation has been preserved.

~

come

together

at our TESOL

conventions to leam from each other,

Reasons for creating a community 01 thinkers.

to share our knowledge, to deepen our friendships,

and to build our

Why would you want a roornful of

futures together.

students to learn from each other,

lESOLisourcornmunityofthinkers,

share their knowledge, anddevelop a

For 20 years now, spring has meant

and 1 would like to suggest that we

sense of community? Thereare many

to me not only a new season, but also

can use this lESOL model to fashion

reasons to promete and encourage

the anticipation of another lESOL

our own classrooms as communities

thinking

Convention,

of thinkers

classroom.

the high point of my

year. Each time 1 come to lESOL 1 feel renewed,

kindled

for our students

continued on page 4路

this feeling to what so many of us share- to the sense of comm unity that in this organization.

The

lESOL cornmunity is a community teachers,

important

with new

am not alone in this feeling. 1ascribe

of caring

The most

and EFL

reason is that most of our students

ourselves.

enthusiasm -and 1have noticed that 1

exists

and

in the ESL

passionate

leamers, and powerful thinkers. Our lESOLcommunityisadiversegroup of individuals representing different cultural and personal backgrounds, differentages, different work settings, different philosophies, and different approaches to teaching. Yet we all

1


EXECUTIVE BOARD President 1st Vice President 2nd Vice President Secretary Treasurer Voting Members

Executive Director

Special Acknowledgements

Mabel Gallo Mabel Chena Vivian Morghen Claudina LoValvo Monica Ranieri María Teresa Abelaira Graciela Cerutti Marta Moure Laura Pastorino Alejandra Pron Selva Sondón Germán Warckmeister Patricia Wemer

Argentina TESOL wishes to acknowledge and publicly thank ICANA which has made this publication possible.

Argentina TESOL wishes to thank the following publishersandbookdealers fortheir support:Addison Wesley - Longman, Alta Book Center, Cambridge U. Press,HarcourtBrace,HarperCollins, Heinemann, McGraw Hill, Oxford U. Press, PrenticeHall Regents. ACME Agency, Edytex, Estari Libros, Librería Rodríguez, San Román and La Comercial.

Blanca Arazi

Editorial Staff Mabel Gallo Vivian Morghen Laura Pastorino Claudina LoValvo

Argentina TESOL (ARTESOL) Newsletter is published twice a year (Fall and Spring)

Make learnina Enalish 'un

~ e J01·n ~h

=-e' . ,,:::,:·~>!;':_L~'"

~"N'

7-LewelPro.ram Ior a.es 5-' 2

.

,

Parade, a new English Language Teaching (ELT) program, is packed with ways to make leaming English fun. You'll find a wide variety offriendly, captívating content, plug on-going leaming support that keeps students comfortable, confident--and communicating! Here are some highlights: • TPR and hands-on activities involve students and promote understanding • Rhymes, songs, and chants engage students and enhance language recall • Pair work and cooperative learníng help students leam from one another • Content connections add new dirnensions to understanding • Friendly mascots motívate students and serve as language models

P;:;r:;;:d't',. , Components

For more IInlormatllon. contacé:

=* ScottF oresman

Leyel 1-7 -Student Text 'T¿acher's Edition 'Workbook Picture Cards Audiocassettes

A Division of HarperCollinsPublishers

Gabriela Bertolini Educational Representative Argentina/Uruguay

2

c.c. n" 278 - Pilar (1629) Pcia. Buenos Aires Argentina Telefax: 9322-70452/665-7776


Dear ARTESOLers, By the time you read these lines you will have already started Academic Year 1996. I wish you all a challenging and rewarding year. For the fírst time in 9 years, and due to budget constraints we have not been able to mail one of the two yearly issues of our newsletter. The present publication is a compilation of the spring and fall issues, therefore it carries the call for presentations for the '96 ARlESOL Convention. Please bear in mind that the deadline for proposals is July 15. . In an effort to reach out to a larger number of EFL professionals in Argentina, ARTESOL has decided to select a group of energetic, dynamic ARTESOL members in different parts of Argentina who may be willing to act as ARlESOL contact' people in their area of influence. Thus weput together a list of people and/or organizations whose professional expertise, active participation in professional advancement programs, and service to ARlESOL make them ideal candidates for this purpose. Below we have included a list of the names, addresses and telephone/ fax numbers of those members who have already accepted to become ARTESOL contact people. Please, feel free to get in touch with them either to provide or request information on ESl./EFL matters. I wish you all a successfull996. MABELGALLO President

Ms. Lidia de Devalle

Ms María Inés Fenés

Ms Diana Charo

Lamadrid 2853 7400- Olavarría

Directora ALICANA San Martín 3134 5p .•. 1"

Irigoyen 886

Pcia. Buenos Aires

3000- Santa Fe

7150- Ayacucho Pcia. Buenos Aires

TeJIFax 0296-2053

TeJIFax 042-531347

Tel:0284-21214/Fax:20804

Ms Graciela Conocente Ms Fanily Ortega

Ms Estela G. de G6mez 25 de Mayo 225

Ms Victoria Ranquist

AMICANA Chile 98Sn 5500- Mendoza

3100-Paraná Entre Ríos

ISICANA Santiago del Estero 865 4400- Salta

TeVFax:043-220259

TeJIFax:087-314040

Ms Carmen Rodríguez Mariani

Ms Cristina P. de González Directora IPICANA

Tel: 061-241972/Fax: 340347 Ms Florencia Murtagh de Perea Directora ACRICANA Escalada1567nl

Lago Quillén 1497 8300- Neuquén

9000- Comodoro Rivadavia Tel: 097-466311/Fax: 473956

TeJIFax: 099-434854 e-mail: nqn@teletel.com.ar

TeJIFax:0954-28543

Ms María Pinzani de Ochoa

Mr Julio Giménez

Ms Marta V.N. de Sosa

Directora Académica nCANA Dean Funes 726

9 de Julio 635 3A 5000 Córdoba TeJIFax: 051-24-210

Directora ASICANA 24 de Septiembre 382 4200 Santiago del Estero TeJIFax:085-213653

5000 Córdoba TeJIFax 051-2140261237858

3

Lisandro de la Torre 674 6300- Santa Rosa


from pageI

will find themselves in educational

regulation can happen only when

language

and work contexts where they will be

individuals

classes and foreign language classes.

required

power of their own thinking.

observing

Both cognitive

teachers and students al all lcvels -

to think

analytically.

critically

and

Many of our students

become aware of the and sociocultural

classroorns,

both ESL

and interacting

with

are already expected to think at this

research has significantly changed

from kindergarten to college. What

level, and as the world comes to rely

our understanding

has impressed

increasingly

for

process. Increasingly, we have moved

classrooms is students' ability to think

performing many of the routine tasks

on technology

of the learning

me most in these

away from observable behavior and

about

that humans have previously done,

searched

students '

learning. And 1have tried to identify

more of this high level thinking will

understanding, processing, attitudes,

the kinds of instruction that provide

be expected.

and feelings about themselves affect

students

for

how

and reflect

with

on their own

that

chance

lO

reason for promoting

their learning. In social cognitive

demonstrate

thinking in the language classroom

theory, for exarnple, students skilled

thinking. Five instructional principIes

is that current educational

in academic self-regulation are aware

seem

of all aspects of their own learning-

importance. These are:

A second

reforms

are calling for high standards

of

1. Recognizing

cognitive,

instructional approaches based on our

and social. Self-regulated

best understandings

about human

are confident in their own learning

2. Providing

affective, students

their

to me to be of critical

knowledge and performance and for

motivational,

and develop

and building

on

students' 'prior knowledge. meaningful

learning

learning. These standards hold high

abilities and reach higher levels of

tasks.

expectations for all students -and if

achievement

3. Engaging in interactive teaching

there's one thing that research and

concepts

practices have taught us, it is that

empowerment have in common the

4. Focusing on learning processes

notion that individuals

and strategies.

students will invariably

meet our

than their peers. The

of self-regulation

and

can gain

and learning.

expectations, be they low or high.

greater control over their own lives.

5. Helping students evaluate their

Meeting high expectations

A fourth reason to promote thinking

own leaming.

in the language classroom

These five principles can provide the

much

more

than

requires

memorizing

is the

information. Students must be able

impact

framework

for

to communicate

about

thinking haveon students and teacher

community

of thinkers

concepts and skills. They will need

motivation. Students enjoy sharing

language dassroom.

thoughtfully

that activities

involving

developing

a

in the

to use language to explain, justify,

their thinking and their own personal

analyze, infer, critique, and evaluate.

approaches to learning. Teachers gain

Students' prior knowledge

English language learners who are

deeper

Current learning theory tells us that

studying

students'

in an English

speaking

understanding points

of their

of view

and

we learn by making links between

setting will need to use English for

personalities.

Valuing each other's

new information and what we already

these types of academic purposes at

thoughts can change the motivational

know. We are frequently reminded

all levels -from elementary

climate of a classroom because when

of the importance of students' prior

through university. Helping students

teachers

knowledge -for example, the many

learn how to use EnglĂ­sh as a tool for

classroom, they are also valuing their

suggestions for prereading activities

thinking will help them become more

students'

and this is

always include discussions on what

successful in academic settings.

perhaps the greatest motivation of

students already know ofthe topic to

all.

be read. Nevertheless,

A third reason thinking

school

for focusing

in the ESL

on

value

thinking

identities,

in the

it's easy to

forget to make time for exploring

and EFL

classroom is to help students better

Instruction that promotes thinking

students' prior knowledge. In an ESL

understand themselves

For the past 12 years I have been

or EFL class, much of a student' s

as leamers

and thinkers. Empowermentand

self-

spending a fair amount of time in continued on page 9

4


9TH ARTESOL CONVENTION AUGUST 18-19,1995 held on August 18-19, 1995. Once

equally challenging. ARTESOLers

again EFL teachers from all over

had to choose

Argentina,

following presentations: The Film of

attend

and the United States got together to

the Book: American Literature in the

presentations.

interact on matters of professional

Language Classroom, María Laura

Caring

interest. In the course of just one and

Rossi, Instituto de Inglés Lenguas

conducted by Blanca Arazi, Vivian

a half day we managed to squeeze in

Modernas,

Morghen, and Mabel Chena served

four plenaries,

Vegetable Garden, Selva Sondón,

as an appropriate

countries,

eight concurrent

was

who on their

Lab. The afternoon

neighboring

session

those ARTESOLers,

The 9th ARTESOL Convention was

from among

Olavarría;

Growing

evaluation sheets said they felt they

the

a

had missed a lot by not being able to all

of

the

and Sharing,

concurrent a plenary

wrap up for the

ns (two one and a half-hour

Nora Carafmi de Massara, Gabriela

convention.

slots), and three book presentations.

Ferrero de Escudero, Saint Agnes

When you finally get this newsletter

Our most heartfelt congratulations

Institute,

we will be well on our way towards

and gratitude go to the prestigious

Responding to Students' Writing: A

the 10th ARTESOL

professionals who generously offered

Workshop on Alternative Strategies,

which will be heldon August 16-17,

to share their expertise with all of uso

Ana Traversa,

1996. Dig up that great plan that

We were honored to have Sandra

Lenguas

de

worked so well with your class, or

Briggs, a practicing ESL/EFL teacher

Filosofía y Letras, UBA; and Al/-

expand on the idea that has been

Santa Rosa, La Pampa;

I.N.E.S.,

A.E.A.

Vivas and Facultad

Convention,

and an author, as our keynote speaker.

time Favorite Classroom Activities,

haunting the teaching side of your

Her three presentations on Teacher

Patricia Werner, TESOL Materials

brain, (which one is it?) and share

Training,

Learning

Styles,

and

WritersInterestSection.Now

them

Reflective

Teaching

provided

the

back on these meetings 1do not blame

framework within which the whole conference

developed.

looking

with

Deadline for proposals is July 15.

Sandra! The empowering effect of your talles made us a1l become even to

our teaching profession. Concurrent sessions catered to a great variety of interests: The morning session featured: Video: An Effective Toolfor Teaching Business English, María Lucrecia Castro; New Trends and Teacher

Education,

Efrain

Davies, Universidad de La Matanza; Let's Do it Together, Designing Your Own ESP Materials,

Liliana and

Patricia Orsi, Rainbow Institute; and Welcome to the CD-ROM Little Monsters, Adriana

Martín

World.

Monica Reggini, and

German

Warckmeister, ICANA Multimedia

ARTESOL

colleagues at our next convention.

Thank you

more involved in andcommitted

your

Sandra Briggs with a group of ARTESOL members

5


jrom page 5

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

••

• •• Prentice Hall- Regents •

• • • •~

: ARTESOL THANKS PUBLISHERS FOR TRAVEL. •• GRANTS AND CONGRATULATES ALL AWARD: •• • WINNERS •

: Harcourt Brace

•• Alta Book Center

Thank you letter from Award

: McGraw Hill

Winners I want to thank Harcourt Brace for the travel grant that made it possible for me to attend the 9th ARTESOL Convention. Thank you very much for this invaluable

opportunity

to

participate in this important event so far away from my city. It was an unforgettable experience, extremely beneficial not only to me but a1so to my colleagues, sharing

with whom

everything

I lived

I'rn and

learned. The keynote speaker, Mrs Sandra Briggs, was an excellent lecturer and one of the most charming persons I've

ever rnet. Her lectures

Reflective Teaching Education

on

and Teacher

were very enlightning,

with plenty of ideas to improve our teaching. The concurrent sessions were all very

• •

: Heinemann

••

: A.Wesley-Longman

Ana

Traversa

was

also

very

interesting. Itpresentedaninnovative

Accelerated

English)

opened

friends,

I would like to thank you for having

production, which 1have discussed

recipient.

with some colleagues of mine and I

As

have already

concerned,

started

to put into

far

as the

Travel Grant

convention

is

I really enjoyed it not

practice. AlI the other activities of

only because of all the colleagues 1

the Convention were also very good.

met but also because I learnt 1 am

IthinkthateventsofthiskiÍldprovide

not alone since all teachers have

an exceUent opportunity to promote

more or less the very same problems

understanding,

and in my humble opinion we found

share

concerns,

exchánge ideas and come together to

the way to solve them: attending the

discuss issues of common interest

ARTESOL Convention though short

among EFL professionals.

in time but excellent in quality.

.::»

Claudia A. Mendoza

Monsters! was very good, and this,

Active English,

Dear ARTESOL

selected me as the ALTA BOOK

THANKYOU

(Vocabulary,

• • • •

CENTER-ARTESOL

HARCOURTBRACE

r ARTESOtTHANKS

TESOl..for the THANKYOU ARTESOL

. Speaker Travel

and

María Inés CarboneU de Jorrat

an

.. t••. ·h.lc···hfunded ranw . G·····

San Miguel de Tucumán

presentation of Interacttve CD ROM

•• •• •

the correction of students' written

Welcome to CD ROM World, Little Brace ' s

..•••

andencourngingwayofdealingwith

aU of them. The one on CD ROM

with Harcourt

• ••

• • •• • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• •

••

attractive. I wish 1couId have attended

together

María Estela Allemand (Misiones) Ma. Inés C. de Jorrat (Tucumán) Claudia Mendoza (Salta) Ruth Ortega (Chaco) Selva Sondón (La Pampa) María José Lopez (Santa Fe)

entirely new world to me, that of computers in EFL teaching. Responding to student' s writing by

•••••••••••••••••• 6

!ill,!~~e


10th ARGENTINA TESOl CONVENTION ,"

August 16-17,1996 For further information contact ARTESOL MaipĂş'672 1006 - Buenos Aires, Argentina Tel: (541) 322-3855/4557/4971 Fax: (541) 322-2106/394-2979 E-mail: icana@arg.siscotel.com 7


l.'" Over

the last

After a great deal of consultation at

One issue that Ihe Board of Directors

individual and organizationallevels,

has struggled with over the last 2 1(2

the Board fashioned the foUowing

years concerns the role ofTESOL as

vis ion statement:

an international organization. sought

its motives

in

TESOL seeks to enhance the teaching

of English by working

wishing lO be seen as an international

intemationally

association of language educators,

within existing structures,

and to establish a realistic role for

both within

the TESOL

itself beyond North America.

world

beyond,

Questions

provide

visited

and revisited

and

educators

material

mean to say that TESOL

is an

opporturuties

have happened

international

What

The

of

services can TESOL provide that will

Directors has become more proactive

be useful and cost-effective? Should

to

in terms of policy formation

TESOL

establishmentofforums

if, to most

invisible within

changes TESOL.

some

to clarify

It has

include the foUowing: What does it

dramatic,

few years,

brought up lO date.

rnernbers, Board

and

organization?

target

its services

to

resources

. professional

to with and for

growth

and

renewal. TESOLalsoseeks .facilitate

the for

implementatíon, the organization has

individual members outside ofNorth

been placed

secure

America, or should it work through

English language policies

and the legal

the affiliates? Which areas of the

around the world thatreflect

world

TESOL'smission.

financial

on a more

footing,

framework organization

within operates

which

the

should

be targeted

immediate attention?

has been

Through

such forurns, TESOL will continued on page 10

Your grammar problems solved from AtoZ

OXFORD GUIDE re ENGLISN GUMMAR A classic modern reference grammar

What is the difference between like and as?

• Comprehensive coverage • Summaries at the beginning of every chapter

When are superlatives used without the?

• Authentic examples of up-to-date, everyday English

What tenses are used after I wish?

• Guidance on usage and register • A chapter contrasting British and American English

Find the answers to these and many other language problems in

Practical English Usage NEW EDITION ........................

Ideal for quick reference or in-depth study

by Michael Swan.

l¡. For turthar infonnation pisase conteet. Elena Dorado. Oxford Universrty Presa. Reconquista (1003) Buenos Aires. Argentina. 313 189311820/158/

for

developing and promoting

,& 1. l'

p.

8


frompage4

prior knowledge has been acquired

students may need to be let in on this

seven

in his native language and has been

well-kept secret.

focusing

shaped by his own cultural identity.

Students need to become aware of

intelligence.

Teachers

who do not share their

the fact that their prior knowledge is

intelligences identified in Gardner's

students' nativelanguage and cultural

a valuable tool for helping them learn

theory

identity must make a special effort to

new things. For example, when 1

intelligence,

uncover

prior

taught an ESL class for a couple of

bodily-kinesthetic

intelligence, interpersonal

their

students'

only

rather on

than

linguistic

The

other

six

are: logicat-mathemaĂźcal spatial

intelligence,

knowledge.

Often, students'

prior

days last month, one thing 1 wanted

musical intelligence.

knowledge

needs to be expressed

to find out was the degree to which

intelligence,

and intrapersonal

first in their native language before

students were aware of their teacher' s

intelligence.

For example, some of

the bridge can be made to English.

purpose in beginning new lessons

these intelligences could be accessed

So teachers can make certain lo elicit

with a brainstorming activity. This

in a content-based ESL or EFL class.

students' prior knowledge on a topic

was a class of 11- and 12- year-olds

W orking on a mathematics

through discussions, brainstorming,

in acontent-basedESLclassfocusing

problem can provide opportunities

semantic

and similar

on science. 1asked them, "Last week

for

activities in both the native language

your teacher asked you what you

mathematical

and English.

mapping,

students

with

word

logical-

intelligence to shine.

prior

already know about electricity -why

Students with spatial intelligence will

knowledge activities arean excellent

do you think she did that?" These

beespecialIy successful in visualizing

way to develop new vocabulary that

were some of their answers. "So we

information and in drawing diagrams

is both relevant to students'

own

could share ideas and learn from

and making graphic organizers

experiences and their future needs in

others." "So our teacher can know

represent wtiat is being learned in a

English.

what we already know, so she can

contentsubject. Students with bodily-

Students also need to be reminded

know what to teach." "So we can

kinesthetic

that they already know many things

learn more."

star

Incidentally,

intelligence

actors

to

will be the

in role

simulations,

that can be related to what they are

play s and

while students

with

Afeaningfullearning

musical inteIligence will find creative

remember an early research study in

When we ask students to think in

ways to use songs, chants, andraps to

now learning

.:Âť:

intelligences,

in English.

1 well

which we interviewed ESLstudents

English, we must be sure that they

enhance their language and content

and asked them if anything they had

have access

subject learning.

learned in school

thinking about. Trivial topics tend to

in their native

10

ideas and topics worth

lnteractive teaching and learning

countries helped them in school in

elicit superficial thinking. Learning

the US. Many students could give

activities

examples of both information

whether they are assigned by the

promotes both language Iearning and

skills learned in another language

teacher, developed collaboratively,

thinking. By interactive

that could be applied in their ESL

or chosen individually. One of the

mean teaching that involves ongoing

and

and

must be challenging,

Interactive

teaching

and learning teaching 1

many advantages of content-based

dialogues

particularly struck by one student's

language programs is that they bring

teaching

. answer to this question: "Why, no",

some of the important and interesting

shared and constructed rather than transmitted one way from teacher to

other

classes.

But

1 was

and inquiry.

1 mean

in which knowledge

is

he said, "Nothing 1learned in school

content topics from different subject

in my country is of any help here.

areas into the language classroom.

students. And 1mean teaching that is

You see, in my country, school was

Language in such programs is learned

coĂ­laborative, in which students and

all in Spanish, and here it is all in

in the serviceofknowledge.

Content-

teachers work together to discover,

based

provide

create,

English." Andlrealized researchers

assume

thatalthough that transfer

between languages is a given, some

programs

opportunities

also

for acti vities

that

capitalize on all ofHoward Gardner' s

and

understanding

expand

their

and skills.

When

students are engaged in collaborati ve continued on page 12

9


8

frompage

-------,---

respect regional, national,

enjoys in the intemational area is due

and cultural distincti veness

to the hard work and dedication of

and autonomy while at the

the Field Services

same

Central Office. Its Director, Terry

time

promoting

\·>:'

1.

CONE

:.,

TESOL

1 1

.

.

. ..

1/·,··/:,

.

There are several things worth noting

a network of contacts, and a set of

in this policy statement. In the first

services

place,

functioning

TESOL

importance

...

.

..

. ,"..'.

at

O 'Donell, provides a reference point,

mutual understanding.

ISOtJTHERN r ..

Department

recognises

of working

the

with and

critica! of

to the effective TESOL

as an

intemational organization.

through existing structures. It has

If intemationalism

chosen to work at an institutional,

to flourish, then itis up to individuals,

within TESOL is

notan individuallevel. In so doing, it

institutions,

acknowledges the importance of its

North America to become proactive,

affiliates, and seeks to help them

to suggest

initiatives,

fulfill

prepared

to

their own missions

more

and affiliates

make

beyond

and to be positive

1C3.0NVENTION

effectively.

contributions themselves. In the past,

1

A second important implication of

ideas have languished, and potential

the direction that TESOL has chosen

initiatives have withered because of

to take in the intemational area is to

a tendency for groups to wait for

shift

r IU 1 1

1.

August 14-16,

the

TESOL to take the initiative. When

provision

of goods towards

the

individuals

away

provision of skills and services. It is

:.

·>}997

willing

and

ready

to provide

guidance, assistance, and support at

1 l·· 1 1 1 1

from

the focus

development of leadership skills, to build

.... ,:.

.

Paraguay .

networks,

and

initiate

professional development activities. Institution building, networking, and

1

professional

1,:::/.......

.

... :.".'..•

development

are the

rubrics under which TESOL seeks to

!':for::::~t!:~tac~l1!l¡ work.

Some of the initiatives

1

·'/::\:::1

r<Mary

. .1

1< PARATESOL

·1

beyond North America include the development

1> Presídent ,.... ··1 arrangements : Avenida España 352 :"., • ",: presence of

t Asunción, Paraguay ..·.

1

international

I Tél.: (S9,5~21r24831/ l·.'·'····· ··24772 I #:(595-21)26133<1 1 .... :':'..,,< .. 1 ·:.::H.··

1 I

mentoring

Fax

that have

already elevated the profile ofTESOL

LouiseBaez

question "Why doesn't TESOL do something?", my inevitableresponse is, "But wait -TESOL is you."

an institutional level lo help in the

Asunción, .

e:>

come to me with the

of

twinning

between affiliates, the Board

members

conferences,

at the

prograrn at the annual

convention, a new speakers bureau, and, last but not least, TESOL

1 1

l_·_.~::~::~·:~~·:[ )

institutes, which are held beyond the confines of North America. Much of the success that TESOL

10

David Nunan ·teaches at the University 01 Hong Kong and is a member 01 the TESOL Board 01 Directors. /

I


1996 R.eflective Teaching ·Jack Richards CALLand the Internet for language Teachers • Jeff Magoto Multiple Intelligences and leaming Styles • Mary Ann Christison Specially Oesigned Academic Instruction in English • Sharron Bassano Collaboration Between ESLand Mainstream Teachers • Linda New Levine Intercultural Awareness Janet Bennett

• Milton and

Look for rcgistration information in the February/March )lJlJ6 issue 01" TESOL Matters.

The Cambridge International Dictionary of English (ClDE) for learners o( English as a Foreign language (intermediate upwards) contains a wealth ol information to help students use and undmtand English confidently and accurately.

( O M P R E H E N SI V E • 100,000 words and phrases defined. examples illustrdte usage and context,

• More than 100,000

( LEAR •

Guide Words help differentiate immediate~ between serses of the same word. • Exceprional~ dear page layout • Grammatical poinn mys a((ompanied by an mmple . • A Phrase Index gives instant amss to 30,000 phrases and idioms.

IN TER N A TI O N AL· False Friend information for 16 different languages. of British, American and Australian En~ish. 1192pp HB o III 41lJ6 4 PB o III 48421 9 PY( liT Reprmnmive,

• Full (overage

o S21 48469 J

Hartha Frenkel de lrers, Par1guay 946 - 4' A, /051 Buenos Aires. Argentina. Iel and F•.•: (01) ns - 164B

CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY

PRESS

11


frompage

9

work they are developing the sixth of

ESL teacher who promotes thinking

Gardner's

and collaboration in her classroom,

seven

intelligences,

interpersonal intelltgence, whicb is characterized

by the ability

to

assigned a student teacher whose approach shecharaclerizes as: Chalk,

to others. The teacher should also be

talk, talk, drill, ask, regurgitate,

learning

experience.

review -a telling description of the transmission model of teaching. This

As an example, I offer you an e-mail

student

message

impervious to change. The students

that I received

from a

teacher

seems

to

be

coUeague in response ro my question,

are dismayed

"How do you promote thinking in

instructional approach, to the point

your classroom?"

that Ihey have begged my colleague,

This is what she

wrote:

by the change

in

"Miss, miss, this is so boring. Please, Hi Anna. I had some more thoughts on your question regarding a classroom of thinkers. Well, I told you about the question about the turtle's shell, didn't 1? The students wanted to know if and how a turtle' s shell grows. Upon further investigation (science teachers e-mailing me), 1 found out that indeed the shell does grow. As a matter of fact, you can tell a turtle' s age by counting the number of "age rings" on the shell.

miss, you have to talk to her ..."

Learnlng processes and strategies Participants

in

a

classroom

community ofthinkers quite naturally discuss

and analyze

their

own

thinking and approaches 10 learning. Teachers

can

development awareness

encourage

the Then 1asked the students to describe

of metacognitive by asking students

to

describe their thoughts, to explain how they found an answer, to share their own techniques for Iearning and remembering English. In addition to

WeU, it's questions like these that make

I'rn going to show you how 1 use SeJective Attention with something I'rn going to read that's irnportant for me to understand. The first thing 1 do is look inside the cover and read the description of the book. "Why are magnets magnetic"? 1 don't realJy know why magnets are magnetic -this is something 1 need to find out about in reading this book. 1can see another question coming, so Ibis must be important, So 1 used Selecti ve Attention 10 Iook at three important questions -things I'lJ need to Jearn about in this book. So this is how 1use SeJective Attention when I'rn trying to understand what I'rn reading.

so imagine her frustration at being

understand and respond effectively part of the collaborative

what 1 said:

for excellent

classroom

discourse. You had asked me if 1 didn 't mind relinquishing my role as experto ActualIy,

I think it is an

advantage sometimes

not to know

the right answer, because as a teacher 1 am in the (bad) habit of simply supplying it. This way, my students and 1investigate together and discuss possibilities.

What's

better than a

room full ofESL students discussing things -in English specially!! This example

of interactive

helping students become aware of the learning

strategies

they are

aIready using, teachers can show them how to use additionaJ strategies that can help them learn efficiently.

Learning

more

strategy

instruction needs to be quite explicit so that

students

can

become

consciousJ y aware of which strategies workbestforthem

fordifferentkinds

of tasks. A good way to get started on explicit strategies instruction is for the teacher to model the strategies.

and

collaborative teaching and learning contrasts sharply with the experience of another colleague. She is also an

For instance,

in the content-ESL

classes 1 taught recently, 1 modeled my own use of learning strategies 10 , preview a science trade book. This is

what they had observed, to teU why they thought 1 had approached the book in that fashion, and to think of other ways in which thcy could use this strategy. Another way to be explicit about Jearning strategies instruction is to letstudents experience the difference between using strategies for a task and not using stratĂŠgies for the same type of task. 1observed a high school Spanish effectively.

teacher

do

this

very

She had been teaching

her students a number of reading strategies for several months. Arnong the strategies she had taught, two seemed to be especialIy

useful in

improving students' comprehension and recall. These .were Selective Attention, in which students listed the words and ideas they considered most important

in a story,

and

Imagery, in which students had to coruinued nea page

12


draw pictures that would help them

evaluations in journals or learning

strengths, and weaknesses.

recall details of the story. In the class

logs, complete checklists, or answer

the kind of inteUigence thatempowers

I observed, one group ofstudents

open-ended questions such as: Two

students as learners.

was asked

things I learned this week are

In summary,

to wait

outside

the

. 1 feel

principIes

five that

This is

instructional can

provide

classroom for a few minutes. During

I had difficulty with

this time, the teacher assigned the

............. about my work this week.

opportunities

other groups to use either Selective

Adult or college students can write

community of thinkers in the EFL or

Attention or Imagery to help them

brief

ESL classroom are:

understand and remember the story

application of what they are learning

1. Activating

to be read. Then she had the first

to their lives outside of the language

knowledge.

group return to the classroom, and all

classroom.

the students

read

the story

in

reflection

papers

These

evaluation

on the

types of self-

activities help students

2. Providing

for

creating

students' meaningful

a

prior learning

tasks worth thinking about.

cooperative groups. Afterwards, the

understand themselves better and,

3. Teaching and learning interactively

teacher picked one student at random

when collected and reviewed over

and collaboratively.

from each group to retell the story.

time, are also helpful in providing

4. Sharing

The difference in the performance of

students with a picture of their own

strategies.

students who had used one of the two

growth. In this way, self evaluation

S. Asking students to evaluate their

strategies and the students who had

is helpful in developing the seventh

own motivations,

not been told to use strategies was so

of Gardner' s multiple intelligences -

learning.

dramatic

intrapersonal intelligence, defmed as

These principIes

strategy -deprived group protested

self-knowledge

complement

angrlIy, "I1's not fair -why wouldn't

one's

that one boy from the

own

and awareness

goals,

of

and teaching

strategies

point.

Self-evaluatioD Teachers evaluate students in many ways -through tests, observations,

thern- are found in

motivations,

continued nexi page

performance, and work sarnples. In addition to these types of assessments, students also need opportunities

lo

assess themselves. Upon completing a task, they need to reflect on their accomplishments.

ponder

any

problems they encountered and how they were sol ved. and assess the effectiveness of the strategies used. Self-evaluation will probably not take place unless the teacherprovides both time and structure

for it. Because

EDYTEX OFFERS A WIDE VARIETY OF:

• • • • • •

TEXTBOOKS FOR ALL LEVELS READERS . DICTIONARIES FICTION POCKETS REFERENCEBOOKS, ETC.

PLUS:

• CONSULTANCY SERVICESFOR ALL OUR MATERIAL. • PERSONAL VISIT OF ONE OF OUR PROMOTERS TO INFORM YOU. ABOUT THE LATESTMATERIAL. • ORGANIZAnON OF A BOOK FAIR AT YOUR SCHOOL.

self-evaluation is personal, students

WE WILl WELCOME YOU WITH A CUP Of COFFEE AT:

generally prefer to do it individually .

ECHEVERRIA 4742 (1431) CAP. FEO. OR RECEIVE YOUR CALL AY:

rather than collaboratively.

Teachers

can ask students to record their self-

lEL./FAX: 523-1696/7009 13

and

-and others that

you let us use the strategies?" The teacher smiled. She had made her

learning


from page 13

several

current

instructional

classroom:

(ASCD).

frameworks orphilosophies that seek

1.Find out what your students already

Chamot,

A.U. & O'Malley,

to develop higher levels of thinking

know and think about the topic you

(1994).

The CALLA

in all students. Some examples are:

plan to teach.

Implementing

Jim

2. Ask students to describe their own

language learning approach. Read-

Cummins'

empowering

framework

for

minority' students: the

J.M.

handbook:

the cognuiveacademic

special techniques or strategies for

ing, MA: Addison/Wesley.

leaming and remembering.

Cummins, J. (1986). Empowering

Leaming Approach (CALLA), which

3. At the end of the lesson, provide

minority students: A framework for

Michael O'Malley and 1developed;

your students with an opportunity to

intervention.

the Strategic Teaching and Leaming

reflect on their own leaming and

Review, 56, 18-36.

framework developed by Beau Fly

motivations.

Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelii-

Jones, Anne-MariePalincsar,

1wish all of you many opportunities

gences: The theory in practice. New

to enjoy being part of the TESOL

York: Basic Books.

Cognitive

Ogle,

Academic

and

applications

Language

Eileen

Donna

Carr;

ando

of Howard Gardner's

multiple intelligences

Harvard Educational

community of thinkers.

theory, such

Anna Uhl Chamot is Associate Di-

as the instructional model developed

References

rector, National Foreign Language

by Thomas Armstrong.

Armstrong, T. (1994). Multiple in-

Resource Center, Georgetown Uni-

To conclude, 1would like to suggest

telligences in the classroom. Alex-

versity/CAL and Project Specialist,

three things that you can do next

andria, VA: Association for Super-

Arlington Public Schools.

week 10 promote thinking in your

vision and Curriculum Development

Argentina TESOL (ARTESOL) Mission Statement Argentina English Argentina •

TESOL

(ARTESOL)

as a foreign language

throughout

is to strengthen

the effective

teaching

and learning

of

Argentina:

TESOL:

supports and seeks to inspire those involved in English language teaching, administration

mission

provides

and management,

leadership

and direction

curriculum

and materials

through the dissemination

teacher education,

design, and research; and exchange

of information

and resources; •

establishes

and maintains

and its affiliates •

publishes

especially

TESOL

International

around the world;

a newsletter

professionals

links with similar associations,

and organizes

can share their concerns

conferences

that serve as forums

and achievements;

14

where EFL/ESL


FROMDfSERTTOSHOWER When at TESOL'9.3 in Atlanta we heard this expression, we thought we Argentine EFL teachers needed a shower too. We are finally taking one and this was c1early felt at ARTESOLand URlJn:)OL '95 Teaching in isolation is like being in a desert without a mirror to reflect your image and that one of your teaching. One day you look at yourself in a mirror and find out you don't look as neat and fresh as you thought you looked, your hair is long and tangled, your clothes are old fashioned and Iaded. your skin dry and wrinkled. Shocked and puzz1ed you crave for a shower. you look for someone to advise and help you untangle your hair, recommend the best shampoo, show you the latest hydrating skin treatment. But, there are no showers in the desert. Before it is too late. walk to the next oasis (i.e. TESOLConvention), your clothes and skin might have already started to fade. . That's what it is all about. Thanks TESOL. ARTESOL. URUTESOL for letting us share and grow together. Liliana y Patricia Orsi

n.

SAN ROMAN LIBRERIA

IF rOU ARE LOOlClNG FOR

o o

o

o o

COfIUD

UlUAlVU WFfUMBNTür

tttus

o

DIC'TlOHAAIU

*Libros *Inglés *Psicología *Pedagogía *Didácticos *Mercado de Pulgas

I'/DUJ$/CASSETnS MmODDLOGr

Find them at

Viamonte 2052-(1056)-Capital Phone:374-0014j0547-FaI:374-9351

3 de Febrero 990 771-2236 Capital Federal 15


The ESP instructor as a materials editor and writer by Julio GimĂŠnez Reprinted from TESOL Matters, AugustJ September 1995

writers, they will find that grading material s is not an easy task.

this problem is throug cooperative teaching.

Another benefit of using a textbook

3. Armed with the knowled

is recycling. Most good ESP textbooks inelude some recycling of

resulting from text analysis

the aspects presented in each unit in the form of further exercising or consolidation practice. In short, ESP instructors can select a textbook that will provide them with graded, recyclable materials. These are decisive factors to consider when choosing a textbook for an ESP. course.

When selecting materials for a course, ESP instructors usually face a serious problem because of the very nature ofESP. An analysis of each group of students will reveal their needs not only regarding learning strategies but also the materials they will need

Advantages ofTered by editing and writing materials. The idea of editing and writing material s may be intimidating, so some guidelines may be useful.

to work on. This needs analysis can mark the beginning of a never-ending quest by the instructor for relevant materials that meet such needs. Often ESP instructors decide on a boolc that at the end of the course did not meet the needs of the students for practical and economic reasons, instructors cannot possibly write their own materials

for each of their

classes. How, then, can ESP instructors strike a balance between the difficulty of finding a book that meets their students' needs and the lack of time to prepare their own materials for each class? Advantages ofTered by textbooks. One of the main advantages offered by textbooks is .that they present material that has been graded according to difficulty ,be it structural or lexical. Unless ESP instructors have ampleexperience

as materials

reading in the subject area E instructors are now ready to s editing authentic texts to be u in the class. For the purpose this article, editing mea simplifying texts that are rich content but too complex f beginning students understand. What instructo must remember is ro keep t message of the text intact, whi~ replacing comptex structures with simpler ones. lt is good practice to ask subject-matter teachers 10 read the edited text to see if the message is still

1. The first task ESP instructors wanting to edit materials should

accurate. The transi tion from a materials editor

do is to analyze as many instances of technical discourse

to a materials writer is not easy. But the experience gained through editing materials will guide the future writer

as possible. In this way they will be able to explore the basic linguistic features that characterize technical texts and determine how these features are used in technical discourse. The main features to be identified are: text structure, register, point of view, cohesive devices, grarnmatical structures, tenses, and lexical items. 2. Once instructors are well acquainted with the discourse of technical English, they will need some subject-matter knowledge of the field they are teaching. ESP instructors do not need lo 00 experts on the field, but gaining knowledge of the fundamentals of the subject is essentia1. One way 10 overcome

and provide much sound insight. The following is a list of some of the most relevant features to consider when writing ESP materials: 1.Linguistic features. What linguistic features of technical discourse will the passage inelude? WiII it include most of them or will it concentrate on just a few? 2. Subject matter. Will the content of the text be relevant lo the course and the needs of the students? Will it provide ground in further discussion? Will it be interesting and motivating to read? 3. Lexicalload. How much continued next page

16

~jL

~-"~~~-----------

_


vocabulary

load will the

students be able to take? How much will the cohesion

HARCOURT ~BRACE ESL/EFL

of the text help understand unfarniliar

words? Will a

glossary be neeessary?

presents

4. Length. How long will the text be? How far will

CHANTS AND ENCHANTMENT

the length of the text affeet students'

motivation

and

understanding? 5. Structural

complexity.

How complex should the textual and/or grarnmatical structure of the text be? 6. Exploitability.

How

exploitable

ESP

for

activities wiU the text be? Howmanypre-, postreading

while-,and

activities will

the text generate? Conclusion If ESP instructors adopt a textbook that will meet most of their students' needs, they will have time to learn how to adapt materials and then write their own.

By completing

their

textbook with their own materials, ESP instructors will make SUTethat very few, if any, of the students'

BIG~)

CHAtW'S

m

"G·¡~

B" .h." CHA ts "[III':'~'., ,:\\1'1'1\1. ~.o\ 11",,,,,, ~

needs will go unmet..

Carolyn Graham

Carolyn Graham

Julio Giménez is an ESP instructor and materials writer at lES (Instituto de Estudios Superiores) and at the National University 01 Córdoba, in Córdoba, Argentina.

10th ARTESOL CONVENTION ",

:.:",

,AUGUST 16-17, 1996 17

e


TECHTALK

----------Stepping into the Class of the Future Getting Trained

----------In our previous article we touched

suitable and flexible timetables and

of teachers to be held during the y

lowering anxiety are the first two

and prepare hands-on workshops f

targets you should aim at.

their co-workers

The first steps you can take in

material by themselves before th

this sense are to make it clear why

take their students to the compuĂ­

you are introducing new technology

lab. They might also browse throu

in your institution and assure your

magazines or brochures and spotn

teachers that their training will be

software that may be useful to y

part

institution.

started. Wealso

of

their

professional

development,

Another

Computers can arouse

upon some basic issues on how lo get yourcomputerroom

to try the ne

a wide

variety of responses, from panic to

point to consider

whetherto havea person permanen in the computer Jab to

~~isl t

pointed out the need to get teachers

teachers who want lo work wuh

and students trained to use computers.

computers or to train teachers loco

What we intend to do now is

on their own. The latter seeros

to delve into what is needed

to be more appropnate. On tne

to get the computer

one hand it encourages teachers

room

to achieve a higher level of

working.

expertise, and on the other hand,

The best way to ensure the success of your program

it

is to gi ve teachers

convenient,

the

is

financially

more

since you do no

possibility to use the lab for

need to hire a lab assistant.

their

As

Besides, experience proves that

Elizabeth Hanson-Smith puts

having a full-time lab assistant

itinHow toset upa computer

does not result in either more

lab (l) "... one of the most

frequent or better use of the lab.

important ingredients for lab

As regards learners, their

own purposes.

computer

success'is the participation in and active 'ownership'

simultaneous with their actual use of

ofthe lab by

teachers." Teachers can use the lab to

enthusiasm, from contempt to fervor.

the computer

prepare handouts,

type their own

training should be

for their

From the beginning, make it clear

purposes.

plans, design activities and explore

that computers

familiar with computers while they

by themselves.

teachers, and not to replace them.

This would necessarily caIl for

are there to aid

Try to profit from those teachers

Learners

specific

are experimenting browsing,

should

get

on the tools,

typing,

navigating,

drawing, working on the activities,

some training. In your effort to train

who

teachers one of the first difficulties

computers. You will find that among

without having formal knowledge of

you may encounter comes from the

any number of teachers, there will

what they are doing. What we should

fact that most teachers will argue that

always be a few who would like to

bear in mind is that the main purpose

they do not "have time" to take up

join the project

of our class is to have our students

courses due to their tight schedules.

closely. Rely on those teachers to

pick up the language

At the same time, you should always

organize plans, design activities for

computer as a too1. The point here is

bear in mind that the mere suggestion

different

the

to make the acti vities challenging for

of the word "computers"

can give

material available. Have them arrange

those who can hardly use a computer

rise to anxiety.

offering

demonstrations for different groups

and interesting for those who "know

Hence,

are

eager

to work

with

and collaborate

courses

18

and adapt

having

a


a lot",

This

will

cause

group

interaction as students help each other

Dear readers,

to develop both their computer skills and their language proficiency. Even

We are sure SOITU! ofyou are experimenting wiJh computers. Why don't you share your success with other colleagues? Your ideas will be welcome and published in future

though different age groups react in different ways they will generally feel at ease as long as the teacher himself/herself

feels confident and

knows

to

how

transmit

issues in this section. Let us all know what's cooking out there.

that

confidence to his/her learners. Once teachers have experimented

Send your contributions to:

themselves the challenge involved in the use of this extremely powerful technology,

ARTESOL Newsletter

they will be. ready to

TECH TALK

lead their learners into the class of the future, where learning English

Maipú 672 (1006) Buenos Aires - Argentina

will mean discovering a new world. (1) Hanson-Smith,

Elizabeth

(1991). How lo set up a computer

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

lab. Advice [or the beginner,

: 10th ARTESOL CONVENTION : AUGUST 16-17, 1996 •• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Athlestan La Jolla, CA, USA M6nicaReggini,

AdrianaMartín and

Germán Warckmeister. ICANA Multimedia Room.

. .....•;' ..:

.:.:

• : : •• •

.

::... :....•

!Tel(~.4M show

.Río Cuart()·"taIks: teclittloo

iwmforgeJ~

me. aitd 1 may rememaer;

invotve nje and 1 ~Ii learn

",'

.

..

19

.

-

,"'

.".

",·:·,,·,·,::"'····:,:·<1 o.:


LIBRERIA RODRIGUEZoAo TRADITION EXCELLENCE QUALITY & SERVICE •

In

E.L.T

WE INVITE YOU TO VISIT OUR PREMISES AT:

HEAD OFFICE

FLORIDA BRANCH

Sarmiento 835 1041 Buenos Aires Tel. 326-3725/ 3826/3927 Fax: 326-1959

Florida 377 1005 Buenos Aires Tel. 325-4992/4993 Fax: 325-4992


AffiCGlENTINA 1flE§(Ü)IL 1l®Ü1hlANNlUAIL CC(Ü)NVlENTI(Ü)N CCAILIL IF(Ü)ffi IIDAffi1fIICCJIllDA 1fII(ü)N JD)lUl~JD)~llie~ JJlUllly 1l§9 1l~% ARGENTINA TESOL is an Argentine organization with broad interests. The convention is planned for professional development andprovides opportunities for social interaction among colleagues who share common interests. The program committee invites presentations dealing with elassroom practices, research in language leaming and teaching, or the connection between the two. We welcome proposals from teachers, teachers in preparation, graduate students, researchers, program administrators and materials and curriculum developers, ineluding colleagues in related disciplines such as communication, education, linguistics, foreign languages, anthropology, sociology and psychology. Kinds of presentations: • Demonstration: Rather than describing or discussing, a demonstration shows a technique for teaching or testing. Normally the presenter's statement of the theory underlying the technique takes no more than five minutes. The rest of the time is used for showing, rather than telling. The abstract should include a brief statement of the presenter's central purpose and a description of what will be demonstrated (e.g. role playing) and how it will be done (e.g. some of the audience participating as students or an unrehearsed lesson with actual students). One hour. • Workshop: In a workshop, one or more leade.s work with a group, helping them either to solve a problem or to develop a specific teaching or research technique. There is very little lecturing by the leader(s), the emphasis is, rather, on the participant's activity which is carefully structured by the leader(s). The abstract should inelude a statement of the workshop's goal, a summary of the theoretical framework, and a precise description of the tasks to be performed during the workshop. Two hours. • Colloquium: A colloquium provides a forum for a group of scholars to discuss current pedagogical, political, or research issues in TESOL. Ideally, participants

exchange papers in advance and make formal responses to each other's presentations. In any case, both presentation and discussion, should be part of the session. Abstracts and proposals should inelude a description of the topic for the colloquium and the same name and affiliation of each of the invited participants. All colloquia will be open to non participating observers. Two hours. Presenter's Responsibilities: To write your proposal follow these stylistiCguidelines and include: 1) title, 2) a biographical statement, and 3) an abstract. # Title: choose a title that will be elear to the intended audience, and limit it to a maximum of nine words. Capitalize only the first word, proper nouns, and initials, do not put the title in quotation marks. Example: Music and movement for kindergarten and the primary grades. # Biographieal statement: In a maximum of 25 words, give your first name, family name, institutional affiliation and relevant activities or publications. Degrees are not normally listed, and titles such as professor are not capitalized. You can generally omit "currentIy". Example: J ane Dos, a specialist in curriculum deyelopment and composition, teaches ESL in Houston public junior high schools, (Not currentIy teaches ) (17 words). # Abstraet: Bear in mind that the abstract is

the first part of the proposal that the referees see. Because we have found that brevity helps people to crystallize their ideas, we ask that your abstracts be limited to 250 words. All proposals must arrive at ARGENTINA TE SOL, Maipú 672 (1006), Buenos Aires, Argentina by July 15, 1996 1

PARTICIPATEI


ARGENTINA TESOL 10th ANNUAL CONVENTION PROPOSAL FORM -Complete the ARTESOL '96 Proposal Fonn. This fonn must be typed. If you need additional space, attach a single sheet of white bond paper. ( Type the mailing address lo whom all correspondence should be sent)

( Name)

(Address)

(Home Phone#) .

(Office Phone #)

(Province)

(City)

(Zip code)

D Cheek here if not a member of ARGENTINA TESOL Pre senters (In ord erm. w hile h th ey sh ou Id be r1Sted) Family name. Other Name(s)

Title of Presentation

Institutional Affiliation

(9 Words)

T.ypeo f Secnon (h e ec k one ) Demonstration Workshop I Colloquium Surnmary (50 words maximum). Number of words in this surnmary: Abstraet: (250 words maximum) Biographieal statements (25' words per presenter, 100 words total)

(Country)


Librería LA COMERCIAL Imprenta - Librería Viamonte 709 1053 - Capital Federal Tel/Fax 326-4803/326-9228

A 3-levellnteractive

English Course for ages 9-12

Hands-on, interactive, and fun, My Friend:••helps students succeed with English. At each ofthe program's three levels, units introduce vocabulary, language functions, and grarnmatical structures sequentially and in meaningful contexts. Instruction in each ofthe fOUTlanguage skills is consistently combined with critical thinking skills and leaming strategies. Abundant reinforcement and review material en sures understanding. --

M Y fRJfNDS

Components

Leve I 1-2-3

Student Text Téacher's Edition Student Workbooks Audiocassettes

F.r more .nIonn •••• n••• n•••• :

-= ScottF oresman

A Division of HarperCollinsPublishers

Gabriela 8ertolini EducationaI Representative ArgentinanJruguay

e.e. n° 278 - Pilar (1629) Pcia. Buenos Aires Argentina Telefax: 0322-70452/665-7776


Spring 1995-Fall 1996 Vol 8 n°7