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ALAN TANKSLEY

Colorado Contemporary JOHN BARMAN

To the Manor Barn

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LISA KANNING

Layer by Layer Display through September 2016

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ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

SABAXTER.COM

LONDON

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

NEW YORK


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Features

Volume 13 Issue 2

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Layer by Layer By Catherine McHugh Lisa Kanning’s textural designs work equally well in abodes near sandy beaches, city streets, or mountaintops.

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To the Manor Barn By Cathy Whitlock John Barman brings a little LA Mid-Century chic to a Connecticut barn.

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Colorado Contemporary By Cathy Whitlock For Alan Tanksley, art meets chalet in this Hollywood-inspired vacation home.

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Departments

Volume 13 Issue 2

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STYLERADAR By Katie Doyle Designer Amy Lau curates a selection of Zen decor pieces for those who seek serenity inside the home and out.

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CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh Taking care of unfinished business at Met Breuer, heading for the stacks in New Jersey, punking out in Queens, and looking for the light in Connecticut.

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BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock Hollywood interiors, floral designs, and cooking are the latest book offerings this season.n ew tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Katie Doyle Beach beats, painted paddles, steamy reads, and an ombre longboard are just some of the key ingredients to serene but spirited summer days.

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EATS’N’SLEEPS By Katie Doyle From inventive Indian to artisan vegetarian, water tower bars to red-walled, retro hotel rooms, New York’s hospitality scene is more colorful than ever.

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GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition. l FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200 Lex showrooms.

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STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

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DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

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NEWSHOWROOMS 2016 Fresh faces and new designs.

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SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200 Lex's most familiar names.

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EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

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SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

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BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The Fire Island Lighthouse has lit the sky for nearly 200 years.

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Array Magazine, Inc. 115 West 18th Street Second Floor New York, NY 10011 (v) +1.212.929.2733 x103 arrayny.com

ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com

Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2016 All rights reserved The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

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Editorial Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Katie Doyle Managing Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copy Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

Contributors Catherine McHugh Cathy Whitlock Jim Lochner Katie Doyle

New York Design Center James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Director of Special Events/Senior Marketing Manager Claire Evans Design Services Manager/Public Relations Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing & Digital Content Manager on the cover Alan Tanksley photographed by Richard Schultz. 6

Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager


letter from the editor Dear Readers, New York in the summertime is like a non-stop festival. There is so much to do outdoors this season—from free kayaking on the Hudson River or a ferry ride to blissfully peaceful and vehicle-free Governors Island to numerous concerts, fairs, and food celebrations—there’s never a shortage of options. But sometimes we just have to get away and leave the City behind. Whether you prefer the mountains, the beach, or just a rural farm, great design is always there to enhance the view. Lisa Kanning of LKID is a perfect designer to highlight in this issue, as her work is equally at home oceanside, mountainside, and countryside. We took a closer look at Terrapin Villa, a residence Kanning completely remodeled in Turks and Caicos that exudes relaxed charm and informal living for its owners and their guests. You can practically feel the trade winds coming off the pages (Layer By Layer, p. 18). For a project in Roxbury, Connecticut, designer John Barman took a 19th-century farmhouse and a barn and updated both for 21st-century living. Acknowledging the years that fell between, Barman brings Mid-Century modern touches, for a unique marriage of rustic and L.A. glamour (To the Manor Barn, p. 24). And for our cover story, designer Alan Tanksley’s latest project reached new heights—in the mountains of Colorado. Tanksley uses materials indigenous to the Rocky Mountains to renovate and modernize a ’70s-era A-frame chalet into a getaway for the owners and a showcase for their extensive art collection (Colorado Contemporary, p. 30). We hope you get some revitalizing vacation time this season. But even if you don’t, you can relax in the park or along the waterfront and enjoy a brief getaway in the pages of ARRAY. Don’t forget the sunblock!

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

Photo by Andrew French

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StyleRadar

By Katie Doyle

Designer Amy Lau curates a selection of Zen decor pieces for those who seek serenity inside the home and out.

AMY LAU Founded in 2001, Amy Lau Design creates interiors known for their warmth, expressiveness, and impeccable attention to detail. Amy has a reverence for the inherent beauty of natural materials and landscapes, and thoughtfully incorporates elements of each into every project. Embracing both art and design, each personalized space is enlivened with dynamic mixes of vintage and contemporary pieces, and site-specific commissions. Amy’s portfolio of luxurious residential interiors includes an array of artistic and sophisticated homes throughout the world.

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1. Ladyslipper Terrarium: The Wardian Case Collection Atlas Industries at FAIR, Suite 601, fair-design.com, $1,200 “This contemporary take on a Japanese Zen garden is the perfect finishing touch to a meditative space, offering a beautiful piece of nature as an art piece to reflect on. Focusing visually on the design of a Zen garden is thought to evoke peace and calmness within and bring healing.” 2. Quartz Specimen, Brazil, Prehistoric Bernd Goeckler Antiques at 1stdibs, 1stdibs.com, $8,250 “A beautiful quartz crystal is the perfect piece to have on hand for meditation and relaxation. Quartz is one of the best crystals for meditation, and is said to be able to channel one's thoughts and intentions more clearly and directly. This large quartz specimen from Bernd Goeckler is incredible, believed to have been formed over 100 million years ago.”

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3. Ombre Trunk Basket, Hapao weave with teal ombre finish Palecek, Suite 610, palecek.com, $388 “A basket is handy to have nearby to store meditation blankets, candles, speakers, etc. Choose something in a calming color or that visually disappears so it helps to remove visual clutter in the space. This piece works beautifully with the Michelle D'Ermo painting, bringing in a soft and hazy teal hue that is instantly relaxing.” 4. Revery by Michele D’Ermo, Oil painting (2015) Michele D’Ermo at 1stdibs, 1stdibs.com, $3,800 “Transform the space into a calming respite from daily activity with a large abstract artwork in soothing colors. Every time you revisit the piece, you will find new meaning and it can help you transition into your meditation. This beautiful painting has a serene palette and evokes a feeling of a limitless horizon or even a moonlit ocean.”

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ARRAY STAFF PICKS P laces and ( H ead ) S paces

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5. MNDFL 10 East 8th Street mndflmeditation.com At MNDFL, urban Zen is undeniably a reality. Thanks to its expert teachers and welcoming classes, MNDFL makes meditation (and its numerous benefits) accessible to even the most frenzied New Yorkers. MNDFL provides an opportunity to disconnect in order to reconnect, in a gorgeous, modern setting that is bound to reinvent your notion of a meditation studio. 6. Sky Ting Yoga 55 Chrystie Street (at Canal Street), 4th Floor skytingyoga.com Sky Ting is a newcomer to New York’s yoga scene, but it's here to stay. With its whitewashed walls, large skylight, and cheeky giraffe mascot, the studio’s breezy aesthetic is certainly an attraction. But it’s teachers like founders Krissy Jones and Chloe Kernaghan who keep students coming back, thanks to their simple excellence in distilling poses and philosophies to create an experience that will move you in both mind and body. 7. Aire Ancient Baths 88 Franklin Street ancientbathsny.com With its gorgeous architecture, golden light, and range of aquatic experiences—from the cold, warm and hot pools, to the aromatherapy steam rooms, propeller-jet baths, and salt-water flotarium—step into Aire Ancient Baths and you’ll feel like you’ve stepped into another world. True to its name, Aire is all you need to survive a stressful day and emerge renewed.

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8. BREATHE Salt Rooms 1 Park Avenue 825 7th Avenue breathesaltrooms.com The pink walls of BREATHE provide far more than rose-colored lighting. Though BREATHE is a space for relaxation, it is also a place of healing, tapping into the power of dry salt therapy. Himalayan salt is known to have numerous health benefits for your respiratory system and your skin, though just an hour of peace and quiet in the salt rooms or private salt bed will leave you clear-headed and holistically refreshed.

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

Taking care of unfinished business at Met Breuer, heading for the stacks in New Jersey, punking out in Queens, and looking for the light in Connecticut. To Market, To Market The Queens International Night Market is back for a second season as founder John Wang “leverages the diversity of Queens.” The large, family-friendly open-air night market features more than 100 independent vendors selling merchandise, art, and food, plus small-scale cultural performances and entertainment, all celebrating the rich cultural diversity and heritage of NYC and Queens, with 90% of the items costing less than $5. Wang was inspired by the open-air evening markets popular in Asia, and as he is committed to making the market “truly international,” the layout of the vendors has the Peruvian ceviche stand across from the Trinidadian shark sandwich booth and next to the knishery, which is beside the Hawaiian musubi tent. The site also has a historical perspective—just half a century ago Flushing Meadows was host to the 1964–65 World’s Fair. Saturday nights, 6 p.m.–midnight, through August 20. Queens International Night Market, New York Hall of Science, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens. queensnightmarket.com

Nandipha Mntambo, Europa (2008). Exhibition print, 31.5 x 31.5 inches. Photographic composite: Tony Meintjes. Courtesy of the artist and STEVENSON, Cape Town and Johannesburg.

Lost In a Masquerade The Brooklyn Museum is bringing African masquerade to life with Disguise: Masks and Global African Art, a groundbreaking installation that connects works by 25 contemporary artists with examples of traditional disguise. Originally produced by the Seattle Art Museum, the exhibition has been reorganized by the Brooklyn Museum to include works culled from its own collection and features contemporary artists from Africa and of African descent working across the globe—including 12 from the New York area—who offer fresh visions of masquerade. Presented alongside historical masks, the contemporary works provoke a heightened awareness of key issues in our world today, such as race, women’s agency, queerness, and governmental corruption. The exhibit includes an immersive and lively installation of video, digital media, sound, and installation art, as well as photography and sculpture. Through September 18. Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, 718.638.5000. brooklynmuseum.org

A Neo-Sumerian copper foundation figure of King Ur-Namma. Mesopotamian, Third Dynasty of Ur, ca. 2112–2004 B.C. The Morgan Library & Museum, purchased by J. P. Morgan, Paris, 1907.

Left: Most of the delicious offerings at the Night Market cost less than $5, including the “Roti Taco,” or “Roco.” Photo: Sarah Choi. Right: In the shadow of the New York Hall of Science in Flushing Meadows, Corona Park, Queens, the crowds were out in full force for the Queens International Night Market’s 2016 opening night on April 23. Photo: Kyle Wong.

Tiny but Mighty The Morgan Library & Museum is presenting Founding Figures: Copper Sculpture from Ancient Mesopotamia, ca. 3300–2000 B.C., which brings together 10 extremely rare and important examples. Standing about a foot tall, the small yet monumental “foundation figures” in ancient Mesopotamia were cast in copper and placed beneath the foundation of a building, often a temple, intentionally buried from prying human eyes. Royal rulers, concerned with leaving a record of their humanity, deeds, and civilization, commissioned the sculptures, which combine abstract and natural forms. Culled from several public and private collections, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Babylonian Collection of Yale University, the exhibition has the Morgan’s own Foundation Figure of King Ur-Namma serving as its centerpiece. The show demonstrates how the medium of copper allowed sculptors to explore a variety of forms with a fluidity not available in traditional stone, resulting in figures of exceptional grace and delicacy. The exhibition also includes enlarged impressions of scenes engraved on cylinder seals, maps, and other visual tools to provide visitors historical and cultural context. Through August 21. The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, 212.685.0008. themorgan.org JUN JUL AUG SEP

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CultureCalendar Totally Unzipped

Left: Weird Tales of the Ramones (2005). Poster. Courtesy Martino Pasina. Right: Danny Fields, “Ramones in alley behind CBGB” (1977). Photo courtesy the artist.

Punk Art To celebrate the 40th anniversary of The Ramones, the Queens Museum and The GRAMMY Museum are partnering to present an unprecedented two-part exhibition celebrating the lasting influence of the punk rock progenitors with Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: Ramones and the Birth of Punk. While the exhibition’s two parts will share many key objects, the Queens Museum iteration will begin with the Ramones’ roots in Queens and reveal their ascendancy in both music and visual culture, demonstrating their remarkable influence on music, fashion, fine art, comics, and film. The Grammy Museum version will contextualize the band in the larger pantheon of music history and pop culture. Punk Magazine co-founder John Holmstrom’s specially commissioned cartoon map tracing the band’s path from Forest Hills to the downtown nightclub CBGB will welcome visitors in Queens. Rare artifacts such as a recently unearthed early press package, and early flyers and lyrics represent the musicians’ Queens upbringings and their transformation from John Cummings, Jeffrey Hyman, Douglas Colvin, and Thomas Erdelyi into Johnny, Joey, Dee Dee, and Tommy Ramone. Video monitors play early Ramones shows, while vintage concert flyers and photographs by Bob Gruen and David Godlis place the four unsmiling hoods in ripped jeans and leather jackets, and their uncompromising attitude known as punk within the larger downtown milieu where their minimalist tunes, slapstick lyrics, buzzsaw guitars, and blitzkrieg tempo became the wellspring for a genre of music and a strain of culture. Through July 31 (will open at The GRAMMY Museum in Los Angeles on September 16, on display through March 2017). Queens Museum, New York City Building, Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Queens, 718.592.9700. queensmuseum.org

The Jewish Museum is hosting Isaac Mizrahi: An Unruly History, the first museum exhibition to focus on the influential American fashion designer. Mizrahi’s creativity has expanded over a nearly three-decade career to embrace acting, directing, set and costume design, writing, and cabaret performance. Spanning his first collection in 1988 to the present day, the show weaves together the many threads of his prolific career, juxtaposing work in fashion, film, television, and the performing arts. The core of the exhibition features iconic designs from the Isaac Mizrahi New York clothing label, the “semi-couture” collections and the trailblazing line for Target. The show’s 42 “looks” include clothing, hats, jewelry, shoes, accessories, and costumes for the theater, the opera, and the Mark Morris Dance Group. Also featured are the designer’s original drawings, performance stills, and behind-the-scenes photographs. A multi-screen video installation showcases content drawn from film and television cameos, and runway shows, as well as scenes from the award-winning documentary Unzipped, the cabaret LES MIZrahi, and the current QVC network show IsaacMizrahiLive!. Through August 7. The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave at 92nd Street, 212.423.3200. thejewishmuseum.org

Top left: Isaac Mizrahi, sketch for Totem Pole dress (1991). Photo: Richard Goodbody, The Jewish Museum, New York Image. Top right: Isaac Mizrahi with models at the showing of his 1997 Spring Collection. Photo: Bebeto Matthews. Image provided by AP Images. Bottom: Installation view of the exhibition Isaac Mizrahi: An Unruly History, The Jewish Museum. Photo: David Heald.

Sublimely Stacked

Top: Boaz Vaadia, Untitled (1976). Wood, leather, and stone. 1.75 x 8 x 4.5 inches. Collection of the artist, ©1976, Boaz Vaadia. Right: Boaz Vaadia, David (2010). Bronze and bluestone, 1/5 edition of 5. 91 x 36 x 36 inches. Collection of the artist, © 2010, Boaz Vaadia.

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Grounds For Sculpture is presenting Boaz Vaadia: Sculpture as part of its Spring/Summer series. Featuring the work of the Israeli-born New York artist, the exhibition includes more than 30 works on display in the Museum Building, on the Domestic Arts Building Mezzanine, and outdoors in the surrounding landscape. The artist creates figurative compositions by carefully chiseling then stacking layers of sedimentary rock and capturing what he calls “the pause in the movement.” This series, much of which has been cast in bronze, comprises the main body of the exhibition. Vaadia’s rarely seen early pieces show the artist’s interest in the effects of gravity, a key element he developed further in his later work. Through October. Grounds For Sculpture, 80 Sculptors Way, Hamilton Township, New Jersey, 609.586.0616. groundsforsculpture.org


La Ville Lumière On exhibit at the Bruce Museum, Electric Paris offers a revealing look at the role of new lighting technologies in the work of the Impressionists and their contemporaries. The nickname “City of Light” actually arose in the 18th century when Enlightenment philosophers made Paris a center of ideas and of metaphorical illumination. The term soon came to be associated with the blaze of artificial light that began to illuminate the streets of Paris by the 1840s and 1850s. Organized thematically into four sections— Nocturnes and
Panoramas, Lamplit Interiors, Street Light, In and Out of the
Spotlight— the exhibition reveals the era’s fascination with
forms of artificial lighting as opposed to natural light. The exhibit features approximately 50 paintings,
prints, photographs, and drawings by artists such as Edgar
Degas, Mary Cassatt, Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, Georges
Seurat, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Jean Béraud, James Tissot, and
Maurice Prendergast, among others. Through September 4. Bruce Museum, 1 Museum Drive, Greenwich, Connecticut, 203.869.0376. brucemuseum.org.

Left: Alfred Maurer (American, 1868-1932), Nocturne, Paris, n.d. Oil on board. 10 1/4 x 13 3/4 inches. Avery Galleries, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Courtesy of Avery Galleries. Right: Willard Metcalf (American, 1858-1925), Au Café (1888). Oil on panel. 19 11/16 x 12 1/4 inches. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection, 1992.10. Photo: Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago.

Hitting the 30-Year Mark Jan van Eyck, Saint Barbara (1437). Metalpoint, brush drawing, and oil on wood. 16 3⁄8 x 11 x 2 3⁄8 inches. Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerp.

Unfinished Business Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible, the first exhibition at The Met Breuer, located in the former home of the Whitney Museum, aims to answer the question of when an artwork is finished. The exhibition examines works left incomplete by their makers, a result that often provides insight into the artists’ creative process, as well as works that engage a non finito—intentionally unfinished—aesthetic that embraces the unresolved and open-ended. Featured artists who explored such an aesthetic include some of history’s greatest practitioners, among them Titian, Rembrandt, Turner, and Cézanne, as well as modern and contemporary artists such as Janine Antoni, Lygia Clark, Jackson Pollock, and Robert Rauschenberg, who blurred the distinction between making and un-making, extending the boundaries of art into both space and time. Through September 4. The Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue, 212.731.1675. metmuseum.org

Marking Socrates Sculpture Park’s 30th anniversary this year, the institution is presenting LANDMARK, a series of artist commissions and projects that transforms the land both physically and symbolically. Once an industrial landfill and illegal dumping ground, the park has become New York City’s preeminent sculpture park and social space for public art, community engagement, and urban discovery. Since its inception in 1986, Socrates Sculpture Park and the surrounding area of Queens has rapidly changed. Whether by engaging directly with the land or commenting on the neighborhood’s cultural and economic shifts, each artwork in LANDMARK reflects historic transformations in the making. Through August 28. Socrates Sculpture Park, 32-10 Vernon Boulevard, Long Island City, 718.956.1819. socratessculpturepark.org

Rendering of Hank Willis Thomas’ 2016 Broadway Billboard, From Cain’t See in the Mornin’ Till Cain’t See at Night (from Strange Fruit). Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

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books Martyn Lawrence Bullard: Design & Decoration

Patina Farm

The Four Elements of Design: Interiors Inspired by Earth, Water, Air and Fire

Hollywood Interiors: Style and Design in Los Angeles

Martyn Lawrence Bullard Rizzoli May 2016 240 pages, $50

Steve Giannetti and Brooke Giannetti Gibbs Smith March 2016 176 pages, $40

Vicente Wolf Rizzoli April 2016 256 pages, $50

Anthony iannacci The Monacelli Press May 2016, $75

With its distinctive black and white interior featuring a larger than life-size photograph of Elizabeth Taylor, frankly this book immediately captured my attention with its cover. Martyn Lawrence Bullard: Design & Decoration is the Hollywood A-list designer and star of Bravo’s Million Dollar Decorators follow-up to his successful Live, Love & Decorate. The multifaceted designer is also known for his product lines with Christofle, Haviland Limoges, and Schumacher.

Patina Farm is the second book from the California-based interior decorator Brooke Giannetti with her husband and architect Steve. Known for their design aesthetic “patina style,” a look that employs soft romantic colors and furnishings with natural materials and distinct architectural details, they are the owners of Giannetti Home, a fabulous and not-to-be-missed home furnishings store in Brentwood, California. The design power couple’s first book, Patina Style, was an offshoot of Brooke’s popular Velvet and Linen blog, which reaches over 150,000 readers a month.

Heralded as one of the top ten most influential designers in the US, Vicente Wolf’s sophisticated neutral monochromatic interiors filled with global artifacts have garnered a legion of adoring fans. Truly a design “everyman,” the talented four-time author is also a product designer and a gifted photographer as well.

Hollywood is synonymous with glamour and style so it stands to reason interiors in its home city of Los Angeles would follow suit. The city’s designs, as unique as the film industry, range from 1920s and ’30s style Spanish Revivals to streamlined Mid-Century in areas from Silver Lake to Malibu. Heralded as the home of High Design, the city is enjoying a renaissance design-wise.

Bullard’s penchant for creating luxury and glamour in his interiors is fully evident in the book’s 240 pages, showcasing his love of color, texture, and use of unique global objects and pedigreed antiques. The book profiles a wide mix of styles and locations from a Connecticut country estate and a Swiss chateau turned boutique hotel to fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger’s (who also penned the book’s foreword) pop art-filled home in Miami.

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Their current book chronicles both the process and inspiration in the creation of their beloved farm in California’s Ojai Valley. Depicted in over 200 photographs and told with Brooke’s engaging prose and Steve’s architectural drawings, the book features every nook and cranny of the couple’s family home, guest house, and animal quarters, which houses the couple’s miniature pets. Patina Farm is both unique in its style and approach.

His recent book The Four Elements of Design is divided into designing with the four natural elements— earth, air, water, and fire. Residences from New York, Connecticut, and California depict this unique concept as earth showcases stone, wood, and natural textures; water utilizes shades of blue and aqua; deep reds and coral depict fire; and air projects lightness and a cool, clean palette. Wolf’s narrative explains his design process with breathtaking photographs taken by the designer himself. Architectural Digest Editor-in-Chief Margaret Russell writes the book’s foreword.

Written by journalist and art critic Anthony Iannacci, the book examines the resurgence of the City of Angels and the California Dream, celebrating its diversity through a collection of 19 residences. Over 200 full-color images illustrate homes from architects Commune, Rose Tarlow, Kelly Wearstler, Paul Fortune, and Melinda Ritz. Up-and-coming designers Nickey Kehoe, Andrew Benson, Courtney Applebaum, and Olivia Williams are also featured. From antique-filled classics to Storybook houses, there is something for everyone in this fabulous book.


By Cathy Whitlock

Hollywood interiors, floral designs, and cooking are the latest book offerings this season.

Designing Life’s Celebrations

The Cotswold House: Stone Houses and Interiors from the English Countryside

Botanical Style

Would You Like To See The House? Unapologetic Interiors Filled With Color, Verve, Oh and There’s a Door On The Ceiling!

DeJuan Stroud Rizzoli April 2016 224 pages, $50

Nicholas Mander Rizzoli May 2016 208 pages, $19.95

Selina Lake Ryland Peters & Small May 2016 160 pages, $29.95

Lorraine kirke Rizzoli April 2016 224 Pages, $50

Summer means weddings, outdoor parties, celebrations, and, in general, lots of entertaining. And while many of us are designers, decorating the table is daunting. Manhattan event designer DeJuan Stroud (whose client list includes Alicia Keys, Michael Bloomberg, and Katie Couric) demystifies the process with the designs for 17 at-home events featuring fantastic tablescapes, centerpieces, and a how-to floral tutorial on the art of flower arranging.

For those of us who are dyed-in-thewool Anglophiles, a stone house is a welcome sign of all things British. Featuring photographs from Country Life, the magazine of upscale English country living (classic country houses have been showcased weekly for over 100 years), Stone Houses of the English Countryside is a wonderful compilation of the architectural genre. More than 50 homes from the rolling hills and green meadows of the Cotswolds are profiled from some of the earliest medieval stone abodes to classic houses today.

In her latest book, Botanical Styles, freelance interiors stylist Selina Lake shares her tips on how to make the most of outdoor spaces. The six-time author first examines the style’s ingredients, such as antique botanical prints, flower stalls, potting sheds, and, of course, houseplants as both inspiration and essentials for “transforming your home into a leafy haven.”

Now here is a title and unique as the book itself! Would You Like To See The House is the first book from interior designer and Geminola vintage clothing storeowner Lorraine Kirke, who is known for her fearless and beautiful interiors. Her flair for the dramatic, use of bold color palettes, wild wallpaper designs, and rooms that mix both antiques and Boho take eclectic designs to the next level. Inspirational and innovative ideas to bring color, drama, and life in your home are illustrated through 200 lavish photographs.

A variety of celebratory themes are covered in the book ranging from Christmas in the country to a Venetian-inspired birthday party and the joy of day-to-day occasions. One of my favorite parts of the book covers how to “map” and set a beautiful table, a practice that always needs a refresher course. Rocker Jon Bon Jovi wrote the book’s foreword.

Author Mander, whose own Tudor manor is also featured, illustrates the beauty and majesty of English stone through the ages in over 200 photographs. Thirty houses are grouped by period and style, depicting castles, manor houses, Jacobean, Arts and Crafts, classical country, and noblemen’s palaces of the 18th century, as well as homes and gardens from the 20th century to the present. The book is an essential part of your design library.

Five facets of the style are explored: Vintage Botanicals (think pressed flowers and a soft romantic color palette), Boho Botanicals (potted plants of the 1970s), Industrial Botanicals (items with rusted metals and laboratory glass), Tropical Botanicals (bold leafy plants, cacti, and palm trees), and Natural Botanicals (objects based on antique botanical prints). Lake also offers valuable DIY and style tips on how the reader can create Botanical Style in their own home.

Cabinets constructed from vintage refrigerator parts to a ceiling covered with multicolored tin pieces are just a few of the outside-the-box design ideas. Kirke’s style, known as possessing a “punk-luxe aesthetic,” is favored by her celebrity friends Lena Dunham and Mariska Hargitay, who serve as the book’s contributors. Perhaps the book’s subtitle “Unapologetic Interiors Filled with Color, Verve and Oh There’s a Door on the Ceiling” sums it up best.

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Trove

By Katie Doyle

Beach beats, painted paddles, steamy reads, and an ombre longboard are just some of the key ingredients to serene but spirited summer days.

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Beach Beats Beats at the beach always add up to a win. One point if your tunes are totally waterproof, two if the sound is pristine, three if the speaker can sustain a whole day (and night) among the surf and sand. With a fiber-reinforced resin shell and durable waterproof covering, the Fugoo Style Bluetooth speaker will survive even the wettest beach or pool days. With a 360-degree premium sound experience and a 40-hour battery life, your party will be bumping and thumping around the clock. 2.1 inches x 6.5 inches x 2.6 inches. $179.99. fugoo.com

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If your summer season includes lazing at a lake retreat, consider these artisan-painted paddles as a darling and daring way to personalize a rented canoe (or to brighten the walls of your cabin). Each paddle is crafted from a laminated combination of western red cedar, aspen, and black walnut, glazed with a durable varnish dip and hand-painted on a made-to-order basis. The elegant blade shape glides gracefully in and out of the water for a serene and sauntering stroke. Lack a canoe? Stay tuned, as Sanborn Canoe Company will debut their namesake product very soon. Length: 58 inches; blade: 5 inches x 26 inches. $180. sanborncanoe.com Here’s Looking at You Capture the whimsy of a summer fling with this flirtatious woven tote. Crafted from natural woven straw and white rafia, the Wink Basket Tote is a breeze to carry and roomy to pack. An interior leather zip pocket keeps your valuables in order while sporty bungee handles add a spunky touch. Whether you whisk it to the beach, the farmers’ market, or yoga class, this bag spreads more good vibes than its namesake emoji ever could. 11.5 inches (H) x 22.0 inches topline (W)/13.0 inches baseline (W) x 5.5 inches (D); 4 inches handle drop. $795. barneys.com

Making Waves If you venture to the Rockaways, Long Beach, or Fire Island, you’re sure to see waves of wave chasers. With its artistic ebony dip-dyed stain, sublimely crafted Port Orford cedar body, glassed-in fin, and custom titanium leash cup, the Octovo Longboard is made for carving real waves. It also comes with a tailored carrying bag, complete with UV- and shockresistant material, temperature insulation, and luxe touches like fine leather trim and an ergonomic shoulder strap. Longboards, like this one, are best for beginners. But if you can’t hang ten, hang the Octovo for decoration instead. 108 inches x 22-5/8 inches x 2-7/8 inches. $3,600. octovo.com


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Life Is Swell If you’ve struggled to stay on the reusable bottle bandwagon, the S’well makes it oh so easy. This metallic finish is just one of its sleek exteriors, but this bottle’s true beauty runs deeper than any luster or print. While many of S’well’s features shine bright—it’s non-toxic, BPA-free, vacuum-sealed, and resistant to condensation—there’s one aspect that sets it apart from ordinary glass, steel, or ceramic bottles. The S’well keeps your drinks cold for 24 hours and hot for 12. Leave it soaking in the sun for a few hours as you frolic in the sand, and you’ll come back to water (or, say, rosé) just as icy as you left it. Now that’s s’well! $42. 10.39 inches x 2.80, inches. swellbottle.com

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spanish stripes Throw typical maritime tones to the wind and spice up your summer look with an infusion of Spanish hues. Beach blanket, pool towel, or summer sheet, this breezy throw is perfect for cozying up or sprawling out. Highquality cotton jacquard, weaved in an old European mill, makes this piece an heirloom to stay at your summer home for years to come—or bring it back to brighten colder days. 55 inches x 62 inches. $122. zigzagzurich.com

Cruising Through Time The Del Sol Shoreliner Americano bike stands apart from other beach cruisers, and that’s not just because of its unique, retro graphic finish. Thanks to its Shimano 3-speed internal rear rub, pedaling above sea level won’t force you off the bike to walk it up hill. And if you plan to stay seaside, the Shoreliner’s Kenda cruiser tires keep your ride as smooth as ever, with a custom spring saddle and soft grips that will make it a comfy one. Alloy rims and an aluminum frame guarantee rust-free rides for summers to come. $399. ridedelsol.com

08 Cover to Cover It wouldn’t be summer without a stack of books to devour in the sun. Nicole Dennis-Benn’s highly anticipated debut novel, Here Comes the Sun, tops the list of must-reads this season. Written in Jamaican patois, the book offers a tantalizing (and intimate) glimpse into life at an opulent resort in Montego Bay. Dennis-Benn captures the intricate complexities of life by the bay, from the hardships locals endure in the face of a new hotel threatening their village to the enthralling experience of forbidden love. Imbued with lush details that bring the story to life, Here Comes the Sun is a literary opportunity to dive into the many facets of a two-sided tropical paradise. $20.98. barnesandnoble.com

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By Catherine McHugh

Terrapin Villa’s infinity pool and lounge area.

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LAYER BY LAYER L i s a K a n n i n g ’ s t e x t u r a l d e s i g n s w o r k e q u a ll y w e ll i n a b o d e s n e a r s a n d y b e a c h e s , c i t y s t r e e t s , o r m o u n ta i n t o p s .

L

isa Kanning of LKID put in several years of slow but steady work on Terrapin Villa, a 5,000-plus squarefoot residence in Turks and Caicos, but she readily admits that its prime spot is actually outside—the daybed that floats over the infinity pool. “That’s where everyone fights to be,”

she says. “And it is really amazing— you just feel like you are floating on your own little island out there.” Located on a private bay in Turtle Cove, the house is the fifth project Kanning has designed for this client. “We did this one in two stages,” she

explains. “First, we worked with what was there—reupholstered some items and worked on secondary areas. For example, there was a big squash court and a lot of wasted areas on the property. Then we came back and gutted it according to the original vision we had.”

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Right and far right: The daybed over the pool was made out of a local wood called Ipe, which was also used for the railings and awnings. Karr used a Trina Turk pattern for the daybed and outdoor furnishings for the other seating areas.

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Top: The cozy kitchen features clean lines, a glass panel backsplash, and cabinetry made of Spanish Mahogany.

Kanning transformed the squash court into a theatre room and converted other structures to guest bedrooms. She describes the main house as “island”— simple and casual. “We focused on neutrals

hanging out there, or even using their laptops. Adjacent to that, we’ve got the TV and the doors swing open, and you’ve got some outdoor dining and living as well.”

(Facing page) Middle: In the main living space, Karr installed custom-made doors to integrate the outside and the inside spaces.

and then brought in some of the colors from

Behind the dining nook, Kanning installed a vinyl wall covering that creates a reflection. “It kind of looks like tiny mosaic tiles,” she says. “Vinyl is a great way to add texture and color as well as durability.” Meanwhile, the brand-new kitchen features nice clean lines. “It’s not large, but we were able to fit the basics in. It has a glass panel backsplash that brings in more of those coastal blues.”

Bottom left: Karr transformed a squash court into a cozy theatre room. Bottom right: A fan of unconventional and more casual dining room settings, Karr installed a bench in the alcove with chairs on the other side of table. The dining nook’s vinyl wall covering creates a reflection and Karr notes that it was a great way to add texture and color as well as durability. CT Lighting of Philadelphia created the branchlike chandelier that hangs above the table.

outside, the corals and the blues,”

she says. “This client really enjoys the whole design process. So we worked together as a team.” As a vacation home, the layout needed to accommodate not only the couple and their four children but also their friends and various guests. “One of the biggest challenges was getting the scale right on some of the pieces,” Kanning explains. “There isn’t a huge living area but we tried to maximize seating by creating a couple of different places. For example, I tend not to like to do a typical dining room table anywhere, so we put the bench in the alcove with chairs on the other side. It’s not so formal and people feel more comfortable

For the living room area, Kanning installed folding doors that allow the wall to be opened up. “The outside and the inside spaces became one, so that was a nice feature,” Kanning says. “And there’s an entry leading right out to the water, which is a really spectacular view.”

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Far left, top: Karr used red vinyl coverings for the beds’ headboards and covered some of the pillows in vinyl for an added textural touch as well. Far left, bottom: The location’s color palette was brought indoors using different shades of blue in the furnishings and artwork.

The bedrooms are simply done but all include some of the blue and coral color theme. Kanning used outdoor furnishings not only outside but for most of the inside as well. “Right now, there is such a wealth of fabrics for outside that look exactly like indoor—even velvet,” she explains.

“We also added a lot of

warm, woven fabrics between the furnishings and the windows.”

For this couple, Kanning has done their log cabin in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, their main home in Philadelphia, and a house in San Lucas, Mexico. They are currently getting ready to embark on a large project in Vail, Colorado, which will bring her back to her mountain roots. Kanning left her home state of Montana to attend prep school in the East, and then attended the Colorado Institute of Art in Denver. But she made the decision to become an interior designer on a whim. “I was near to getting my degree in psychology—which tends to have its use in this business— but I was thinking I might want to do something else. I had decided to go for fashion merchandising when someone said I should go for interior design. So I did. I really didn’t know

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I had a creative bone in my body at that point, but luckily it worked out.” Kanning began her career in Colorado, at Vail-based Worth Interiors, and then lived in Palm Beach for eight years before returning to Colorado. After splitting with her business partner, she picked up her clients and moved to New York City. Kanning started LKID three and a half years ago and runs her business from her studio in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. “I was kind of at the forefront of the whole mountain/modern look and then I went to Florida so I was doing more beach design,” Kanning explains. “You follow people around, so you do someone’s mountain home and then, of course, they have a beach home and a primary residence, and then a city apartment. You kind of become part of the family and keep going with them.”


I like a tonal background— maybe pops of color, art pillows, whatever. But mostly, my interest is creating by layering textures.

Facing page: An arched doorway leads back to a private terrace off the master bedroom. Above: The master bathroom incorporates blue glass tiles and simple stone inside and outside of the shower while outdoor flowers poke through the blinds above the large soaking tub.

Lisa Kanning

in Yellowstone, the American Spirit house, almost every piece in there is from a showroom in the NYDC.

Hence, Kanning’s portfolio features mountain, city, and coastal properties. “It’s all in my repertoire. It’s all clean lines and very much about texture,” she explains. “I like a tonal background— maybe pops of color, art pillows, whatever. But mostly, my interest is creating by layering textures.” Kanning believes her style evolved along with the interior design industry. “My style evolved with the availability of things. Then I started to see how the layering would work. Years ago there were about 10 good sources, four good fabric lines, and a couple of traditional wall covering lines,” she says. “The industry has just bloomed and blossomed.”

“Now there is almost too much out there,” Kanning continues. “It’s a full-time job just trying to keep up with what’s new and what’s next.” Still, she prides herself on doing just that. “I try to go to all of the trade shows, and stay current on new trends. I can find almost anything online, or people will come and present to me. A lot of my clients are talented—they could do what I do. But they don’t have the time to source this stuff. Some of my greatest projects are collaborations with people who are very design-oriented but they have lives. This isn’t what they do for a living.” And that suits Kanning just fine. “My

role is to bring all the

interesting stuff to the table and sort through it beforehand,” she concludes.

“I have a major library in my studio now. I might

meet a person and look at a project and immediately know that

As a new designer, Kanning made a point to visit the New York Design Center on her first trip to New York. “I still heavily rely on some of the showrooms there,” she says. “I have been going there for 20 years now—it’s always exciting and you can always find something new coming in or happening. Dennis Miller is one of my favorites—and The Bright Group. For a house I did

something cool

I have been saving in a file will work perfectly.”

But what about convincing the client? That’s where the psychology studies come in handy.

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To the

Manor Barn

John Barman brings a little LA Mid-Century chic to a Connecticut Barn.

t’s always fascinating to see two different worlds collide in a highly unexpected setting. In this case, a Connecticut barn meets Los Angeles Mid-Century with a uniquely modern yet refreshing renovation designed by Manhattan-based interior designer John Barman. Located in Roxbury, Connecticut, the project was the perfect marriage for a designer who is not only a modernist and a classicist but designs by the credo, “Being a modernist is all about keeping up with current trends and styles.”

Colorful concentric circles of red, green, yellow, and orange anchor the Mid-Century furnishings in the main living room. Shown left, the project’s interior designer John Barman. 24


By Cathy Whitlock

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Top: In keeping with the bold color scheme, Barman lined the pool table in yellow felt.

(Facing page) Top right, middle, and left: Scenic views of the Connecticut barn’s exterior. Middle left: Walls were painted a warm white to accommodate the client’s extensive artwork. Middle right: Mushroom chairs by Pierre Paulin and ottomans by Enrico Baleri and Denis Santachiara create a ’60s vibe in the media room. Bottom left: Vintage ceramic lamps and a colorful orange and white sofa contribute to the Mid-Century California-inspired décor.

Barman, who had already designed an apartment in the city for the barn’s owner, a Manhattan couple and their two children, faced the task of bringing a 10,000-squarefoot 19th-century farmhouse and barn into the 21st century. “We wanted to do contemporary to counterbalance the strong architectural beams,” notes the Wharton Business School graduate turned interior designer. Barman’s projects range from contemporary residences in Miami and Palm Beach to Manhattan. His client list of luminaries includes ABC’s George Stephanopoulos and actress wife Ali Wentworth, jazz impresario Wynton Marsalis, broadcast legend Bryant Gumbel, and playwright Neil Simon. The starting point for the farmhouse centered around modernizing the structure and incorporating the couple’s extensive contemporary art collection. Since “artwork on the wall can take over a room,” Barham purposely left the accent wooden walls bare while the others were painted off-white to let the paintings speak for themselves. The barn’s wide plank flooring, large rough stone fireplaces, and impressive beams are contrasted with the selection of mid-century furnishings as opposed to the expected pieces of rustic furniture and folksy accessories. Known for his judicious

Bottom right: Wide plank wood flooring and rough-hewn beams are apropos to the modern country feel of the 10,000-square-foot barn.

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Top: A classic bovine graces the room’s stone wall and takes a nod at the modern barn theme.

(Facing page) Top left: Olive green, a popular Mid-Century color, was used for the kitchen bar stools. Top right: Leather-banded chairs and an impressive wood slab table with natural edges were selected for the dining room. Middle left: A view of an open glass shower. Middle center: The game room gets a lighter treatment with white walls, built-ins, and beams as a contrast to the predominant dark woods. Middle right: Vibrant colorful vases by artist Robert Kuo on display in the dining room are part of the client’s collection. Bottom left: A desk from the headquarters of the United Nations and curved sofa were used for the office.

use of strong color—a welcome sight in a sea of monochromatic beige interiors these days—Barman employed eye-catching pops of taxicab yellows, lime and avocado, and bright corals for the room’s accents, lighting, and color-blocked carpets. “The barn is a ‘Connecticut meets Los Angeles’ modern concept that we called ‘Modern Barn.’” “The house has an open plan and we didn’t touch the house structurally,” says Barman. “It also has a nice view which was important and we tried to make it look likes it has been there for years.” To capitalize on the vista, the designer decided to forgo window treatments, even in the master bedroom. Mid-Century notes abound. Furniture choices include a pair of Hans Wenger Papa Bear chairs and ’60s-style custom circular rug in the living room, while a pair of round orange mushroom chairs by Pierre Paulin create vintage comfort in the barn’s media room. Contemporary glass vases and pendants, chandeliers, and floor lamps are also show-stoppers, particularly the bright orange pendants that dot the living room’s cathedral ceiling. Games and recreation were also an important consideration. A custom billiard table was designed with bright yellow felt while foosball and ping-pong tables inhabit the two-story library. For

a designer whose hallmark is glamour, color, function with a mix of vintage and

contemporary, the

Modern Barn is a trend that is here to stay.

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By Cathy Whitlock

A 10,000 square-foot five-bedroom renovated 1970s house organically melts into its Colorado surroundings. 30


Co lo ra do

Con tem por ary

For Alan Tanksley, art meets chalet in a Hollywood-inspired vacation home.

erhaps it’s no accident that the Hitchcock 1959 classic North by Northwest is a favorite film of interior designer Alan Tanksley. The Frank Lloyd Wright Fallingwater-inspired limestone and glass modernist house where Cary Grant goes to save love interest Eva Marie Saint contains rivers of design inspiration around every cantilevered corner. Case in point is Tanksley’s latest project—a family vacation home for serious art collectors where a 1970s chalet doubles as an updated movie set. Designed in conjunction with architect James Dayton of James Dayton Design in Minneapolis, Tanksley says the house, purchased in the 1970s, had all the trappings of the ’60s, complete with a sunken conversational living room. “All you needed was a John Denver soundtrack in the background,” the Manhattan-based designer quips. The goal was simple—renovate and modernize the house for collectors and major patrons of the arts who wanted a great place to go for family vacations as well as exhibit their art.

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Top left: Minneapolis-based architect James Dayton’s goal was to “create a more dynamic, light filled series of spaces.” Top right: Tanksley kept the color palette of beiges, blues, and taupes clean and simple so as not to compete with the outdoors. Bottom left: The cool sleek bathroom was designed with open glass windows to allow a view of the elements. Bottom right: Fred Sandback, known for his unique conceptualist yarn structures, is one of the many artists whose work is prominently featured.

Unfortunately, initial plans for the 10,000-square-foot, five-bedroom A-frame ski lodge hit a snag when they discovered cracked concrete walls spewing water upon demolition. “We began with the idea that we would do a pretty significant amount of renovation,” Dayton explains, “but once we got down to the foundation, we learned that the old concrete was failing, among other things.” New construction became the order of the day and by “keeping with the verticality of the mountainside, the house was designed with the guest rooms on the ground level, all the living and entertaining space and the master bedroom on the midlevel, and an office/library on the top level, and united by a glass stair that runs from bottom to top, with skylights above so the heart of the house, the center of circulation, is beautifully daylit.” Tanksley concurs, “It was a great organic space melting into its surroundings. The house never made an attempt to shout its own name. It was contemporary and organic, and the whole foundation was compromised.”

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A custom Bocci light fixture provides light and an instant wow factor over a dining table by Bryan Hunt. 34


Constructed out of materials indigenous to the Rocky Mountains such as stone, weathered steel and cedar, the style of the house was constructed out of the client’s desire for peaceful surroundings. Tanksley notes, “The client wanted an organic contemporary space respectful of surroundings that wouldn't be a showhouse.” This translated into an open flow of rooms where the artwork was front and center. Drawing on his earlier roots with the classically trained designer Mark Hampton (who The New York Times once coined “an icon of American Style”) and design legend Albert Hadley, Tanksley learned that “an understanding of design pre-dated all of us. The really important thing is understanding scale and a classic approach.” In the heady Bonfire of the Vanities days of the late ’80s and early ’90s, Tanksley received “an intense design course where we we would have major discussions about molding details or the history and relevance of scale proportion and quality. Mark Hampton was a great teacher and educator.”

Top left: Soft grey, beige, and off-white create a serene palette in the kitchen. Top right: Glass stairs framed in stainless steel were two of the many striking materials used by Dayton. Middle: A Cliff Young sectional is paired with an upholstered swivel chair from A. Rudin and ottoman from Design Within Reach for a corner of the media room. Bottom: An impressive black dry-stacked stone fireplace divides the contemporary dining and living room areas.

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Top: The office/library also gets a minimalist twist. (Facing page) Top left: Exterior view of the house shows the plan to complement rather than compete with the natural elements. Top right: The wall of a contemporary dining corner mimics the exterior. Bottom: Tanksley used the client’s Donald Judd desk for the sleek décor of the office.

Working with a keen lens came in handy when interpreting the client’s wish list for the room’s interiors. Artwork by artists Donald Judd, Fred Sandback (known for his minimalist yarn structures), Catherine Opie, Roni Horn, and Agnes Martin beautifully comingle with sophisticated mid-century furnishings, Donald Judd desks, and a show-stopping Bocci chandelier. A master at mixing classical and traditional pieces, tones, and textures, Tanksley employed a color palette of amber, browns, and beiges to complement the environment. “The hallmark of my work is I know how to make people comfortable,” Tanksley says, “and I make every effort to accommodate my clients and show them the possibilities for the designs they try to translate into words but often cannot.

I am their lens.”

And if Hollywood ever makes a sequel to North by Northwest, here is the house.

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Eats’N’Sleeps Nix 72 University Place (212) 498-9393 nixny.com

Indian Accent 123 West 56th Street (212) 842-8070 indianaccent.com/newyork

Le Coq Rico 30 East 20th Street (212) 267-7426 lecoqriconyc.com

Café Altro Paradiso 234 Spring Street (646) 952-0828 altroparadiso.com

Thanks to Chefs John Fraser and Nicolas Farias, vegetarians seeking a five-star meal finally get more than a side of produce. Though vegetables do, of course, abound on this menu, the chefs at Nix turn them into dishes you wouldn’t think could be so delicious. Take the “ribbons of jicama” plate, where a dose of fresno chili and blood orange transform the starchy Mexican root into a remarkably flavorful meal. The wok-roasted cucumbers with jerk spices, goat cheese, and kumquats are another creative feat of taste. On the heavier side, the Yukon potato fry bread (generously topped with cheese, sour cream, and veggies) is a must-try, as is the Shiitake “cacio e pepe” with heirloom polenta and salsify, an edible root that many believe tastes like an oyster once it’s cooked. Though you’ll likely want to try every main dish on the menu, don’t overlook the signature Tandoor bread as a side or starter dish, with dips like the smooth house hummus and zaatar or the rich but refreshing avocado, mint, and curry blend.

In Le Parker Meridien, Chef Manish Mehrotra is combining traditional recipes with new-school techniques. With locations in New Delhi and New York, Indian Accent provides an opportunity to indulge in authentic and innovative Indian flavors in a luxuriously appointed dining room. The menu is structured to provide three methods of dining—the three or four course route, or the chef’s tasting. Highlights include kolhapuri chicken with peanuts, cucumber, tomato, and avocado; sweet pickle ribs with sundried mango and onion seeds; silken tofu kofta spiced with bottle gourd curry and accompanied by a fluffy quinoa pilaf; and for dessert, makhan malai with saffron milk, rose petal jaggery brittle, and almonds. You’ll want to end (or begin) your meal at the bar. With ingredients like rose petal tincture, assam team, orange blossom water, and Kewra mist distilled from the pandanus plant and usually featured in biyrani, the cocktail menu certainly supports the restaurant’s appeal to innovation.

Chef Antoine Westermann’s original Le Coq Rico is a world away, on Montmartre's Rue Lepic in Paris. So how did this renowned French chef end up here? In 2006, Westermann requested Michelin revoke his stars in return for the freedom to embrace his culinary creativity. He left France to work as a food consultant in the US, later taking a year’s tour around the Northeast, meeting with farmers and studying their poultry philosophies. At the new Le Coq Rico, ingredients are sourced from local birds raised happy and healthy, and the poultry-centric menu is a colorful one. Eggs come deviled with marinated octopus and cumin cabbage salad; the seared duck foie gras is encrusted in poppy seeds and garnished with Gala apples, pink radish, and ginger; and the Catskill guinea fowl breast sits atop asparagus, green peas, and lime fricassee. For those looking for a great piece of meat, plain and simple, Westermann’s “Whole Bird” menu, featuring six different fowl, will not disappoint.

Café Altro Paradiso is the latest from Ignacio Mattos and Thomas Carter. With vaulted ceilings, golden hanging lights inspired by fixtures in an Italian post office, wrap-around wood booths, and a marble bar, the restaurant is a dream to linger in for brunch, lunch, or dinner. Though its menu carries a heavy Italian accent, Mattos and Carter go far beyond pasta and red sauce, pairing grilled swordfish with artichoke, raisins, and almonds; seared octopus with salsa verde and chickpeas; and ribeye with braised cardoons and rosemary. Also of note is the restaurant’s rotating selection of decadent specials—think grilled quail and “maiale arrosto,” or pig roast. (Hint, if you don’t recognize a word on the menu, ask for a translation.) You’ll likely need a glass of vino to wash it down, so take a gander at the wine list with its fine Italian vintners from Tuscany, Lombardy, and Piedmont.

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By Katie Doyle

From inventive Indian to artisan vegetarian, water tower bars to red-walled, retro hotel rooms, New York’s hospitality scene is more colorful than ever.

The Bernic 145 East 47th Street (212) 754-9700 thebernichotel.com

InterContinental New York Barclay 111 East 48th Street (212) 755-5900 intercontinentalnybarclay.com

The Redbury Hotel 29 East 29th Street (212) 689-1900 theredbury.com/newyork

The Williamsburg Hotel 96 Wythe Avenue, Brooklyn thewilliamsburghotel.com

On July 15, when the Bernic is due to open, Midtown East’s hotel scene will become a bit more accessible to guests looking for a refuge in the heart of boisterous Turtle Bay. The Bernic operates around a mantra of “luxury deconstructed,” in which guest room perks include fine linens, complimentary WiFi, flat-screen TVs outfitted with Apple TV technology, neo-modern furniture, and Beekman 1802’s all-natural toiletries. The walls are decorated with blind contour cityscapes drawn by Brooklyn artist Ian Sklarsky and the rooms are appointed with thoughtful coffee table reads. Floor-to-ceiling windows and private terraces in most of the rooms offer a taste of the city from afar. Evident in the air, infused with the soothing scent of white tea, is the hotel’s mission to offer guests a dual sense of calm and connection.

After 90 years, even the most well-aged beauty could stand a facelift. The InterContinental New York Barclay dates back to 1926, when it was built to service upscale rail travelers. After undergoing the most ambitious restoration in its history, a project that was also lauded as one of the most anticipated hotel renovations of 2016, the InterContinental New York Barclay is in prime shape for its reveal. The $80 million renovation included extensive work to refurbish the hotel’s Federalist furnishings, along with a new bar that serves 88 types of premium gin, expanded event space, and a spectacular, two-bedroom Presidential Suite, featuring a living and dining room, steam room, fitness equipment, and 1,500-square-foot terrace overlooking the Chrysler Building. For guests whose aspirations aren’t so lofty, the other 703 lovely rooms and suites were also redesigned, with Anichini bedding, custom furniture, plentiful artwork, expanded bathrooms, and signature Caswell-Massey toiletries.

Formerly the Martha Washington Hotel, The Redbury Hotel is ready for a red-hot debut. Located in the lively NoMad district, its 265 newly renovated rooms, curated by the visionary photographer Matthew Rolston, boldly break the mold with their eclectic décor. While guests can thank Rolston for crafting the Redbury’s unique aesthetic, the design for the New York location was inspired by nearby Tin Pan Alley, the street that housed many of Manhattan’s top singers and songwriters in the early 20th century. The gramophone on the nightstands is a testament to that. Beyond good design, the Redbury offers other perks, including complimentary WiFi, babysitting and bell staff services, Italian linens and terry, and in-room dining service from Marta, a lively pizzeria by Danny Meyer’s Union Square Hospitality Group.

For guests who fancy a truly boutique experience, Brooklyn is the place to go, and the Williamsburg Hotel is the place to stay. Within the industrial exterior (all bricks, glass, and steel) are 150 modern, chic guestrooms and attractions that might even rival the revelry on nearby and now iconic Bedford Avenue. Guests can enjoy multiple bars on the property, one of which is reportedly seeking a cabaret license and another that will be set in a replica water tower. In perfect timing, the Williamsburg Hotel is due to open very soon. Its rooftop bar, lounge, and seasonal outdoor restaurant sound like they’re on track to become the borough’s buzzy new hotspots as the temperature rises this summer. The establishment also touts the neighborhood’s only grand ballroom. With 30-foot ceilings and a 400-person capacity, it’s already being eyed for weddings and bar mitzvahs.

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GALLERY A picture-perfect showroom exhibition .

The Chroma Table by Gary Hutton available at PROFILES, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com Pearl walnut finished custom cabinetry with zebrawood doors available at Bakes & Kropp, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

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Gallery

Clockwise from top left: Molten Glass Vase and Bottles available at Studio A Home, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com Fantasia Serving Petal and Fantasia Serving Flower available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com Tub Chair available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Oonah Quilt available at Odegard Carpets, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Sidelight sconce from George Kovacs available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com

The Tempo Crib available at Rooms By Zoya B, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

Francis Cocktail Table available at Reagan Hayes, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com

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Gallery

Alecia’s Necklace available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com

Lindsay Cowles textiles available at BRADLEY, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

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Seat Belt Chair available at Phillips Collection, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com

Mr Brown London Maribella Chair available at Julian Chichester, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Convoitise Table available at CĂ´tĂŠ France, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

The Maynard Lounge Chair available at Plexi-Craft, 212.924.3244, signature.plexi-craft.com

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Gallery

L3 Sun Lounger available at LEPERE, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com Facing page clockwise from top left: La Dame au Chapeau mosaic artwork available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com Sotille Chandelier available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com Rio Sofa available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com Chromatic Falls giclĂŠe canvas with gold accents available at Leftbank Art, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

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City Bench available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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freshpicks T H E M O S T C U R R E N T products in 2 0 0 L E X showrooms .

Modern Patina Multiple panes of burnished Raj mirror give the Zanzibar Chandelier from Currey & Company a stunning radiance, beautifully reflecting light from its aged light bronze gold wrought iron frame. The chandelier joins a collection that also includes a wall sconce, rectangular chandelier, and pendant. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com

Canned Heat Witty, contemporary, and bold, the Paint Can Panel is crafted out of, well, recycled paint cans! Phillips Collection is devoted to designing pieces that evoke creative conversations while contributing to recycling. The varying colors and textures of the paint cans create a unique appeal. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com

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freshpicks

Those Summer Nights The Summer Dining or Island Pendant is one of four seasons represented in a new collection of LED fixtures at Metropolitan Lighting. Simple yet artistically crafted, the glass or rippled metal accents evoke thoughts of sunlight reflecting off water’s surface and add the serenity of summer days and nights all year round. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

Nineteen to Twenty-One Inspired by a mid-19th century coverlet design, Odegard Carpets’ American Coverlet has been updated in a soft grey colorway. This 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed, and hand-knotted Himalayan wool carpet is also available in custom colors. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Shining Through Designed by Hayley Maynard and manufactured in New York City, the Lane Side Table from Plexi-Craft is the latest piece from their Signature Collection. Clean, beveled edges and subtle color give this table the appearance of an elegant jewel. Only one side is laminated, allowing the color to reflect all the way through. Plexi-Craft, Suite 914, 212.924.3244, signature.plexi-craft.com U-Turn Inspired by the revival of the late ’80s, BRADLEY offers a collection of accent tables in colorful high-gloss finishes with unique patterns and metal accents of brass, bronze, and stainless. Hand-applied painted patterns such as linear strié, organic malachite, and natural stone are protected with a thick clear gloss finish. Pictured is the Mallory U-Shaped Console with brass detail. BRADLEY, Suite 802, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

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Bird of Paradise Powell & Bonnell’s Cockatoo Table at Dennis Miller Associates is fabulously flexible. The hand-cast acrylic resin top is secured to a cylindrical metal base. Add multiple splashes of color or bring your design together in a monochromatic palate. Available in Powell & Bonnell metal finishes and eight refined resin colors. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

Light Stepper The TipToe Sofa and Components by Rafa Garcia at LEPERE take their name from the slender steel feet they stand upon. This sectional lounge seating is built on a structure of black epoxy steel tubing with metal springs and upholstered with your choice of fabrics and leathers. Feet in copper or graphite finish. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

Rich Reflections A trend in wall dĂŠcor is images that reflect light. In Simply Divine from Leftbank Art, a hand-painted image is neutral with gold tones and metallic embellishments. The image has texture and a sparkle effect, and is framed in a gold float. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

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freshpicks

Yes We Canted A favorite design in the Julian Chichester Collection, the Danish Cabinet’s touch-latch doors are faced front and back with vellum. The canted cabinet is clad in hand-cut brass, applied in a fish-scale pattern, and rests on two metal arc-shaped legs finished in aged gold. The Danish Cabinet may also be customized to your specifications. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Time And Again The Mid-Century Modern Tempo Collection is the newest addition to Zoya B. Made with the finest of hardwoods, the Tempo Desk comes in two standard sizes, and the matching hutch can feature custom shelving, cubbies, or small accessory drawers. The desk has three full-extension drawers on both sides and a keyboard drawer in the center. Rooms By Zoya B, Suite 433, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

American Accent With the introduction of the Astrid Dining Table and Alana Chair at The Bright Group, Troscan Design restates its commitment to crafting a modern American vernacular. Using locally sourced wood, working with small batch bronze foundries and blending bench-made with high-tech processes, Troscan pieces honor the tradition of craftsmanship and withstand the test of time. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Group Theater Grouping a set of Harlow Cocktail Tables from Reagan Hayes creates a sense of fluidity and movement even when they’re doing nothing at all. This is simplicity at its finest. Available in brass with aged brass and gunmetal finishes, or stainless steel in nickel and matte nickel finishes. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com Flower Power With exquisite fine petals of hand-carved wood and a convex glass pane, the Marguerite Mirror at Christopher Guy is an elegant daisy-inspired mirror that makes an unusual statement piece. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Lunar Return Côté France is proud to be representing Ecart International from Paris. The firm was founded by renowned French designer Andrée Putman in 1978 to resurrect forgotten furniture designers from the 1930s like Rene Robert Mallet-Stevens, Jean-Michel Frank, Eileen Gray, and others. Putman’s own designs, like the Cresent Moon Sofa, were added as well. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

Burst of Creativity The Linen Fold 2-Drawer Chest at Global Views adds a layer of glam to any room with its dimensionally folded fabric-like metal covering. The Deco starburst pattern in the front makes a stunning statement. This ornate piece features push-to-open metal glides and a coating to protect from tarnishing. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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natural Light The L’Oiseau Lamp at PROFILES, designed by Marian Jamieson, sets a peaceful scene. A bird. A tree branch. And light. All of these elements come to life in a dark bronze patina, ebony, and handmade shade. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Shadows and Strength Baker Furniture introduces the Jean-Louis Deniot Collection. Deniot is a designer lauded worldwide for his unexpected juxtapositions of vintage and modern, linear and curved, masculine and feminine. Featured among the pieces here are the Celestite Sofa and Celestite Cocktail Ottoman. Organic shapes play inside strong lines, and intriguing shadows form within lavish detailing. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

raise the bar In addition to an expansive kitchen, Bakes & Kropp was commissioned by a Hamptons bachelor to transform the adjoining space into this stunning Wet Bar and Butler’s Pantry. A stark departure from the ever-popular Bakes & Kropp white, the black Meridian Custom Cabinetry coordinates handsomely with the stunning black subway tile. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com 54


Another good Turn Brueton introduces the Patrick Swivel Bar Stool, designed by the prestigious architectural firm of Bentel & Bentel, with a wooden seat. The one-inch thick cerused oak seat complements the beautifully polished or satin finished stainless steel base. Available in bar or counter height, with or without swivel, and with an upholstered seat. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

Upon reflection In the Prism Pendant at Studio A Home, 46 pieces of faceted glass hang from a three-tiered frame, casting a magical glow of reflection and refraction. Its 26-inch height gives it a commanding presence. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Cool Smoke Bakes & Kropp recently introduced a line of 36 signature finishes—a designer’s dream array of specially curated paint, stain, species, and sheen varieties—for their custom cabinetry. In this Bridgehampton stunner, Oiled Smoke Walnut is the star, adorning the waterfall island and range hood, as well as accenting several drawer and door fronts. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. Wow Factor (opposite) The Diamonds Bath Bracket from George Kovacs Lighting at Metropolitan Lighting is sure to dazzle. 1400 lumens of dimmable LEDs sparkle through a clear glass tube brimming with radiant crystals. 2. Fashionable Fringe The Sylvester Club Chair from BRADLEY is available in leather fringe and metal accent swivel base. BRADLEY launched their fringe-adorned upholstery line after it made a comeback in the fashion industry.

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3. Nod to the Mod (opposite top) The inspiration for these fantastic Mid-Century pieces is not hard to guess at all. Named for the iconic Googie-influenced West Coast airport, the LAX Bowls from Global Views have speckled gold-finished bases featuring soft arcs and holding white marble bowls. 4. Glide Path (opposite bottom) Easy-access, smooth gliding dowel pull-out drawers are a highly requested feature in many Bakes & Kropp kitchens as a client-favorite storage solution for bulky pots and heavy serving trays. 5. Flat Out Beauty Anatolian Stripe from Odegard Carpets is a truly unique Kooches killim. Each color of yarn used to weave this rug is spun with a different twist, resulting in a captivating flat weave. 6. Framed Light The Bastian Chandelier from Currey & Company is an inviting mix of color, shape, and texture featuring a light chestnut finish on wood with brass caps on each corner. 7. Open Support A striking design from Julian Chichester, the Marcel Desk has a vellum desktop outfitted with three sycamore-lined drawers and is supported by two undulating, brass-finished metal legs, capped with aged brass spheres.

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8. Sharp Eye In the Iron Eye Console by Jean-Louis Deniot at Baker Furniture the metered lacquer case rests upon a rectangular mahogany frame supported by brass legs that appear to flow around and envelop the piece. 9. Beveled Beauty The Natalia Dresser at The Bright Group is highly customizable with options including lacquered or suede drawer fronts. The beveled frame elevates the case piece, highlighted with solid brass handles and accents. 10. Molten Modern The Biennale Table by Robert Marinelli at PROFILES features a thick slab of molten glass, poured to size and polished on five sides, resting on an architectural bronze or steel base. 11. Jean Genie From afar, the Captured Denim Stool at Phillips Collection appears to have a lustrous blue tone. When viewed closer, there are small pieces of reclaimed blue jeans captured and encased in resin.

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12. In Orbit The Giotto Burst Pendant at Dennis Miller Associates is inspired by 20th-century space exploration. Tapered wood arms cradle hand-blown glass globes with incandescent bulbs. Easily customizable to create many unique designs. 13. Designer DNA The Helix Sculpture at Studio A Home brings to mind the building blocks of life or a wild roller coaster. Either way it’s the ultimate in three-dimensional sculpture. 14. Wrap Star A modern twist on an antique writing desk, the Leather Wrap Desk is Plexi-Craft’s first concept merging acrylic with other materials. The contrast between the rich leather and the transparent acrylic is especially striking. 15. Vive La Flooring Côté France’s range of green-certified solid and engineered French Oak hardwood floor planking, parquetry designs, and distinct patterns are born and made in France. Pictured here is Black Parquet de Versailles. Choices include 30 grey hues, 5 Metallics, and new trendy XXL (extra-large/extra-long) 18-foot-long boards. JUN JUL AUG SEP

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16. Figured Out For the beautifully carved Lievre Chair from Christopher Guy a natural wood figure is transformed into a surprisingly comfortable modernist accent chair with subtle brass arms. 17. Sharp Geometry Reagan Hayes’ Xavier Cocktail Table is an angular brass brute that can lie low in sophisticated gunmetal or go all out in aged brass, nickel, or two-toned finish options. 18. Puzzle Masters Mosaico Occasional Seating and Side Tables at LEPERE are like puzzle pieces with multiple solutions. Solid ash structure with many upholstery choices and optional Carrara marble tabletops.

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19. Day or Night Zoya B’s Tempo Daybed is finished in black ceruse with an upholstered headboard and footboard in a trendy silver fabric. A white mod trundle serves as an additional bed or storage. 20. Multi-Dimensional Woman In Her I, multiple layers of plexiglass give the illusion of a hologram as you move around the image. Designed and manufactured by Leftbank Art in Southern California. 21. Tiny Feet The Metropole at Brueton, designed by Stanley Jay Friedman, is a handsomely detailed, tailored sofa with classical modern appeal. Comfortable cushioning is framed with beautifully finished mahogany side and base panels, and supported by stainless steel cylinder feet.

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

Studio A Home Just like the famous inkblot tests, there is much to interpret from the starkly contrasting glazes in the Rorschach Vase Collection. This earthen-looking collection is based upon centuries-old techniques, yet looks modern and fresh to 21st-century eyes. The collection consists of vases in three sizes, a charger, and a bowl. Studio A Home, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Odegard Carpets The Ikat Carpet is a classic Odegard Carpet design in 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed, and hand-knotted Himalayan wool. Inspired by antique Ikat textiles, it has been updated in a soft, subtle colorway, with silk accents giving it a hint of shimmer. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

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Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. Like fireworks on the Fourth of July, the Sparta Chandelier by Hudson Valley Lighting is a celebration in glass and illumination. A center sphere bursts forth with chunks of icy glass and light clusters, dazzling guests stepping into your entry or dining room. Available in polished nickel or aged brass finish. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com

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Rooms By Zoya B The Tempo Dresser is available in four standard sizes, but can be modified to any dimensions. It features hardwood construction, dovetail joints, and full-extension deep drawers with soft-close glides. A removable changer makes it usable in a baby nursery or as a tray for a modern vanity look. Rooms By Zoya B, Suite 433, 212.726.0006, roomsbyzoyab.com

LEFTBANK ART In The Hidden Beach, created by one of Leftbank Art’s in-house artists, the abstract image evokes waves hitting a rocky shore. It should come as no surprise then that it was painted in California. Available in five sizes. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

Bradley The McCoy Iron Vanity with Towel Bar is a hammered iron base shown here in a rubbed bronze finish along with the Mimi Sink in smoke concrete. BRADLEY bathroom vanities are artisan-made concrete sinks, hand-forged iron bases, and solid wood cabinets. Select from over 25 hand-polished concrete colors from bright hues to neutral tones. BRADLEY, Suite 802, 646.766.1011, bradley-usa.com

Christopher Guy The sumptuous curves and sweeping asymmetrical lines of Christopher Guy’s Courbé Setee are complemented by a beautifully carved scalloped apron. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

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DefiningPieces

BRUETON The award-winning Pinnacle Table is a conical metal form bisected by a semicircle to form an innovative base upon which a glass top appears to be in perfect balance. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Julian Chichester The Gustav Cabinet has emerged as a signature piece in the Mr Brown London collection. The walnut-finished cabinet is designed with three aged mirror sliding panel doors and set on hairpin legs for a modern vibe. This cabinet is media-ready with an open back and adjustable shelves. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

Currey & Company The traditional Empire shape of the Eduardo Chandelier is meticulously covered in steel wire with intermittent brass braising. This unique piece looks as if it could have been drawn by artist and illustrator Edward Gorey, or found hanging in a Brutalist industrial building built in Europe in the late 1950s. Currey & Company, Suite 506, 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com Côté France This solid bronze Baton de Marechal Handle designed by Jacques-Emile Ruhlmann is just one of the many antique and modern style handles, levers, window crémones, knobs, escutcheons, door plates, and hinge covers on display in the newly opened Maison Fontaine Decorative Hardware Boutique at the Côté France showroom. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com Reagan Hayes With an hourglass silhouette and generous proportions, the Oscar Dining Chair is as striking as they come in fully upholstered form. Center matched, quarter-sawn veneer is a crowning touch. Shown in solid walnut with mink stain and French natural nail detail. Available in all Reagan Hayes finishes as well as custom finishes. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, 212.658.1922, reaganhayes.com

Dennis Miller Associates The Fretwork Casegood features a geometric grid of raised metal inlay overlaying its cabinet front. Integral tab pulls extend out of the inlay pattern at functionally designed intersections to act as grasp points. Metal-capped door ends frame the composition. Available in a variety of standard or custom sizes, configurations, woods, and metal finishes. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

GLOBAL VIEWS Inspired by an Art Deco cabinet, but reimagined in rich santos veneer, the Santos Media Cabinet recalls the luxe era of days gone by. The piece features book-matched veneers on the top and front, and two doors with nickel hardware and a hidden escutcheon keyhole and lock. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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DefiningPieces LEPERE The Magenta Lounge Chair by Casamilano is an armchair with a fir-wood structure covered in polyurethane foam in varying densities. The feet are solid beech stained in various finishes. Available in various fabrics and leathers, it is shown here with mocha-stained oak feet and upholstered in celadon Trevira velvet. LEPERE, Suite 714, 212.488.7000, lepereinc.com

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PLEXI-CRAFT The King George Vanity is a shining symbol of Plexi-Craft’s philosophy on design. Their NYC-based team has produced a range of King George pieces, varying from a small one-drawer nightstand to a six-drawer vanity desk. Customizable to any size and shape, the sides can be clear, colored, or mirrored. Plexi-Craft, Suite 914, 212.924.3244, signature.plexi-craft.com

PROFILES Wingchair is just another word for comfort. And Victoria Hagan’s Wainscott Wingchair is the latest example in the long history of this exemplary form, providing enclosure, warmth, and protection. Hagan’s design is a classic example with carved legs and nailhead trim. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

THE BRIGHT GROUP The Bright Group’s versatile Calvin Sectional series, designed by Douglas Levine, is a classic example of the kind of attention to detail, style, and quality that Bright is known for. Custom sizes are available. Choice of tight seat or loose cushions. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

BAKES & KROPP Featuring Meridian Cabinetry in a white hand-painted finish, this custom Southampton kitchen is a stylish open-concept space with tons of storage. The upper doors showcase a beautiful patterned glass, and the rich walnut island warms the entire space. A striking focal point, the stainless steel range hood is a true one of a kind. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, 917.885.9650, bakesandkropp.com

PHILLIPS COLLECTION Cast from real tree trunks, this Log Stool brightens up the room with its gold-leaf finish. Crafted from artisan-grade resin and hand finished, this piece will truly make a statement in any space, either as a stool or a side table. This bold product is available in various sizes and finishes. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, 336.884.9271, phillipscollection.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2016 new showroom new location opening soon

FAIR, Suite 601 FAIR is a new showroom at the New York Design Center that heralds a return of craftsmanship, technique, and a sense of community to the furniture industry. The vision of interior designer Brad Ford, FAIR furthers these values with a curated focus on high-end handcrafted design. It is modern, elevated work created by various artisans from both New York City and the Hudson Valley area of upstate New York, handpicked by Ford into one dynamic collection. Kelly Wearstler, Suite 816 kellywearstler.com Global interior designer and tastemaker Kelly Wearstler is renowned for her signature brand of unexpected, bold, and sophisticated design, and has revolutionized the look, feel, and meaning of modern American living. This season marks the debut of Kelly’s New York Design Center showroom. The showroom highlights her extensive furniture, lighting, and decorative home accessory collections inspired by her masterful mix of diverse materials, artisanal craftsmanship, and classic forms. Heirloom woods, mixed metal patinas, and hand-cut stones combine with a cultivated palette, clean lines, and sculptural forms to create a collection with Kelly’s distinct vision. A collection of modern classics, marrying form and function with unrivaled artistry and enduring quality. Leftbank Art, Suite 609 leftbankart.com For over 40 years, Leftbank Art has provided the latest in art to the design world. They are bringing their line of over 8,000 pieces to the New York Design Center, including Original Hand Paintings, Giclees, Prints on Canvas, Plexi, Outdoor, Glass Framed, Shadow Box Art, and Murals. All of their work is hand embellished, bringing a realistic painted look to each image, offering a one-of-akind representation of their artwork. Their attention to detail and quality drive the manufacturing and creation of the artwork. Custom size options are available for most of the products to make sure that the artwork fits any size you may need. Their line is updated seasonally, ensuring the availability of the latest trends and styles. 72

Plexi-Craft, Suite 914 plexi-craft.com Plexi-Craft, the oldest and leading acrylic furnishings company, is proud to announce the opening of their new flagship showroom in the New York Design Center. Plexi-Craft was founded over 50 years ago in Manhattan and is excited to bring their exclusive Signature Collection back to the borough’s premier design showcase. The new showroom includes unique custom capabilities and collaborative collections with New York-based designers Alan Tanksley, Coffinier Ku, and Timothy Whealon. Plexi-Craft further tapped Alan Tanksley’s creative mind in the design of this new showroom.

AERO, 15th Floor aerostudios.com Celebrating its 20th year, AERO is a fixture in New York City’s design community. Thomas O’Brien continually puts forth his latest finds and ideas in a revolving, imagined interior. The store houses O’Brien’s hand-picked, ever-changing selection of refurbished vintage modern furniture and lighting, antiques, fine art, tableware, accessories, and collectibles. In addition, AERO stocks the most complete offering of Thomas O’Brien brand home furnishings, both ready-made and made to order. It is the only place to find O’Brien’s custom AERO-label goods, from handcrafted, luxury upholstery, and lighting to trays, bedding, and favorites like the perennially popular AERO leather tote bags.

Seguso Murano since 1397, Suite 431 seguso.com The Seguso family has been dedicated to the art of Murano glass since 1397, with 23 generations passing down knowledge, art, and passion at the highest level. MoMA, the Victoria and Albert Museum, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art are among 100 museums around the world that have Seguso glass in their permanent collections. Today Seguso brings together both tradition and modernity, offering the most comprehensive range of authentic Murano glass artworks. Lighting, furniture, accessories, and a wide range of custom capabilities are inspired by the rich creative heritage of Seguso glass, for the finest residential and commercial interiors.

BRADLEY, Suite 802 bradley-usa.com BRADLEY is an innovative, to-the-trade luxury furnishings company specializing in artisancrafted, American-made furnishings, lighting, and accessories. Distinguished by a range of materials and customized finishes—reclaimed wood, concrete, hand-forged metal, antiqued mirror, painted glass— BRADLEY is sold through major design centers and by design trade professionals around the world. In addition to its signature furnishings line, the Atlanta-based design and manufacturing company offers an extensive fabric library of custom-printed textiles, classic linen, silk, chenille, and bouclé, as well as fabric and wall coverings from established and emerging artisans. BRADLEY represents a growing roster of artists, positioning the company as a one-stop source for the design community. Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1208 jiunho.com Celebrated San Francisco-based interior and home furnishings designer Jiun Ho will debut his luxury lifestyle line in a new showroom at the New York Design Center. In collaboration with Dennis Miller Associates, the new space will showcase Jiun Ho’s collections of furniture, lighting, and accessories, as well as pieces curated from selective complimentary collections. The showroom will highlight the Jiun Ho Collection V, created in celebration of his 15th Anniversary, as well as classic pieces that have become favorites of designers and architects. A global nomad with an extraordinary eye, Jiun Ho has traveled to 108 countries. His designs are inspired by elements of nature, architecture, and art. “I am so pleased to be opening a showroom in New York. My dream is to create a total design experience.”


ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200 Lex's Most Familiar Names

BAKER FURNITURE Suite 300

BAKES & KROPP Suite 430

BRADLEY Suite 710

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

Founded in 1902, Baker Furniture remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Furniture, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

Founded by designer Robert Bakes and craftsman Paul Kropp, Bakes & Kropp is a luxury cabinetry firm combining elegant design and expert craftsmanship to create spectacular kitchens, vanities, libraries, and closets. Their new flagship showroom at the New York Design Center is the much-anticipated extension of their original Sag Harbor location. Bakes & Kropp, Suite 430, phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710 bakesandkropp.com

BRADLEY is an innovative luxury furnishings company specializing in American-made furnishings, lighting, fine art, and accessories. Distinguished by a range of unique materials and artisan finishes—reclaimed wood, concrete, hand-forged metal, antiqued mirror, painted glass—BRADLEY is sold through major design centers and by trade professionals around the world. In addition, BRADLEY offers an extensive fabric library of custom-printed textiles from established and emerging artisans. BRADLEY, Suite 802, phone 646.766.1011, fax 646.766.8686, bradley-usa.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Company with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

BRUETON Suite 910

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

Côté France Suite 1201

Currey & Company Suite 506

Brueton, a US manufacturer based in New York, manufactures a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

Côté France respects tradition, and embraces the future. Renowned for quality, style, and originality, the company’s workrooms proudly boast generations of families continuing a tradition of hand craftsmanship. In addition to reproductions and outdoor teak, collections include Ecart International Furniture, Chêne de l’Est French Oak Flooring, and Maison Fontaine Decorative Hardware. The company specializes in projects for fine residences and luxury hotels worldwide. Côté France, Suite 1201, phone 212.684.0707, fax 212.684.8940, cotefrance.com

For more than 25 years, Currey & Company has fulfilled customers’ need for distinctive chandeliers, wall sconces, lamps, rugs, and furniture. The company’s perspective on product design is one of a lively interest in historical influences, correct materials for the design and a keen interest in product integrity. Every detail is executed with clarity and finesse. Products show the touch of the human hand meticulously crafted of natural materials. Currey & Company, Suite 506, phone 212.213.4900, curreyandcompany.com JUN JUL AUG SEP

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ShowroomPortraits DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

HICKORY CHAIR–PEARSON– HENREDON, Suite 102

In House Kitchen Bath home Suite 1511

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home décor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair–Pearson– Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, Lane Venture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair–Pearson–Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com, hickorychairpearson.com

In House Kitchen Bath Home is New York’s premier showroom offering distinctive cabinetry from custom manufacturers Wood-Mode and Brookhaven for all rooms throughout the home. In House Kitchen Bath Home, Suite 1511, phone 212.686.2016, fax 212.686.2048, inhousekbh.com

JULIAN CHICHESTER/ MR BROWN LONDON, Suite 604

LEFTBANK ART Suite 714

LEPERE Suite 714

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture perfect for how we live today. Julian Chichester is pleased to offer the inimitable, irrepressible, and always edgy Mr. Brown London in his New York showroom with a beautifully edited assortment of furniture, lamps and accessories. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com, mrbrownlondon.com

For over 40 years, Leftbank Art has been creating and manufacturing wall art in Southern California, offering 10,000 image options. Our trade clients include designers, retail, hospitality, contract, and corporate. They offer giclées in multiple sizes, finishes, and substrates, along with 100 frame options. Also available are hand painted images, framed under glass, wall murals, and plexiglass. Orders are customizable to specifications. Leftbank Art, Suite 609, phone 646.293.6694, leftbankart.com

LEPERE showcases a contemporary collection of innovative designs from Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, and Spain. LEPERE has developed a strong and loyal following in both the residential and contract design community with its warm, minimalist aesthetic, featuring the best-in-class in furniture, outdoor, carpets, and lighting. LEPERE, Suite 714, phone 212.488.7000, fax 212.488.7006, lepereinc.com

Metropolitan Lighting has been illuminating the finest interiors for many years. Their New York showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

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Odegard Carpets Suite 1209

Phillips Collection Suite 603

Plexi-Craft Suite 914

PROFILES Suite 1211

Since 1987, Odegard Carpets has been an innovative leader in the production of sophisticated high-end, hand-knotted carpets. Recently partnered with Kooches Handmade Carpets, Odegard has greatly expanded its distinctive carpet offerings and production capabilities. Odegard Carpets requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising the standard of living for thousands of artisan weavers in developing countries. Odegard Carpets, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

The creative world of Phillips Collection thrives on creating pieces that stimulate creative conversations. Their team travels to remote areas of the world to discover and bring you one-of-a-kind pieces that are whimsical, contemporary, and eco-friendly. For over 30 years, Mark and Julie Phillips have served as innovative leaders within the design community, displaying an extraordinary eye and skill for discovery. Phillips Collection, Suite 603, phone 336.884.9271, fax 336.882.7405, phillipscollection.com

Plexi-Craft is unique among custom acrylic furniture manufacturers, having been located in New York City since their founding in the 1960s. Many of the Mid-Century acrylic antiques you see at vintage furniture shops were made by Plexi-Craft. With a sketch or even a written description, your vision can be translated into a custom item. All of their pieces can also be scaled, modified or customized. Plexi-Craft, Suite 914, phone 212.924.3244, fax 212.924.3508, signature.plexi-craft.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the US and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Reagan Hayes Suite 903

Rooms By Zoya B Suite 433

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

STUDIO A HOME Suite 614

Reagan Hayes, Inc. designs and manufactures high-end furniture for interior design and architecture firms. Each piece in the company’s collection is hand made in Los Angeles with the finest materials, craftsmanship, and attention to detail. The company has flagship showrooms in the New York Design Center and the Pacific Design Center, with representation in other locations, including with Jean de Merry in Dallas. Reagan Hayes, Suite 903, phone 212.658.1922, fax 310.494.5937, reaganhayes.com

New York City-based interior designer Zoya Bograd, ASID, showcases her passion and inspiration for designing children’s rooms at America’s most prestigious designer showhouses, shares designer tips and decorating ideas, and gives personal advise on motherhood. Zoya operates three websites. Her portfolio site is roomsbyzoyab.com. Her retail site for furniture, toys and accessories is bogradkids.com. And zoyab.com is the newest site for tothe-trade only. Rooms By Zoya B, Suite 433, 212.726.0006, fax 212.726.0061, roomsbyzoyab.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

Studio A Home’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A Home is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A Home, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com JUN JUL AUG SEP

2016

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Events at 200 Lex A look at a few recent celebrations.

Dining by Design Kick Off On Wednesday, January 20, the New York Design Center and Henredon hosted the Sponsor & Designer Kick-Off Party for DIFFA’s Dining by Design. Dining by Design brings together internationally renowned and local talent to create dining installations to raise critical funds for DIFFA’s work fighting HIV/AIDS. These extraordinary dining environments set the stage for five days of fun and fundraising.

Ngahuia Damerell, Michelle Aguda, and Johanna Osburn, Executive Director at DIFFA; guests mingled in Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon; 200 Lex’s Alix Lerman with Regan Iglesia and Laura Holland of Heritage Home Group, and Johanna Osburn; Rio Hamilton snapped photos of the festivities. Photos by Lev Avery-Peck Photography.

Design on a Dime Kick Off On Tuesday, March 1, the New York Design Center hosted the kick-off party for Housing Works Design on a Dime event. Design on a Dime is a 3-day benefit and sale featuring more than 60 of the world’s top interior designers, who create unforgettable room vignettes with new merchandise, which is donated and then sold for 50 to 70 percent off retail pricing. Guests enjoyed a festive evening of cocktails and conversation in the DESIRON showroom, mingling with participating designers and learning more about Housing Works’ life-saving mission.

Asler Valero, founding chair James Huniford, Michael Dipp, Dyana Kazan, and Chris Viehe; Tim Croneberger and Michael Logan of Halycon Design; Francis Toumbakaris and Tyler Wisler; Peti Lau and Darcy Fulton; event co-chairs Nicole Gibbons and George Oliphant with Elle Decor Editor-in-Chief Michael Boodro (center); Zoe Oliphant, Ellie Mroz, and Dianne Rose; Jana Weill of Robert Allen and IFDA’s Su Hilty with Caleb Anderson and Jamie Drake of Drake/Anderson. Photos by Getty Images for Housing Works.

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DIFFA's Dining by Design 2016 The New York Design Center was thrilled to support DIFFA at the 19th annual Dining by Design event, held March 17 – March 21, in conjunction with the Architectural Digest Design Show. 200 Lex celebrated its 90th birthday with an elegant rooftop party set high above the bustling streets of downtown Manhattan. To commemorate nine decades at the Center of Design, Antonino Buzzetta of Antonino Buzzetta Design conceptualized an al fresco dinner party with furnishings exclusively sourced from New York Design Center showrooms. The dining setting crafted by Buzzetta set the scene for a lively evening that married a quintessential birthday party with iconic New York City. The airy rooftop was complete with a limestone façade, wrought iron railings, NYC-inspired graffiti, and a classic fire escape. Copious birthday party essentials were playfully elevated, including custom-made party hats designed with Kravet fabric and trim, a dozen delicious fun-fetti cakes, and rainbow-colored balloons galore!

A full view of the table featuring Laura Kirar Kiwari Dining Tables from McGuire and Jordan Side Chairs by Palecek; New York Design Center’s table designer Antonino Buzzetta; pedestals with urns from Century Furniture; Wharton Wall Sconces and Harewood Console Table by Currey & Company; pillow fabric and party hat fabric and trim by Kravet; Vases, bowls, dinnerware, decanters, and cake stands by Global Views/Studio A top the tables with flatware from MATCH through Richard Cohen Collection. Photos by Darren Ornitz. JUN JUL AUG SEP

2016

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ShowroomDirectory

A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex

S uite PHON E FA X SHOWROOM 1stdibs Gallery at 200 Lex 10th Fl 646.293.6633 646.293.6687 Access To Design 424 212.679.9500 212.447.1669 AERO - Thomas O'Brien 1500 1509 305.470.1200 305.470.9070 Alea AMQ 1316 212.685.1077 212.685.1078 ANDREU WORLD 1111 212.679.0300 212.679.5996 212.684.6987 212.689.3684 Apropos Inc. 710 Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. 1411 212.751.1590 212.751.2434 Aristeia Metro 1416 646.761.4711 Arteriors 608 646.797.3620 646.786.4818 Atelier 202 212.696.0211 212.696.0299 Atlas Carpet Mills 212.779.4300 212.779.0838 1314 Baker Furniture 300 212.779.8810 212.689.2827 Bakes & Kropp 430 917.885.9650 631.725.1710 Bograd Kids 433 212.726.0006 212.726.0061 Bolier 804 212.889.2060 Boyce Products Ltd 1405 212.683.3100 212.683.5005 BRADLEY 802 The Bright Group 902 212.726.9030 212.726.9029 Brueton 910 212.838.1630 212.838.1652 Brunschwig & Fils 401 212.725.0340 212.684.7350 Calger Lighting Inc. 434 212.689.9511 212.779.0721 Century Furniture 200 212.479.0107 212.479.0112 CF Modern 510 917.699.6024 Christopher Guy 212.684.2197 212.684.2123 1601 CityScapes NYC 1106 212.961.6984 Clickspring Design 1405 212.220.0962 212.683.5005 CLIFF YOUNG LTD. 505 212.683.8808 212.683.9286 Colombo Mobili USA 809 212.683.3771 212.684.0559 Côté France 1201 212.684.0707 212.684.8940 Crosby Street Studios 1303 212.486.0737 917.591.4373 Currey & Company 506 212.213.4900 212.213.4911 DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. 1116 212.961.6984 212.951.7070 Decca Contract Furniture 1414 646.761.4711 Delivery By Design (DBD) Dock 212.213.1691 212.213.9843 Dennis Miller Associates 1210 212.684.0070 212.684.0776

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DesignLush DESIRON DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Dune EJ Victor ENRICOPELLIZZONI FAIR Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Groupe Lacasse Halcon Harbour Outdoor Hickory Chair-Pearson-Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jasper Group Jiun Ho at Dennis Miller Associates Julian Chichester Karkula Kasthall Rugs USA Inc.

415 702 1516 806 715 100 814 1304 601 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1109 1304 1301 102 1511 916 417B 1514 1208 604 419 611

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.925.6171 212.679.4341 212.683.7272 212.352.9615 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.689.0300 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.685.1077

212.532.5360 212.353.0220 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.925.2273 212.683.7011 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.689.7143 212.683.0711 212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641

646.293.6622 917.591.2413 212.645.2216 212.421.0220 212.421.0230

SHOWROOM gallery at 200 LEx S u i t e P H O NE FA X Keilhauer 1101 212.679.0300 212.679.5996 Kelly Wearstler 816 212.679.4341 212.679.4935 Kenneth Cobonpue 427 212.532.5450 KI and Pallas Textiles 1313 212.337.9909 212.337.1090 Kindel Furniture 806 646.293.6649 646.293.6657 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 212.3924750 Kravet Inc. 401 212.725.0340 212.684.7350 Krug 1415 212.686.7600 LaCOUR 1412 212.213.6600 973.227.3544 Lee Jofa 401 212.725.0340 212.684.7350 Leftbank Art 609 LEPERE 714 212.488.7000 212.488.7006 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 212.686.7600 212.686.7686 Lexington Home Brands 212 212.532.2750 212.532.2875 Louis J. Solomon Inc. 911 212.545.9200 212.545.9438 Luna Textiles 1410 212.251.0132 McGuire Furniture 101 212.689.1565 212.689.1578 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 212.545.0032 212.545.0031 Milano Smart Living LLC 711 212.729.1938 212.729.1939 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 646.486.3272 646.349.5619 Mr. Brown London 604 646.293.6622 917.591.2413 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 The New Traditionalists 701 212.226.1868 212.226.5504 Niermann Weeks 905 212.319.7979 212.319.6116 1209 212.545.0205 212.545.0305 Odegard Carpets 610 212.287.0063 212.287.0066 PALECEK 1110 212.683.2232 212.683.1297 Paoli 416 212.839.0500 212.839.0501 Pennoyer Newman LLC 603 336.884.9271 336.882.7405 Phillips Collection Plexi-Craft 914 212.924.3244 1101 212.679.0300 212.679.5996 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1109 212.689.0300 212.689.7149 Pringle Ward 1101 212.679.0030 212.679.5996 Prismatique 1211 212.689.6903 212.685.1807 Profiles 511 212.966.6112 212.966.6113 Raul Carrasco NYC 903 212.658.1922 Reagan Hayes RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES 912 212.696.0080 212.696.4248 Richard Cohen Collection 801 212.696.4938 212.696.5333 Rooms by Zoya B 433 212.726.0006 212.726.0061 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 212.203.4382 888.713.6042 1600 212.684.3720 212.684.3257 Saladino Furniture Inc. 400 212.684.4217 212.545.8376 SANFORD HALL Sedgwick & Brattle 815 212.685.0600 212.244.9131 431 212.696.1133 212.696.9757 Seguso Murano since 1397 Skyline Contract Group 1106 212.961.6984 Smart 1115 212.696.9762 212.696.2729 Studio A Home 612 212.956.0030 212.956.0031 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A 212.213.2703 212.231.2708 515 646.293.6628 336.885.5260 Theodore Alexander 815 212.736.6564 212.244.9131 Thom Filicia Inc. TK Collections 410 212.213.2470 212.213.2464 Todd Hase 425 212.871.9075 212.871.9085 Townhouse Kitchens 421 212.684.8696 212.684.8696 transFORM 708 212.584.9580 504 212.355.3383 212.355.3116 Tucker Robbins Versteel 1106 800.876.2120 1304 212.683.7272 212.683.7011 Wall Goldfinger 407 646.291.2059 Weinberg Modern Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 212.532.7440 212.532.6440 Wood-Mode, Inc./T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 212.679.3535 212.725.3847 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 212.390.8944 1st Floor 646.616.0584 Café at 200 Lex New York Design Center 426 212.679.9500 212.447.1669


SALADI NO FURNI TUREI NC. SUI TE1600 TEL( 212)6843720 FAX( 212)6833257 SALADI NOSTYLE. COM


backstory LIGHT BRIGHT

By Jim Lochner

T he Fire I sland L ighthouse has lit the sky for nearly 200 years .

The lighthouse’s original First Order Fresnel Lens on display (photo: Art Noble); approach to the lighthouse with the Lens Building, tower, and Keeper’s Quarters (photo: George Bacon); the tower stairs (photo: Bette Berman); the plan for the current lighthouse, ca. 1857.

ire Island has come a long way since its days of Native Americans manufacturing wampum and hunting whales offshore to the treasured weekend getaway it is today. At one time it was downright dangerous. The island’s offshore sandbars, which lie six to nine feet below the surface a quarter of a mile from the shoreline, once proved treacherous to ships sailing parallel to Long Island to enter New York’s busy port. According to the National Park Service, approximately 200 known and an estimated 640 unidentified ships wrecked off the coast of Fire Island beginning in the mid-1600s as ships hit the sandbars, masts snapped, and hulls were destroyed in the rise and fall of the ocean waves. And there were no lighthouses in New York State until the Department of the Treasury assumed jurisdiction over them in 1789. The first lighthouse in the state was built in 1797 at Montauk Point but there was still over 130 miles of unlit coastline for ships to travel before hitting Lower New York Bay and the lighthouse at Sandy Hook, New Jersey. In 1826, Congress appropriated $10,000 for a lighthouse on Fire Island. The tower was a 74-feet high cream-colored, octagonal pyramid made of Connecticut River blue stone located on 31 acres at the western end of the island. On top was a soapstone deck for the lantern, which contained 18 lamps and 15-inch reflectors, with a revolving light that ranged 10–14 nautical miles out to sea. The lantern was later upgraded to 14 lamps with 21-inch reflectors, but the structure wasn’t tall enough to be seen far enough out to sea and the lighthouse was almost entirely dismantled, leaving only a circular ring of bricks and stone today. A new 152-foot conical tower was designed and built by the Army Corps of Engineers in 1857 for $40,000. The tower was made of red brick and painted a creamy yellow color until it was changed to the present-day alternating black and white bands in August 1891. The new lighthouse was fitted with a massive, 16-foot-tall First Order Fresnel Lens produced in France by the Henry-Lepaute 80

Company. The beehive-shaped glass and brass structure rotated by means of a clockwork mechanism with a flying pendulum, emitting a five-second white flash at one-minute intervals that could be seen from ships at least 21–23 miles out to sea. A Funk Lamp with five concentric wicks used whale oil, lard oil, mineral oil, and kerosene over the years to provide illumination until a motor drive replaced the clockwork and electricity was installed in 1938. The lighthouse continued to serve as an aid to navigation until it was decommissioned on December 31, 1973. Between 1974 and 1980, private citizens banded together in an effort to save the lighthouse. The Fire Island Lighthouse Preservation Society was formed in 1982 and raised $1.3 million to restore the lighthouse to its 1938 condition, when electricity was first installed. The lighthouse was placed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1984 and on Memorial Day 1986, it was relit and reinstated as an official aid to navigation. Today, the light is lit by two 1,000-watt bulbs, which rotate in a counterclockwise direction, giving the appearance of a flash every 7.5 seconds. The light is visible for approximately 21–24 miles. Visitors to the lighthouse can scale the 182 steps of the tower, enjoy two floors of interactive exhibits in the Keeper’s Quarters, and visit the adjoining Lens Building to view the original Fresnel Lens. On a clear day, you can see the Manhattan skyline from the lighthouse—a welcome change from the days when lives were lost off the sandbars. Nearly 200 years later, the Fire Island Lighthouse continues to provide a welcoming beacon—day or night. fireislandlighthouse.com


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Array Magazine Summer 2016  

Array Magazine - Summer 2016 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offic...

Array Magazine Summer 2016  

Array Magazine - Summer 2016 ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offic...

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