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The award-winning design, quality craftsmanship and unprecedented performance of a Big Ass Fan® are always in style. Hidden behind a seamless fit and finish, Haiku’s revolutionary motor features Whoosh®, a proprietary algorithm that simulates a natural breeze to keep you feeling up to 40% cooler*. This Big Ass Fan is recognized by Popular Science as the world’s quietest ceiling fan and rated by ENERGY STAR® as the world’s most energy efficient. With 16 unique brightness settings and a digital dimmer, Haiku’s patent-pending LED module delivers 80% greater efficiency than traditional bulbs over a lifespan of 50,000 hours.

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Features

Volume 11 Issue 2

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Bunny Williams By Cathy Whitlock A grande dame of design with a bohemian streak.

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A Tale of Two Cities By Cathy Whitlock Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz: one designer’s take on Paris and New York.

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Hungry for More By Catherine McHugh Jun Aizaki and crème take their hands-on approach to projects all over the world.

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Departments

Volume 11 Issue 2

9 CULTURECALENDAR By Catherine McHugh The Morgan peers at miniature marvels, the Whitney looks back at Jeff Koons, and food lovers chow down in Brooklyn and on the Lower East Side.

12 BOOKS By Cathy Whitlock

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Linens, gardening, and modern and traditional architecture are featured in this season's selections. d new tomes from Alexa Hampton and TROVE By Jim Lochner From a T-shirt chair to a dog bed made of tennis balls, we’re celebrating those lazy-hazy-crazy days of summer.

34 EATS’N’SLEEPS By Jim Lochner New venues showcase New York City’s historic past and present, while others celebrate the city’s diversity with delicacies from Spain and Korea.

36 MYFAVTHINGS

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A sleek outdoor folding bar, metal and stone tables, a sculpted bench, and big colorful umbrellas are seasonal designer favorites. ssories and color choices. GALLERY When the temperature rises, the line between indoors and outdoors gets blurred. ng l

46 FRESHPICKS The most current products in 200Lex showrooms.

56 STYLESPOTLIGHT Featured highlights of craft and design.

64 DEFININGPIECES Items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

72 NEWSHOWROOMS 2014 Fresh faces and new designs.

73 SHOWROOMPORTRAITS Profiles of some of 200Lex's most familiar names.

76 EVENTSAT200LEX A look at a few recent celebrations.

78 SHOWROOMDIRECTORY A complete list of who’s where in 200 Lex.

80 BACKSTORY By Jim Lochner The Mansion on Madison stands as a lasting landmark of Gilded Age living.

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ArrayMAGAZINE Editorial Array Magazine, Inc. 261 Madison Avenue 9th Floor New York, NY 10016 Phone 212.929.2733 Fax 212.929.0983 arrayny.com ARRAY editorial coverage@arrayny.com ARRAY advertising adinfo@arrayny.com ARRAY Magazine is produced three times per year. All submissions should be e-mailed to: coverage@arrayny.com Array Magazine, Inc. Š 2014 All rights reserved

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief/Publisher Sheau Ling Soo Creative Director Ted Lambert Executive Editor Cathy Whitlock Features Editor Jim Lochner Copy Editor Andrew French Photographer Adam Cohen IT Manager

The contents of Array Magazine, Inc., may not be reproduced without written permission from the publisher.

Contributors Michele Keith Catherine McHugh

New York Design Center James P. Druckman President & CEO Daniel M. Farr Director of Operations Alix M. Lerman Director of Marketing & Communications Leah Blank Senior Marketing Manager/Director of Special Events Alana Moskowitz Design Services Manager Brenna Stevens Marketing Coordinator Susan Lai Controller Vera Markovich Accounting Manager Sara Marsh Concierge

on the cover: Bunny Williams photographed by John Bessler.

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letter from the editor Dear Readers, Individuality—it makes all of us, well, us. But in interior design, both client and designer must be able to see part of themselves and maintain their own singularity within the spaces they collaborate on. For designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz of BNOdesign, that meeting of the minds has resulted in lasting bonds with clients—including one couple for whom he has worked on eight projects, most recently on their residences in Paris and New York (A Tale of Two Cites, p. 22). Both designer and clients are thrilled with the results, which are individual yet linked by an immediately recognizable signature aesthetic.

Photo by Andrew French

Bunny Williams has been described as a “doyenne” of interior design (The Grande Dame of Design, p. 16), but she confesses to ARRAY’s Cathy Whitlock that what she really likes to do is create homes that are “backdrops for living.” For Williams, this means expressing herself and her client, and giving each space its own flair, whether sprinkling individualistic touches throughout a gracious traditional home in Greenwich or adding wow-factor to a Manhattan penthouse with a sculptural spiral staircase that leads to lofty spaces and terraces. Designer Jun Aizaki’s company, aptly named crème, has worked closely with chefs and restaurant owners on projects in New York, where he is based, and internationally (Hungry for More, p. 28). The firm enjoys designing everything from initial concepts down to matchbooks and signage. This kind of close collaboration means Aizaki and his team are as integral to these clients’ businesses as their menus (which they also design). Discover one of the freshest things to come out of Brooklyn since Grimaldi's pizza. All three of these designers solve design challenges in their own individual ways, but they have one thing in common, they make spaces that perfectly suit their clientele.

Paul Millman Editor-in-Chief

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CultureCalendar

By Catherine McHugh

The Morgan peers at miniature marvels, the Whitney looks back at Jeff Koons, and food lovers chow down in Brooklyn and on the Lower East Side. Crossing Delancey Evoking the pushcart market that once thrived on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, the Hester Street Fair is an outdoor community market that specializes in showcasing handmade goods, creative products, and artisanal food. The Fair is a launching pad for small, independent businesses and artists, in which hundreds of vendors rotate over 60 spots to create one of the most dynamic outdoor events in New York City. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday through October 26. The intersection of Hester and Essex Streets, hesterstreetfair.com.

Left: Attendees grab lunch and picnic blankets to enjoy the goods. Bottom: Hundreds of vendors rotate over 60 spots every Saturday and Sunday at the Hester Street Fair. Photos courtesy of Hester Street Fair.

Top: Mel Bochner, Kvetch, Kvetch, Kvetch, 2010. Oil and acrylic on canvas, 22 x 38 inches. Private Collection. Left: Mel Bochner, The Joys of Yiddish, 2012. Oil and acrylic on two canvases, 100 x 85 inches. The Muriel and William Rand Collection Gift, by exchange, and Gift of Hyman and Joan C. Sall.

The Power of Words The Jewish Museum is exhibiting Mel Bochner: Strong Language, which focuses on the artist’s career-long fascination with the cerebral and visual associations of words. Bochner juxtaposes the vernacular and the proper, the formal and the vulgar, and the high versus the low, using terms often appropriated from Roget’s Thesaurus. A founding figure of the Conceptual Art movement of the 1960s, Bochner has taken an unusual turn toward painterly expressiveness during the past two decades. The exhibition will present a broad selection of 70 works—from often-witty early conceptual examples to vibrantly colored and lushly executed recent paintings— which show the artist’s engagement with the possibilities of language as image, medium, and content. Through September 21. The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Avenue, 212.423.3200, thejewishmuseum.org.

AN OVERDUE LOOK BACK The Whitney Museum is hosting Jeff Koons: A Retrospective, the first exhibition to comprehensively survey the full scope of this important American artist’s career. As one of the most influential, popular, and controversial artists of the postwar era, Koons has pioneered new artistic techniques, and tested the boundaries between advanced art and mass culture. Through his sculptures, he has challenged the limits of industrial fabrication, and transformed the relationship of artists to the cult of celebrity and the global market. The exhibition comprises 120 objects that date from 1979 to the present. By reconstituting all of his most iconic works and significant series in a chronological narrative, the retrospective will allow visitors to understand his remarkably diverse output as a multifaceted whole. June 27–October 19. Whitney Museum of American Art, 945 Madison Avenue, 212.570.3600, whitney.org. Left: Jeff Koons, Split-Rocker (Orange/Red), 1999. Polychromed aluminum, 13 1/2 x 14 1/2 x 13 inches. Collection of B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons. Right: Jeff Koons, One Ball Total Equilibrium Tank (Spalding Dr. J 241 Series), 1985. Glass, steel, sodium chloride reagent, distilled water, basketball, 64 3/4 x 30 3/4 x 13 1/4 inches. Collection of B. Z. and Michael Schwartz. © Jeff Koons. JUN JUL

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CultureCalendar Public Palaces The Museum of the City of New York is presenting Palaces for the People: Guastavino and the Art of Structural Tile. Throughout New York City’s five boroughs are more than 200 long-overlooked marvels of engineering and architectural beauty: the interlocking tile vaults built by Spanish immigrants Rafael Guastavino Sr. (1842–1908), and his son, Rafael Jr. (1872–1950). They developed a system of structural tile vaults to be lightweight, fireproof, low-maintenance, and capable of supporting significant loads. Leading architects of the day used the Guastavino vaults to construct Ellis Island’s Registry Room, Carnegie Hall, the Bronx Zoo’s Elephant House, and Grand Central Terminal. Through September 7. Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Avenue, 212.534.1672, mcny.org.

Above left: Ludwig Bemelmans, “One nice morning Miss Clavel said” from Madeline [Simon & Schuster, 1939]. Crayon and watercolor, 18 x 18 inches. Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Royce. Right: Ludwig Bemelmans, “They went looking high,” panel from the Christina, Aristotle Onassis’ yacht, 1953. Oil, 68 1/2 x 24 1/4 inches. Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Royce.

In Step With Madeline To celebrate the 75th anniversary of the publication of Madeline, the New-York Historical Society will honor the plucky Parisian schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks. Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans is the first exhibition devoted to the artist in more than 50 years. It will feature drawings from all six Madeline books, as well as Bemelmans’ drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book. The manuscript for the first Madeline and original drawings from all the Madeline books will also be on view, providing further insights into Bemelmans’ creative process. July 4–October 13. New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, 212.873.3400, nyhistory.org.

Top: City Hall subway station, the vaulting, 1904. © Michael Freeman, Museum of the City of New York. Bottom left: Guastavino Residence Dining Room detail, 1913. © Michael Freeman, Museum of the City of New York. Bottom center: Guastavino Residence Fireplace detail, 1913. © Michael Freeman, Museum of the City of New York. Bottom right: Pennsylvania Station, 1910. Courtesy of Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University.

Making It Happen

Left: Michele Oka Doner, Totem, 2007. Cast bronze, 100.5 x 33 x 30 inches. Photo: Nick Merrick. Top: Misha Kahn, Pig Bench, 2012. Resin, trash, found objects, 17 x 46 x 14 inches. Photo: Misha Kahn.

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Museum of Arts and Design is presenting its inaugural NYC Makers: The MAD Biennial, an exhibition that spotlights the creative communities thriving across the five boroughs today. This first showcase features the work of approximately 100 highly inventive artisans, artists, and designers. Every maker selected will demonstrate the highest level of skill in their respective field, whether by fabricating furniture or fashion, creating artworks, films, and architecture, inventing new possibilities for food, or reshaping educational and social gatherings. The exhibition will be structured as a series of immersive tableaus that will house live programs—fashion shows, performances, social practice projects, and culinary explorations—which will underline the relationship between material and immaterial making found in New York City today. July 1–October 12. Museum of Arts and Design, 2 Columbus Circle, 212.299.7777, madmuseum.org.


Heaven for Foodies Smorgasburg, the Brooklyn Flea’s giant outdoor food market, recently kicked off in the East River State Park in Williamsburg and at Pier 5 in Brooklyn Bridge Park. More vendors than ever are participating, with the Saturday market featuring 100 vendors each week, and the Sunday market showcasing more than 80. Highlights include Fort Greene restaurant Martha’s famous General Tso’s fried chicken, Dun-Well Doughnuts’ exquisite vegan donuts, seafood tostadas from newcomer Fanny Moy, mushroomshaped meringues by Girl Meets Whisk, and cold-press juices and hacked coconuts by Summers, a new South Williamsburg shop. Through November 23. Saturdays in East River State Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, and Sundays at Pier 5 in Brooklyn Bridge Park, www.smorgasburg.com.

A bird’s-eye view of Smorgasburg at the East River State Park in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Photo courtesy of Brooklyn Flea. Top: In Feeling is Believing, choreographer luciana achugar led a group of onlookers on an architectural tour, interacting with the spaces she and her dancers occupied. Photo: Julieta Cervantes. Bottom: Rashaun Mitchell and Silas Riener performed r e v e a l at the Elevated Acre in July 2013. This site-specific performance was presented as part of Water Street Pops! Photo: Darial Sneed.

Left: Master of Claude de France, Daffodil, Book of Hours, France in Tours, ca. 1520. 107 x 76 millimeters. Purchased on the Fellows Fund, with the special assistance of Mrs. Donald M. Oenslager. Morgan Library & Museum. Right: Calendar vignette from a Book of Hours, France in Tours, ca. 1517–20. 74 x 68 millimeters. Morgan Library & Museum.

Dancing in the Streets Since 2002, the River To River Festival has been bringing free summertime culture events to public plazas, parks, and some unusual sites in lower Manhattan. This year, the partnership between the Alliance for Downtown New York, World Financial Center, Battery Park City Authority, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Port Authority of New York & New Jersey, and the South Street Seaport promises 11 days, 35 projects, and 90+ artists. Highlights will include a series of “world music” concerts at the South Street Seaport as well live music events at Federal Hall and Pier 15. The organizers urge attendees to experience, learn, and socialize at late-night house parties with DJs and pop-up performances, ETHEL with Kaki King at the Brookfield Place Winter Garden, site-specific dance performances by Vanessa Anspaugh, Eiko Otake, Tere O’Connor, Okwui Okpokwasili, enrico d wey, Souleymane Badolo, Reggie Wilson, Wally Cardona & Jennifer Lacey, Maria Hassabi, and a Bang on a Can Marathon at the Brookfield Place Winter Garden. June 19–29, rivertorivernyc.com.

Tiny Treasures The Morgan Library & Museum is showcasing one of the last great French illuminators with its exhibition, Miracles in Miniature: The Art of the Master of Claude de France. The Claude Master flourished in Tours, France, for only about 12 years (1508–1520), leaving behind a small but exceptional oeuvre. His fine and delicate style was characterized by the use of subtle lilacs, mauves, and roses, juxtaposed with chartreuse and royal blue, all applied in tiny, almost invisible brushstrokes. Nearly two-dozen items will be featured in the exhibition, the centerpiece of which is the Prayer Book of Claude de France, one of two jewel-like manuscripts that he painted for the queen of France and after which the artist was named. The manuscript measures a mere 2 3/4 by 2 inches, but it includes an amazing 132 miniatures. Also on view will be 12 of his newly discovered calendar miniatures, which the Morgan recently acquired. Through September 14. The Morgan Library & Museum, 225 Madison Avenue, 212.685.0008, themorgan.org. JUN JUL

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Books Art of the House: Reflections on Design

The Architecture of Diplomacy: The British Ambassador’s Residence in Washington

Never Stop to Think… Do I Have a Place For This

A Home in Provence: Interiors, Gardens, Inspiration

Bobby McAlpine and Susan Ferrier Rizzoli April 2014 208 pages, $55

Anthony Seldon and Daniel Collings Flammarion May 2014 236 pages, $65

Mary Randolph Carter Rizzoli May 2014 288 pages, $55

Noelle Duck Flammarion May 2014 216 pages, $34.95

Southern architect Bobby McAlpine has enjoyed a cult following from the beginning of his career. Known for their sloped roof, stucco-and-limestone houses filled with freshly appointed interiors, McAlpine Booth & Ferrier Interiors has designed and built sophisticated and tranquil homes all over the world for the past 29 years. A frequent name on Architectural Digest’s esteemed AD100 list, the firm’s McAlpine Home has a licensed line of upholstered furniture at Lee Industries and a fabric collection with Coleman Taylor Textiles. Written with business partner Susan Ferrier, Art of the House marks the pair’s second book (the 2010 book The Home Within Us: Romantic Houses, Evocative Rooms was an enormous success). More than just beautifully illustrated photographs, the book dissects the designer’s method for creating “atmospheric environments,” achieved through the application of an array of hues, textures, and patinas, and a mix of antiques and contemporary furnishings.

The residence of the British Ambassador is one of the most intriguing diplomatic addresses in our nation’s capital. Built by Sir Edwin Lutyens, the Neoclassical English country house meets American Queen Anne Colonial remains the renowned British architect’s only project in the United States. The lavishly illustrated The Architecture of Diplomacy is both a design and historical delight as authors and historians Seldon and Collings delve into the building’s rich history, weaving tales such as King George VI and Queen Elizabeth’s first visit to the United States (a social event of the decade that was marked by a garden party). Since then, dignitaries, ambassadors, powerful financiers, and politicians from Winston Churchill to Margaret Thatcher have frequented the elegant halls of the Massachusetts Avenue residence for the past 80 years. While few of us will live, decorate, or perhaps even visit the hallowed halls of an Ambassador’s home, there is something to be gleaned from the stately English-style interiors, exteriors, and gardens.

Author, photographer, designer, and longtime creative director for Ralph Lauren, Mary Randolph Carter has written a thoroughly engaging and informative book with a title that says it all. Never Stop to Think…Do I Have a Place For This illustrates how to happily surround ourselves with and stylishly display the items we cherish and want to keep forever. An authority on the art of shopping flea markets and antiques, Carter demonstrates how to design beautiful interiors with your finds, whether they are thrift shop cast-offs or pedigreed antiques. Exploring the interiors of “real-life tastemakers culled from the world of antique dealers, fashion designers, artists, and store owners,” the author explores the process of making the interior a place of self-expression. Filled with ideas and inspiration, Never Stop to Think marks the author’s twelfth book and will not disappoint her legions of fans.

A book on the idyllic region of Provence is just what the doctor ordered for summer reading, particularly if a trip to France is not in your travel plans. Part design tome and part travelogue, the book is a compact version of author Noelle Duck’s best-selling classic and worth a revisit. This time around, she features the home of French designer Edith Mézard along with British designer Terence Conran’s former French residence. Gold and terra-cottahued walls, rustic style furnishings, leafy terraces, lavender-filled pots, and floral fabrics are just a few of the design elements that comprise a classic Provencal interior. The book also explores the world of the Provencal glassmaker and potter, illustrating the materials, techniques, styles, and designs in detail. Duck also traces the interesting history of Provencal textiles and concludes with a useful design resource section.

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By Cathy Whitlock

Linens, gardening, and modern and traditional architecture are featured in this season's selections.

Designs for Living: Houses by Robert A. M. Stern Architects

George Stacey and the Creation of American Chic

Gardens Are For Living: Design Inspiration for Outdoor Spaces

Linens: For Every Room and Occasion

Randy M. Correll, Gary L. Brewer, Grant F. Marani, Roger H. Seifter The Monacelli Press May 2014 400 Pages, $75

Maureen Footer Rizzoli April 2014 224 pages, $65

Judy Kameon Rizzoli April 2014 224 pages, $50

Jane Scott Hodges Rizzoli April 2014 240 pages, $55

Known for his self-proclaimed “modern traditionalist” work, architect Robert A. M. Stern is one of the most prominent architects working today. As Dean of the Yale University School of Architecture, his varied public projects include the George W. Bush Presidential Library, 15 Central Park West, Nashville Public Library, 10 Rittenhouse Square in Philadelphia, and the Federal Reserve Bank in Atlanta, to name a few. Designs for Living celebrates the residential side of his practice. Houses from Napa and Sonoma to the Hamptons and New England are profiled, emphasizing the importance of keeping the “nature of place and environment” in mind. At the hallmark of every installation is the company’s mantra—designing an interior that is timeless and has “an ability to evoke a conversation with the past.”

Much has been written about the trailblazing icons of interior design such as Billy Baldwin, Sister Parish, and Dorothy Draper. Little has been written about decorator George Stacey, whose star was on the rise in the 1930s and caught the eye of style icon Diana Vreeland and the magazine editors of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Town & Country, and House & Garden. Irreverence coupled with a lifelong passion for French classicism make up the components of a Stacey interior. His coveted Rolodex of clients included Averell Harriman, John Hay Whitney, and Vincent Astor. One of his most prominent interiors included another style icon, Barbara “Babe” Paley (wife of CBS Chairman William Paley) and her Victorian-inspired interior on Long Island. Actress Ava Gardner’s house in Madrid (where 18th-century French gilt furniture mingled with modern upholstery) was another classic Stacey interior. He was also credited as one of the first designers to mix high and low, becoming known as a pioneer of the “haute-humble” look.

Gardens Are For Living arrived on my doorstep just in time for spring as I have never been known for my green thumb and need all the help I can get. Chock-full of ideas to jump-start the imagination, Kameon’s book promotes the philosophy that gardens should be spaces for entertaining, gathering, and, most importantly, relaxation. This has been a growing trend and the book takes the concept a step further, covering the basics on creating community spaces from space planning and aesthetics to climate, soil, watering, and maintenance. Landscape lighting and designing the front garden (with details on how to choose the correct plans, shrubs, and trees) are also covered. A chapter on designing outdoor spaces for entertaining is of particular interest as Kameon delves into everything from furniture and pillows to creating a kitchen garden and cooking outdoors in a woodburning oven. The book features a valuable resource section and there is something for every garden space and climate.

Founder of Leontine Linens, Jane Scott Hodges has spent the past two decades studying, collecting, and innovating her luxurious line. The result is the ultimate bible on the subject and the title says it all—Linens: For Every Room and Occasion. Sharing practical advice on how to live and entertain with fine linens, the book covers the art and the process as well as insights on use and care. Decorating and personalizing a room to change the look and mood is another interesting chapter. Both traditional and contemporary styles are covered through the work of leading designers and home stylists. Appliqué, monogrammed, embroidery, and a variety of weaves are all featured, inspiring all sorts of design applications. Interior designer Charlotte Moss penned the book’s foreword.

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Trove 01

By Jim Lochner

From a T-shirt chair to a dog bed made of tennis balls, we’re celebrating those lazy-hazy-crazy days of summer.

Bottled Up Perfect for travel to your next picnic or just taking a break on your bike ride, this bicycle wine carrier makes transporting wine a snap. Equipped with a stainless steel opener and hand crafted from vegetable-tanned leather, the carrier holds a standard red wine bottle 3 inches in diameter and 9 inches tall from bottom to the start of the neck. The holder also has an easy carrying handle and removable straps for use when you’re not on your bike. $65 pedalhappydesign.com.

03 Easy Being Green Show off your green thumb with this stylish x3 Watering Can. Constructed using a single copper tube, the x3 is bent three times (get it?) to create the handle and pour spout, and then soldered onto a metal can. The handle allows it to be held on top for carrying when full and at the side for watering. Comes in copper and a multitude of colors. 14 inches x 7 inches x 6 inches. $95 leibal.com.

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On the Ball Court your pooch’s love with this handproduced Tennis Bed. Hundreds of real tennis balls are hand-tightened and connected to produce a grand slam sleeping area your pampered pet will love. The bed also comes with a reversible cushion in red and black. Diameter 26 inches. $300 opulentitems.com.

Preserve YOURSELF Want to store your genetic fingerprint for future generations? Preserve your DNA in this triple-sealed time capsule. A chemical matrix of dissolvable compounds stabilizes DNA within a blood sample at room temperature, preserving the sample for over 100 years. The sample can be taken at your preferred medical facility or at home with an enclosed kit. The time capsule can be stored at home or in a bank lock box until needed for genetic analysis—or you get a good deal on cloning equipment. 4 inches x 3.5 inches. $299.95 hammacher.com.


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Fit to a TEE Green Furniture Sweden’s T-shirt Chair offers a unique take on the classic rag rug, weaving together worn textiles, leftover clothes, and rags to create a unique way of upholstering. The textiles are woven over a bent-wire frame, which has a lifetime guarantee if used indoors. Every chair has its own unique color and texture combination, and can be custom designed with materials that are personal to you. 34 inches x 26 inches x 27 inches. $2,961 ecofirstart.com.

06 About Time With the QLOCKTWO LARGE Wall Clock, German design studio Biegert & Funk has doubled the modern style spelled out by the original QLOCKTWO clock. This new clock spans an impressive three feet, with laser cut letters in the stainless steel faceplate spelling out the time with LED illumination. Available in a range of colors and languages. 35.43 inches x 35.43 inches x 1.38 inches. $6,080 lumens.com

07 Under the Table With the Prism Table, designer Maurie Novak creates a unique twist on the glass coffee table. Combining art and mathematics, the table weaves strings of elastic hand-threaded on a silver stainless steel frame. Like a prism refracting light, the elastic forms different color combinations depending on the viewing angle. A colorful addition to any living space. 47.2 inches x 47.2 inches x 18.1 inches. $5,000 prismtable.com.

08 Smokin' Hot Dutch designer Frederik Roije based his Smokestack outdoor fire pit on the factory chimneys from his youth in Holland. This standalone garden fireplace heater is cast out of Corten stainless steel, a metal developed in the 1930s with a strong, protective oxide film that weathers to a handsome coppery hue when exposed to the elements. The ultimate in chic adult fireplaces. 20 inches x 6 1/2 feet. $1,750 aplusrstore.com.

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By Cathy Whitlock

The

Grande Dame of Design 16


She’s been described as the grande dame of design, “a decorating doyenne with a bohemian streak,” and one of the most important designers of our times. But professionally and personally, she is simply known as Bunny.

B

unny Williams is recognized for her penchant for classical architecture, a passion for gardening, and her love of the decorative arts, as well as the ability to create simply elegant and comfortable houses. Working for legendary decorators Sister Parish and Albert Hadley at Parish-Hadley Inc. (her first assignment was to remake Brooke Astor’s curtains), she learned a lot from the Paley and Whitney clients of the world on how to live. As detailed in her 2007 book Bunny Williams’ Point of View (Stewart, Tabori and Chang), she writes, “You always learn from people with great taste…who really know how to live, and living well takes effort. Their houses were inspirational and magical, I was lucky to be exposed to their great style.” Twenty-two years later, she opened her own interior design firm, Bunny Williams Incorporated, in 1988, creating comfy classical rooms with a universal panache. “I’m really interested in creating homes,” the Virginia-bred designer notes. “My approach to decorating extends beyond my ability to design a floor plan, purchase antiques, and hire expert upholsterers, carpenters, and painters to execute my vision. What I design are backdrops for living.” Williams further muses, “The exciting thing about design today is you don’t get roped into doing the same thing over and over." And nowhere is this more evident than in her recent city and country projects that are polar opposites of each other— “One is a very traditional house in Greenwich

with antiques and rugs and the other a very contemporary penthouse in a traditional building.” “All my design projects start with how the client is going to live. How do we make the shoe fit? I first talk with the clients about how they live and what they need,” she says. For the project in Greenwich, the client wanted a more formal house. “With children off at college, they also wanted a comfortable place for them to come home to.” Placement of furniture is a forte of Williams as the living room is designed to seat 8-10 comfortably. “There is nothing worse than people having to stand and have no place to sit!” Striving for balance and livability, she designed two furniture groups, one by the window and the other by the fireplace. Symmetry is the order of the day as she accents a pair of blue and white vases on the mantle and decorative gilt sconces flank the fireplace wall. The living room’s sunny interior began with the selection of a rug, building the color palette from there. “I like to keep the palette light with subtle colors,” says Williams. By contrast, the rug offsets the darkness of the adjacent wood-paneled library as the designer picked up the ivory in the rug for the curtain color. Her trademark talent for mixing fabrics—in this case chintz, paisley, and a variety of coordinates—is evident in the upholstered furnishings and pillows. A sleek glass and steel spiral staircase form a magnificent focal point in the design of a

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Left: A sleek glass and steel spiral staircase becomes a major focal point in a Manhattan penthouse. Middle Top: Williams has a penchant for classical interiors and symmetry as seen in the living room of a Greenwich residence. Middle Bottom: Chocolate brown walls and beams make a cozy backdrop in a Greenwich study. Right: A black and red bookcase does double duty as a fold out bed in a Manhattan dining room.

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Top: One-of-a-kind garden treasures can be found at Treillage, the shop owned by Williams and her husband, antiques dealer John Rosselli. Bottom left: A selection of decorative pillows at Treillage. Bottom Right: Williams and Rosselli shop the world for an interesting variety of garden and interior furnishings.

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Manhattan penthouse. “I had done the original apartment twelve years ago and the clients bought the penthouse about a year and a half ago (which was incorporated as a loft). The challenge was where to put the staircase, so I decided to place it in the corner of the living room. I wanted it to be like a piece of sculpture—like a Brancusi,” Williams details. “The penthouse has one stone floor and it’s one big room—the clients wanted a place to watch television and throw large dinner parties so I kept the space flexible.” While the apartment has five bedrooms, another challenge presented itself as the client wanted an additional sleeping spot. Williams custom designed a black-and-red lacquer bookcase in the dining room, complete with a concealed

bed and remote control. “The client needed occasional space for the guest room and overflow. I had seen this mechanism for a remote control and mattress in a showroom in Florida and decided to make it custom.” Williams’ custom work extends to product and furniture lines with Century, indoor/outdoor rugs for Dash & Albert, pillows and throws for Pine Cone Hill, and a rug collection with Doris Leslie Blau. Her goal of filling a home with “unique pieces that give a room personality” became the foundation for the Bunny Williams Home collection—think small drink tables, accent lamps, hurricanes, and beautiful yet functional seating. “Product design really fascinates me but creating items to produce hasn’t been easy,” she admits. “Its hard to be a little thing in a big furniture world.” A regular on the antique show and show house lecture circuits, her high style and appreciation of gracious southern living and books have garnered quite a following. An Affair With a House (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, 2005), the designer’s chronicle of how she turned her 18th-century Greek revival house into a weekend retreat, became a bestseller. The books Bunny Williams’ Point of View and Bunny Williams’ Scrapbook for Living (Stewart, Tabori and Chang, 2010) soon followed, both detailing practical ideas on making a house a home. Downtime finds Williams digging in the dirt and designing her Connecticut garden (which she masters with the same style and sophistication found in her interiors) and the gardens of La Colina, the house she and her husband, antiques dealer John Rosselli, share in the Dominican Republic. Her passion for gardening was so strong that it became the subject of her first book On Garden Style (Simon and Schuster, 1998).Herlove ofallthingsgardenisfurthernurturedwith Treillage, the shop and working laboratory Williams and Rosselli run on the Upper East Side, filled with antique and contemporarygardentreasuresfromtheirworldwidetravels. With product lines, books and interiors spanning the globe, what could possibly be next? “I would love to do a hotel if only someone would only ask! I am always going into hotel rooms and noticing how bad the lighting is,” she notes. In a high-powered, award-winning career that shows no signs of stopping, Williams assures us she will always be working. “I will never retire, I will just do something different. I love what I do and will always do something!”

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By Cathy Whitlock

Antlers provide both color and a focal point in the living room of this Parisian residence. 22


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A Tale of Two Cities BENJAMIN NORIEGA-ORTIZ: ONE Designer’s Take on Paris and New York

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Manhattan based architect and interior designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz.

For those in the design profession, there is nothing more enviable than working for a client with multiple houses. The challenge, however, lies in tailoring the interiors with the client’s personality in mind while making each home unique. Such was the task at hand for Manhattan-based interior designer Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz of BNOdesign. The client in question was a high-powered television producer and his partner who owns a clothing store. Noriega-Ortiz, an architectural,interior,andproductdesigner,workedoneighthouses with the couple whose “hobby is to buy houses, fix them up, and sell them.” It’s a streamlined process, as he designs the concept and recommends sources, and the clients work with the contractors and purchase the furnishings on their own. After the second or third collaboration, both the client and designer developed a sort of shorthand. “After working with us on all these projects, they now know what to do.” The couple’s primary residence in New York was typically Upper West Side—"not too wild and not too traditional,” notes Noriega-Ortiz of the two-bedroom, two-bath apartment that was converted to three when they bought the studio next door. Utilizing his signature style of clean lines and simple patterns with touches of color, the designer employed a brown/white/orange palette throughout the apartment. The combination of a brown accent wall and headboard creates the feeling of height in the bedroom while chocolate brown and orange pillows turn a tufted

daybed into a cozy seating area in the converted studio. “I like to use orange as a pop of color,” says the designer. Art and architectural details abound. The couple’s 1966 Warhol Cow and a rendering of director Alfred Hitchcock’s famous profile grace the walls while the circular hallway ceiling (illuminated and designed with aluminum leaf) mimics the circular carpet shape on the floor. In an ingenious design move, Noriega-Ortiz explains that “the carpet matches the client’s Labrador and conceals the hair!” For the couple’s Paris residence in a modern building (complete with a spectacular view of Notre-Dame), Noriega-Ortiz went for a “South Beach goes to Paris” theme as the décor’s shades of white, brown, and blue are “very similar to a house in South Beach.” For the project, the Architectural Digest 100 designer composed the drawings, added molding and detailing and let the clients handle the contractor and build process. “We specified items such as the Mid-Century Saarinen dining table and 15 dining chairs,” he says. “We show them pictures and then charge by the hour. And so many clients these days have their own Pinterest files!” The majority of the interior furnishings and accessories were purchased at Paris’ legendary Marchés aux Puces (flea markets). The apartment was kept very sparse on purpose. “We used lots of leather and vinyl fabrics since the couple uses it as a rental,” he says. The designers did have fun with a few of the accessories such as the one-of-a-kind feather lamps designed by Noriega-Ortiz’s

Opposite Top Row (Paris): Left: Lamp from ABYU Lighting is a nod to one of Audrey Hepburn’s hats. Middle: A view of Notre-Dame forms a picturesque backdrop. Right: Cerulean blue on the ceiling provides a punch of color in the hallway. Opposite Bottom Row (New York): Top left: A dark brown wall and headboard create height in the master bedroom. Bottom left: A tufted chocolate brown daybed and custom lamp are prominent design elements in a Manhattan apartment. Right: A ’60s Warhol bull painting provides an important accent in a Manhattan living room.

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partner, Steven Wine of ABYU Lighting. “The lighting mimics Audrey Hepburn’s hats,” he explains, as the designer loves to add a touch of whimsy to keep the project from being too serious. Antlers are front and center in the living room as he notes, “Antlers also bring the project down and reflect the Parisian’s love for taxidermy.” “I always wanted to be an architect since I learned the word at the age of seven or eight,” Noriega-Ortiz reflects. As a result, he earned not one but two Masters Degrees in Architecture from the University of Puerto Rico and Columbia University. The young architect developed a taste for interiors when he began his career in 1983 with the esteemed designer John Saladino. “I learned that interiors are much more than decoration—I learned the importanceofintegratingcolor,shapes,andarchitecturetogetherin one environment,” he details. When asked if Saladino’s signature lavender color influenced his work, he says, “I do not use as much lavender although it looks great with brown and orange! I learned color combinations with John, especially how to use color to make a room look fresh and warm versus dark.” Noriega-Ortiz has a penchant for classical architecture like his mentor. “John was very good at designing what the room should be. He had a love for classical architecture with room for organization.” Nine years later, Noriega-Ortiz established his firm which today employs 8-10 designers and designs projects for an impressive array of clients that include rock star Lenny Kravitz, hip hop mogul Russell Simmons, entertainment impresario Sean Combs, bestselling author Laura Esquival, and fashion stylist Patricia Fields (best known for her work on the television series Sex and the City). Kravitz loved working with Noriega-Ortiz so much that he opened his own Kravitz Design firm, specializing in hotels and custom furniture. The retro-style singer/songwriter’s Miami Beach house became the impetus as he redecorated the rooms on a weekly basis and was rumored to have kept a painting crew on retainer. “I did three of his interiors and ironically he is working in the same hotel in Nassau designing some suites,” he explains. “Lenny got the bug and really enjoys it. He has a sense of scale and loves the seventies. I taught him you don’t have to do everything seventies style and can mix centuries!”

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The firm is also known for their commercial work, in particular the Morgan Hotel Group’s luxurious Mondrian hotels in New York’s Soho, Scottsdale, and Los Angeles. Originally designed by Philippe Starck in 1996, Noriega-Ortiz created a fantasy interior for the West Hollywood location inspired by fantasy elements of Antoni Gaudi (a Park Guell bench to be exact) and Alice in Wonderland, while the Soho interiors are reminiscent of Jean Cocteau’s La Belle et Le Bête. “The hotel brand updates every year. They use my interior concepts and our firm does the entire project,” he details. Noriega-Ortiz compares his work to the process of set design. “We are responsible for what they (clients) see the minute they open the door. I see how people will inhabit a space. Our rooms are designed for the character that inhabits the room,” heexplains. “People come to me because of my interest in classical but have a whimsical impact and not too serious.” Perhaps friend and client Pat Fields explains it best, “I always laugh when I go in one of your rooms. It always makes me smile.” Note: Learn more about the designer's work when he publishes his first book this fall, Suspending Reality: Interiors by Benjamin Noriega-Ortiz (The Monacelli Press).

Opposite (Paris):

New York

Top left: The clients found dining chairs at the Marchés aux Puces in Paris. Top right: The designer’s love of tufted furniture and fun accessories are evident in this Parisian living room.

This page (New York): Top left: A pair of contrasting whimsical feather lamps from ABYU Lighting makes an interesting statement. Top right: Noriega-Ortiz is known for his love of classically inspired interiors. Bottom: A restrained and serene gray and white bathroom is another hallmark of Noriega-Ortiz interiors.

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By Catherine McHugh

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Journal Standard by Nacasa & Partners, Inc.

As the founder of crème design group, based in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, Jun Aizaki (pictured, left) has designed dozens of restaurants, including JG Domestic, chef Jose Garces’ flagship restaurant for the Garces Group in Philadelphia. Aizaki and his team not only designed the interiors but all the graphics, including the logo, menus, business cards, and bags (pictured bottom, right). Challenged with warming up the large space, which is located in a skyscraper near Philadelphia’s train station, crème took a lot of inspiration from transportation and the restaurant’s farm-to-table concept. “So the banquettes look like old train seats and there are large graphics in the space,” Aizaki says. “The menu design and all the collateral work relates to all of that.” Photo: Fanny Allié.

s far back as he can remember, Jun Aizaki has wanted to build things. “It’s funny, I always said I wanted to be an architect—I used to tell my parents that,” he says. “ButIwasn’treallysurewhatthedifferencewasbetween an architect and a carpenter. And now that I think about it, I wanted to be more of a carpenter.”

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Indeed, Aizaki has taken a very hands-on approach to his career. While studying architecture at the Pratt Institute in New York City, Aizaki remembers just wanting to get out and work. “I was really excited to finish school, but when I graduated in 1996, the economy was really bad and it was really hard to find work,” he says. “I did work at some smaller offices, just doing freelance work and competitions for a few years.” A friend’s recommendation landed him an interview at the Rockwell Group, where he started working in 1999. “I wasn’t really looking for interior work,” Aizaki explains. “I initially wanted to work at architecture firms, but when I first walked into Rockwell, it changed my whole attitude toward restaurants. I saw the amazing possibilities.” One of Aizaki’s first restaurant projects was Ruby Foo’s on the Upper West side. “It was my first taste of the process,” he explains. “I was really junior but the senior designer I was working with had a very hands-on approach. So it all just clicked for me on that project. Everything was done on site and we would make full-scale mockups. Before that, I felt that my whole job was just doing drawings. It helped me realize that the drawings are just a communications tool.” Aizaki next worked on two restaurants in Philadelphia for Stephen Starr: Pod and Alma de Cuba. “It was amazing

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because I had started to acquire more responsibilities and I fell in love with the process,” he says. “Those projects really taught me the ins-and-outs of the business. They were great experiences, as the projects are kind of fast—as opposed to residential projects, which can take years. Also, you get to visit it once it’s completed—unlike someone’s house. And you get a lot of perks, like free meals! “I like the immediacy and the fact that so many other design categories spring from it—restaurants relate to lifestyle,” he adds. “You go to these places frequently—everybody goes to restaurants. Food is such an important part of everyday life. Everything I’m interested in is there.” By 2004, Aizaki had accumulated enough of his own clients to open his own business. His first project was a pastry store in his native Japan. “The bakery was part of the reason why I named the company crème,” he explains. “I didn’t want an acronym name. I always wanted something a little more light-hearted. Of course, crème de la crème means ‘best of the best’ and I like that connection as well.” Aizaki was born in Japan but his family moved to New York when he was five for his father’s journalism job in the city. “I got to travel a lot at a young age and I think that really opened up my eyes to a lot of possibilities,” Aizaki says. “We moved back to Japan when I was nine and for a


New York City’s Macondo (facing page and left) brings Latin street food to the gourmet level. The restaurant represents crème's second collaboration with restaurateur Héctor Sanz, who worked closely with the designers to translate the unique concept throughout the design of the interior, signage, branding, furniture, and print collateral. Photo: Fanny Allié. crème designed all the signs, menus, stationary, and the website for Chef Garces’ Village Whiskey (pictured below and bottom), which has outposts in Philadelphia and Atlantic City. The design draws on American turn-of-the-century social clubs and old-fashioned pubs. Photo: Fanny Allié.

while I really wanted to be a cartoon (manga) artist. But by the time I finished high school, I knew I wanted to study abroad, so I came back to New York.” In fact, Aizaki has lived in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for about 15 years now—way before it was hyped as an “up and coming” neighborhood. “It has been really interesting to watch the neighborhood change and become developed and populated,” he says. “I literally started the company from my studio space—in this amazing building that used to be a pepper mill—and then two years later, I rented another space underneath that, which I moved into. It was just me when I started and we’re still on the same block where I used to live. It has been a steady, gradual, organic growth.” The roster at crème has now grown to 12. “We’re a multicultural team. We have many different people here from many countries speaking different languages—French, Italian, Korean, Japanese—and that’s also a very New York thing,” Aizaki says. “I also really like that I can bring global influences to work here—and then do the opposite by working in someplace like Japan and bringing back something I have seen there. There is a whole exchange of cultures that can inspire you through this type of work. We have worked in the Middle East, China, and South America—some retail and some restaurants. Now we’re

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starting to work with hotel companies and they always have projects internationally.” The company has been expanding its approach to retail stores, completing the Journal Standard, a flagship store for a Japanese clothing company, last year in Tokyo. “We have done more retail stores in Japan than restaurants,” Aizaki says. “We would love to do more retail work here in the U.S. and we would also love to do more food work over there.”

Tinto is a colloquial expression used to describe the red wine served in typical pintxos bars throughout Northern Spain. For this cozy Philadelphia restaurant, another crème collaboration with chef Garces, the designers drew inspiration from the rich cultural and culinary traditions of Basque country and used finishes and low lighting to create the effect of a private wine cellar. Wooden grids holding hundreds of wine bottles serve as room dividers (top). Wooden menu holders with the branded corkscrew logo, menu books, menu graphics, and identity reference the Basque Country region of Southern France with maps and traditional patterns for a consistent graphic package (bottom). The vestibule features walls of framed corkscrews collected from European flea markets. Aged ironwork with a corkscrew motif mark the entrance with an original logo (middle). Photo: Fanny Allié

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With Aizaki’s restaurant connections, crème’s first projects were in that field. When Alma de Cuba’s first chef, Jose Garces, decided to open his first restaurant, he looked Aizaki up. “He is an amazing chef and we have done a lot of projects with him, including his first—Amada, a Spanish tapas restaurant in Philadelphia—on a really tight budget. Then we did the second one a few years ago in Atlantic City. The first one was a really small-scale, hands-on project but in the course of five years, his brand really grew and he has opened bigger restaurants. “I really enjoy the relationship and Amada is definitely a project I will always remember fondly,” Aizaki continues. “I personally painted the signs and did the graphics myself— that was how hands-on it was. I think the client thinks every designer does that now! We like to joke about that.”


In New York City’s West Village, crème brought RedFarm’s locavore, farm-to-table mindset to life in the parlor-level space of an 1828 townhouse parlor-level space (left). Painted white brick walls and exposed wooden beams add intimate warmth to the 1,200-square-foot room. Aizaki outfitted the room with wooden tables, chairs, crates, and red and white patterned fabrics to create a classic farmhouse feel. Menus, chopsticks, flora, and candles hang from rustic piping above the five booths and two communal tables. Photo: Emily Andrews. The colors and spice of traditional Mexican street food informed crème’s playful designs for the Guapos taco truck (pictured below), including 40,000 bottle caps collected from local businesses to create the facing. The logo and website design were then created, highlighting the iconic bottle-cap shape. Photo: Michael Persico.

The firm has now designed dozens of restaurants (Red Farm, Macondo, Lucy, and many others in New York; JG Domestic, Garces Trading Co., Village Whiskey, and Guapos Taco Truck in Philadelphia; and Tinto in Palm Springs) and for many, they have also helped create the branding. “The logo, the colors—all of that is obvious to us and we really enjoy it,” Aizaki says. “It feels natural for us to do the menus, matchboxes, business cards. When we do all of those things together, it becomes a much stronger concept and I do feel it’s the way to go. We enjoy it and the client gets something more cohesive.” As a licensed architect, Aizaki’s background often allows him to get involved from the very beginning of a project. “A lot of times we can look at the space options and suggest ideas that no one had thought of,” he explains. “We do plan to do more architectural work and I’m really excited about that because I like our work to reflect the experience that we have in interiors. We take branding and logos and treat them the same way we would a big project. The whole exploration process is always the same. “Within the studio, I always encourage people to come up with any ideas and bring them to the table,” Aizaki continues. “It doesn’t matter how silly it is. Just drawing itoutandputtingitonpaperisreallycrucialandessential.

And then at that point you can show it to other people and debate whether it’s a good idea or not. It’s fundamental to our approach.” The designers also make a lot of custom pieces in their studio. “We would like to do more of that,” Aizaki says. “Doing things helps you discover new ideas and new inventions.” One of crème’s current projects is in an upcoming hotel in midtown New York. “We’re doing the lobby and the three inside restaurants and a bar,” Aizaki says. “We are also doing the facades of the storefronts on the first floor. It’s really exciting and it should be opening this fall.” This project also came about through a restaurant connection. “We got a phone call from the owner and the chef who is going in there is someone we have worked with. Somehow they both mentioned this ‘cool, new, younger designer they had discovered’—and they were both talking about us!” Now that the word is clearly out, it’s doubtful anything will impede crème’s rise to the top.

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Eats’N’Sleeps The Roof theroofny.com 124 West 57th Street (212) 707-8008

Park Kitchen parkcentralny.com/dining 870 7th Avenue (212) 707-5500

The Regency Bar & Grill regencybarandgrill.com 540 Park Avenue (212) 339-4050

Tablao Tapas y Restaurante tablaonyc.com 361 Greenwich Street (212) 334-4043

High atop the luxury Viceroy New York hotel sits the appropriately named The Roof. Located on the hotel’s 29th floor, The Roof was designed by the firm of Roman and Williams to evoke the aesthetic of a luxury yacht, complete with walnut ceilings, ipe floors, brass details, and custom walnut-and-leather sofas, all clad in African iroko. Open daily from 3 p.m. to 4 a.m., the drink menu features regionally brewed craft beers and global wine offerings, an expansive collection of small-batch spirits, and a selection of classic and modern cocktails. Tasty small plates are also available from Kingside, the Viceroy’s street-level restaurant, including charcuterie boards, the Grilled 3 Cheese, and the restaurant’s signature burger. The outdoor terrace is open year round with heat lamps and wool blankets so you can enjoy those seasonal chilly evenings and lofty views anytime. And with a direct sightline to Central Park, the Roof’s views are inviting inside and outside.

Park Kitchen recently opened at the newly renovated iconic Park Central Hotel, the midtown landmark that has been home to legendary figures such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Mae West, and Jackie Gleason. Executive chef Nathaniel Eckhaus, formerly of Eleven Madison Park, has created a menu of upscale-casual new American dishes that encourage sharing. Though the sharing format works best in groups, the menu can also be customized into a typical appetizer-entrée-dessert setup. You’ll find whimsical twists on traditional acronyms, such as PB&J toast, pitting braised pork belly against pepper jam, and Southern favorites like chicken fried chicken, served with pickled egg, housemade hot sauce, and honey. Even in something as seemingly ordinary as fish and chips, Eckhaus (himself a fly fisherman), reaches for the unorthodox, using Brooklyn Lagerbattered fried walleye. The bar features cocktails dedicated to each of the five boroughs, and selections from the dinner menu are also available as bar bites. The bi-level space was designed by Jeffrey Beers International, with gilded art deco touches, plush booths, and chandeliers.

The recently completed renovation of the Loews Regency gave Meyer Davis Studio a chance to replicate the interior design of a traditional Park Avenue home inside the iconic Regency Bar & Grill. The space is covered in plush velvet, while the walls are lined with large bookshelves of sculptures and books indigenous to New York, and adorned with abstract photos of quintessential city buildings. In the kitchen, executive chef Dan Silverman offers modern interpretations on classic modern American dishes. Lunch staples such as Joan’s Regency Salad and the eponymous Lobster Roll return, while the dinner menu comprises an eclectic mix from land and sea like dry-aged rib steak for two and Spanish octopus. If you still have room for dessert, try the Popcorn Pot de Crème with confit apples and caramel popcorn served with roasted peanut ice cream. The wine list comprises over 700 international bottles, featuring a wide selection of American wines from New York State, and classics from Italy and France, as well as more unusual regions such as Croatia, Slovenia, Lebanon, and Morocco. For those looking for a trip back in time, the iconic Power Breakfast, first introduced during the city’s 1975 financial crisis, also returns.

Owner/GM Frank Castro and his father, executive chef Francisco Castro, bring authentic, familyowned Spanish tapas to Tribeca. If you’re partial to Montaditos (that’s tapas “mounted” on toasted bread for the uninitiated), try the Queso e Higo with fresh local goat cheese and sherry-marinated fresh figs, layered with basil. If toothpicks are more your style, Solomillo are spears of filet mignon bites sautéed with cherry peppers in Rioja red wine. A la plancha selections present a range of seared seafood, ranging from squid and scuttlefish to jumbo head-on shrimp, flavored with olive oil, sea salt, and lemon, and served with aioli and roasted vegetable vinaigrette. The Platos Principal, including traditional Spanish paella, are great for sharing. Furthering the family-owned atmosphere, brother David Castro handles the cocktail and wine program. Make sure you try the sangria by the pitcher, mixed with a full bottle of wine, all prepared tableside. And last but not least, since “tablao” in the south of Spain refers to the wood floor where Flamenco dancers perform, the restaurant features live Flamenco shows Wednesday and Friday evenings.

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By Jim Lochner

New venues showcase New York City’s historic past and present, while others celebrate the city’s diversity with delicacies from Spain and Korea.

GAONURRI gaonnurinyc.com 1250 Broadway (212) 971-9045

The Wayfarer thewayfarernyc.com 101 West 57th Street (212) 691-0030

The Quin thequinhotel.com 101 West 57th Street (212) 245-7846

The High Line Hotel thehighlinehotel.com 180 10th Avenue (212) 929-3888

Located on the 39th penthouse floor of an office building on the edge of Koreatown, GAONURRI is the highest Korean restaurant in the world and the second highest restaurant in Manhattan, with stunning views to match. The 270-degree panoramic view of the Manhattan skyline, the East River, and New Jersey is a feast for the eyes. With the Empire State Building seemingly close enough to touch, GAONURRI, which means “the center of the world” in Korean, is appropriately named. The Sky Lounge offers an assortment of signature cocktails as well as a large wine selection that includes wines from Moravia, Italy, Sicily, France, Spain, Australia, New Zealand, and Napa Valley. Chef Tae Goo Kang’s menu features a wide selection of seafood and barbecue options (each table is equipped with a grill), including traditional Korean favorites like bibimbap (mixed rice), bossam (braised pork belly), yukhoe (beef tartare), and haemul pajun (seafood pancake). For lunch, pick up a $20 bento-style bansang lunch box of galbi, vegetables, and soup. The dinner menu also offers a threecourse prix fixe for $29 and a $95 six-course tasting menu. If the food wasn’t enough, the view alone is worth the trip.

At the base of the Quin Hotel (see right) sits The Wayfarer, a bi-level American seafood grill. The restaurant’s raw bar features delectable goodies like Alaskan king crab legs in lemon cream fraiche and Jonah crab claw with herb remoulade. Braised Berkshire bacon glazed with maple sugar and Xerxes vinegar makes for a yummy starter. Reel in executive chef Jason Hall’s signature dishes like Shellfish Cioppino, a combination of Alaskan king crab, lobster, shrimp, and clams immersed in spicy tomato broth. Or if beef is more your style, rope in the Rib Eye, a 28-day dry-aged prime cut served with mushroom-rosemary ragu. The brunch menu includes mouthwatering selections such as The Walrus, a three-egg omelette with peekytoe crab, snow peas, shallots, mushrooms, and parsley, or the roast Amish chicken (also available for dinner), with confit garlic, rosemary, and goat cheese crème. Designed by Meyer Davis Studio, the 130-seat dining room evokes the memory of a gentleman’s social club, while the second-floor lounge provides a more casual dining experience with a 20-foot bar and three private dining rooms that can accommodate parties from 12 to 24 guests individually or 72 guests combined.

On the foundation of the old Buckingham Hotel—once home to cultural icons like Paderewski, Chagall, Georgia O’Keeffe, soprano Renata Tebaldi, and Oscar-winning composer Dimitri Tiomkin—the Quin boasts 208 luxury rooms located at the heart of the city’s cultural district. Architecture and design firm Perkins Eastman have re-envisioned the rooms with luxury in mind, using a mixture of lacquered wood and sustainable materials. Each room is equipped with luxury king-size DUXIANA beds, SFERRA bedding, Fresh products, and Nespresso machines. Other amenities include an Apple-equipped drawing room and a 24-hour Technogym fitness center. With world-class neighbors like Carnegie Hall and MoMA, the Quin also aims to capitalize on the area’s cultural ambience, with an Artist-in-Residence Program, artists salons, a fine art collection and a 15-foot video art wall in the lobby. Curated by DK Johnston of The Arts Fund, the Quin Arts program offers a series of events, exhibitions, salons, lectures, film premieres, book debuts, musical performances, and artist receptions.

Just steps away from The High Line park, the eponymous hotel is housed inside the Gothic red brick former dorms of the General Theological Seminary, which dates from 1836. The hotel’s 60 rooms feature hardwood floors, oversized beds, and one-of-a-kind locally sourced furniture. Designers Roman and Williams give the interiors of each room a unique flair, combining vintage, surplus, and salvaged elements. You may find a nonworking fireplace, antique oriental rugs, a rotary dial phone, a pink leather club chair, or even an antique embosser on the desk, for guests who want to kick it old skool and take pen to paper. All of the rooms feature large windows that look out on The High Line park or at the enclosed, Parisian-inspired private garden. Though the hotel doesn’t have a restaurant (there are plenty in the neighborhood), you can partake of the well-stocked minibar or sip espresso from the Intelligentsia Coffee & Tea baristas in the lobby. A particularly nice touch, especially for international travelers, is complimentary phone calls to anywhere in the world. Guests looking for “green” travel should be pleased with the hotel’s geothermal heating and paperless iPad check-in.

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MyFavThings

A sleek outdoor folding bar, metal and stone tables, a sculpted bench and big colorful umbrellas are seasonal designer favorites.

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Jayne Michaels (2Michaels LLC) “This bench/sculpture piece from DESIGNLUSH is exquisite. It bridges the fine line between art and functional design. It’s the perfect piece for an outdoor terrace. I’d place it directly in front, so it can be seen from inside as well as outside.”

Glenn Lawson (Glenn Lawson, Inc.) "Beach umbrellas! These simple yet magical combinations of colored fabrics keep some tried and true classics coming back every summer. Blues, greens, and variations thereof play off the water and sky and are always happy at play."


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Eddie Lee (Eddie Lee Inc.) “My favorite accessory for summer is a margarita…and the Wallbanger outdoor bar is the perfect place to make one. With multileveled shelves to hold liquor, glasses, and bar utensils, and a fold-down front as a serving tray, it’s like a party in a box! It comes in all the colors of the rainbow (plus some)—my favorites are Black, Sky Blue, and White. Very summertime chic. Plus it’s small enough to fit almost anywhere! And an added layer of cool? It’s made of 256 recycled milk jugs. So you can be green while you’re outside getting brown.”

Dennis Miller (Dennis Miller Associates) “The Cordova is a new sleek series of metal and stone tables suitable for exterior or interior use. Whether it’s in the living room or out on the patio, these tables will look great with your summer cocktail. Get yours now through Dennis Miller Associates.”

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GALLERY W hen the temperature rises, the line between indoors and outdoors get S blurred .

Elmira Sculptures, Set of 3 available at Arteriors, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Chrysanthemum Candle Holder available at Stephanie Odegard Collection, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com JUN JUL

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Gallery

Draper CafĂŠ Chair available at Kindel Furniture, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

Greek Mirror available at Brueton, 212.838.1630, brueton.com Echo White Chaise in teak & polished stainless steel available at The Bright Group, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Clockwise from top: Fabrics top to bottom: Marina Leaf in Ocean, Bon Voyage in Sand, Grand Entrance in Bimini, Suzani Bloom in Bimini from Oceania Cruises速 outdoor collection available at Kravet Inc., 212.725.0340, kravet.com Marble Gridblock Side Table available at Global Views, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com Nebula Sconce available at Dennis Miller Associates, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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Sunburst Mirror available at Baker Knapp & Tubbs, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

Organic Bowls available at Tucker Robbins, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Eiffel Park Bench available at Studio A, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

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4—Door Buffet available at Louis J. Solomon, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Bizet Indoor Table available at Christopher Guy, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

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Gallery

Pier 60 available at Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., 212.545.0032, minka.com

C么t茅 France Outdoor Art Deco available at C么t茅 France, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

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freshpicks T H E M O S T C U R R E N T products in 2 0 0 lex showrooms .

King’s Guard Featuring a guardian falcon encircling the seat with its wings, the Falcon Stool/Side Table from Tucker Robbins was inspired by a statue of the Pharaoh Khafre and the god Horus from the Old Kingdom of Egypt. The falcon remains a symbol of royalty, strength, and courage to this day. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Carved Mod An ode to mid-century modern with a classic twist, the wood trim and legs of the Greta Sofa from Studio A are carved in Honduras from sustainably farmed mahogany. Down-wrapped, Dacron-bottom cushions, and hand-tied springs provide lasting comfort. Available in three standard fabric choices or COM. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com JUN JUL

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freshpicks

Bending Light Delightfully witty and coquettish, the convex Aube Mirror from Christopher Guy displays a hand-wrought metal frame studded with handcarved mahogany sun rays emanating outward, lending it an air of quirky glamour. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

One Way or Another The new Sectional with Ottoman from Louis J. Solomon’s contemporary upholstery line brings with it a new level of stylish versatility. If you want to change and refresh a room, you can move the detached ottoman and reverse the cushions to have the chaise on the left or right. Offered in any fabric or leather. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

Leaf Motif Baker’s Trefle Accent Table is a modern, lighthearted application of a motif borrowed from a vase in designer Jacques Garcia’s personal collection. The trefoil, or stylized cloverleaf shape, creates a sturdy base and a low center of gravity. Whether used as a drink, side, or intimate cocktail table, the shape is the thing. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

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Gold & Silver Standard Renowned French designer Jacques Garcia designed the Loti Chair for Côté France, with unusual lacquered gold arm rests and silver nail heads—striking details that give this chair its modern twist. Loti can be ordered in any finish desired and looks wonderful in your choice of fabric or leather. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

New Faces Bright’s Facets Lounge, designed by Douglas Levine, features beautiful angular lines and a mid-century aesthetic highlighted by beautiful faceted leg details. Available as a lounge and side chair, Facets adds a fresh face to a Bright product line known for its subtle, refined designs for today’s modern interiors. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Grill Me A new collection from Global Views includes this beautiful rectangular Quatrefoil Cocktail Table with matching round side table and pendant. The quatrefoil decorative grill base is made of aluminum with a bronze epoxy finish, the legs are iron with a rich brass finish, and the tabletop is made of white honed marble. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Fresh Punch Maxwell Fabrics’ dynamic Chi Chi Collection of relaxed linen-blend jacquard pairs a traditional damask frame design with modern, geometric patterns. It also showcases a palette of soft neutrals enlivened with punchy hues—hot pinks, lime greens, and tangelo orange. Layering the patterns in this collection achieves a sophisticated vintage vibe. Maxwell Fabrics available at Flourishes, Suite 414, 212.779.4540, maxwellfabrics.com

Objectified The U.H.O., or Unidentified Hanging Object, from Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. offers amazing illumination from a plethora of LEDs. This piece not only provides fantastic light output, but also capitalizes on its ultra-sleek, low-profile design. Adjustable in height, it is finished in brushed nickel. Manufactured by George Kovacs, a name synonymous with modern lighting. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com Stagger Me Stephanie Odegard’s Ikat Stagger Carpet was inspired by traditional Ikat textiles. Made of 100% hand-spun, hand-dyed Himalayan wool, given a modern twist with cool greys and beautiful golden silk accents. Shown here in smoky quartz, custom colors are available. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

Mid-Lexington Combining the essence of mid-century styling with bright modern accents made the Lexington Pouf an instant classic for DESIRON. The legs are hand-milled solid walnut fixed together with delicate polished steel x-shaped stretchers, adding stability and a modern look. The hand-tufted top provides a vibrant touch of color. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

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I Dream of Genies The Beehive Ceramic Collection at Global Views is crafted in Portugal using a slipcasting method. Inspired by mid-century modern design, the dominant bright orange reactive glaze reveals slight hints of turquoise beneath it in the three-dimensional beehivepatterned bands. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

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Reflecting Stars If you are searching for a dramatic piece for a large space, the Keegan Large Chandelier at Arteriors could be just what you’re looking for. This jaw-dropping, 30-light, antique brass starburst chandelier can also be used without the circular reflective back plates behind the bulbs, giving you a completely different look. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Comfort Scale As exemplified by the Beekman Wing Chair, the Robert A.M. Stern Collection at Kindel Furniture is a sophisticated, urbane approach to the American tradition of handcrafted furniture. Inspired by historical precedents, the collection is updated with clean lines and elegant detailing, scaled to bring comfort and style to contemporary residences. Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

Brassy Gentleman The Claudio Cabinet by Mr. Brown at Julian Chichester channels a swinging ’60s bachelor pad with a concentric circle motif on its aged brass doors. The dark walnut cabinet is lined with cardinal red faux suede on its interior, offering an unexpected surprise and Mr. Brown’s signature jolt of whimsy. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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freshpicks Natural Selections The Galardo Table at Brueton, designed by Michael F. Galardo comes alive with your selection of custom materials and finishes. Different combinations of beautiful opaque color polyurethane enamels or exciting veneers, such as Zebrano, alter the flow of pattern or color over the form. A polished stainless steel frame completes the story. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

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Full Moon Fever A heavenly celestial body, the Luna Pendant Lamp by Marian Jamieson at PROFILES glows full, not just once a month but every day and night. Available as a white, shell white, or clear globe, plus custom colors, if you wish. The piece is framed in an antiqued brass, dark pewter, or light coffee bronze 18-inch ring—just like Saturn. Well, almost. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

Rich in Fiber The Jonathan Adler for Kravet Carpet collection includes a beautiful and unique selection of in-stock rugs offered in simple and sophisticated geometric designs. Rendered in either hand-dyed, hand-knotted cut pile wool, or hand-knotted un-dyed natural hemp and bamboo silk, these unique carpet designs amplify the beauty of the fibers. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com

Streamlined Seams At Dennis Miller Associates, it’s easy to get comfortable on the Hamilton Sofa’s loose seat and back cushions, and to appreciate the tapered legs, curved corners, and topstitch seams that streamline without welts. This sofa also features intriguing inset sides and back— all leading to a clean, modern look. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

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STYLESPOTLIGHT F eatured highlights of craft and design .

1. That's Deep (opposite) New introductions to Kravet Smart include sofas, sleepers, chairs, and sectionals, all scaled a little larger and sit deeper for a more casual lifestyle. Pictured is the Merrimack One Seat Sofa. 2. Gold Records Rockstar from Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. brings the brilliance of summer sunsets home with beautiful natural agate discs hanging in handcrafted metal rings finished in gold leaf.

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3. Eternal Life (opposite) A beautiful old bonsai tree stood outside a factory in northern China. After it died, Studio A cast the form in iron. Now it lives on as The Imperial Penzai (Chinese for “bonsai”). 4. Leafy-y Green The Maple Leaf Table from the Stephanie Odegard Collection was designed and crafted in India. Made by hand using sustainable raw materials, it is sand-cast in brass incorporating repoussé techniques. 5. Simply Irresistible Small with strong yet simple lines, this comfortable Deco-inspired Lounge Chair from Louis J. Solomon is irresistibly popular, with or without nailhead trim. 6. Elephants in the Room This imposing grand-scale long table from Côté France is a classic example of elaborate Baroque design. The Elephant Table pictured was a specially commissioned version of their standard model.

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7. Wings at Dinner The new Chatsworth Dining Chair from Powell & Bonnell at Dennis Miller Associates offers a stately tapered silhouette and enveloping wings that are set back to ensure a flow of conversation. 8. Garden of Delights Spring Fling, a collection from Maxwell Fabrics, features charming botanical embroideries on a cotton-like ground alongside flame stitch diamonds, organic branches, and printed brushstroke stripes. 9. Dorothy’s Back The Dorotheum Sofa from Kindel Furniture has been carefully reproduced from one of Dorothy Draper's original designs. The signature curvaceous shape flows seamlessly from the arm to the back.

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10. Clearly Marble The beauty of Arteriors’ natural rosin marble Leonard Table Lamp is enhanced by the clear acrylic base and back plate. The rounded rectangular shade mimics the base shape. 11. Seated Forward The Romero Chair from Brueton was inspired by cantilevered steel-framed chairs of the 1930s. Its subtle curves and sharp crisp corners give this design the look of moving forward. 12. Oak Art Inspired by Jean-Michel Frank’s work in the early 20th century, the clean lines of the Cubist Chest by Tucker Robbins contrast with the undulating grain of the pickled oak. 13. Downtown Square A classic cube design that evokes many 20th century icons, The Square Chair by Downtown at PROFILES combines aged brass and lush upholstery. Hand made in Los Angeles.

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14. Just Right Angles The angled design and sculptural lines of the Bedford Lounge from DESIRON provide exceptional comfort as well as an air of sophistication. Shown in Yerra cowhide with a solid walnut frame. 15. Sea Floor The Coral Rug from Global Views is 100% hand-tufted wool with a loop pile base, and handcut pile in two tones and two levels, giving this coral-inspired rug extra dimension. 16. Light On His Feet The Luciano Writing Desk by Mr. Brown and available through Julian Chichester rests on tapered splayed legs with stretchers, giving this homage to mid-century office design a visual lightness.Â

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17. Slung Low Jacques Garcia’s Auguste Chair at Baker Knapp & Tubbs is an eclectic lounge chair with a generous seat on a modest footprint, and the back is low enough for a big modern room. 18. DJ from LA The clean form of the Nolan Tray Table at The Bright Group, a signature Douglas Jennings piece, shows the same care in manufacturing and refinement of all their designs. Custom versions are available. 19. Study Softly Sensuous sweeping curves redolent of the feminine form, a single drawer, and a mahogany top meld into the enchanting Noziere Desk at Christopher Guy.

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De. FIN.ingPieces items that sum up what a showroom is all about.

Tucker Robbins Inspired by the bulol, or “Ifugao rice god,” carvings symbolizing wealth, happiness, and well being, Tucker Robbins’ Human Chair reinterprets this sacred form in acacia wood and has become one of his most notable designs. Intended to embody the spirit of its predecessor, the chair brings positive energy to any space. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, 212.355.3383, tuckerrobbins.com

Kravet Inc. Modern Colors, an exclusive collection from Kravet Couture, offers a fresh approach to color and design. Kravet Couture’s Lifestyle Library introduces new color palettes that range from muted to bright, and includes embroideries and jacquards with complementary solids. Various styles, handcrafted qualities, and colors come together in the Modern Colors. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, 212.725.0340, kravet.com JUN JUL

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DefiningPieces

STUDIO A Camel carts originally had two wheels beneath the platform. One end was harnessed to a camel that pulled it through the deserts and back roads of India. The wheels are long gone, so legs have been added to convert this rich conversation piece into the Antique Camel Cart Table. Studio A, Suite 614, 212.725.8439, studioa-home.com

Stephanie Odegard Stephanie Odegard’s hand-knotted wool and silk Kairali Carpet, shown here in pumpkin, was inspired by foliage near the sea in Kerala, India. The white marble Jour Jali tables were designed by Paul Mathieu for the Stephanie Odegard Collection, inspired by the elegant pierced marble jali screens and windows he saw in the palaces of Mughal, India. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, 212.545.0205, stephanieodegard.com

GLOBAL VIEWS The Branch Wall Console is an artistically expressed functional piece of furniture. The top is hand-planed wood with a carved, fluted edge and the striking branch base the front is made of cast aluminum. Global Views, Suite 613, 212.725.8439, globalviews.com

Julian Chichester The Luberon Chair from Mr. Brown is a handsome antiqued French Country-inspired design perfect for those lazy Hamptons summers. Shown in rustic grey pine, every chair is individually crafted, making each one unique. The boxed seat cushion and kidney pillow are available in COM or in a selection of linens and velvets. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, 646.293.6622, julianchichester.com

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MAXWELL FABRICS At Ease offers a breadth of wonderful heavywearing upholstery textures and designs for the entire home. The interesting mix of multicolored tweed and textured solids paired with small-scale geometric chenilles and gorgeous animal skin designs can build the foundation for a cohesive interior. Maxwell Fabrics available at Flourishes, Suite 414, 212.779.4540, maxwellfabrics.com

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DefiningPieces

Arteriors The rich, hand-applied gold finish on the rough shape and surface of the tree root creates the perfect yin and yang within the Ashland Lamp. This combination of opulence and nature is a true representation of the Arteriors design aesthetic and can be seen in many of their products. Arteriors, Suite 608, 646.797.3620, arteriorshome.com

Dennis Miller Associates Altura’s Duette Round Dining Table is shown here in walnut with an optional western Claro walnut top. Duette is available in five standard round sizes and is also offered as an extension table with one leaf. Numerous natural, stained, and cerused finishes are available. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, 212.684.0070, dennismiller.com

LOUIS J. SOLOMON Available in a wide range of finishes, this Modern Three-Drawer Chest is a stunning eye-catcher. Standing alone or as a side-by-side pair, this piece provides plenty of storage for organizing your life while making a beautiful minimalist statement. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, 212.545.9200, louisjsolomon.com

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BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS This version of the Max Three Seat Sofa by Thomas Pheasant has diamond tufts, a low back, and more of a Hollywood Modern feel. The convergence of the arms makes it an interesting piece to float, and the size allows it to function as an element of interior architecture. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, 212.779.8810, bakerfurniture.com

DESIRON The Hudson Sofa, introduced in 2004, is a DESIRON staple and a favorite of the company and its clients alike. The simple tufted design and elegant contemporary base work well in any space and the look can be transformed with nearly unlimited wood, metal, and fabric options. DESIRON, Suite 702, 212.353.2600, desiron.com

PROFILES The Purple Haze Side Table by Brett Design and available at PROFILES offers six sides and a top in glorious color. In this case, the color is a luscious purple, transparent on oak, and finished off with a high gloss polish. Not a purple person? No problem. Any color can be matched. PROFILES, Suite 1211, 212.689.6903, profilesny.com

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DefiningPieces

Metropolitan Lighting Mixing the timely with the timeless, American designers at Hudson Valley created the Travis Chandelier, an ultra-glamorous look that evokes the silver screen’s golden age of Hollywood Regency. A polished cube of modern acrylic glass encases a sleek and elegant fixture. Available in four sizes in aged brass or polished nickel finishes. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, 212.545.0032, minka.com BRUETON Tall, lean, clean, and very structural and disciplined in its styling, Brueton’s Winged Chair, designed by Stanley Jay Friedman, is a modern interpretation of the classic wing chair form. It is also available with a headrest and an ottoman. Brueton, Suite 910, 212.838.1630, brueton.com

THE BRight group With a modern twist on a Mad Men-era vibe, the Jett Lounge and Chair Series, designed by Douglas Levine, exemplifies attention to detail, style, and quality. Lounge, side, and swivel chairs offer a flexible array of options to provide designers with a variety of choices. The Bright Group, Suite 902, 212.726.9030, thebrightgroup.com

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Kindel Furniture The Philadelphia Bergere Chair reflects Kindel Furniture’s commitment to craftsmanship through bench assembly, hand-carving, and hand-rubbed finishing. Kindel possesses the ability to create special, custom designs with flawless execution—and they do it all in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, 646.293.6649, kindelfurniture.com

Christopher Guy The feminine curve of the backrest on the elegant Bellocq Two-Seater Sofa is beautifully highlighted by richly appointed detailing around the arms and the base. Generous upholstery provides the perfect complement to its luxurious form. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, 212.684.2197, christopherguy.com

Côté France This leopard finish for the LXV Commode Chest perfectly represents Côté France, where classic antique reproductions become new and excitingly different. This commode is trimmed on three sides with real bronze and finished in your choice of gold or silver leaf. The hand-painted finish takes a specialist many labor-intensive hours to complete. Côté France, Suite 1201, 212.684.0707, cotefrance.com

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NEW Showrooms. 2014 F resh faces and new designs.

new showroom new location opening soon

Bakes & Kropp, Suite 422 phone 917.885.9650, fax 631.725.1710, bakesandcompany.com Bakes and Company is now Bakes & Kropp. We love the new name. From the Hamptons to New York City and beyond, Bakes & Kropp offers both kitchen and interior design, and custom cabinet manufacturing. Bakes & Kropp works with architects and homeowners alike, taking a project from initial concept right through kitchen design, cabinet manufacturing, and final installation.

La Bastille, Suite 1305 phone 866.570.9690, labastille.com La Bastille is a leading producer of custom surfaces and fine furnishings, integrating unusual yet classical materials with smart and striking designs. Bastille Metal Works is recognized worldwide as the leader in zinc and pewter installations in both commercial settings as well as within beautifully appointed homes throughout the world.

Bolier, Suite 804 phone 212.889.2060, fax 212.684.0776, bolierco.com In their stand-alone showroom, Bolier continues to be a notable name in the luxury furniture industry, offering a portfolio of classic furniture forms reinterpreted with sophisticated modernistic sensibilities by a select group of designers like John Black, Brian Graham, Jiun Ho, and Michael Vanderbyl.

The New Traditionalists, Suite 701 phone 212.226.1868, fax 212.226.5504, thenewtraditionalists.com The New Traditionalists connect traditional with today. Influenced by classic silhouettes, their furniture is designed for today's eclectic, personal style of decorating. Using multi-layered, hand-rubbed finishes, each piece of furniture is handmade in their factory in New England, built with sustainably harvested hardwoods and finished using proprietary water-based techniques.

CF Modern, Suite 419 phone 917.699.6024, cfmodern.com Less than two years after Irwin Feld and Steve Cassler launched CF Modern, a mid-century-inspired, Americanmade, custom furniture collection, they have expanded to include a showroom at NYDC. CF Modern now offers a full collection of case pieces, tables, lighting, chairs, and sofas, in addition to benches and ottomans.

Tectonic Flooring, Suite 1316 phone 888.748.7319, tectonicflooring.com Flooring isn't just about form, it's about function too, and Tectonic floors have managed to find the perfect equilibrium. Their new showroom at the NYDC will offer their wide range of solid timber flooring products, advanced coatings, and finishes to provide the best timber flooring every time.

Currey & Company, Suite 506 phone 877.768.6428, fax 678.533.1499, curreyandcompany.com Currey & Company, manufacturer of distinctive home furnishings, have brought their well-known lighting products, interior and garden furniture, and accessories to NYDC. Hand-forged iron chandeliers and sconces have long been their specialty, but the range of materials has been extended to include such materials as hand-carved wood, porcelain, and brass.

Ted Boerner, Suite 903 phone 212.675.5665, fax 212.675.5654, tedboerner.com Ted Boerner recently relocated to the ninth floor of the NYDC in a redesigned showroom. Along with their own line of furnishings that balance nature and modernism, Ted Boerner features a range of textiles, lighting, carpets, wallpaper, art, and accessories by their distinctive selection of artists and designers.

Harbour Outdoor Australia, Suite 1301 phone 646.692.4227, harbouroutdoor.com In 2007, Harbour Outdoor was conceived by founders Harrison and Nicholas Condos with the desire to continue the legacy and growth of their fathers’ Australian company, Tecno Furniture. Harbour Outdoor focuses on creating outdoor furniture of unique design and unparalleled quality to suit any landscape or climate.

Jamie Herzlinger, Suite 425 phone 212.582.2790, jamieherzlinger.com Jamie Herzlinger’s showroom includes her signature custom furniture line, along with Herzlinger’s curated collection of her favorite resources, such as exquisite antiques from Linda Horn and Milord Antiques, stunning period lighting by Carlos de la Puente, and elegant handmade wall coverings by Studio E. 72

WOODWRIGHTS WIDE PLANK FLOORING, Suite 436 phone 212.390.8944, fax 212.390.8955, woodwrightswideplank.com Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring offers an extensive selection of wide plank floors—from traditional to modern—in both classic and prefinished varieties. The durability and uniquely American character of wide plank floors have influenced generations of designers, architects, and builders seeking to recreate the distinctive, elegant look. The company firmly believes that responsible stewardship of natural resources is not just business, it’s a good investment in the environment.


ShowroomPortraits

Profiles of Some of 200Lex's Most Familiar Names

ARTERIORS Suite 608

BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS Suite 300

THE BRIGHT GROUP Suite 902

BRUETON Suite 910

Founded by Mark Moussa in 1987, Arteriors is a Dallas-based company that specializes in lighting, furniture, and decorative accessories that appeal to the design-trade clientele. The company collaborates with experienced artisans and manufacturers around the world, producing a full spectrum of styles in luxury materials and finishes. Arteriors has showrooms in High Point, Las Vegas, Dallas, New York, Atlanta, and Chicago. Arteriors, Suite 608, phone 646.797.3620, fax 646.786.4818, arteriorshome.com

Founded in 1902, Baker Knapp & Tubbs, remains one of the largest wholesale distributors in the industry with 16 showrooms located in major design districts throughout the United States and at the Chelsea Harbour Design Centre in London. Product assortment spans from historic reproductions dating back to the 17th century to modern designs from today’s most recognized independent designers. Baker Knapp & Tubbs, Suite 300, phone 212.779.8810, fax 212.689.2827, bakerfurniture.com

The Bright Group is a unique collection of handcrafted, American-made furnishings, combining the extensive product range of Bright Chair Co. with artisan designers and manufacturers, showcasing a coordinated environment for the design community. Whether the focus is seating, case goods, or lighting, The Bright Group searches the country for quality product lines with great new design and an aesthetic popular in contemporary environments. The Bright Group, Suite 902, phone 212.726.9030, fax 212.726.9029, thebrightgroup.com

Brueton, a U.S. manufacturer based in New York, manufactures a full line of contemporary furniture, including sofas, tables, chairs, casegoods, and accessories catering to residential and commercial clients. In addition, Brueton offers vast custom capabilities, including fabricating the simplest to the most complicated stainless steel products and architectural metals for architects and designers. Brueton, Suite 910, phone 212.838.1630, fax 212.838.1652, brueton.com

CALGER LIGHTING INC. (HAIKU) Suite 434

CHRISTOPHER GUY Suite 1601

CÔTÉ FRANCE Suite 1201

COUTURE SHOWROOMS Suite 715

Backed by years of research and development, and hundreds of prototypes, Haiku reflects the attention to detail the Big Ass Fan Company is known for worldwide. Its industry-leading efficiency, silent motor, tops-in-class airflow, sustainable materials, quality craftsmanship, and minimalist design combine to create the perfect airmoving machine. With eight patents worldwide, Haiku is a true original. Haiku (at Calger Lighting Inc.), Suite 434, phone 212.689.9511, fax 212.779.0721, haikufan.com

Christopher Guy’s new 20,000-squarefoot penthouse showroom showcases his latest collections and design philosophy within three suites, each portraying varying lifestyles. The new Mademoiselle Collection internationalizes Parisian chic for the 21st century. The showroom also features the state-of-the-art Christopher Guy Design Lab, an ideal working environment for interior designers to complete entire design projects. Pictured: Dandelion Wall Mirror. Christopher Guy, Suite 1601, phone 212.684.2197, fax 212.684.2123, christopherguy.com

Visit Côté France for quality, style, and originality. The company’s French workrooms proudly boast generations of families continuing a tradition of fine handcraftsmanship. In addition to classic French reproductions in authentic finishes, Côté France brings tradition into the 21st century with vibrant colors and unique painted designs. Recently introduced is a collection of 18th-century reproduction outdoor teak furniture and a solid bronze lighting collection. Côté France, Suite 1201, phone 212.684.0707, fax 212.684.8940, cotefrance.com

Couture Showrooms is now on the 7th floor. In addition to carrying the wellknown Vladimir Kagan Couture line, the company has now expanded its offerings to encompass other prestigious names such as A.S. Morris, Spectrum West, Ron Seff, Axis Mundi, and Custom Designs by Luigi Gentile. Fabric and leather lines are available for your selection from their local workroom. Couture Showrooms, Suite 715, phone 212.689.0730, fax 212.689.1830, coutureshowrooms.com

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ShowroomPortraits DENNIS MILLER ASSOCIATES Suite 1210

DESIRON Suite 702

GLOBAL VIEWS Suite 613

Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon, Suite 102

Since 1983, Dennis Miller Associates has offered innovative furniture and lighting collections designed by architects, interior designers, and artisans. Its showroom provides a continually evolving showcase of contemporary and 20th-century classic design excellence. Its popularity with top designers speaks for itself. Come see the newly expanded collections to the Dennis Miller lighting, rugs, and furniture lines. Dennis Miller Associates, Suite 1210, phone 212.684.0070, fax 212.684.0776, dennismiller.com

Desiron, designed by Frank Carfaro, is a highly celebrated luxury furniture design company with a focus on benchmade, fully customizable home furnishings. The company’s 4,000-square-foot showroom concentrates on a contemporary clean aesthetic with strict attention to detail and finishing. Desiron manufactures its pieces in Kenilworth, New Jersey, at their state-of-the-art facility, just 19 miles from downtown NYC. DESIRON, Suite 702, phone 212.353.2600, fax 212.353.0220, desiron.com

Global Views is expanding its showroom space. Global Views is a home decor wholesale company with collections that blend various styles to make pieces that are elegant, exotic, refined, and casual. They offer a wide assortment of fashion-forward products from furniture to accessories that fit every price range. Global Views, Suite 613, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, globalviews.com

The mission of Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon is to service the design trade at the highest possible level, while offering a fashion-forward shopping experience. The showroom represents Henredon, Barbara Barry Realized by Henredon, Celerie Kemble for Henredon and Maitland-Smith, LaneVenture, Maitland-Smith, LaBarge, and Taracea. The company offers hundreds of beautiful wood and upholstery designs for every room. Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon, Suite 102, phone 212.725.3776, fax 212.725.3763, henredon.com

Julian Chichester Suite 604

Kindel Furniture Suite 510

KRAVET INC. Suite 401

LOUIS J. SOLOMON Suite 911

Julian Chichester is still relatively new to NYDC, but the success of his Britishinfluenced line has been immediate. Interpreted in a distinctively contemporary way, Julian Chichester reinvents the great designs of the 19th and 20th centuries to create eclectic, transitional furniture that is perfect for how we live today. Julian’s more accessible line, Mr. Brown, gives classic English formality a quirky twist. Julian Chichester, Suite 604, phone 646.293.6622, fax 917.591.2413, julianchichester.com

Established in 1901, Kindel Furniture remains one of the few American-made furniture brands known for hand carving, bench assembly, and hand finishing. Today, Kindel continues this legacy with fresh new designs and finishes, beautifully tailored upholstery, and exciting new capabilities for customization. Kindel Furniture, Suite 510, phone 646.293.6649, fax 646.293.6657, kindelfurniture.com

Barclay Butera’s latest collection for Kravet is inspired by his book, Getaways and Retreats, which combines two signature “getaway” looks: Retreat and Bungalow. Kravet’s showroom strives to create a unique shopping experience for every designer in order to be the primary resource in the decorative fabrics and furnishings industry. The company’s goal is to create a comfortable workspace and resource center for designers that serves as an extension of its own design studios. Kravet Inc., Suite 401, phone 212.725.0340, fax 212.684.7350, kravet.com

Since 1930, Louis J. Solomon has had a reputation in the industry for fine traditional furniture. Over the past 10 years the company has introduced more than 200 new transitional and contemporary styles that complement the quality styles it has always been known for. Please visit the company’s showroom to see the latest additions. Louis J. Solomon, Suite 911, phone 212.545.9200, fax 212.545.9438, louisjsolomon.com

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Maxwell Fabrics (Flourishes) Suite 414

METROPOLITAN LIGHTING FIXTURE CO., Suite 512

PROFILES Suite 1211

SALADINO FURNITURE, INC. Suite 1600

Maxwell Fabrics is a third generation family-run business with a distinct reputation for offering modern classic fabrics to the interior design trade. The foundation of Maxwell Fabrics is built on unprecedented quality and service, providing committed support to today’s design professionals. While innovation and evolution drive its growth, Maxwell Fabrics owes its enduring success to the principles of authentic and timeless design. Available through maxwellfabrics.com or visit Flourishes, Inc., Suite 414, phone 212.779.4540, fax 212.779.4542, maxwellfabrics.com

Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. has been illuminating fine interiors since 1939. Now part of the Minka Group, the Metropolitan showroom represents lighting from all Minka companies, including George Kovacs, as well as products from other quality lighting manufacturers. Its large showroom offers one of the most comprehensive selections of designer-oriented lighting in the industry. Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co., Suite 512, phone 212.545.0032, fax 212.545.0031, minka.com

Serving the design profession since 1980, PROFILES’ workrooms in the U.S. and in Europe create pieces of uncommon beauty and imagination for both residential and contract customers, offering a full spectrum of furniture in a variety of woods, metals, and finishes, as well as finely tailored upholstery—all to the designer’s specifications. PROFILES, Suite 1211, phone 212.689.6903, fax 212.685.1807, profilesny.com

Established in 1986 by renowned designer John F. Saladino, the Saladino Furniture collection currently has over 75 original designs of upholstery, casegoods, and lighting. The line is available exclusively through its New York showroom among select antiques and accessories. A 75-page catalog may be purchased online at saladinostyle.com. Saladino Furniture, Inc., Suite 1600, phone 212.684.3720 x31, fax 212.684.3257, saladinostyle.com

STEPHANIE ODEGARD COLLECTION Suite 1209

STUDIO A Suite 614

TUCKER ROBBINS Suite 504

WOODWRIGHTS WIDE PLANK FLOORING, Suite 436

The Stephanie Odegard Collection is a leader in bold design and color innovation in the production of highend, hand-knotted carpets. The collection also features handcrafted furniture, lighting, antiques, and decorative accessories from across the globe. In all of her products, Stephanie Odegard requires strict adherence to social responsibility, raising standards of living for thousands of craftspeople in developing countries. Stephanie Odegard Collection, Suite 1209, phone 212.545.0205, fax 212.545.0305, stephanieodegard.com

Studio A’s unique mix of organic, design-driven accessories, furniture, found objects, and textiles is rich in texture and elemental in composition. Cutting-edge design, unexpected materials, and handcrafted finishes form the foundation of their product mix. The eclectic blend of textures, classic silhouettes, and timeless design will transform any interior. Studio A is a partner company and harmonious complement to Global Views. Studio A, Suite 614, phone 212.725.8439, fax 212.679.4927, studioa-home.com

For the past 25 years, Tucker Robbins’ passion has been bringing the spirit and craft from traditional artisans to contemporary life. He has created thriving artisan workshops in Guatemala, Philippines, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Cameroon, working with sustainably harvested or reclaimed materials and incorporating sustainable methods that have been practiced by local people for centuries. Tucker Robbins, Suite 504, phone 212.355.3383, fax 212.355.3116, tuckerrobbins.com

Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring offers an extensive selection of wide plank floors—from traditional to modern—in both classic and prefinished varieties. The durability and uniquely American character of wide plank floors have influenced generations of designers, architects, and builders seeking to recreate the distinctive, elegant look. The company firmly believes that responsible stewardship of natural resources is not just business, it’s a good investment in the environment. Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring, Suite 436, phone 212.390.8944, fax 212.390.8955, woodwrightswideplank.com JUN JUL

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Events at 200Lex A look at a few recent celebrations. Gloria Vanderbilt Exhibition Opening

On February 26, The New York Design Center hosted the opening exhibition of The Left Hand is the Dreamer, featuring over 50 new works by Gloria Vanderbilt, the American artist, author, actress, heiress, and socialite.

Colombo Mobili Showroom Renovation Unveiling

Rendered in deep blues, dusty pinks, and soft lavenders, each painting speaks to Ms. Vanderbilt’s vivid imagination, conjuring up ethereal images of dreaming girls, long forgotten memories, and mysterious places in the past. The exhibition also included a salon-style room Ms. Vanderbilt created with interior designer Matthew Patrick Smyth.

On March 18, Colombo Mobili celebrated the opening of their newly renovated showroom. Designers, editors, and friends gathered to view the 8,000-square-foot space and classical furniture collection. The evening also included a string quartet performance. Visit Suite 809 to see the stunning new showroom.

Left to right: Gloria Vanderbilt with her son, Anderson Cooper; Matthew Patrick Smyth and Barry Goralnick; Chris Coleman poses with Brian del Toro; the salon-style room designed by Ms. Vanderbilt and Matthew Patrick Smyth; Charlotte Moss smiles alongside Ms. Vanderbilt’s work. Photos by Paul Porter/BFAnyc.com.

Designer Ellie Cullman (right) poses with Cullman & Kravis’ Claire Ratliff and Alyssa Urban; designer James Rixner, Terry Paladini-Baumgarten, and Colombo Mobili’s Paolo Pantaloni; Rosemary Bonner, Rayon Black and Luadana Colombo. Photos by Annie Watts.

Floral Motifs Opening Reception

The New York Design Center held the opening night reception for Floral Motifs, an exhibition and sale benefiting The Horticultural Society of New York, on January 15. The Hort’s gallery encourages gardeners and artists to appreciate the creative intersection between art and nature. The exhibition showcased emerging and established contemporary artists who are inspired by horticulture, botany, landscape, and the environment.

Left to right: Zachary Turner, Elizabeth Bak, Sarah Boston, and Missey Condie; designer John Chadwick poses with The Hort’s Mary Van Pelt and Bruce Addison; The Hort’s Executive Director Sara Hobel and artist Jessica Tcherepnine; Tom Gibb poses with designer Robert Lindgren. Photos by Karen Cattan. 76


DIFFA’s Dining by Design 2014 The New York Design Center was thrilled to support the 30th anniversary of Design Industries Foundation Fighting AIDS at the 17th Annual Dining by Design event, held March 20–March 24, in conjunction with the Architectural Digest Home Design Show. This year’s table, designed by Kati Curtis, explored our masculine and feminine sides, asking which dominates you, guides you, and intrigues you. Kati expressed the interplay of the boy and girl in us all, and played with stereotypes that we can so easily fall prey to. Growing out of her own design balancing acts, she created a fantasy world utilizing the New York Design Center’s crafted materials and playful patterns, all used in ways that, while unexpected, also make perfect sense. Be sure to take a second look—things aren’t always what they seem!

Left to Right: New York Design Center’s table designer Kati Curtis; a full view of the table featuring chairs from Elizabeth Pash and Bolier, floor lamps from John Richard and Currey & Company, rugs from Roubini Rugs and Stephanie Odegard Collection, fabric and wallpaper from Timorous Beasties through Ted Boerner and fabric by Kravet; the male place setting featuring dinnerware by MATCH through Richard Cohen Collection; Dining Arm Chair by The New Traditionalists heads the masculine PROFILES table; Porcelain Chandelier by Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. hangs above the female side’s table; mirror by Louis J. Solomon and Venetian Dining Arm Chair by adLib Antiques; Gien France dinnerware through Richard Cohen Collection; hurricanes and vases by Global Views flank Sister & Brother Genetic Portrait by Ulric Collette; a chandelier from Currey & Company hangs above a mirror from the Thom Filicia Collection for Vanguard by Sedgwick & Brattle and Gareth Sculpture by Arteriors. Special thanks to De Buck Gallery for “You Are Not” Neon Light by Ruby Anemic. Photos by Darren Ornitz. JUN JUL

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ShowroomDirectory A Complete List of Who’s Where In 200 Lex SHOWR OOM

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S uite

PHON E

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S H OW RO O M

1stdibs at NYDC Access To Design ANDREU WORLD Antique Rugs, Jerry Livian Collection Apropos Inc. Aqua Creations Lighting & Furniture Atelier Arc|Com Fabrics, Inc. Aristeia Metro Arteriors Atelier Atlas Carpet Mills, Inc. Baker Knapp & Tubbs Bakes & Kropp Bograd Kids Bolier Boyce Products Ltd The Bright Group Brueton Brunschwig & Fils Calger Lighting Inc. Century Furniture CF Modern Christopher Guy CityScapes NYC Clickspring Design CLIFF YOUNG LTD. Colombo Mobili USA Côté France Couture Showrooms/Valdimir Kagan Couture Currey & Company DARRAN Furniture Industries, Inc. Decca Contract Furniture Delivery By Design (DBD) Dennis Miller Associates

10th Fl 424 1111 806 710 427 1411 1416 608 202 1314 300 422 433 804 1318 902 910 401 434 200 419 1601 1106 1318 505 809 1201 715 506 1116 1414 Dock 1210

646.293.6633 212.679.9500 212.679.0300 212.683.2666 212.684.6987 212.219.9922 212.751.1590 646.761.4711 646.797.3620 212.696.0211 212.779.4300 212.779.8810 917.885.9650 212.726.0007 212.889.2060 212.683.3100 212.726.9030 212.838.1630 212.725.0340 212.689.9511 212.479.0107 917.699.6024 212.684.2197 212.961.6984 212.220.0962 212.683.8808 212.683.3771 212.684.0707 212.689.0730 877.768.6428 212.961.6984 646.761.4711 212.213.1691 212.684.0070

646.293.6687 212.447.1669 212.679.5996 212.683.2668 212.689.3684 212.219.4042 212.751.2434

Julian Chichester & Mr. Brown Kasthall Keilhauer Kindel Furniture

DesignLush DESIRON DIFFA DIRTT Environmental Solutions Dorothy Draper & Co., Inc. ducduc Flourishes GIBSON INTERIOR PRODUCTS Giorgio USA Global Views Good Design Gordon International Grange Furniture Halcon Harbour Outdoor Australia HBF & HBF Textiles Hickory Chair Pearson Henredon In House Kitchen Bath Home Interior Crafts NY IFDA Jamie Herzlinger Jasper Group Jofco John-Richard

415 702 707 1516 510 701 414 1510 502 613 423 1401 201 1304 1301 1501 102 1511 916 417B 425 1514 1109 603

212.532.5450 212.353.2600 212.727.3100 973.454.6282 646.293.6649 212.226.1868 212.779.4540 212.685.1077 212.684.7191 212.725.8439 212.722.1110 212.532.0075 212.685.9494 212.683.7272 646.692.4227 212.686.3142 212.725.3776 212.686.2016 212.696.4400 212.686.6020 212.582.2790 212.685.1077 212.689.0300 646.293.6668

646.786.4818 212.696.0299 212.779.0838 212.689.2827 631.725.1710 212.726.0061 212.684.0776 212.683.5005 212.726.9029 212.838.1652 212.684.7350 212.779.0721 212.479.0112 212.684.2123

212.683.9286 212.684.0559 212.684.8940 212.689.1830 678.533.1499 212.951.7070

604 611 1101 510 Korts & Knight, Kitchens by Alexandra Knight 716 Kravet Inc. 401 Krug 1415 La Bastille 1305 LaCOUR 1412 Lee Jofa 401 Levine Calvano Furniture Group 1406 Lexington Home Brands 212 Louis J. Solomon 911 Luna Textiles 1410 McGuire Furniture 101 Metropolitan Lighting Fixture Co. 512 Milano Smart Living 711 M|n Modern Living Supplies 408 M. Topalian, Inc., Antique Carpets 802 Napier + Joseph + McNamara, Ltd. 1304 The New Traditionalists 701 Niermann Weeks 905 Orrefors Kosta Boda 602 PALECEK 610 Paoli Inc. 1110 Pennoyer Newman, LLC 416 Phillips Collection 601 Porcelanosa 609 Primason Symchik, Inc. 1101 Pringle Ward 1109 Profiles 1211 RAUL CARRASCO

212.213.9843 212.684.0776 212.532.5360 212.353.0220 212.727.2574 646.293.6657 212.226.5504 212.779.4542 212.685.1078 212.725.2683 212.679.4927 212.722.1115 212.779.0147 212.685.7312 212.683.0711

212.725.3763 212.686.2048 212.686.4408 212.686.6258 812.771.4641 212.689.7149 646.293.6669

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912 Richard Cohen Collection 801 Rocky Mountain Hardware 903 Rooms by Zoya B 433 Robert Wilson Associates 1307 SA Baxter Architectural Hardware 1205 Saladino Furniture, Inc. 1600 Sanford Hall Carpets 400 Sedgwick & Brattle 815 Smart 1115 Stephanie Odegard Collection 1209 Studio A 614 Sun Decor Fabrics 417A Tectonic Flooring 1316 Ted Boerner 903 TK Collections 410 Townhouse Kitchens 421 transFORM 708 Tucker Robbins 504 Versteel 1106 Weinberg Modern 407 Wood & Hogan, Inc. 812 Wood-Mode/T.O. Gronlund Co. 1515 Woodwrights Wide Plank Flooring 436 NYDC Café 1st Floor New York Design Center 426 RENAISSANCE CARPET & TAPESTRIES

P H O NE

FA X

646.293.6622 212.421.0220 212.679.0300 646.293.6649 212.3924750 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 866.570.9690 212.213.6600 212.725.0340 212.686.7600 212.532.2750 212.545.9200 212.251.0132 212.689.1565 212.545.0032 212.729.1938 646.486.3272 212.684.0735 212.683.7272 212.226.1868 212.319.7979 212.684.5455 212.287.0063 212.683.2232 212.839.0500 336.884.9271 212.252.7370 212.679.0300 212.689.0300 212.689.6903 212.966.6112 212.696.0080 212.696.4938 212.675.5665 212.726.0006 212.685.7788

917.591.2413 212.421.0230 212.679.5996 646.293.6657

800.407.4295

212.684.3720 212.684.4217 212.685.0600 212.696.9762 212.545.0205 212.725.8439 212.213.2703 888.748.7319 212.675.5665 212.213.2470 212.684.8696 212.584.9580 212.355.3383 800.876.2120 646.291.2059 212.532.7440 212.679.3535 212.390.8944 646.616.0584 212.679.9500

212.684.7350

973.227.3544 212.684.7350 212.686.7686 212.532.2875 212.545.9438 212.689.1578 212.545.0031 212.729.1939 646.349.5619 212.725.2185 212.683.7011 212.226.5504 212.319.6116 212.684.5665 212.287.0066 212.683.1297 212.839.0501 336.882.7405 917.289.1228 212.679.5996 212.689.7149 212.685.1807 212.966.6113 212.696.4248 212.696.5333 212.675.5654 212.726.0061 212.686.9781 888.713.6042 212.684.3257 212.545.8376 212.244.9131 212.696.2729 212.545.0305 212.679.4927 212.231.2708 212.675.5654 212.213.2464

212.355.3116

212.532.6440 212.725.3847

212.447.1669


ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

OUR FABRICS ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3


backstory DESIGN FOR LIVING

By Jim Lochner

T he Mansion on Madison stands as a lasting landmark of Gilded Age living .

From left to right: The Villard Houses exterior then and now; the inspiring spires of St. Patrick's Cathedral across the street; interior wrought-iron baluster detail.

Deep in the heart of midtown, in the shadows of St. Patrick’s Cathedral and The New York Palace Hotel, stands a lasting remnant to 19th-century design and opulent Gilded Age living—the Villard Houses, also known as The Mansion on Madison. Built by budding architecture firm McKim, Mead & White in 1884 on the southeast corner of 51st Street and Madison Avenue, the six-story, 26,190-square-foot building was commissioned by Henry Villard, president of the Northern Pacific Railway. The home looks like one large mansion from the outside, but the inside was designed to house six private yet connected brownstones for Villard and his business associates. Villard took the largest residence of the six, occupying the entire right wing. This set of row houses, instead of relating to the street line, non-traditionally forms a U-shaped block around a fenced-in courtyard to “secure privacy and get rid of tramps,” said Villard, “and to live in a quiet and secluded way.” By the time the Villard houses were being built, brownstone, which been in fashion for the last 40 years, was no longer in style. Yet publisher Whitelaw Reid, who eventually bought the property following Villard’s financial ruin and saw the project through to completion, insisted on the use of Belleville brownstone rather than the light-colored stone preferred by the architects. Designer Joseph M. Wells borrowed from 16th-century Italian Renaissance palazzos such as the Cancelleria and the Farnese Palace in Rome. Projecting balconies were added on the second story of the north and south wings, and quoins on the second, third, and fourth stories of the central portion to indicate the points of separation of the central house unit from the side houses. Deviating from the Italian example, Wells situated the principal rooms like a traditional row house, on the parlor floor above the basement, rather than a true Roman piano nobile a full story above the street.

staircase was carved with a different design, and the vaults, walls, and floors were adorned with Mexican and Siena marble. The glass panels in the inner entrance leading from the vestibule to the main hall, designed by Tiffany and John LaFarge, are still in place in the fanlight and sidelights. The first floor featured a triple parlor, large hall, and a huge dining room served by a pantry, with a traditional service area and servants’ dining room in the basement. The highlight of the two-story music room is the plaster-cast panels copied from Luca della Robbia’s Cantoria in the Sacristy in Florence. The various houses of the Mansion changed hands many times, serving as offices for disparate entities such as the Friends of Free France, Random House publishing company, and the Archdiocese of New York. In 1968, the Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the complex a historical landmark, up to the ridgeline of the roof 100 feet east of Madison. This meant that the rear extensions could be legally demolished later to make room for the construction of the Helmsley (now New York) Palace Hotel. The hotel was designed to blend in with the Villard houses and the Villard’s carriage entrance on Madison now serves as the hotel’s courtyard. The success of the Villard design enhanced the reputation of McKim, Mead & White, and led to their commission to design the Boston Library. That the Villard Houses continue to stand amidst midtown’s glass and steel jungle is a marvel. Even more marvelous is the mansion’s ability to inspire new generations of designers. In May, over 20 of the country’s most celebrated interior designers and architects revived the historic interiors of the north wing of the house for the 42nd Annual Kips Bay Decorator Show House. The designers spent eight weeks transforming the various spaces, with the proceeds from the public viewings going to the Kips Bay Boys and Girls Club. Now that’s design for living—in every sense of the word.

Villard’s interior included pilasters inlaid with rosewood, mother-of-pearl, and brass, which framed the library doorway. Each baluster of the grand 80


ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

Photograph by Antoine Bootz

SALADINO FURNITURE INC. 200 LEXINGTON AVENUE, SUITE 1600, NEW YORK, NY 10016 TEL 212 684 3720 FAX 212 683 3257 SALADINOSTYLE.COM TO THE TRADE


ARRAY INSIDE THE NEW YORK DESIGN CENTER

inspired. kravet

VOLUME 4 ISSUE 3

FA B R I C S

FURNITURE

TRIMMINGS

CARPETS

K R A V E T. C O M

o n e f a m i l y. n i n e t y - s i x ye a r s

Array summer 2014  

ARRAY Magazine brings the most interesting people, places and ideas in interior design into the homes and offices of both design professiona...