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Board of Education Notice of Meeting & Agenda 

BOARD OF EDUCATION REGULAR MEETING  Board Room, 215 S. EAGLE STREET, Oshkosh, WI   

WEDNESDAY, MAY 12, 2010 

6:00 P.M.  Upon request, reasonable auxiliary aids and services will be provided for individuals with disabilities. If accommodations are required, please provide 24-hour notice by calling 424-0120.

 

 COMPLIANCE WITH OPEN MEETING LAW NOTIFICATION [§19.84(2) Wis. Stats.]    ROLL CALL ‐ Verification of Quorum. 

 

  PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE/SCHOOL PRESENTATION – EMMELINE COOK   

 

School Representatives: Jasimeen Thor, Jaime Thor, Jarisma Thor 

 

  RECOGNITION OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ART STUDENTS 

 

Josh Lehman, Mya Jamrock, Madison Steier, Max Brylski, Anna Weidman, Isaiah Palmquist, Justin  Kubicz, Becca Geffers, Jordan Biesinger, Sean Terzynski, Kaylin Meyer, Skylar Nourse, Jake Besaw,  Lillie Mortenson, Meg Traska, Chloe Abitz         NON­AGENDA RELATED PUBLIC FORUM     AGENDA RELATED PUBLIC FORUM 

 

         

         

  BOARD/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS  1  Superintendent’s Report    2  Other Reports (Committee chairs will notify Board President if they have a report to give)    3  Youth Risk Behavior Survey (Written Report)   

   

  CONSENT RESOLUTION AGENDA 

       

         

1  2  3  4  5 

 

       

7  8  9  10 

For the consent agenda, the board has been furnished with background material on each item or has discussed it  at a previous meeting.  These will be acted upon with one vote without discussion.  If a board member wants to  discuss any item, it will be pulled out of the consent agenda and will be voted on separately.    

The Board will consider approval of: 

             

 

Minutes of Reorganizational Board Meeting – April 26, 2010  Minutes of Board Meeting ‐  April 28, 2010  Minutes of Executive Session – April 28, 2010  Bills Payable  Personnel  A. Appointments, Additions to Contract, Changes in Contract, Retirements, Resignations, Temporary  Contracts, etc.  Resolution Authorizing the Issuance and Awarding the Sale of $6,685,000 Taxable General Obligation  Refunding Bonds; Providing the Form of the Bonds; and Levying a Tax in Connection Therewith  Policy 453.9 Live Animals on School Property  Policy 453.91 Student or Staff Use of Service and Companion Animals  Policy 453.92 Accommodation of Staff Service Animal Trainers and Dogs on School Grounds  Race to the Top Memorandum of Understanding 

  INDIVIDUALLY CONSIDERED RESOLUTION(S)  Page 1 of 2 


NOTICE OF MEETING & AGENDA OASD – BOARD OF EDUCATION 05/12/10  

 

  RECESS FOR DOCUMENT SIGNATURES   

  REQUEST FOR FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS  

   

 

  ANNOUNCEMENTS 

 

  WORKSHOP SESSION AGENDA  Lead Presenter 

 

       

     

 

 

   

1  2 

Oaklawn Solutions Including Discussion of Proceeds from the Lincoln School Sale Bette Lang  Discussion of Other Uses of Proceeds from the Lincoln School Sale Bette Lang 

      ADJOURN TO EXECUTIVE SESSION 

  EXECUTIVE SESSION  1  Deliberating or negotiating the purchasing of public properties, the investing of public funds, or   

 

conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed  session §19.85(1)(e)  A. Non‐Teaching Employees Association – Food Service Unit (NTEA‐FSU) Negotiation Strategies  B. Oshkosh Education Association (OEA) Negotiation Strategies  C. Oshkosh Paraprofessional Education Association (OPEA) Negotiation Strategies  D. Non‐Teaching Employees Association (NTEA) Negotiation Strategies  E. Discussion Regarding the Purchase of Property Adjacent to 112 Viola Ave. Site    2  Considering the Employment, Promotion, Compensation or Performance Evaluation Data of Any Public  Employee Over Which The Governmental Body Has Jurisdiction or Exercises Responsibility §19.85(1)(c)   A.  Discussion of Candidates for the Executive Director of Business Services Position   

  ADJOURN  

Page 2 of 2 


DRAFT  BOARD OF EDUCATION ‐ OSHKOSH AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT  05/12/10 

  DATE 

 

        DESCRIPTION 

I.

SHORT RANGE FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS    

May 26  May 26  May 26  May 26  May 26  May 26  May 26  May 26

Res.  Res.  Res.  Res.  Res.  Rpt.  W  W

Certification of High School Graduates  Approval of FVTC Purchased Service to Meet Alternative Education Needs  Curriculum Adoptions for Implementation 2010­2011  Approval of Annual Extended Contracts  Approval of Appointment of Summer School Staffing   Dissolution of East High School as a Charter School  Social Worker Service Update  Policy 611 – General Fund – Undesignated Fund Balance Policy and Policy 612 – General Fund – Guidelines for Capital Improvement Budgeting

Est. Discussion  

 

        TYPE 

LENGTH 

 

Presentation 

 

 

 LENGTH 

      Ad = Admin.    Ex. =  Executive Session   Res. = Resolution      W = Workshop   Rpt = Report    Ret. = Retreat          PRESENTER 

             

             

Lang  Muza/Geigle  Muza  Sprangers  Kielbasa/Cernohous/Lewis  Brown  Marshall/Geigle  Board of Education

 

II.

  June 16  June 16    July 14  July 14  July 14    July 28

LONG RANGE FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS  Res.  Res. 

Approval of Dissolution of East High School as a Charter School  Approval of Remaining Staffing Requests (Non­Enrollment Driven) 

   

   

  Sprangers 

Res.  Res.  Rpt 

Approval to Publish Public Budget Notice  Approval of SAGE contracts for Jefferson and Roosevelt  Charter School End of Year Reports 

     

     

Sprangers  Garrison­Bruden  Brown 

W

Review First Draft of Budget  

 

Sprangers 

 

 

 

   

   

  Muza 

  Aug 

Res. 

Final Adjustments in EEN Staffing for Current Year 

Aug

W

Review of Second Draft of Budget

Sept. 

Res. 

Approval of Short Term Borrowing for Current Year 

Sept

W

Review of Third Draft of Budget

Oct  Oct 

Res.  Res. 

Approval of Final Budget Adjustments and Approval of Tax Levy  High School Course Modifications, Additions, Deletions 

 


Board Meeting Date: May 12, 2010 Agenda Item: YRBS Results STAFF REPORT - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Also to be used with resolution going directly to the Board) SUBJECT:

Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) results

Presenter(s): Marcy Peters-Felice (Webster Stanley Middle) and Jackie Schoening (CESA 6) I.

II.

III.

Overall Content/Purpose of Presentation: The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was administered January of 2010. Identified areas of concerns are included in this packet. This information is being reviewed by the AODA Advisory Council to determine what next steps the Council will recommend that the district take to address the issues that became apparent in the results of the survey. The Council has also recommended that the YRBS be administered on a bi-annual basis, similar to the process in place in other districts.

Board Motion Needed (if any) No BOE motion is required.

Major Points in this Report: A. Middle School Data The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was administered to 1,821 middle school students of the Oshkosh Area School District (OASD) in January 2010. A total of fifty-six (56) questions that included a range of topics such as bike and car safety, alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use, sexual activity and exercise and eating habits. Following is a table comparing results of the survey administered in January 2010 with the YRBS last administered in 2006.

Activity Been bullied on school property Have seriously thought about killing self Have tried to kill themselves Tried smoking cigarettes (even one or two puffs) Smoked a whole cigarette between the ages of 11 and 13 Smokes between 2-20 cigarettes a day Smokes cigarettes daily Had more than a few sips of alcohol Have used marijuana Tried marijuana for the 1st time between the ages of 11 and 13 Have used cocaine Have had sexual intercourse Have had sexual intercourse between the ages of 11 and 13 Going without eating for 24 hours or more to lose or not gain weight Play video or computer games 2 hours or more each day Involved in 2 or more sports teams Have been diagnosed with asthma

2010 54.6% 18.3% 5.9% 14.4% 4.2% 1.6% 6.2% 27.7% 7.1% 4.6% 2.5% 10.1% 6% 11% 43% 46.2% 16%

2006

The above table is a comparison of the YRBS’ results of the survey administered in 2006 and that of 2010. Results indicate that there is an increase in sexual activity between the ages of 11 and 13. It also evidences that more students are reporting the use of marijuana. A decrease in cigarette and alcohol use has been noted between 2006 and 2010. Some questions were not on both surveys – those have been marked with an (*) for the year it was not present on the survey.


B. High School Data The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) was administered to 2,468 high school students of the Oshkosh Area School District (OASD) in January 2010. A total of one hundred and six (106) questions that included a range of topics such as bike and car safety, alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette use, sexual activity and exercise and eating habits. Following is a table comparing results of the survey administered in January 2010 with the YRBS administered in 2006. Activity Binge drinking (5 or more drinks of alcohol in a row) 30 days prior to survey Have had at least one drink in their life Had first drink of alcohol before the age of 13 (other than a few sips) Prescription drug use without a doctor’s prescription Using cocaine, including powder, crack or freebase 30 days prior to survey Using methamphetamines, at least one time Using heroine, at least one time Offered, sold, or given illegal drugs on school property 12 months prior to survey Marijuana use during 30 days prior to survey administration Used marijuana at least one time Tried smoking cigarettes (even one or two puffs) Smoked a whole cigarette before the age of 13 Smokes cigarettes on a daily basis Smoked cigarettes on school property Chew tobacco, snuff, or dip during 30 days prior to survey Smoked a cigar, cigarillo, or little cigar 30 days prior to survey Tried to quit smoking over the past 12 months Involved in a physical fight during 12 months prior to survey In a physical fight on school property during past 12 months During the past 12 months, someone tried to hurt by hitting, punching, or kicking while on school property Boyfriend or girlfriend hit, slap, or physically hurt on purpose Verbally or physically forced to take part in sexual activity Physically hurting self without wanting to die (cutting or burning self) 12 months prior to survey Carried a weapon on school property during past 30 days prior to survey Carried a gun during 30 days prior to survey Carried a weapon (gun, knife, or club) during 30 days prior to survey Not want to go to school because felt unsafe either at school or on the way to or from school Someone threatened or injured them with a weapon on school property

2010 24.3% 71% 25.6% 26.7% 5.3% 5.5% 4.5% 22% 24.8% 39.4% 46.8% 14.6% 7.2% 9.9% 7% 12.1% 15.5% 29.7% 12.8% 21.2%

2006 21.4% * 31.5% * 4.5% 5.0% * 14.8% 14.9% 23.9% 37.4% 16.3% 14.8% 8.0% 8.8% 13.0% 57.4% 35.0% 17.6% 32.3%

10.8% 12.2% 22.2%

8.8% 9.6% *

5.9% 3.7% 11.7% 4.6%

7.1% 4.3% 5.8% 6.9%

7.5%

13.1%

The above table is a comparison of the results of the YRBS administered in 2006 and the one of 2010. Results show a marked increase in students reporting carrying weapons, trying cigarettes (even one or two puffs), marijuana use, and being offered, sold, or given illegal drugs on school property. Some questions on the 2010 survey were not one the 2006 one, those are marked with an (*).

C. OASD High School Compared to the State Data


The following table shows the comparison between OASD high school students with high school students throughout the state.

Activity

Binge drinking (5 or more drinks of alcohol in a row) 30 days prior to survey Have had at least one drink in their life Had first drink of alcohol before the age of 13 (other than a few sips) Prescription drug use without a doctor’s prescription Using cocaine, including powder, crack or freebase 30 days prior to survey Using methamphetamines, at least one time Using heroine, at least one time Offered, sold, or given illegal drugs on school property 12 months prior to survey Marijuana use during 30 days prior to survey administration Used marijuana at least one time Tried smoking cigarettes (even one or two puffs) Smoked a whole cigarette before the age of 13 Smokes cigarettes on a daily basis Smoked cigarettes on school property Chew tobacco, snuff, or dip during 30 days prior to survey Smoked a cigar, cigarillo, or little cigar 30 days prior to survey Tried to quit smoking over the past 12 months Involved in a physical fight during 12 months prior to survey In a physical fight on school property during past 12 months Someone tried to hurt by hitting, punching, or kicking while on school property Boyfriend or girlfriend hit, slap, or physically hurt on purpose Verbally or physically forced to take part in sexual activity Physically hurting self without wanting to die (cutting or burning self) 12 months prior to survey Carried a weapon on school property during past 30 days prior to survey Carried a gun during 30 days prior to survey Carried a weapon (gun, knife, or club) during 30 days prior to survey Not want to go to school because felt unsafe either at school or on the way to or from school Someone threatened or injured them with a weapon on school property

January 2010 OASD State Sample sample 24.3% 25.1% 71% 73.8% 25.6% 69.7% 26.7% 20.5% 5.3% 1.8% 5.5% 3.7% 4.5% 2.2% 22% 20.5% 24.8% 18.9% 39.4% 34.2% 46.8% 43.6% 14.6% 32.9% 7.2% 11.3% 9.9% 4.7% 7% 8.5% 12.1% 14.9% 15.5% 11.6% 29.7% 25.9% 12.8% 9.6% 21.2% 18.1% 10.8% 8.4% 12.2% 4.2% 22.2% 14.3% 5.9% 3.7% 11.7% 4.6%

3.4% 3.7% 10.9% 3.7%

7.5%

6%

The above table compares the results of the YRBS for the Oshkosh Area School District with a State sample. Results are very close with the exception of the question about students having their first drink of alcohol before the age of 13. The state sample is 69.7% while the district’s is at 25.6%. Physically hurting self without wanted to die is much higher in the district (22.2%) than the state level (14.3%).

C. Further Analysis CESA 6 will be doing further disaggregation of the YRBS’ results. Plans are to provide districts with a regional analysis for comparison as well.

V.

Budget/Financial Impact

Costs: Survey cost (included in CESA

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3


network fee) Net Budget Impact

$3,000 0

N/A N/A

TBD TBD

Reviewed by District Business Office × Yes No x Fits into budget  Does not fit into budget Explain:

Does Board of Education action require an addition, deletion or change to policies?

 Yes

× No

If Yes, what action is needed? _____N/A______________________________________________________

VI.

Primary Contact for More Information: Name: Marcy Peters-Felice, AODA CoordinatorPhone: (920) 424-0442 Michelle Ring, ESEA District Coordinator Phone: (920)424-0100


April 26, 2010 Page 1 of 2 COMPLIANCE WITH OPEN MEETING LAW NOTIFICATION [ยง19.84(2)]. The reorganizational meeting of the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education was called to order by Secretary/Deputy Clerk Teresa Collins on Monday, April 26, 2009 at 6:00 p.m. in the school district administrative offices. ROLL CALL - Verification of Quorum. Present: Dedow, Eliasen, Loewenstein, Lemberger, McDermott, Schneider, Wiedenhoeft OATH OF OFFICE: The oath of office was administered to Steve Dedow, Steve Eliasen, and Karl Loewenstein ELECTION OF OFFICERS: Board members agreed that voting would be by roll call. Secretary Collins declared nominations open for the office of President of the Board of Education. Tom McDermott nominated John Lemberger. There being no further nominations, nominations were closed and John Lemberger was elected President by a unanimous roll call vote. President Lemberger declared nominations open for the office of Vice President. Matt Wiedenhoeft nominated Tom McDermott. Nominations were closed and Tom McDermott was elected Vice President by a unanimous roll call vote. President Lemberger called for nominations for the office of Clerk. Tom McDermott nominated Matt Wiedenhoeft. Nominations were closed and Matt Wiedenhoeft was elected Clerk by a unanimous roll call vote. President Lemberger asked for nominations for the office of Treasurer. Matthew Wiedenhoeft nominated Ben Schneider. Nominations were closed and Ben Schneider was elected Treasurer by a unanimous roll call vote. ELECTION OF SECRETARY/DEPUTY CLERK OF THE BOARD: President Lemberger asked for nominations for the position of Secretary/Deputy Clerk. Ben Schneider nominated Teresa Collins. Nominations were closed and Teresa Collins was elected Secretary/Deputy Clerk of the Board by a unanimous roll call vote. CONSENT RESOLUTION AGENDA For the consent agenda, the board has been furnished with background material on each item or has discussed it at a previous meeting. These will be acted upon with one vote without discussion. If a board member wants to discuss any item, it will be pulled out of the consent agenda and will be voted on separately. 1. RESOLVED, that all order checks shall be signed by the following persons: John Lemberger, President Matthew Wiedenhoeft, Clerk Ben Schneider, Treasurer and shall be so honored. RESOLVED FURTHER, that in lieu of their personal signatures, the following facsimile signatures, which have been adopted by them as below shown: may be affixed on such order checks; that Associated Bank shall be fully warranted and protected in making payment on any order check bearing such facsimiles notwithstanding that the same may have been placed thereon without the authority of the designated person or persons. RESOLVED FURTHER, that a certified copy of this resolution shall be delivered to Associated Bank and they may rely on this resolution until changed by lawful resolution and a certified copy of such resolution has been given to their cashier.


April 26, 2010 Page 2 of 2 2. BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education adopt the Rules, Regulations, and Policies as they exist on April 26, 2010. Moved by McDermott, second by Wiedenhoeft to approve the consent resolution. Unanimous upon roll call. APPOINT BOARD COMMITTEES Board of Education standing and advisory committees were selected as follows: I. Standing Committees A. Policy/Governance Tom McDermott - Chair Karl Loewenstein Steve Dedow B.

III.

IV.

Administrator Compensation Committee Karl Loewenstein - Chair Tom McDermott

C.

Standards & Assessment Matt Wiedenhoeft

Facilities & Property (includes ADA) Matthew Wiedenhoeft- Chair Steve Eliasen Ben Schneider

II. Advisory Committees A. Human Growth & Development Steve Dedow B.

C.

Partnership for School Improvement Tom McDermott

Representative Delegates CESA 6 Karl Loewenstein TIF Districts (City of Oshkosh) Ben Schneider WASB Delegate Assembly John Lemberger Negotiations Teams FSEA Negotiations Tom McDermott Ben Schneider IATSE Negotiations Ben Schneider NTEA Negotiations Karl Loewenstein Steve Eliasen (alt.)

D. Partners in Education Steve Eliasen Steve Dedow

BOE President Responsibility -Museum Board (City of Oshkosh) -Fox Valley Tech. College Bd. of Dirs. Selection Comm. -Community Sounding Board

OEA Negotiations Tom McDermott Matt Wiedenhoeft Ben Schneider OPEA Negotiations John Lemberger Karl Loewenstein (alt.)

ADJOURN Moved by McDermott, second by Wiedenhoeft to adjourn. Unanimous upon roll call. The meeting adjourned at 6:26 p.m. Respectfully submitted,

Teresa Collins Teresa Collins Secretary


April 28, 2010 Page 1 of 4

COMPLIANCE WITH OPEN MEETING LAW NOTIFICATION [§19.84(2)]. The regular meeting of the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education was called to order by President Lemberger on Wednesday, April 28, 2010 at 6:00 p.m. in the district administrative offices. Teresa Collins verified that the meeting had been noticed pursuant to Wisconsin State Statutes. ROLL CALL - Verification of Quorum. Present: Dedow, Eliasen, Loewenstein, Lemberger, McDermott, Schneider, Wiedenhoeft PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE/SCHOOL PRESENTATION by students from ALPS Charter School. NON-AGENDA RELATED PUBLIC FORUM: Ben Schlichting, a student at Oaklawn, expressed his concern with the proposed elimination of the art and music rooms at Oaklawn next year. He stated that last year in music, he could not play very many instruments but with music having its own room this year, he has had the chance to play many more instruments. Alicia Herman, 501 Congress, spoke on behalf of Oaklawn staff, students and community members. There was a meeting on Monday to focus on the impact that losing the art and music rooms would have on learning. The number one concern is student learning and how losing the art and music rooms would impact the students. She looks forward to hearing the short term and long term solutions that the board has for Oaklawn. Kelly Sherman, 655 Weatherstone Dr., expressed her opposition to adding a third kindergarten to Oaklawn. She is concerned for the students’ future, the quality of education and the time and space this decision will affect. Oaklawn is already at capacity. It will limit the amount of curriculum the art teacher can teach with the loss of the art room. The gym could be an invitation for behavioral problems when trying to incorporate art into a wide open area of the gym. With regard to moving music back to a shopping cart, this creates another set of issues. There is not enough room for instruments. The teacher relies heavily on the use of a keyboard that would have to balance on top of the cart. It will not allow the students a very broad musical experience. Art and music are key to a child’s development and should be taken seriously. Kaitlyn Schlichting, an Oaklawn student, expressed her concern for the elimination of the art and music rooms. Hannah Sherman, an Oaklawn student, expressed her concern for the elimination of the art and music rooms. Chris Richards, 346 W. 17th Ave., invited everyone to Smith School on May 8 to help celebrate Smith’s 115 year anniversary. There will be an open house from 8-11 with self-guided tours. Lauren Christy, a student at Smith, invited the board to join in at one or more spring activities including Movie Night this Friday in the gym, the 7th annual brat fry at Pick n Save South, a Smith rummage sale on May 8, and the 5th grade farewell on June 9 at 8:30 a.m. in the gym. AGENDA RELATED PUBLIC FORUM: Tom Sonnleitner, Vice-Chancellor at UW-O, 2944 Pine Ridge Rd., addressed the resolution regarding the sale of Lincoln School. The university has been working on this over the last 6 months since the district put the property up for sale. Each year the University undergoes a master planning process to look at university needs and tries to identify what types of facilities they need to work with. Lincoln School could solve several critical needs that UW-O has. This is a real estate transaction that has reached the 11th hour and he asked that the board move through with the resolution. The funding has been identified and will only be available for a short period of time.


April 28, 2010 Page 2 of 4

BOARD/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS Interim Superintendent Dr. Bette Lang: - North High School sponsored multi-cultural week - Youth leadership Oshkosh classes graduated. - South Park students were recognized by Downtown Rotary PAL - Franklin raised $1554.70 to donate to the Red Cross for Haiti earthquake victims - South Park received a $5,000 donation in honor of Mildred Marx Maclean - Washington received a donation to purchase new books for the 1st grade class - Webster Stanley and Washington received a renewal of the 21st Century After School grants - DPI proclaimed May 3-7 as School Nutrition Employee Week The Policy Governance Committee met on April 14 and 19 to discuss the rule for filling board vacancies and policies concerning student attendance and release time for religious instruction. On April 19 policies discussed were dropping/adding courses as well as various policies and rules regarding live animals on school property as well as service and companion animals. Policy revisions will move forward to the Board on May 12. CONSENT RESOLUTION AGENDA For the consent agenda, the board has been furnished with background material on each item or has discussed it at a previous meeting. These will be acted upon with one vote without discussion. If a board member wants to discuss any item, it will be pulled out of the consent agenda and will be voted on separately. 1. (A) Minutes of the April 12, 2010 Special Board Meeting 1. (B) Minutes of the April 12, 2010 Executive Session 2. Minutes of the April 14, 2010 Regular Board Meeting 3. Minutes of the April 14, 2010 Executive Session 4. Minutes of the April 15, 2010 Executive Session 5. Schedule of vouchers payable filed with the secretary of the Board in the amount of $3,321,771.56 for the Board of Education and $5,483.12 for the recreation department for a total of $3,327,254.68. 6. (A)BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the temporary appointments, co-curricular appointments, change of assignment, temporary increase in assignment, resignations, retirements, and salary schedule as filed with the Secretary of the Board of Education April 28, 2010, in accordance with the Rules, Regulations, and Policies of the Board of Education. 11. BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education accept the bid of Schenck SC, Green Bay, Wisconsin, for the audit of the financial records of the district for the fiscal years ending June 30, 2010, 2011, and 2012 as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education in accordance with the Rules, Regulations, and Policies of the Board of Education. Moved by McDermott, seconded by Wiedenhoeft to approve the consent resolution. Unanimous upon roll call. INDIVIDUALLY CONSIDERED RESOLUTION(S) Resolution #7 Moved: McDermott Second: Dedow BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the McKinstry change order for the Building Automation System Upgrade Project in the amount of $525,00.00 (Guaranteed Maximum Price), as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education in accordance with the Rules, Regulations and Policies of the Board of Education. Motion by Loewenstein, second by Dedow to postpone the resolution to May 12. Voting “YES” Eliasen, Loewenstein Voting “NO” Dedow, Lemberger, McDermott, Schneider, Wiedenhoeft The motion failed. Voting on original resolution: Unanimous upon roll call. The resolution was adopted.


April 28, 2010 Page 3 of 4

Resolution #8 Moved: McDermott Second: Wiedenhoeft BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the Instructional Materials and Student Fee Schedule for 2010-11 school year as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education. Voting “YES” Dedow, Eliasen, Loewenstein, Lemberger, McDermott, Wiedenhoeft Voting “NO” Schneider The resolution was adopted. Resolution #9 Moved: McDermott Second: Dedow BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approves the three-Year (2010-2013) Combined Information and Technology Plan as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education. Unanimous upon roll call. The resolution was adopted. Resolution #10 Moved: McDermott Second: Loewenstein BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education authorize administration to prepare requests for proposals (RFP), based on the National Science Teaching Association (NSTA) standards, for a K-12 science curriculum audit to be conducted during the 2010-2011 school year as filed with the secretary of the Board of Education on April 28, 2010, in accordance with the Rules, Regulations, and Policies of the Board of Education. Motion by Wiedenhoeft, second by Dedow to refer motion to the Policy Governance Committee. Unanimous upon roll call. The motion was carried. Resolution #12 Moved: McDermott Second: Wiedenhoeft BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the sale of Lincoln School located at 608 Algoma Boulevard, Oshkosh, for $1,480,000 (One Million Four Hundred Eighty Thousand Dollars). BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that Randy Johnston, Director of Buildings and Grounds is hereby authorized to execute all necessary documents related to the sale of property as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education in accordance with the Rules, Regulations and Policies of the Board of Education. Signed this 28th day of April, 2010 Board President Board Clerk Motion by Dedow, second by Eliasen to postpone the resolution to May 26. Voting “NO” Dedow, Eliasen, Loewenstein, Lemberger, McDermott, Schneider, Wiedenhoeft The motion was defeated. Voting on original resolution: “YES” Dedow, Eliasen, Loewenstein, McDermott, Wiedenhoeft “NO” Lemberger, Schneider The resolution was adopted. President Lemberger asked for a short recess. The meeting resumed at 8:28 p.m. REQUEST FOR FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS/ANNOUNCEMENTS Mr. Dedow requested a workshop on Oaklawn to explore different options (short term and long term) and to discuss the potential shifting of students during a construction phase. The workshop would also include a plan for the use of the Lincoln School proceeds. Mr. Schneider also expressed his agreement to the workshop.


April 28, 2010 Page 4 of 4

ROLL CALL - ADJOURN TO EXECUTIVE SESSION Moved by McDermott and seconded by Wiedenhoeft to adjourn to executive session to: 1 Deliberate or negotiate the purchase of public properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other specified public business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed session §19.85(1)(e) A. B. C. D. E. F.

Non-Teaching Employees Association – Food Service Unit (NTEA-FSU) Negotiation Strategies Oshkosh Education Association (OEA) Negotiation Strategies Oshkosh Paraprofessional Education Association (OPEA) Negotiation Strategies Non-Teaching Employees Association (NTEA) Negotiation Strategies International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Negotiation Strategies Discussion regarding the purchase of property adjacent to 112 Viola Avenue Site

Unanimous upon roll call. The meeting adjourned into closed session at 8:34 p.m. Respectfully submitted,

Teresa Collins Teresa Collins Secretary


MEMORANDUM

TO:

Board of Education

FROM:

John Sprangers

RE:

Personnel Resolution – Removal from Layoff

DATE:

May 12, 2010

As a result of 26 retirements and 3 resignations, we are able to remove several staff members from the layoff list. There are still 17 staff members remaining on layoff who were active this year, along with several who were not active this year but who retain recall rights. It is our hope that some of those staff members will also be removed from the layoff list as other resignations and retirements are obtained or staffing needs come into full clarity. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.


May 12, 2010 RESOLUTION # 5(A) CARRIED_______

LOST_______ WITHDRAWN_______ LAID OVER_______

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the appointments, temporary appointments, increase in assignment, change of assignments, temporary reduction in assignments, co-curricular appointments, resignations, retirements, and salary schedule as filed with the Secretary of the Board of Education May 12, 2010, in accordance with the Rules, Regulations, and Policies of the Board of Education. INCREASE IN ASSIGNMENT Michelle Robl, .6 Spanish to 1.0 Spanish (.65 Carl Traeger Middle School and .35 Merrill Middle School/ALPS), effective for the 2010-11 school year. TEMPORARY REDUCTION IN ASSIGNMENTS Tara Feiter, 1.0 to .87 German Teacher (.47 South Park Middle School and .40 Merrill Middle School), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Christine Koslowski, 1.0 to .6 Math Teacher, Oshkosh North High School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Timothy O’Loughlin, 1.0 to .9 Art Teacher (.7 Read Elementary School and .2 Second Chance), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Vicki Porior, 1.0 to .75 Professional Development/GT Teacher, Carl Traeger Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. CHANGE OF ASSIGNMENTS Emily Bauer, 1.0 Band Teacher (South Park and Webster Stanley Middle School), to 1.0 Band Teacher, South Park Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. William Counts, 1.0 Grade 4 Teacher, Read Elementary School, to 1.0 Literacy/Social Studies Teacher, Perry Tipler Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Jeffrey Erdmann, 1.0 4K Teacher, Peace Lutheran, to 1.0 Literacy/Social Studies Teacher, Perry Tipler Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Kay Peikert, 1.0 German Teacher, Oshkosh North and Oshkosh West High Schools, to 1.0 Grade 4 Teacher, Webster Stanley Elementary School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Arlene Stanek, 1.0 Spanish Teacher (Perry Tipler Middle School and Carl Traeger Middle School), to 1.0 Spanish Teacher (Perry Tipler Middle School and Oshkosh North High School), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Sarah Warren, 1.0 Grade 3 Teacher, Webster Stanley Elementary School, to 1.0 Literacy Teacher, Webster Stanley Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year.


REMOVAL FROM LAYOFF LIST Michelle Burkard, 1.0 Unassigned, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Tracy Frevert, 1.0 Grade 3 Teacher, Washington Elementary School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Melanie Jungwirth, .8 Family Consumer Science Teacher, Carl Traeger Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Joshua Loppnow, .6 Art Teacher (.3 Oshkosh North High School and .3 Oshkosh West High School), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Kristin Machkovech, 1.0 Choral Teacher, Perry Tipler Middle School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Jennifer Moderson, 1.0 Unassigned, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Debra Nelson, 1.0 Family Consumer Science Teacher, Unassigned, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Pam O’Loughlin, 1.0 Art Teacher (.8 Oakwood Elementary School, .2 Green Meadow Elementary School), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Holly Pershing, 1.0 Science Teacher (.8 Merrill Middle School, .2 Oshkosh West High School), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Catherine Senso, 1.0 Professional Development/Math Title I/G-T Teacher, Roosevelt and Lakeside Elementary School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Arthur Shipley, 1.0 Orchestra Teacher (.4 Perry Tipler Middle School, .6 Elementary Strings Program), effective for the 2010-11 school year. Craig VanCamp, 1.0 Math Teacher, Oshkosh West High School, effective for the 2010-11 school year. Paul VandenBoogaard, 1.0 Physical Education Teacher, Unassigned, effective for the 2010-11 school year. CO-CURRICULAR APPOINTMENTS Tara Eastman, Asst. Softball Coach, Oshkosh West High School, effective for the 2009-10 season. Andrew Grill, Student Council Advisor (.5), Webster Stanley Middle School, effective for the 2009-10 school year. Jenny Reinke, Student Council Advisor (.5), Merrill Middle School, effective for the 2009-10 school year. RESIGNATIONS Wen Ding, Chinese and ESL Teacher, Oshkosh West and Oshkosh North High Schools, effective at the end of the 2009-10 school year. Bette Lang, Interim Superintendent, effective June 18, 2010.


Trisha Neveau, Asst. Volleyball Coach, Oshkosh West High School, effective immediately.

RETIREMENTS Shari Hart, Autism Consultant, Carl Traeger Elementary School, effective June 10, 2010. Kathleen Jung, Grade 3 Teacher, Washington Elementary School, effective June 10, 2010. Colleen Lambrecht, Speech and Language Pathologist, Read and Lakeside Elementary School, effective July 31, 2010. Nancy Stroh, Family & Consumer Science Teacher and Department Chair, Oshkosh West and Oshkosh North High Schools, effective June 10, 2010. NON-TEACHING APPOINTMENT Cheryl Wirtz, 1.0 Executive Assistant to Superintendent, Central Office, effective May 17, 2010. TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS Lisa Albrecht, .75 1-on-1 SLD Teacher Assistant, Read Elementary School, effective April 26, 2010, for the balance of the 2009-10 school year. Jean Framke, .45 1-on-1 Early Childhood Teacher Assistant (4-year old), Webster Stanley Elementary School, effective May 4, 2010, for the balance of the 2009-10 school year. Jennifer Merten, .8 Early Childhood Teacher Assistant (4-year old), Webster Stanley Elementary School, effective April 26, 2010, for the balance of the 2009-10 school year. Susan McIlraith, .45 CDMS Teacher Assistant, Merrill Middle School, effective April 26, 2010, for the balance of the 2009-10 school year. CHANGE OF ASSIGNMENT Lisa Fox, .3 Building Assistant, to Temporary 1.0 1-on-1 EBD Teacher Assistant, Washington Elementary School, effective May 6, 2010, for the balance of the 2009-10 school year. RESIGNATION Lucas Everett, .7 Supervisory Teacher Assistant, Webster Stanley Middle School, effective May 26, 2010. RETIREMENT Jini Mortensen, Secretary, Read Elementary School, effective June 16, 2010.


PERSONNEL RESOLUTION #5 (A) –May 12, 2010 SCHOOL

NAME

West H.S.

Tara Eastman Asst. Softball Coach Andrew Grill Student Council Advisor (.5) Jenny Reinke Student Council Advisor (.5) Cheryl Wirtz Executive Asst. to Superintendent Lisa Albrecht .75 SLD 1-on-1 Teacher Asst. Jean Framke .45 1-on-1 EC Teacher Asst. Jennifer Merten .8 EC Teacher Asst. Susan McIlraith .45 CDMS Teacher Asst.

Webster M.S. Merrill M.S. Central Read Webster El. Webster El. Merrill M.S.

UNIVERSITY

Degree

YRS. OUT

YRS. LOCAL

STEP

BASE

ACTUAL

EFF. DATE

$2,232.93

$2,232.93

2009-10 season

$801.95

$400.98

2009-10 school year

$801.95

$400.98

2009-10 school year

$2981/mo.

$2981/mo.

5/17/10

$11.73/hr.

$11.73/hr.

4/26/10

$11.73/hr.

$11.73/hr.

5/4/10

$11.73/hr.

$11.73/hr.

4/26/10

$11.73/hr.

$11.73/hr.

4/26/10

TEMP TEMP TEMP TEMP


May 12, 2010

RESOLUTION #6

CARRIED _______ LOST _______ WITHDRAWN _______ LAID OVER _______

RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE AND AWARDING THE SALE OF $6,685,000 TAXABLE GENERAL OBLIGATION REFUNDING BONDS; PROVIDING THE FORM OF THE BONDS; AND LEVYING A TAX IN CONNECTION THEREWITH WHEREAS, it is necessary that funds be raised by the Oshkosh Area School District, Winnebago County, Wisconsin (the “District”) for the purpose of paying the cost of refinancing certain of its outstanding obligations, to wit: the District’s $5,000,000 State Trust Fund Loan, dated January 27, 2004 and the District’s $3,880,000 State Trust Fund Loan, dated March 14, 2004 (the “State Trust Fund Loans” or the “Prior Issue”) (hereinafter the refinancing of the District’s outstanding obligations shall be referred to as the “Refunding”), and there are insufficient funds on hand to pay said costs; WHEREAS, the proceeds of the State Trust Fund Loans were used for the purpose of paying the cost of the District’s unfunded prior service liability owed to the Wisconsin Retirement System; WHEREAS, the District’s governing body hereby deems it to be necessary, desirable and in the best interest of the District to refund the Prior Issue for the purpose of interest cost savings and debt restructuring; and, WHEREAS, the District is authorized by the provisions of Chapter 67 of the Wisconsin Statutes to issue general obligation refunding bonds to refinance its outstanding obligations. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the governing body of the District that: V. Authorization of the Bonds. For the purpose of paying the cost of the Refunding, there shall be borrowed pursuant to Chapter 67 of the Wisconsin Statutes, the principal sum of not to exceed SIX MILLION SIX HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($6,685,000) from Hutchinson, Shockey, Erley & Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin (the “Purchaser”), in accordance with the terms and conditions of its purchase proposal attached hereto as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by this reference. VI. Sale of the Bonds. To evidence such indebtedness, the President and Clerk are hereby authorized, empowered and directed to make, execute, issue and sell to the Purchaser for, on behalf of and in the name of the District, taxable general obligation refunding bonds aggregating the principal amount of SIX MILLION SIX HUNDRED EIGHTY-FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS ($6,685,000) (the “Bonds”), for the sum of ______________________ _________________________________________________ DOLLARS ($_________), plus accrued interest to the date of delivery. VII. Terms of the Bonds. The Bonds shall be designated “Taxable General Obligation Refunding Bonds”; shall be dated June 1, 2010; shall be in the denomination of $5,000 or any integral multiple thereof; shall be numbered 1 and upward; and shall mature serially on March 1 of each year, in the years and principal amounts as follows:


Year of Maturity

Principal Amount

2012 2013 2014 2015 2016

$1,290,000 1,320,000 1,365,000 1,415,000 1,295,000

Interest Rate _.___% _.___ _.___ _.___ _.___

Interest is payable commencing on March 1, 2011 and semi-annually thereafter on September 1 and March 1 of each year. VIII. Designation of Purchaser as Agent. The District hereby designates the Purchaser as its agent for purposes of distributing the Final Official Statement relating to the Bonds to any participating underwriter in compliance with Rule 15c2-12 of the Securities and Exchange Commission to the extent applicable. IX.

Redemption Provisions. The Bonds shall not be subject to redemption prior to maturity.

X. Direct Annual Irrepealable Tax Levy. For the purpose of paying the principal of and interest on the Bonds as the same becomes due, the full faith, credit and resources of the District are hereby irrevocably pledged and a direct annual irrepealable tax sufficient for that purpose is hereby levied upon all taxable property of the District. Said direct annual irrepealable tax shall be levied in the years and in the amounts as follows:

Levy Year 2010 2011 2012

Amount

Levy Year

Amount

$_______.__ _______.__ _______.__

2013 2014 2015

$_______.__ _______.__ _______.__

The direct annual irrepealable tax hereby levied shall be collected in addition to all other taxes and in the same manner and at the same time as other taxes of the District levied in said years are collected. So long as any part of the principal of or interest on the Bonds remains unpaid, the tax hereinabove levied shall be and continues irrepealable except that the amount of tax carried onto the tax roll may be reduced in any year by the amount of any surplus in the Debt Service Fund Account created by Section 8 hereof. XI. Form of the Bonds. The Bonds shall be issued in registered form and shall be executed and delivered in substantially the form attached hereto as Exhibit B and incorporated herein by this reference. XII. Debt Service Fund Account. There is hereby established a fund account separate and distinct from every other fund or account of the District to be designated “Debt Service Fund Account for $6,685,000 Taxable General Obligation Refunding Bonds, dated June 1, 2010”. There shall be deposited in said fund account any premium plus accrued interest paid on the Bonds at the time of delivery to the Purchaser, all money raised by taxation pursuant to Section 6 hereof and all other sums as may be necessary to pay interest on the Bonds when the same shall become due and to retire the Bonds at their respective maturity dates. Said fund account shall be used for the sole purpose of paying the principal of and interest on the Bonds and shall be maintained for such purpose until such indebtedness is fully paid or otherwise extinguished. XIII. Borrowed Money Fund. The whole proceeds of the Bonds (the “Bond Proceeds”) herein provided for (other than any premium and accrued interest which must be paid at the time of delivery of


the Bonds into the Debt Service Fund Account created in Section 8 hereof) shall be segregated in a special fund upon receipt and shall be used solely for the purposes for which borrowed or for the payment of the principal of and interest on the Bonds. XIV. Persons Treated as Owners; Transfer of Bonds. The District Clerk or Treasurer shall keep books for the registration and for the transfer of the Bonds. The person in whose name any Bond shall be registered shall be deemed and regarded as the absolute owner thereof for all purposes and payment of either principal or interest on any Bond shall be made only to the registered owner thereof. All such payments shall be valid and effectual to satisfy and discharge the liability upon such Bond to the extent of the sum or sums so paid.

Any Bond may be transferred by the registered owner thereof by surrender of the Bond at the office of the District Clerk or Treasurer, duly endorsed for the transfer or accompanied by an assignment duly executed by the registered owner or his attorney duly authorized in writing. Upon such transfer, the District Clerk or Treasurer shall deliver in the name of the transferee or transferees a new Bond or Bonds of a like aggregate principal amount, series and maturity and the District Clerk or Treasurer shall record the name of each transferee in the registration book. No registration shall be made to bearer. The District Clerk or Treasurer shall cancel any Bond surrendered for transfer. The District shall cooperate in any such transfer, and the District President and Clerk are authorized to execute any new Bond or Bonds necessary to effect any such transfer. The fifteenth day of each calendar month next preceding each interest payment date shall be the record date for the Bonds. Payment of interest on the Bonds on any interest payment date shall be made to the registered owners of the Bonds as they appear on the registration book of the District at the close of business on the corresponding record date. XV. Utilization of The Depository Trust Company Book-Entry-Only-System. In order to make the Bonds eligible for the services provided by The Depository Trust Company, New York, New York ("DTC"), the District has heretofore agreed to the applicable provisions set forth in the DTC Blanket District Letter of Representation and a representative of the District has executed such Letter of Representation and delivered it to the DTC on behalf of the District. XVI. Execution of the Bonds. The Bonds shall be issued in typewritten form, one Bond for each maturity, executed on behalf of the District by the manual or facsimile signatures of the District President and Clerk (except that one of the foregoing signatures shall be manual), sealed with its official or corporate seal, if any, and delivered to the Purchaser upon payment to the District of the purchase price thereof, plus accrued interest to the date of delivery. In the event that either of the officers whose signatures appear on the Bonds shall cease to be such officers before the delivery of the Bonds, such signatures shall, nevertheless, be valid and sufficient for all purposes to the same extent as if they had remained in office until such delivery. The aforesaid officers are hereby authorized to do all acts and execute and deliver all documents as may be necessary and convenient to effectuate the Closing. XVII. Payment of the Bonds. The principal of and interest on the Bonds shall be paid by the District Treasurer or his or her agent in lawful money of the United States. XVIII. Continuing Disclosure. The District hereby covenants and agrees that it will comply with and carry out all of the provisions of its Continuing Disclosure Certificate, which the District Clerk will execute and deliver on the Closing Date. Any Bondholder may take such actions as may be necessary and appropriate, including seeking mandate or specific performance by court order, to cause the District to comply with its obligations under this Section. XIX. Repayment of the State Trust Fund Loans. The District hereby determines to repay the State Trust Fund Loans in accordance with their terms. The District hereby directs the District Clerk to cause appropriate notice to be given in order to repay the State Trust Fund Loans as provided above.


XX. Conflicting Resolutions; Severability; Effective Date. All prior resolutions, rules or other actions of the District or any parts thereof in conflict with the provisions hereof shall be and the same are hereby rescinded insofar as they may so conflict. In the event that any one or more provisions hereof shall for any reason be held to be illegal or invalid, such illegality or invalidity shall not affect any other provisions hereof. The foregoing shall take effect immediately upon adoption and approval in the manner provided by law.

Adopted this 12th day of May, 2010.

District President ATTEST:

District Clerk 4900688_1


EXHIBIT B UNITED STATES OF AMERICA STATE OF WISCONSIN OSHKOSH AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT WINNEBAGO COUNTY, WISCONSIN REGISTERED TAXABLE GENERAL OBLIGATION REFUNDING BOND NO. R-__ MATURITY DATE: ORIGINAL DATE OF ISSUE: MARCH 1, 20__

INTEREST RATE:

CUSIP:

_.___%

687908____

JUNE 1, 2010

DEPOSITORY OR ITS NOMINEE NAME: CEDE & CO. PRINCIPAL AMOUNT:

________________________________________ DOLLARS ($_______)

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS, that the Oshkosh Area School District, Winnebago County, Wisconsin (the “Issuer”), hereby acknowledges itself to owe and for value received promises to pay to the Depository or its Nominee Name (the “Depository”) identified above (or to registered assigns), on the maturity date identified above, the principal amount identified above, and to pay interest thereon at the rate of interest per annum identified above. Interest is payable commencing on March 1, 2011 and semi-annually thereafter on September 1 and March 1 of each year until the aforesaid principal amount is paid in full. Both the principal of and interest on this Bond are payable in lawful money of the United States. The principal of this Bond shall be payable only upon presentation and surrender of the Bond at the office of the Issuer’s Treasurer. Interest payable on any interest payment date shall be paid by wire transfer to the Depository in whose name this Bond is registered on the Bond Register maintained by the Issuer’s Clerk or Treasurer at the close of business on the 15th day of the calendar month next preceding the semi-annual interest payment date (the “Record Date”). For the prompt payment of this Bond together with interest hereon as aforesaid and for the levy of taxes sufficient for that purpose, the full faith, credit and resources of the Issuer are hereby irrevocably pledged. This Bond is one of an issue of Bonds aggregating the principal amount of $6,685,000, all of which are of like tenor, except as to denomination, interest rate and maturity date, issued by the Issuer pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 67, Wisconsin Statutes for the purpose of paying the cost of refinancing certain of its outstanding obligations, to wit: the Issuer’s $5,000,000 State Trust Fund Loan, dated January 27, 2004 and the Issuer’s $3,880,000 State Trust Fund Loan, dated March 14, 2004, all as authorized by a resolution of the Issuer’s governing body duly adopted by said governing body at a regular meeting held on May 12, 2010. Said resolution is recorded in the official minutes of said governing body for said date.


The Bonds are non-callable. It is hereby certified and recited that all conditions, things and acts required by law to exist or to be done prior to and in connection with the issuance of this Bond have been done, have existed and have been performed in due form and time; that the aggregate indebtedness of the Issuer, including this Bond and others issued simultaneously herewith, does not exceed any limitation imposed by law or the Constitution of the State of Wisconsin; and that a direct annual irrepealable tax has been levied sufficient to pay this Bond, together with the interest thereon, when and as payable. This Bond is transferable only upon the books of the Issuer kept for that purpose at the office of the Issuer’s Clerk or Treasurer. In the event that the Depository does not continue to act as depository for the Bonds, and the Issuer appoints another depository, new fully registered Bonds in the same aggregate principal amount shall be issued to the new depository upon surrender of the Bonds to the Issuer’s Clerk or Treasurer, in exchange therefor and upon the payment of a charge sufficient to reimburse the Issuer for any tax, fee or other governmental charge required to be paid with respect to such registration. The Issuer’s Clerk or Treasurer shall not be obliged to make any transfer of the Bonds after the Record Date. The Issuer may treat and consider the Depository in whose name this Bond is registered as the absolute owner hereof for the purpose of receiving payment of, or on account of, the principal or redemption price hereof and interest due hereon and for all other purposes whatsoever. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Oshkosh Area School District, Winnebago County, Wisconsin, by its governing body, has caused this Bond to be executed for it and in its name by the signatures of its duly qualified President and Clerk, all as of the 1st day of June, 2010. OSHKOSH AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT WINNEBAGO COUNTY, WISCONSIN By: _________________, District President By: _________________, District Clerk

2


ASSIGNMENT FOR VALUE RECEIVED, the undersigned sells, assigns and transfers unto

(Name and Address of Assignee) (Social Security or other Identifying Number of Assignee) the within Bond and all rights thereunder and hereby irrevocably constitutes and appoints , Legal Representative, to transfer said Bond on the books kept for registration thereof, with full power of substitution in the premises. Dated: Signature Guaranteed:

(e.g. Bank, Trust Company or Securities Firm)

(Depository or its Nominee Name)

NOTICE: The above-named Depository or its Nominee Name must correspond with the name as it appears upon the face of the within Bond in every particular, without alteration or enlargement or any change whatever.

(Authorized Officer)

4902297_1

3


May 12, 2010

RESOLUTION #7

CARRIED _______

LOST ________

WITHDRAWN ________

LAID OVER ________

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve revisions to Policy 453.9 – Live Animals on School Property as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education.


Board Meeting Date: May 12, 2010 Agenda Item: Resolution #7

STAFF REPORT - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Also to be used with resolution going directly to the Board)

SUBJECT: Revision of OASD Policy 453.90 Live Animals on School Property Presenter: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration I.

Overall Content/Purpose of Presentation: The overall purpose of this report is to provide the board with background information regarding the revision of the policy related to the presence of live animals on school property.

II.

Board Motion Needed (if any) A board motion will be necessary to approve the revision of policy 453.9 Live Animals on School Property Policy.

III.

Major Points in this Report: A. The policy has been revised to reflect the current language used by the Americans with Disabilities Act regarding references made to individuals with disabilities and their service animals as well as service animal trainers. B. The policy has been revised to reflect legislation at the federal and state levels, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004, Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 as well as Wisconsin Statutes. C. The reference to the City of Oshkosh Ordinances has been eliminated as the ordinance in code does not make any reference to the exclusion of animals on school property. The reference to exclusion of animals on school property was posted in error on the city’s website.

IV.

Impact on District Goals: Strategic Aim #1: OASD will target student programs & services to the skills young people will need to succeed in a changing world. Strategic Aim #2: OASD will align human and financial resources to meet student program and service needs. Strategic Aim #3: OASD will continue to promote partnerships to improve student learning.

Budget/Financial Impact No additional district funding would be requested to implement this policy.


Does Board of Education action require an addition, deletion or change to policies?  Yes  No If Yes, what action is needed?

VI.

The policy revisions must be approved by resolution.

Primary Contact(s) for More Information: Name: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration 0296

Phone: 920-424-


453.9 Page 1 of 2

LIVE ANIMALS ON SCHOOL PROPERTY

The OASD will allow live animals to be brought on school property only for educational purposes, and only under conditions which ensure the health and safety of children, staff, and the well-being of the animal. Persons bringing live animals into the school must receive prior written permission from the building principal and follow the approved rules, and provide the original copy of Exhibit A attached to the rule. This policy does not pertain to those individuals who are provided with service animals apply to a person with a disability or to a service animal trainer if the person with a disability or the trainer is accompanied by a service animal as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act. This policy does not pertain to animals under the control of public safety officials for educational, public relations or law enforcement purposes. This policy does pertain to OASD employees who train service or companion animals. The guidelines here established are to assist staff and inform families of the district’s expectations when acceptable animals are brought on school property and include necessary precautions to insure health and safety. LEGAL REFERENCE:

Wisconsin Statutes 95.195, Sections 6-6, 6-7, 6-13 1 95.21 (c) (f) 106.52 (3) am 111.1 252.21 254.56 PI 8.01 (2) (c) Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 City of Oshkosh Ordinances 951.14, 951.15, 951.16

CROSS-REFERENCE:

Wisconsin Statute 29.614 453.9-R, Guidelines for Having Animals on School Property Exhibit A 453.9; Exhibit B 453.9; Exhibit C 453.9 453.91, Student or Staff Use of Service and Companion Animals 453.92, Accommodation of Staff Service Animal Trainers and Dogs on School Grounds

Adopted: September 9, 1998; May 28, 2008; July 23, 2008; December 17, 2008; May, 2010 OSHKOSH AREA SCHOOL DISTRICT Oshkosh, Wisconsin


May 12, 2010

RESOLUTION #8

CARRIED _______

LOST ________

WITHDRAWN ________

LAID OVER ________

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve revisions to Policy 453.91 – Student or Staff Use of Service and Companion Animals as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education.


Board Meeting Date: May 12, 2010 Agenda Item: Resolution #8

STAFF REPORT - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Also to be used with resolution going directly to the Board)

SUBJECT: Revision of OASD Policy 453.91 Student or Staff Use of Service and Companion Animals Presenter: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration I.

Overall Content/Purpose of Presentation: The overall purpose of this report is to provide the board with background information regarding the revision of the policy related to the accommodation of a service or companion animal for students or staff.

II.

Board Motion Needed (if any) A board motion will be necessary to approve the revision of policy 453.91 Service and Companion Animals Policy.

III.

Major Points in this Report: A. The policy has been revised to reflect current language used by the Americans with Disabilities Act regarding the district’s legal responsibilities when managing requests for service and companion animal accommodations, including provisions of language in the Individual Education Plan (IEP) of a student with disabilities. B. The policy has been revised to provide the precise language that can be legally used by school staff when querying visitors who are on school grounds accompanied by a service or companion animal. C. The policy has been revised to reflect current legislation at the federal and state levels, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004, Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 as well as Wisconsin Statutes. D. The policy has been revised to include national standards for administrators to consider when determining the approval of a service or companion animal. E. The reference to the City of Oshkosh Ordinances has been eliminated as the ordinance in code does not make any reference to the exclusion of animals on school property. The reference to exclusion of animals on school property was posted in error on the city’s website.


IV.

Impact on District Goals: Strategic Aim #1: OASD will target student programs & services to the skills young people will need to succeed in a changing world. Strategic Aim #2: OASD will align human and financial resources to meet student program and service needs. Strategic Aim #3: OASD will continue to promote partnerships to improve student learning.

Budget/Financial Impact No additional district funding would be requested to implement this policy.

Does Board of Education action require an addition, deletion or change to policies? ďƒž Yes  No If Yes, what action is needed?

VI.

The policy revisions must be approved by resolution.

Primary Contact(s) for More Information: Name: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration

Phone:920-424-0296


453.91 Page 1 of 2

STUDENT OR STAFF USE OF SERVICE AND COMPANION ANIMALS Service animals may be permitted on district property as an accommodation to individuals with disabilities. The board of education recognizes the obligation to comply with applicable laws and to provide direction to district staff when managing requests for service and companion animal accommodations. In making such accommodations, the district will comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004, Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act, The Americans with Disabilities Act and any other applicable laws. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. If they meet this definition, animals are considered service animals under the ADA regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government. Animals trained or being trained to assist individuals with disabilities will be allowed in school buildings and on school grounds provided the health, safety and welfare of the students, staff, and the animal are not compromised. Service Animals for Students and Staff The district may shall permit students or staff to use service animals in district facilities and at school events under the following circumstances: 1. The student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) or the staff member provides evidence of the educational, medical or workrelated necessity of the service for the student or staff member; 2. The student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) or the staff member provides evidence of the animal’s certification or appropriate evidence of the animal’s training to provide the required assistance; and 3. The student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) or staff member provides certification that all required animal immunizations are current. Service Animals for Visitors The district shall permit visitors to use service animals in district facilities and at school events and make reasonable accommodations for a disabled person’s use of a service dog on school property. The site administrator/designee will ask the following questions: 1. Is that animal a service animal? 2. If it is a service animal, is it trained? 3. What tasks is the service animal trained to do? If the animal is not a service animal, the site administrator/designee should inform the visitor of the board of education policy 453.90 regarding animals on the school grounds. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) defines a service animal as any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to provide assistance to an individual with a disability. If they meet this definition, animals are considered service animals under the ADA regardless of whether they have been licensed or certified by a state or local government. The district will comply with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004, Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act, and any other applicable laws in implementing this policy, including but not limited to laws regarding the training of animals. The district shall apply the provisions of Board Policy 453.9 and its rules to in makeing a determination on as to whether the animal will have an adverse impact on a student(s) and or a staff member(s). Companion Animal Approval Process If parent(s)/guardian(s) believe their child requires the assistance of a companion animal to effectively participate in the educational programs of the district, the parent(s)/guardian(s) shall provide, if requested: A. A physician’s written confirmation of the necessity of the animal; B. A veterinarian’s written confirmation of the animal’s appropriate immunizations; and C. A copy of the animal’s certification. The parent(s)/guardian(s) shall meet with the Director of Pupil Services or, if the child is a child with a disability, the child’s IEP Team or Section 504 Team, to identify other conditions under which the companion animal may be present in the classroom. These conditions shall be documented in the child’s IEP. If approved, a written copy of the initial approval, Adopted: December 17, 2008 Oshkosh Area School District Oshkosh, WI


including the timelines for review of the decision shall be given to the parent(s)/guardian(s) and to each of the student’s teachers. The Director of Pupil Services, or if the child is a child with a disability, the child’s IEP Team or Section 504 Team, shall periodically review the impact of the animal on the student’s academic performance and/or behavior. A sStaff members who requires the assistance of a companion animal in order to perform their job-related responsibilities shall make their request to the Executive Director of Human Resources. The conditions for the Companion Animal Approval Process will also be followed to ensure that there will be no adverse impacts on students and staff in the workplace setting. The district shall apply the provisions of Board Policy 453.9 and its rules in making a determination as to whether the animal will have an adverse impact on a student(s) or a staff member(s). The companion animal must, at all times, wear a leash, training collar, harness, back-pack with harness underneath, or special cape. The logo of said business incorporated to train the companion animals must be visible on a leash, backpack, harness, or special cape. Companion animals may, with administrative approval, be permitted at after school and evening cocurricular and extra-curricular events. Any purported service or companion animal that is being brought into a school setting will have sufficient training to behave appropriately in public and be handled appropriately by the owner. The Assistance Dogs International Minimum Standards for Assistance Dogs in Public” should be maintained:  Clean, well-groomed and does not have offensive odor.  Does not urinate or defecate in inappropriate locations  Does not solicit attention, visit or annoy an member of the student body or school personnel.  Does not vocalize unnecessarily, i.e. barking, growling, whining.  Shows no aggression towards people or other animals.  Does not solicit or steal food or other items from the student body or school personnel.  Must not in any other way interfere with the educational process of any student.  Must not pose a health or safety threat to any student, personnel, or other persons. The site administrator/designee will determine if the service or companion animal is approved. A challenge to the site administrator’s decision may be appealed to the superintendent/designee.

LEGAL REFERENCE:

Wisconsin Statutes 95.195, Sections 6-6, 6-7, 6-13 1 95.21 (c) (f) 106.52 (3) am 111.1 252.21 254.56 PI 8.01 (2) (c) Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 City of Oshkosh Ordinances 951.14, 951.15, 951.16

CROSS-REFERENCE:

Wisconsin Statute 29.614 Policy 453.9 Live Animals on School Property 453.9-RULE Guidelines for Having Live Animals on School Property Exhibit A, Exhibit B, Exhibit C 453.92 Training Service & Companion Animals in School

Adopted: December 17, 2008, April, 2010, May 12, 2010 Oshkosh Area School District Oshkosh, WI


May 12, 2010

RESOLUTION #9

CARRIED _______

LOST ________

WITHDRAWN ________

LAID OVER ________

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve revisions to Policy 453.92 – Accommodation of Staff Service Animals Trainers and Dogs on School Grounds as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education.


Board Meeting Date: May 12, 2010 Agenda Item: Resolution #9

STAFF REPORT - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Also to be used with resolution going directly to the Board)

SUBJECT: Revision of OASD Policy 453.92 Accommodation of Staff Service Animal Trainers and Dogs on School Grounds Presenter: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration I.

Overall Content/Purpose of Presentation: The overall purpose of this report is to provide the board with background information regarding the revision of the policy related to the accommodation of staff service animal trainers and dogs on school grounds.

II.

Board Motion Needed (if any) A board motion will be necessary to approve the revision of policy 453.92 Accommodation of Staff Service Animal Trainers and Dogs on School Grounds.

III.

Major Points in this Report: A. The policy has been revised to reflect current legislation at the federal and state levels, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004, Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 as well as Wisconsin Statutes. B. The reference to the City of Oshkosh Ordinances has been eliminated as the ordinance in code does not make any reference to the exclusion of animals on school property. The reference to exclusion of animals on school property was posted in error on the city’s website.

IV.

Impact on District Goals: Strategic Aim #1: OASD will target student programs & services to the skills young people will need to succeed in a changing world. Strategic Aim #2: OASD will align human and financial resources to meet student program and service needs. Strategic Aim #3: OASD will continue to promote partnerships to improve student learning.

Budget/Financial Impact No additional district funding would be requested to implement this policy. Does Board of Education action require an addition, deletion or change to policies?  Yes  No If Yes, what action is needed?

VI.

The policy revisions must be approved by resolution.

Primary Contact(s) for More Information: Name: Patricia Vickman, Executive Director of Administration

Phone:920-424-0296


453.92 Page 1 of 1

ACCOMMODATION OF STAFF SERVICE ANIMAL TRAINERS AND DOGS ON SCHOOL GROUNDS The board recognizes that its facilities are a resource for staff members who volunteer without compensation to train service animals for the purpose of providing support for deaf, blind, or mobility-impaired persons. Permission may be granted by the Superintendent /designee to conduct such training if the following conditions are met: 1. Submission of a completed Trainer Request Checklist. The staff member-trainer wishing to bring a dog to school as part of an approved training program, shall submit a completed Trainer Request Checklist (Exhibit A) to the site administrator. Only one dog in training per staff member per school year may be approved. 2. Adherence to all procedures required by board policy. The staff member-trainer will comply with the approval process outlined in Board Policy 453.9 regarding live animals on school property. The school staff member will further acknowledge that s/he is responsible for the safety and welfare of the students and staff, and also for the humane treatment and welfare of the dog while at school. 3. Presentation of credentials. The staff member-trainer must present to the site administrator for inspection credentials issued by a school for training service animals for the blind, deaf, or mobility-impaired, along with a summary of the trainer’s past training service experience. 4. Determination of schedule. The staff member-trainer will meet with the site administrator and staff members whose classroom or activities would be affected, to develop a plan for the training schedule. This plan shall include the length of time, day(s) and location of the training. The plan may provide for a graduated increase in the length of time and number of days of training. The schedule must be approved by the training agency taking into consideration the dog’s age, temperament, and readiness, as well as the environment into which the dog will be placed and the expertise of the trainer. 5. Identification of training dog. The dog in training is, at all times, wearing a leash, training collar, harness, back-pack with harness underneath, or special cape. The logo of said business incorporated to train the service dog must be visible on the leash, backpack, harness, or special cape. 6.

Proof of liability insurance with an indemnification provision. The staff member-trainer must produce a certification of liability insurance with a maximum coverage amount of no less than the amount recommended by the district’s liability insurance carrier and a provision indemnifying the district and its employees for any liability incurred.

If all of the above conditions are met, the Superintendent/Designee may permit the training to take place. However, the Superintendent/designee may at any time refuse to permit or to continue to permit the presence of a dog in training if it is determined that the dog would jeopardize the safe operation of a school or facility, adversely affect students and/or staff or interfere with the staff member-trainer’s job-related responsibilities. LEGAL REFERENCE:

CROSS-REFERENCE:

Wisconsin Statutes 95.195, Sections 6-6, 6-7, 6-13 City of Oshkosh Ordinances 951.14, 951.15, 951.16 95.21 (c) (f); 106.52 (3) am; 111.1; 252.21; 254.56 PI 8.01 (2) (c) Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 Individuals with Disabilities Act of 2004 Section 504 Rehabilitation Act, 1973 Wisconsin Statute 29.614

453.9-R, Guidelines for Having Live Animals on School Property Exhibit A, Exhibit B, Exhibit C 453.91 Student or Staff Use of Service & Companion Animals 453.92 Training Service & Companion Animals in School Oshkosh Area School District Adopted: December 17, 2008, May 12, 2010 Oshkosh, WI


May 12, 2010

RESOLUTION #10

CARRIED _______ LOST _______ WITHDRAWN _______ LAID OVER _______

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Oshkosh Area School District Board of Education approve the Race to the Top Memorandum of Understanding as filed with the secretary to the Board of Education on May 12, 2010 in accordance with the Rules, Regulations, and Policies of the Board of Education.


Board Meeting Date: May 12, 2010 Agenda Item: Resolution #10 STAFF REPORT - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY (Also to be used with resolution going directly to the Board) SUBJECT: Race to the Top memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Presenter(s): Bette Lang Interim Superintendent I.

II.

III.

Overall Content/Purpose of Presentation: To gain approval of the Board of Education to register the district for Race to the Top funds, to provide a placeholder for the district should the Board decide to move forward after receiving the requirements. The Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) and the State of Wisconsin are applying for Phase Two of the Race to the Top Funds. Board Motion Needed (if any) Majority of Board approve the resolution.

Major Points in this Report: A This application is for Phase Two of the Race to the Top funds. The MOU is due on May 21, 2010. B. Signing the MOU is a placeholder as the district awaits final requirements. The district may opt out prior to writing a plan of work. C. If Wisconsin receives Phase Two funding in September 2010, districts will have 90 days to submit their plan of work to confirm their involvement. D. The Oshkosh Area School District is eligible for $1, 032, 900 if the State of Wisconsin is awarded funds in Round 2 of Race to the Top.

IV.

Impact on District Goals:

Vision Statement: Our vision statement is a realistic, credible, attractive future for this District. We will be an innovative school system recognized for excellence in education. We will achieve excellence through open, interactive participation of students, staff, parents, and the community. Our students will demonstrate the skills needed to succeed in a changing world. Mission Statement: Our mission statement describes the purpose of the District. We commit ourselves to educate and inspire all students to achieve their full potential. Our students will master challenging district standards and benchmarks and develop creative and critical thinking abilities. We empower students to be lifelong learners and caring, responsible citizens of our global community. Strategic Aim #1: OASD will target student programs and services to the skills young people will need to succeed in a changing world. Strategic Aim #2: OASD will align human and financial resources to meet student program and service needs. Strategic Aim #3: OASD will continue to promote partnerships to improve student learning.


V.

Budget/Financial Impact

Costs: Salary/Benefits Other Less: New revenues or cost reductions applicable to program Net Budget Impact

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

$1, 032,900

Reviewed by District Business Office  Yes  No  Fits into budget  Does not fit into budget Explain: Race to the Top is grant funding that would be coded as revenue and offsetting expenditures.

Does Board of Education action require an addition, deletion or change to policies?

 Yes

 No

If Yes, what action is needed? ___________________________________________________________

VI.

Primary Contact for More Information: Name: Bette Lang, Interim Superintendent

Phone: 424-0428


STATE OF WISCONSIN JIM DOYLE GOVERNOR

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION TONY EVERS STATE SUPERINTENDENT

May 4, 2010 Dear School Leaders: We are writing to provide you with an update about Wisconsin’s Phase Two Race to the Top application to the federal government. As you know, through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, President Obama and Congress provided $4 billion in competitive grant funding to states that move forward with innovations and reform in education. Although Wisconsin did not receive funding from the first phase of Race to the Top awards, we remain committed to securing these competitive funds to benefit Wisconsin’s students, and will re-submit an application on June 1, 2010, under Phase Two of the competition. There is over $3 billion remaining in the Race to the Top fund, and Wisconsin’s Phase Two application will aim to secure up to $250 million of this amount. Phase Two awards will be announced in September 2010. Over the past several months, we have carefully reviewed feedback from local school leaders, educators, stakeholders, legislators and the federal government. Additionally, we have been working closely with statewide organizations that represent teachers, principals, administrators, school boards, CESAs and other key stakeholders to outline a framework for Wisconsin’s Phase Two application. While these conversations are still ongoing, we appreciate the commitment that all groups have shown in working with the state to make our application more competitive. Since we do plan to make changes to our application for Phase Two, we will be providing a revised MOU for all districts to consider prior to our application submission. We are hoping to provide this MOU to districts no later than May 6; the deadline to return signed MOUs will be May 21. To demonstrate broad commitment to the MOU, districts should seek to obtain signatures from the local superintendent, school board president, and the local teachers’ union leader or their authorized representative. At the time the MOUs are sent out, we will also conduct a webinar for local representatives to detail the content of the MOU. As a reminder, if Wisconsin receives a Race to the Top Phase Two award in September, districts will have a 90 day period to submit a workplan to confirm their involvement. We hope all of you will consider being a part of this important initiative. Please contact Jeff Pertl, Policy Initiatives Advisor at the Department of Public Instruction, by email jeff.pertl@dpi.wi.gov or by phone 608/267-9232 or Nina Carlson, Senior Policy Advisor in the Governor’s Office, by email nina.carlson@wisconsin.gov or by phone 608/266-3271 if you have any questions or concerns as we move forward with the Race to the Top opportunity. Sincerely,

Jim Doyle Governor

Tony Evers, PhD State Superintendent

JD:TE:jp State Capitol Room 115 East, Madison, Wisconsin 53702 • (608) 266-1212 • FAX (608) 267-8983 • governor@wisconsin.gov


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Memorandum of Understanding

Participating LEA Memorandum of Understanding This Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) is entered into by and between the State of Wisconsin (“State”) and _____________________________ (“Participating LEA”). The purpose of this agreement is to establish a framework of collaboration, as well as articulate specific roles and responsibilities in support of the State in its implementation of an approved Race to the Top grant project. The elements committed to in this MOU are intended to set forth the minimum requirements for participation in Race to the Top and are not intended as limitations. Participating LEAs are permitted to adopt locally developed requirements and standards in addition to those required by this MOU and any applicable Exhibit to the extent that these strategies do not conflict with federal or state law, collective bargaining agreements, or any requirement related to the Race to the Top grant program. I.

SCOPE OF WORK Exhibit I outlines the State’s proposed reform plans (“State Plan”) that the Participating LEA is agreeing to implement. Participating LEAs are authorized and encouraged to work collaboratively in consortia or with Cooperative Educational Service Agencies (CESAs) to develop and/or implement any or all requirements under Exhibit I. If the State is awarded a Race to the Top grant in this funding round, Participating LEAs will be informed of their local award and asked to complete the Final Work Plan required by the U.S. Department of Education within 90 days. The Final Work Plan must be approved by an authorized LEA representative and the State Superintendent. Acceptance of a local award binds the LEA to the conditions agreed to in the MOU and the Final Work Plan. Nothing in this Memorandum of Understanding shall be construed to alter or otherwise affect the rights, remedies, and procedures afforded school districts and school district employees under Federal, State, or local laws (including applicable regulations or court orders) or under the terms of collective bargaining agreements, memoranda of understanding, or other agreements between such employers and their employees. The signature of the Local Teachers’ Union Leader set forth below indicates support for the LEA’s decision to be a Participating LEA and a commitment to discuss any relevant provisions in good faith. However, the signature provided and the Local Teachers’ Union Leader’s indication of support does not constitute an agreement by the Local Union to reopen or otherwise modify any existing collective bargaining agreement or waive its rights and protections under the Wisconsin Municipal Employment Relations Act. Any changes to the collective bargaining agreement made pursuant to this MOU shall be implemented only upon agreement of the LEA and the Local Union. 1


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Memorandum of Understanding

II.

LEA GRANT PERIOD The project period shall be up to 48 months.

III.

PROJECT ADMINISTRATION A. PARTICIPATING LEA RESPONSIBILITIES In assisting the State in implementing the tasks and activities described in the State’s Race to the Top application, the Participating LEA subgrantee will: 1. Implement the LEA plan as identified in Exhibit I of this agreement; 2. Actively participate in all relevant convenings, communities of practice, or other practice-sharing events that are organized or sponsored by the State or by the U.S. Department of Education (“ED”); 3. Post to any website specified by the State or ED, in a timely manner, all non-proprietary products and lessons learned developed using funds associated with the Race to the Top grant; 4. Participate, as requested, in any evaluations of this grant conducted by the State or ED; 5. Be responsive to State or ED requests for information including the status of the project, project implementation, outcomes, and any problems anticipated or encountered; 6. Participate in meetings and telephone conferences with the State to discuss (a) progress of the project, (b) potential dissemination of resulting non-proprietary products and lessons learned, (c) plans for subsequent years of the Race to the Top grant period, and (d) other matters related to the Race to the Top grant and associated plans. B. STATE RESPONSIBILITIES In assisting Participating LEAs in implementing their tasks and activities described in the State’s Race to the Top application, the State grantee will: 1. Work collaboratively with, and support the Participating LEA in carrying out the LEA Plan as identified in Exhibit I of this agreement; 2. Distribute in a timely fashion the LEA’s portion of Race to the Top grant funds during the course of the project period and in accordance with the LEA Plan; 3. Provide feedback on the LEA’s status updates, annual reports, any interim reports, and project plans and products; and 4. Identify sources of technical assistance for the project. 2


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Memorandum of Understanding

C. JOINT RESPONSIBILITIES 1. The State and the Participating LEA will each appoint a key contact person for the Race to the Top grant. 2. These key contacts from the State and the Participating LEA will maintain frequent communication to facilitate cooperation under this MOU. 3. State and Participating LEA grant personnel will work together to determine appropriate timelines for project updates and status reports throughout the whole grant period. 4. State and Participating LEA grant personnel will negotiate in good faith to continue to achieve the overall goals of the State’s Race to the Top grant, even when the State Plan requires modifications that affect the Participating LEA, or when the LEA Plan requires modifications. D. STATE RECOURSE FOR LEA NON-PERFORMANCE If the State determines the Participating LEA is not meeting its goals, timelines, budget, or annual targets or is not fulfilling other applicable requirements, the State grantee will take appropriate enforcement action, which could include a collaborative process between the State and the Participating LEA, or any of the enforcement measures that are detailed in 34 CFR section 80.43 including putting the Participating LEA on reimbursement payment status, temporarily withholding funds, or disallowing costs. IV.

ASSURANCES The Participating LEA hereby certifies and represents that it: 1. Has all requisite power and authority to execute this MOU; 2. Is familiar with the State’s Race to the Top grant application and is supportive of and committed to working on all or significant portions of the State Plan; 3. Agrees to be a Participating LEA and will implement those portions of the State Plan indicated in Exhibit I, if the State application is funded; 4. Will provide a Final Work Plan to be attached to this MOU as Exhibit III only if the State’s application is funded; will do so in a timely fashion but no later than 90 days after a grant is awarded; and will describe in Exhibit III the Participating LEA’s specific goals, activities, timelines, budgets, key personnel, and annual targets for key performance measures (“LEA Plan ”) in a manner that is consistent with the Preliminary Scope of Work (Exhibits I) and with the State Plan; and 5. Will comply with all of the terms of the Grant, the State’s subgrant, and all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations, including laws and regulations applicable to the

3


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Memorandum of Understanding

Program, and the applicable provisions of EDGAR (34 CFR Parts 75, 77, 79, 80, 82, 84, 85, 86, 97, 98, and 99). V. MODIFICATIONS This Memorandum of Understanding may be amended only by written agreement signed by each of the parties involved and in consultation with ED. VI. DURATION/TERMINATION This Memorandum of Understanding shall be effective, beginning with the date of the last signature hereon and, if a grant is received, ending upon the expiration of the grant project period, or upon mutual agreement of the parties, whichever occurs first.

4


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Exhibit I

VII. Exhibit I – Requirements for all Participating LEAs Standards and Assessments • Implement a curriculum aligned to the Common Core Standards in English language arts and mathematics. • Implement the state’s next generation summative and benchmark assessment system in reading and mathematics when it becomes available Data Systems • Implement a response to intervention model that provides diagnostic and progress assessments, core instruction to all students, differentiation strategies, and interventions in reading and mathematics. • Use local and state-provided student growth data to set annual district and school achievement goals. Ensure regular principal and teacher review of local achievement data in professional learning communities or ensure cooperative planning time to continuously refine improvement strategies. • Authorize the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) to share data collected from the Participating LEA with researchers as allowed under FERPA. Great Teachers and Leaders Measuring student growth • Measure individual student growth over time using multiple measures that include formative assessments; standardized benchmark and summative tests; curriculum- and course-based assessments and individual student work (performances, projects, etc.) Teacher and principal evaluation systems • Under Wisconsin’s Quality Educator Initiative (Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34) initial educators must establish and successfully execute a professional development plan, which must be reviewed by a professional development team comprised of a teacher, an administrator and a representative of a teacher training institution (IHE) to attain professional certification. DPI-trained team members must approve the goals. • Ensure local principal and teacher evaluation systems include both formative and summative components.i • Conduct annual formative and summative evaluations for probationary teachers as determined locally by applicable collective bargaining agreements, and for probationary principals. • Conduct annual locally-determined formative evaluations, a summative evaluation in the first year, and a summative evaluation at least every third year thereafter for non-probationary teachers and principals. (Wis. Stat. § 121.02(1)(q)) 5


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Exhibit I

• Implement improvement plans, which include annual summative evaluations, professional development, and classroom observations for principals and teachers rated as “unsatisfactory.” Use evaluations to inform key decisions • Under Wisconsin’s Quality Educator Initiative (Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34) initial educators who fail to satisfactorily complete a professional development plan (PDP) within five years are denied professional certification. The PDP approval process is based on planned professional growth and evidence of the effect of that growth on student learning. • Use the results of formative evaluations to inform decision-making in the areas of coaching, induction support, and/or professional development • Optional Activities: Use the results of formative evaluation systems to inform compensation, promotion or advancement decisions. Participating LEAs may choose to implement none, some or all of these activities at their discretion and without penalty. LEAs should check the box for any item they wish to implement, or for any item already in place in the district. □ Opportunities to pursue advanced professional certifications for teachers and principals, including certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (Optional) □ Career ladders for promotion, additional compensation or advancement of teachers based on additional responsibilities and other qualifications. (Optional) □ Career ladders for promotion, additional compensation or advancement of principals based on additional responsibilities or other qualifications. (Optional) • Use the results of summative evaluation systems to inform decisions regarding nonprobationary status for teachers and principals. • Use the results of summative evaluation systems to inform non-renewal decisions. Equitable distribution of teachers and principals • Implement a district policy to ensure the equitable distribution of effective teachers and principals among schools within the LEA. 

Measurement of principals and teachers will be based on qualifications, summative evaluations and experience.



Measurement of schools will include school-level student growth, achievement and demographic data.



Distribution analysis must compare high-poverty and high-minority schools relative to the district as a whole; as well as hard to staff subjects and specialty areas relative to all subject areas.

6


Wisconsin Race to the Top – Exhibit I

• If inequities in distribution exist, then the Participating LEA must perform a comprehensive review of policies and other constraints that prevent the recruitment, placement and retention of effective staff and implement strategies to address those barriers. • Additionally, Participating LEAs must provide effective support to teachers and principals in those schools around improving student performance and qualifications. These supports may include professional learning communities, job-embedded professional development, and tuition reimbursement for license-related coursework. High quality professional development • Use local student data as well as district and school achievement goals to inform currently required professional development and coaching and mentoring programs. • Provide regular common planning and collaboration time, which may include professional learning communities, to teachers and principals to support data usage and response to intervention efforts. • Require additional, targeted professional development for principals and teachers rated as “unsatisfactory.” Adopt a policy to measure and assess the effectiveness of professional development programs as well as district and school intervention relative to improvements in student achievement and staff evaluations. Turning Around Struggling Schools • Implement one of the four federally required school intervention models: turnaround model, restart model, school closure, or transformation in schools identified among the lowest-achieving five percent of Title I-eligible schools. (Based on Federal criteria, currently this only applies to 12 schools in the City of Milwaukee.) i

Evaluation system definitions and description: Formative Evaluations: Are not intended for disciplinary purposes but can inform professional development activities and may lead to the implementation of individual plans designed to improve performance and instruction. Formative evaluations include the following as significant factors: • Student growth and achievement data that result from assessments in core academic subjects administered to pupils under Wis. Stat. § 118.30 and 20 USC 6311 (b) (3), provided the school board has developed a teacher evaluation plan through collective bargaining that includes all of the following: 1) A description of the evaluation process. 2) Multiple criteria in addition to examination results. 3) The rationale for using examination results to evaluate teachers. 4) An explanation of how the school board intends to use the evaluations to improve pupil academic achievement • Evidence of student growth and achievement from locally developed assessments, portfolios of student work, grades, rigor of coursework (including dual enrollment, honors, AP or IB courses), and other measures deemed by the State to be rigorous and comparable across classrooms. • Portfolio of teacher’s work or instructional artifacts • Classroom observations

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Wisconsin Race to the Top – Exhibit I

Summative Evaluations: Per Wis. Stat. § 121.02(1)(q), conduct an evaluation in the first year and at least every third year thereafter to assess overall employment performance, which may be used for disciplinary purposes. This should include: • A classroom observation • A review of compliance with action steps created under the formative evaluations process. • A review of compliance with district personnel policies • Multiple rating categories, which must include at a minimum “satisfactory” and “unsatisfactory.” If performance is unsatisfactory, then an improvement plan shall be implemented. Progressive disciplinary measures may be taken pursuant to district policy. • Performance improvement plans must clearly articulate: the specific areas of improvement, time frame for the plan, and defined outcomes. Opportunities for improvement shall be offered, which may include ongoing observation, mentoring, ongoing conferences, modeling, and professional development. Career transition benefits may be offered to employees that voluntarily choose to leave their positions.

8


Wisconsin Race to the Top MOU – Signature page

VIII. SIGNATURES LEA Superintendent (or equivalent authorized signatory): ___________________________________________________________ Signature/Date ___________________________________________________________ Print Name/Title President of Local School Board: ___________________________________________________________ Signature/Date ___________________________________________________________ Print Name/Title Local Teachers’ Union Leader: ___________________________________________________________ Signature/Date ___________________________________________________________ Print Name/Title Authorized State Official - required: By its signature below, the State hereby accepts the LEA as a Participating LEA. ___________________________________________________________ Signature/Date ___________________________________________________________ Print Name/Title

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Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan

State Commitments

Participating LEA

A. State Success Factors A(2) Building strong statewide capacity to implement, scale up, and sustain proposed plans •

The State will create the Office of Education Innovation and Improvement (OEII).  Reporting to the State Superintendent, the OEII will be responsible for overseeing the execution of Wisconsin’s Race to the Top plans, awarding and managing external contracts and ensuring the State’s and LEA’s compliance with the conditions outlined in the State’s RTTT grant and LEA Final Work Plans.  Additionally, the OEII will be charged with providing statewide expertise and support to LEAs to advance the federal education reform agenda requirements the areas of standards and assessments, data systems, effective teachers and leaders, and turning around struggling schools.  The office will include project management and administration staff housed in Madison and project consultants working regionally with each CESA.

• (i) (a-c) Ensuring the capacity to implement

The State will secure external mechanisms to measure and report on Race to the Top progress.  The Wisconsin DOA, in consultation with the Wisconsin Office of Recovery and Reinvestment, Wisconsin DPI, and the OEII will contract with an outside accountability/audit/consulting firm or firms to externally measure and report on an annual basis the State’s and LEAs’ progress with and compliance to the conditions and goals outlined in the State’s Race to the Top grant and LEAs’ Final Work Plans.  Outside entities may also be used in the 90 day period to ensure that the correct resources, capacity, and capabilities are leveraged by the State during this critical period in order to guarantee that the Final Work Plans are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and time bound, and are in line with the RTTT guidelines for ambitious yet achievable plans for implementing coherent, compelling, and comprehensive education reform.

The State will augment the Wisconsin Initiative for Neighborhoods and Schools that Work for Children (WINS), a Milwaukee philanthropic effort. WINS will provide holistic, data-driven wraparound services, including healthcare access, early childhood, education and child care, to students in two Milwaukee neighborhoods.

B. Standards and Assessments

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No action required.


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan

State Commitments

Participating LEA

(B)(1) Developing and adopting common standards (i) Participating in consortium developing high quality standards

(ii) Adopting standards

• The State will adopt the English Language Arts Common Core Standards and the Mathematics Common Core Standards. • The State, as a leading member of the SMARTER/Balanced assessment consortium, will involve Wisconsin educators in developing model curriculum and units of instruction for each grade level, reflecting a learning progression for the Common Core Standards.

(B)(2) Developing and implementing common, highquality assessments

• The State, as part of the SMARTER/Balanced assessment consortium, will develop a common statewide benchmark assessment accessible through a shared computerbased format to gauge student progress on the Common Core Standards throughout the school year.

(B)(3) Supporting the transition to enhanced standards and highquality assessments

• The State, in collaboration with the SMARTER/Balanced assessment consortium, will develop online resources to include model curriculum, model units of instruction, classroom assessment strategies, and video classroom vignettes. • The State will support professional development through a combination of local and regional professional learning communities, summer institutes, and online training modules and networking.

No action required. See B(3)

No action required. See B(3)

No action required. See B(3)

• Implement a curriculum aligned to the Common Core Standards in English language arts and mathematics. • Implement the state’s next generation summative and benchmark assessment system in reading and mathematics when it becomes available

• The State is working with postsecondary institutions and national research partners, including the National Center for the Improvement of Educational Assessment, Inc. (NCIEA), the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) and the ValueAdded Research Center (VARC) on improving the quality of student growth data and related professional development to LEAs.

C. Data Systems (C)(1) Fully implementing a statewide longitudinal data system

• The State meets 10 of the 12 requirements of the America COMPETES Act. • Per State Fiscal Stabilization Fund (SFSF) conditions, the State will meet all 12 requirements of the American COMPETES Act by September 30, 2011.

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• Complete new data collection and reporting required under the America COMPETES Act.


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (C)(2) Accessing and using State data

State Commitments

Participating LEA

• The State provides a public reporting portal for education data through the Wisconsin Information Network for Successful Schools (WINSS).

No action required.

• The State LDS provides secure access to the Multidimensional Analytic Tool (MDAT), which allows teachers and principals to review annual individual student growth data combined with attendance, discipline and other key student indicators. • The State established a P-16 data exchange and is incorporating postsecondary enrollment data from the National Student Clearinghouse. (C)(3) Using data to improve instruction (i) Use of local instructional improvement systems

• The State will rapidly expand and scale the statewide Response to Intervention (RtI) Center, tripling the capacity to coordinate and provide technical assistance, professional development and data coaching services to LEAs and CESAs.

• Implement a response to intervention model that provides diagnostic and progress

• The State will expand individual student growth data currently available through the LDS by enhancing the Multidimensional Analytic Tool (MDAT) and incorporating the “Colorado growth” system into the LDS by 2011.

• Use local and state-provided student growth data to set annual district and school

• The State will provide financial support to VARC to expand district participation and training in value-added analysis. (ii) Professional development on use of data

• The State will work with key stakeholders to develop professional development modules and tools around data literacy and using data to improve instruction. • Professional development and training will be delivered by the State as well as regional CESAs, professional organizations, and non-profit organizations to provide educators the professional face-to-face training they need to utilize student growth and valueadded data reports in the classroom to improve instruction.

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assessments, core instruction to all students, differentiation strategies, and interventions in reading and mathematics.

achievement goals. Ensure regular principal and teacher review of local achievement data in professional learning communities or ensure cooperative planning time to continuously refine improvement strategies.

• See (D)(5)(i)


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (iii) Availability and accessibility of data to researchers

State Commitments

Participating LEA

• Pursuant to 2009 Wisconsin Act 59, the Department of Public Instruction, University of Wisconsin System, Wisconsin Technical College System and the Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities established a PK-16 data exchange to facilitate greater program evaluation and educational research. 

An enabling memorandum of understanding has established data exchange protocols to effectuate the legislation.



Additionally, a data management position was established to coordinate research requests across agencies, facilitate data exchanges, serve as a point of contact for external research partners, and review FERPA-related concerns.

• Authorize the Department of Public Instruction to share data collected from the Participating LEA with researchers as allowed under FERPA.

• Under the pending ARRA state longitudinal data system grant, the State will implement a robust online teacher licensure system that will more accurately and efficiently link student coursework, teachers and preparation programs, significantly improving research and program evaluation. • The online teacher licensure system will enable DPI to assess and verify the equitable distribution of teachers and principals by school and subject (see (D)(3)) • The State will convene a Data Summit to outline a research agenda for the year and discuss best practices with a wide group of stakeholders and researchers, and will work collaboratively to provide a wide range of data as allowed under FERPA to researchers whose research projects are selected by the state as complementary to that agenda.

D. Great Teachers & Leaders (D)(1) Provide high-quality pathways for aspiring teachers and principals

• Under Wis. Stat. § 115.28 (7), the State Superintendent is given authority to prescribe rule standards and procedures for approval of educator preparation programs leading to licensure. Alternative route programs are specifically prescribed in Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34.17 (6). • Candidates for alternative certification must complete the Praxis I and II exam as well as a clinical experience, per Wis. Stat. § 118.19 (3). • The State supports 11 alternative certification programs, which focus on critical shortage areas and increasing the diversity of the state’s teachers.

(D)(2) Improving teacher and principal effectiveness based on performance:

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No action required.


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (i) Measure student growth

State Commitments

Participating LEA

• The State will provide individual student growth data through the state longitudinal data system and support statewide access to value-added data through VARC. • The State, in conjunction with key stakeholders, will establish parameters for local measures of student growth, which may be locally developed or commercially purchased, that are rigorous and comparable across classrooms.

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• Measure individual student growth over time using multiple measures that include formative assessments; standardized benchmark and summative tests; curriculumand course-based assessments and individual student work (performances, projects, etc.)


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (ii) Design and implement evaluation systems

State Commitments

Participating LEA

Pilot a Preservice Evaluation • The State will participate in a national partnership to develop and pilot a preservice teacher performance assessment (TPA) tool with a rating scale to be used during the student teaching clinical experience. Educator preparation programs will be able to use this tool to endorse candidates for state licensure. Develop a Model Evaluation System • The state, in conjunction with key stakeholders, will develop and pilot a rigorous, transparent and fair model evaluation system for teachers and principals that will: 

Include multiple criteria such as standardized assessments in core academic subjects, locally developed assessments, grades, portfolios of student work, rigor of coursework (including dual enrollment, honor, AP or IB courses), and other measures deemed by the state to be rigorous and comparable across classrooms.



Include student growth as a significant factor.



Establish multiple rating categories for principal and teacher evaluation.



Be based on Wisconsin Educator Standards, the National Board Certification and the Wisconsin Master Educator Assessment Process.



Be aligned with Wisconsin’s next generation assessment system.

Tiered Licensing Requirements The State has a tiered licensing system under Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34. • Initial educator license: This is a five-year, non-renewal initial license. Initial educators are provided with a qualified mentor, support seminars and an ongoing orientation by the employing school district. 

Advancement: Successfully complete a minimum of three years as an initial educator period and complete a professional development plan (PDP) that demonstrates increased proficiency, evidence of student learning, evidence of collaboration and is aligned with State standards.

• Professional educator license: This is a five year renewable license. 

Renewal: Successfully complete a professional development plan that demonstrates increased proficiency, evidence of student learning, evidence of collaboration and is aligned with State standards.

• Master educator license: This is a ten year renewable license for educators based on the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification or the Wisconsin Master Educator Assessment Process.

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• Ensure local principals and teachers evaluation systems have both formative and summative components. Participating LEAs are encouraged to align local systems to the State-developed standards or adopt the model evaluation system. ___________________________________________________________________ Definitions Formative Evaluations: Are not intended for disciplinary purposes but can inform professional development activities and may lead to the implementation of individual plans designed to improve performance and instruction. Formative evaluations include the following as significant factors: • Student growth and achievement data that result from assessments in core academic subjects administered to pupils under Wis. Stat. § 118.30 and 20 USC 6311 (b) (3), provided the school board has developed a teacher evaluation plan through collective bargaining that includes all of the following: 1) A description of the evaluation process 2) Multiple criteria in addition to examination results 3) The rationale for using examination results to evaluate teachers 4) An explanation of how the school board intends to use the evaluations to improve pupil academic achievement • Evidence of student growth and achievement from locally developed assessments, portfolios of student work, grades, rigor of coursework (including dual enrollment, honors, AP or IB courses), and other measures deemed by the State to be rigorous and comparable across classrooms • Portfolio of teacher’s work or instructional artifacts • Classroom observations Summative Evaluations: Per Wis. Stat. § 121.02(1)(q), conduct an evaluation in the first year and at least every third year thereafter to assess overall employment performance, which may be used for disciplinary purposes. This should include: • A classroom observation • A review of compliance with action steps created under the formative evaluations process • A review of compliance with district personnel policies • Multiple rating categories, which must include at a minimum “satisfactory” and “unsatisfactory” If performance is unsatisfactory, then an improvement plan shall be implemented. Progressive disciplinary measures may be taken pursuant to district policy.. Performance improvement plans must clearly articulate: the specific areas of improvement, time frame for the plan, and defined outcomes. Opportunities for improvement shall be offered, which may include ongoing observation, mentoring, ongoing conferences, modeling, and professional development. Career transition benefits may be offered to employees that voluntarily choose to leave their positions.


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (iii) Conduct annual evaluations

State Commitments

Participating LEA

• Wis. Stat. § 121.02(1)(q) and Wis. Admin. Code § PI 8.01(2)(q) establishes specific criteria and a systematic procedure to measure the performance of licensed school personnel. 

An observation of the individual’s performance must be included as part of the summative evaluation data.



A summative evaluation must be conducted in the first year of employment and at least every third year.

• Under Wisconsin’s Quality Educator Initiative (Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34) initial educators must establish and successfully execute a professional development plan, which must be reviewed by a professional development team comprised of a teacher, an administrator and a representative of a teacher training institution (IHE) to attain professional certification. DPI-trained team members must approve the goals. • Conduct annual formative and summative evaluations for probationary teachers as determined locally by applicable collective bargaining agreements, and for probationary principals. • Conduct annual locally-determined formative evaluations, a summative evaluation in the first year, and a summative evaluation at least every third year thereafter for nonprobationary teachers and principals. (Wis. Stat. § 121.02(1)(q)) • Implement improvement plans, which include annual summative evaluations, professional development, and classroom observations for principals and teachers rated as “unsatisfactory.”

(iv)(a) Use evaluations to inform professional development

No action required.

(iv)(b) Use evaluations to inform compensation, promotion, and retention

No action required.

• Use the results of formative evaluations to inform decision-making in the areas of coaching, induction support, and/or professional development • Optional Activities: Use the results of formative evaluation systems to inform compensation, promotion or advancement decisions. Participating LEAs may choose to implement none, some or all of these activities at their discretion and without penalty. LEAs should check the box for any item they wish to implement, or for any item already in place in the district.

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Opportunities to pursue advanced professional certifications for teachers and principals, including certification by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (Optional)

Career ladders for promotion, additional compensation or advancement of teachers based on additional responsibilities and other qualifications. (Optional)

Career ladders for promotion, additional compensation or advancement of principals based on additional responsibilities or other qualifications. (Optional)


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (iv)(c) Use evaluations to inform tenure and/or full certification

State Commitments

Participating LEA

No action required.

• Under Wisconsin’s Quality Educator Initiative (Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34) initial educators who fail to satisfactorily complete a professional development plan (PDP) within five years are denied professional certification. The PDP approval process is based on planned professional growth and evidence of the effect of that growth on student learning. • Use the results of summative evaluation systems to inform decision regarding nonprobationary status for teachers and principals.

(iv)(d) Use evaluations to inform removal

No action required.

• Use the results of summative evaluation systems to inform non-renewal decisions.

(D)(3) Ensuring equitable distribution of effective teachers and principals: (i) High-poverty and/or highminority schools

(ii) Hard-to-staff subjects and specialty areas including mathematics, science, and special education, and language instruction educational programs

• The State will use the proposed online teacher licensure system to assess and verify the equitable distribution of teachers and principals by school and subject.

• Implement a district policy to ensure the equitable distribution of effective teachers and principals among schools within the LEA.

• Provide additional support to the University of Wisconsin System’s Urban Educator Institute to expand the placement of preservice teachers from across the state in urban centers for their student teaching clinical experience.

 Measurement of principals and teachers will be based on qualifications, summative evaluations and experience.

• The State supports educator recruitment and placement by posting on the Department of Public Instruction webpage: 

Educator vacancies in Wisconsin;



Educator loan deferment and forgiveness programs; and



Master educator information.

 Measurement of schools will include school-level student growth, achievement and demographic data.  Distribution analysis must compare high-poverty and high-minority schools relative to the district as a whole; as well as hard to staff subjects and specialty areas relative to all subject areas. • If inequities in distribution exist, then the Participating LEA must perform a comprehensive review of policies and other constraints that prevent the recruitment, placement and retention of effective staff and implement strategies to address those barriers. • Additionally, Participating LEAs must provide effective support to teachers and principals in those schools around improving student performance and qualifications. These supports may include professional learning communities, job-embedded professional development, and tuition reimbursement for license-related coursework

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Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU

Elements of State Reform Plan (D)(4) Ensuring the effectiveness of teacher and principal preparation programs

State Commitments

Participating LEA

• Under Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34.06(3)(a), postsecondary education preparation programs are required to participate in a continuous review process, which includes annual visits. Program evaluation and approval is based on candidate performance measured against state standards and student achievement/growth.

No action required.

• Under Wis. Admin. Code § PI 34.15(8), postsecondary educator preparation programs are required to conduct follow up studies with graduates and their employers on program effectiveness and student achievement/growth and then use that data for improvement. This data is also used by the State as part of the preparation program approval process. (D)(5) Providing effective support to teachers and principals:

(i) Quality professional development

• The State, in conjunction with key stakeholders, will develop mentor and coaching guidelines as well as best practices to improve effectiveness.

• Use local student data as well as district and school achievement goals to inform currently required professional development and coaching and mentoring programs.

• The State will provide high quality coaching and mentoring resources and tools around principal and teacher effectiveness.

• Provide regular common planning and collaboration time, which may include professional learning communities, to teachers and principals to support data usage and response to intervention efforts.

• The State will provide direct mentor and coaching training and support, including mentor academies and coaching institutes.

(ii) Measure effectiveness of professional development

• Annually review the effectiveness of state-sponsored professional development programs, which may include third-party assessments, participant evaluations and LEA assessments of principal and staff improvement.

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• Provide additional, targeted professional development for principals and teachers rated as “unsatisfactory.” • Adopt a policy to measure and assess the effectiveness of professional development programs as well as district and school intervention relative to improvements in student achievement and staff evaluations.


Appendix A: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Overview of State Plan and MOU E. Turning Around Struggling Schools: The following Section (E) only applies to the Milwaukee Public Schools, which encompasses all of the identified lowest-

achieving schools. (E)(1) Intervening in the lowestachieving schools and LEAs

The State derives authority to intervene in the lowest-achieving schools and LEAs from:

No action required.

• State Superintendent intervention authority under 2010 Wisconsin Act 215 • Federal Corrective Action Requirements under Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) • Federal School Improvement Grant requirements (E)(2) Turning around the lowest-achieving schools (i) Identifying the persistently lowest-achieving schools

• Per the federal SFSF and School Improvement Grant requirements, the State has implemented a methodology for identifying the persistently lowest-achieving schools. Currently, all schools are located in the Milwaukee Public Schools.

(ii) Turning around the persistently lowest-achieving schools

• The State will work with MPS to align requirements under the School Improvement Grant program, the ESEA-required corrective action plan and new state requirements pursuant to 2010 Wisconsin Act 215 to maintain a focused, coherent approach to school and district turnaround in Milwaukee.

No action required.

• Implement one of the four federally required school intervention models: turnaround model, restart model, school closure, or transformation in schools identified among the lowest-achieving five percent of Title I eligible schools. (Based on Federal criteria, currently this only applies to 12 schools in the City of Milwaukee.)

Competitive Preference Priority: STEM • The OEII will create a working group to coordinate STEM efforts around the state, strengthen ties with regional economic development partners and higher education stakeholders to align STEM efforts around higher education and workforce need as well as to promote best practices within Wisconsin schools. • The OEII will contract with educational institutions, professional organizations and/or non-profit organizations to provide STEM teacher and learning academies on site and via virtual learning opportunities throughout the state. • The OEII will work with educational institutions, professional organizations and/or non-profit organizations to develop and provide resources and partnerships that drive STEM best practices through support of pilot projects, teacher development, and STEM instructional materials. These efforts will be coordinated with the STEM academies and ensure the long term sustainability of these enhanced STEM initiatives.

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No action required.


Appendix B: Wisconsin Race to the Top – Proposed Base Funding

Exhibit I, Appendix B – Proposed Base Funding

6 Urban Districts (Beloit, Kenosha, Green Bay, Madison, Milwaukee and Racine, $30,128,668, 12%

LEA additional $70k/$100pp floor, $29,574,435, 12%

LEA 'Title I' funding, $125,000,000, 50% State Plan, $65,296,897, 26%

Figure 1. Overview of Wisconsin's RTTT Budget

The table below provides general guidance as to the base funding amount that the Participating LEA may receive upon successful award of the total funding amount requested by the State of Wisconsin. No less than 50% of all Wisconsin Race to the Top funds will be distributed via this formula. Participating school district funding amounts may be increased in the event that not all eligible districts opt in to participate. Additionally, this base amount of funding does not reflect additional discretionary funding that may be awarded to districts. Assumptions: (1) all LEAs participate, (2) the State is awarded $250 million, and (3) each participating district receives a minimum of $70,000 or $100 per pupil, or the allocation under the Title I formula, whichever is the greatest amount. Note: This table does not include additional funding allocated to the six urban districts (Beloit, Kenosha, Green Bay, Madison, Milwaukee, and Racine)

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Instructions for Completing the Wisconsin’s Race to the Top MOU- Exhibit I Please review the following instructions and attached Race to the Top MOU materials. To ensure an accurate count of participation, it is essential that all necessary checkboxes have been selected and that all signatures are in place. The deadline to return signed MOUs is Friday, May 21st at 4pm. Instructions 1. All LEAs wishing to participate in Race to the Top are required to complete “Participating LEA Memorandum of Understanding” (Exhibit I). 2. Review the exhibit and the accompanying appendices thoroughly. The requirements for Participating LEAs along with the preliminary State Plan are described in the body of the document. 3. Capture all checkbox responses in their appropriate places. a.

For Exhibit I, see Page 6

4. Capture all signatures in their appropriate places. a.

For Exhibit I, see Page 9

5. All completed MOUs must be received by Friday, May 21st at 4pm. There are three ways to submit the competed MOU (pages 1-9). The completed MOU can be submitted: a.

Electronically to the department via wirttt@dpi.wi.gov.

b. Be sent to the following address: Jeff Pertl Policy Initiatives Advisor & Federal Funds Trustee Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction P.O. Box 7841 Madison, WI 53707-7841 c. Hand delivered to the DPI Reception Desk located in the GEF 3 building at 125 S. Webster Street, Madison, on the 5th Floor. Please contact Jeff Pertl, Policy Initiatives Advisor at the Department of Public Instruction, by email jeff.pertl@dpi.wi.gov or by phone 608/267-9232 or Nina Carlson, Senior Policy Advisor in the Governor’s Office, by email nina.carlson@wisconsin.gov or by phone 608/266-3271 if you have any questions or concerns as we move forward with the Race to the Top opportunity.

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Oaklawn Concept Design