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ARMY CADET VOLUNTEER G O I N G

Autumn 2018

F U R T H E R

armycadets.com

RESULTS TIME

MOVING FORWARD

Parents and carers have their say in our survey Page 20

A NEW SYLLABUS FOR THE ACF

STANDING FOR ALL

THE VITAL ROLE OF THE COLONEL CADETS

ACTION & ADVENTURE CFAVs and cadets join forces for an unforgettable annual camp 2018

INSIDE: NEWS

THE ACF IN NUMBERS COMMAND TASKS COUNTY FOCUS


ISSUE #11: AUTUMN 2018

W E LC O M E

We have had a brilliant summer season, with wonderful cadet camps and experiences. Our adult volunteers have given selflessly and the cadets have benefited enormously. The Medical Support Officer construct is in place and developing well. Although camp is over, things do not stand still. By the time this issue of Volunteer is published, the ACF will have shifted from ArmyMail to SOGO, the last No 8 rifle will have been withdrawn, and the shift to the shorter, residential Initial Officer Training will be under way. We have had our first Cadet Force Commissioning Board in Scotland, which was a great success. The results of the ACF Challenge have been made known, as have the rather smart award boards. CFAVs and cadet numbers are starting to go up: now is the time to work at recruiting locally, using the ACFA and Yes agency. I have loved my time with the cadet force and am humbled by the commitment of the adult volunteers. I know you will give my successor the same support and advice you have given me.

CONTENTS 16

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EVERY ISSUE 04. THE BRIEFING Army Cadet news round-up �I have an amazing team around me� Capt Jennifer Richardson, County Focus, p12

08. THE DRILL Ideas, advice and comment

12. COUNTY FOCUS ACFs leading with their Drums Corps and in first aid

14. COMMAND TASKS Tasks for indoors and out

30. ACF POLICY Safety Management System

32. IN THE FIELD ACF events in pictures ON THE COVER New syllabus Colonel Cadets Survey results Cover image: Capt Craig Angus (Somerset ACF) taking part in a course for ACF/CCF adult instructors on teaching FIBUA and FIWAF (Photo: Peter Russell, PRO for Somerset ACF)

BRIGADIER MATTHEW LOWE MBE Deputy Commander Cadets, Regional Command

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GO FURTHER Registration is now open for two new fully funded CVQO BTEC level 2 qualifications. Read more on page 6

34. DAY IN THE LIFE CSM Kate Dunscombe Army Cadet Volunteer is produced by the ACF Marketing and Communications team, based at the Army Cadet Force Association: Holderness House, 51-61 Clifton Street, London EC2A 4DW Get in touch: Tel: 020 7426 8377 Fax: 020 7426 8378 Website: www.armycadets.com Email: marketing@armycadets.com Facebook: facebook.com/Armycadetforce Twitter: @ArmyCadetsUK Army Cadet Volunteer magazine is designed and edited by James Pembroke Media

THIS ISSUE 16. ANNUAL CAMP A look back at some of the highlights of the summer

20. PARENT SURVEY We asked cadet parents for their feedback on the ACF. Here are the results

24. COLONEL CADETS Discover how these top-level volunteers can help

26. IN NUMBERS Key ACF infographics

28. APC UPDATE The Army Proficiency Certificate is changing This publication may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form whole or in part without prior written permission of the publishers. All contents and addresses correct at time of going to press. Every care has been taken in the preparation of this magazine, but neither James Pembroke Media nor ACFA can be held responsible for the accuracy of the information herein, or any consequences arising from it. Views expressed by contributors might not reflect the views of the ACF or the Army.

Acting editor: Alice Hoey Head of design: Simon Goddard Senior project manager: Charlie Lyon

ARMYCADETS.COM 3


THE BRIEFING ARMY CADET NEWS FROM AROUND THE UK

WW1 MEMORIAL

Round Britain Challenge

Proud ACF officers complete part one of the IOT at Sandhurst

COURSE UPDATE

IMPROVING INITIAL OFFICER TRAINING Following feedback, the new IOT will be more flexible and take account of prior experience and learning

A

t the beginning of September, recently commissioned ACF officers completed the first part of the revised Initial Officer Training (IOT) course at Sandhurst. The IOT was introduced at the start of 2016 to provide development training for new officers and, based on feedback from former students, changes are being made to how the

Samantha McEndoo receives her certificate

4 ACF AUTUMN 2018

course will be delivered. In future, the course will be split into three parts: a training residential weekend, a tutor-assessed assignment and a practical module residential weekend. However, for those who prefer distance learning, it will be possible to complete the training weekend online with a reduced number of assignments and lessons. Those opting to follow the distance learning route will, however, still need to complete the assignment and attend the final residential weekend at Sandhurst to complete the course. Another change will be how students’ prior

LOOK OUT

For the new video on what to expect from the CFCB – out later this year

experience and learning are recognised. Those CFAVs who have been appointed to certain roles in the ACF, or bring with them qualifications from previous military service, will only have to attend the final residential weekend. However, they will be able to complete the other training voluntarily if they or their commandants think they would benefit from one or more of the modules. Finally, the links between officer selection and initial training will be strengthened, improving the way that officers in the ACF are mentored through the process, from initial interest to promotion to Lieutenant.

ARMY CADETS FROM across the UK took part in the Lord Dannatt Round Britain Challenge, which took place between 25 July and 1 September. The voyage, part of the remembrance activities to mark the end of WW1, saw the cadets work alongside injured soldiers on the Jubilee Sailing Trust’s specially adapted tall ship, Lord Nelson. Cadets, servicemen and instructors worked together as a team, climbing the mast, helming the ship and setting the sails. The Jubilee Sailing Trust has taken around 50,000 people across the world on board Lord Nelson. Cadets who took part in the event had to fundraise a minimum of £695; any leftover funds will be used to fund future Army Cadet activities in conjunction with the Jubilee Sailing Trust. Crews changed every 10 days at London, Cardiff, Belfast and Edinburgh and there was a celebration of remembrance at each port, attended by cadets, instructors and local supporters. A quarter of a wooden shield was presented to the crew in each city. At the end of the challenge, cadets and veterans presented the completed shield to the Governor of the Tower of London, where it will remain as a WW1 memorial.

GET IN TOUCH E: marketing@armycadets.com facebook.com/Armycadetforce @ArmyCadetsUK cadetsarmy


THE BRIEFING

ACF AWARDS

The cadets took part in a range of activities

The following have been recognised for their commitment and dedication to the ACF CADET FORCE MEDAL

TRAINING

Fitness first Cadets on Canadian Exchange take part in new Fitness Instructor training UK CADETS WHO took part in

this year’s Canadian Exchange benefited from being able to attend a new Fitness Instructor course. This was the first year that the UK sent a full cadre of cadets on the course, which involves practical and handson training in a range of sports, fitness and life skills. “The course is a valuable and beneficial experience

and is held in high regard in Canada,” says Senior Escort Officer Major Mike Pilkington, who accompanied the cadets. “The UK cadets got to integrate with the Royal Canadian Army Cadets, make friends and have unique experiences that will both expand their abilities as young people and provide lasting memories.” The six-week course covered diet, fitness and fitness monitoring, self discipline, first aid, and creating bespoke fitness programmes, and also gave the cadets opportunities to mentor junior cadets and gain valuable leadership experience. Staying active from morning to late evening, the cadets also took part in a wide range of fun team sports, including football, basketball and Ultimate Frisbee.

SSI SSI SMI SSI LT SSI SI SSI SI LT COL SMI SSI SSI RSMI SMI LT SMI SSI LT MAJ CAPT SSI SMI CAPT SSI LT SI 2LT LT SSI SSI SMI CAPT MAJ SMI SI SMI SSI CAPT CAPT CAPT SSI SMI REV (CF3) CAPT SMI COL SSI SI SSI SMI MAJ SMI CAPT LT SSI LT SSI SSI MAJ MAJ SSI SSI MAJ SSI SSI SSI LT SSI SSI SSI SI SMI SMI CSMI REV (CF3) SMI SI SSI SMI SSI SSI SSI SSI RSMI CAPT SSI SSI SI SMI SSI LT

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ADAMS ALLAN ALLEN BENNETT BIZZELL BLACKLEY BOYD BOYD BOYLE BROWN BROWN-DAY BRYANT BURDISS BURKE BURNS CAMPBELL CLEMENTS CRAVENS CUBBON DAVIDSON DAVIS DERRY DUNSCOMBE EVANS EVANS FELTHAM FRASER FRY GLAYSHER GOODALL GOUGH GREEN GREENWOOD GUBBY GUYMER HAMMOND HASWELL HEYWARD HOLLAND HOLMES HOUSE HOWARD-BAKER HOYDAN HUGHES HUMBERSTONE HUNTER JAMMES JARDINE JARRETT JOY KELLY KELLY KENNEDY KERR KING KIRWAN KITCHEN KNOWLES LISTER LONG MBE MACKIE MAKIN MANSELL MATHER MCDOWELL MCLEAN MEEK MINISS OAKEY PARKER PARNELL PATERSON PATON QUIDLEY ROUTLEDGE ROW SAVORY SCOTT SMITH STACEY STEWART STOCKWELL STONES SWAN TAYLOR THOMAS THOMPSON VINCENT WALKER WHEATSTONE WILLIAMS WOODRUFF

1ST CLASP SSI CAPT MAJ SMI MAJ MAJ CAPT CAPT CAPT CAPT MAJ SMI SMI SMI SMI MAJ SMI SI CAPT SMI CAPT MAJ MAJ SSI SSI SSI SSI SMI LT COL RSMI LT MAJ RSMI SSI MAJ MAJ SMI CSMI RSMI SMI

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SMI CAPT LT COL SSI SSI SI CAPT CAPT SSI RSMI SMI MAJ LT CAPT MAJ CAPT SSI 2LT LT COL LT MAJ MAJ LT MAJ SSI

FW AR M S TJ N GA GA D LR RJ AE PL PT RL D JF I JW S JFK WS C S MC

LT COL LT SMI LT LT COL MAJ CAPT LT COL MAJ MAJ SMI COL

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ALLAM BRIAN BROUGH BURROWS BUTTERWORTH CARR CARR CONNELLY COOK CROUCH DEACON FERN FOSTER GALLICK GILBERT GREY HALE HASKELL HENDRY HOWARTH LANG LLOYD MILLER MONK ORWIN PARKER PAYNE PHILLIPS REID RIZZO SAUNDERS SNEAD TAIT TREWIN WALLACE WARD WATSON WESTALL WILSON WOOLLEY

2ND CLASP ALEXANDER BALL BELL BROWN BROWN CARNEY CROWTHER DECARTERET EDWARDS ELLIS GILLISON GROVES HOOPER LINCOLN LORAM MALLINSON PARKER PEAPLE RAYNER RENNIE RICHTER ROYLE SIDOROWICZ WILKINSON WOOD

3RD CLASP ADAMS BLAKE CORBETT HARRIS HOLDER LEVELL MCNANEY OWEN PRICE SHAYLE TUCKER YOUNG

4TH CLASP MACKIE O’MEARA PALFREYMAN PASSMORE PUGH ROBERTSON SARLING TAYLOR WOODHAMS

5TH CLASP COX FITZPATRICK KITCHING WILSON

ARMYCADETS.COM 5


THE BRIEFING

IN THE MEDIA

Teamwork skills will be developed in a new BTEC qualification

ACF luminaries making headlines

TRAINING

New-look BTEC qualifications Registration now open for cadets to enrol to take two key qualifications

R

egistrations are now open for two new-look CVQO BTEC Level 2 qualifications: Teamwork and Personal Development in the Community, and Music for Practical Performance. Cadets aged 16-18 in England can enrol on either course at no cost, with limited places also available to cadets in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. Support is available at every step of the way from CVQO, which runs regular workbook sessions and adventure training and

BTEC weekends, enabling cadet groups to get together and complete their work. As well as having their CVs boosted, cadets who are enrolled on a CVQO-led BTEC Level 2 qualification become eligible to be nominated for the CVQO Westminster Award. Finalists are invited to lunch at the House of Lords and take part in a trip to South Africa. Nominations for the 2019 Award open in the autumn; further information will be announced on CVQO’s social media channels. Do you know cadets who might be interested in registering for a CVQO-led BTEC Level 2 qualification? They can contact CVQO by emailing btec@cvqo.org or visiting www.cvqo.org/btec to find out more.

6 ACF AUTUMN 2018

Durham ACF: Northern Echo reported on Durham ACF’s recent Band and Bugles trip to France. The 35 cadets spent time in Paris, where they played in the Jardin du Luxembourg, the Chateau Grande Romaine and during the Disneyland Paris parade, in front of more than 40,000 holidaymakers. Hereford and Worcester ACF: The Mayor of Worcester and High Sheriff attended a service dedicated to Hereford and Worcester ACF getting its own banner for the first time, as reported in the Worcester News. The cadets had spent several months raising the necessary funds. Suffolk ACF: B Company was featured in the Lowestoft Journal after winning best company at Normandy barracks in Sennelarger, Germany. Suffolk ACF went

Padre Captain Roberts blesses Hereford and Worcester ACF’s new banner

to Germany for their annual camp this year. Merseyside ACF: The Liverpool Echo recognised Army Cadet instructor Amy Phipps’ achievement in being one of the first new appointees to the Cadet Forces Commission. 1st Northern Ireland Battalion ACF: Cadet Megan McGaughey from Ballymena detachment was given a special Mayor’s reception for her part in Lord Dannatt’s Round Britain Challenge. Guest of honour Mrs Joan Cristive CVO, OBE, Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant for the County of Antrim, was entertained by cadets from Essex, Yorkshire and Shetland, who recounted their adventures on board during the Edinburgh-toBelfast leg of the trip.


THE BRIEFING

COLONEL CA DETS ROLE EXPL AINED David Carson MBE talks about what Colonel Cadets do on behalf of cadets and volunteers

page 24

NATIONAL COMPETITION RESULTS Results for national athletics, hockey and tug of war

NATIONAL ATHLETICS OVERALL PLACINGS Junior Boys 1st Scotland 2nd Eastern 3rd South West

Junior Girls 1st Eastern 2nd West Midlands 3rd South East

Intermediate Boys 1st Eastern 2nd West Midlands 3rd South East

Intermediate Girls 1st Eastern

Senior Boys 1st Eastern 2nd West Midlands 3rd London/South

West/North East

National Athletics Championships Nine regional teams competed at the Meres Stadium in Grantham on 9 June. All teams showed great sportsmanship and worked hard to represent their regions. National Hockey Competition For the girls, five regions sent teams to the 2018 national competition, with boys representing four regions. The competition took place on 7 July, with Northern Ireland claiming the championship title for the girls and Eastern for the boys. National Tug of War Championship Cadets from a number of regions took part in the National Tug of War Championship, which took place on 7 July at Altcar.

OVERALL 1st Eastern 2nd

2nd 3rd

South West South East

Senior Girls 1st Scotland 2nd 3rd

Eastern West Midlands

West Midlands 3rd

Scotland

NEW NATIONAL RECORDS: Class D high jump

Class D 200m

Cdt F Fenwick 1.54m (Eastern Region)

Cdt T Owoso 26.59 sec (South-East Region)

Class D shot

Class F 4 x 100m relay

Cdt J Wright 10.53m (Eastern Region)

58.31 sec (Scotland)

NATIONAL GIRLS HOCKEY COMPETITION 2018 National champions

Northern Ireland

Runners up

Player of the tournament

Cdt Elise Robinson

Eastern

NATIONAL BOYS HOCKEY COMPETITION 2018 National champions

Eastern

Runners up

Player of the tournament

Cdt Nathan Michelow

WINNING TEAM

Exercise Outback Cadet A GROUP OF 20 cadets from London and Leicestershire, Northants and Rutland LNR (ACF) recently returned from Australia, where they took part in the annual Chief of the Australian Army Cadet Team Challenge. Two UK teams, Alamein and Anzio, took part in the three-day Outback Cadet 18, competing against teams from New Zealand and Australia. Despite the challenging weather, Team Alamein won the International Trophy, with New Zealand in second and Anzio third. “It’s been an amazing experience and I’d recommend other cadets get involved,” said Cdt SSgt Williamson from LNR ACF. “I’ve made friends for life, including people from the other side of the world.” The cadets also laid a wreath at the Melbourne Shrine of Remembrance on the 102nd anniversary of the Battle of the Somme and attended the Last Post service at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra.

North East

NATIONAL TUG OF WAR CHAMPIONSHIP 2018 Girls national champions

Scotland

UK Cadet 4x4 champions

England A

Boys national champions

Northern Ireland

Cadets taking part in the National Tug of War Championship Cdt LCpl Farrell of LNR ACF on the obstacle course

ARMYCADETS.COM 7


THE DRILL TIPS, ADVICE AND COMMENT

ACRONYM AID

JARGON BUSTER THIS ISSUE: G, H AND I We continue to work through the alphabet, helping to decipher some of the acronyms you come across most often. What do they mean? Check below to find out GN GOC GP H&ML

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TIPS FOR GOOD TURNOUT

Whether you have a Remembrance Day event or VIP visit coming up, you and your cadets will want to look your best. WO1 David Lightfoot, RSM at the Cadet Training Centre, has this advice...

HC HDT HSE HSW ICT

IIC ILM

P R E S E NTAT I O N A D V I C E

IPT ISCRM

1. Kit needs to be seen on the person who’ll be wearing it to make sure it fits well. You can then move it to a coat hanger, ready for cleaning and ironing. Store it on the hanger afterwards to keep it in pristine condition. 2. Don’t leave your checks to the last minute or underestimate how long it will take to ensure everything is washed and pressed correctly. Give yourself plenty of time to get it right. 3. Be systematic when preparing your kit and work together with a friend,

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checking one another for even the smallest imperfection. Give each other one last check just before you step off. 4. Use a slightly damp cotton ball to apply shoe polish. After cleaning all the dirt off your shoes with a stiff brush, work in the polish using small circular motions. It takes a while, but the result is well worth it. 5. Always read the label to check if a garment can be steam-ironed and to fi nd the correct temperature to use. Iron slowly and methodically, continually moving the garment until it is crease-free.

Guidance Notes General Officer Commanding General Purpose Hill and Mountain Leadership Home Command Home to Duty Travel Health and Safety Executive Health and Safety at Work Information and Communications Technology Intermediate Induction Course Institute of Leadership and Management Integrated Project Team Inter-Service Cadet Rifle Meeting


THE DRILL

A VOICE FOR PA R ENTS

A recent survey informs how the ACF will work more closely with guardians page 20

HOW TO : WELCOME VIP GUESTS

GET IN TOUCH Share ideas with other CFAVs! Email marketing @armycadets.com

appropriate to encourage the cadets to do a little research and prepare some questions in advance, ready to use in conversation. That way they can make the most of the opportunity.

It’s important to make a good impression on any visitors

W

hen someone noteworthy is coming to visit your ACF, it’s natural to want to roll out the red carpet and make the best impression you can. However, making a positive impact doesn’t necessarily mean putting on an elaborate show of pomp and ceremony. We look at some of the simple things you can do to ensure your guest feels welcome and valued.

Meet and greet. It’s essential that someone is there to welcome your guest at the gates or main entrance, and take them where they need to go. Why not give the responsibility to a couple of cadets? On arrival, they should offer to take the guest’s coat and any bags they may have. Always provide drinks and light refreshments. Welcome your guest with a smile and it will make them feel instantly welcome and at ease. When initial introductions are made, use full names and ranks. People then have the opportunity to make it known if they prefer to be addressed in a different or less formal way.

Brief everyone on who is coming and why. Introductions can be awkward if a proffered hand is met with a blank look, so ensure all of your CFAVs and cadets are aware of who is coming to visit, when and why. Depending on who the visitor is, it might be

What might both sides gain from the visit? Think about what your guest might like to know about your unit and have any relevant information to hand. Also, what do you want to highlight? Perhaps a particular cadet achievement or a new initiative you’ve been working on. Preparing something visual to show to your guest, such as photos, a video or a cadet demonstration, can help to make the visit more memorable. Do you have more ideas that you would like to share with other CFAVs? Tell us about them at marketing@armycadets.com

A W O R D W I T H E D S TA F F O R D Adventurer Ed Stafford, the first man to walk the Amazon, visited Norfolk ACF at Swynnerton Training Camp this summer. Here are his thoughts on the experience. “It was great to see so many cadets throwing themselves into such a variety of activities, each designed to push them outside their comfort zones. Command tasks, adventurous activities and drill can help to fill the gaps that exist in education and youngster’s lives today.

They’re a million miles from classroom-based learning. When I was a kid, I roamed the fields for days, building dams and treehouses, and getting stuck down wells. I had a passion for the outdoors even before I joined the Royal Marines Cadets, but they helped to equip me with practical skills. I still use skills such as navigation, field administration and hand signals in my job today. People assume that because I have my own show on the Discovery Channel, I must have been

a confident, adventurous kid. In fact, I was very shy at school, but the Cadets helped to change that. It gave me discipline, showed me how to work as a team, and taught me leadership, public speaking and personal administration – skills that give you great advantages in the workplace.”

ARMYCADETS.COM 9


THE DRILL

THE ACF IN NUMBER S Vital statistics on what cadets across the country have achieved this year page 26

PROFILE

Lt Col Mark Geernaert-Davies National Shooting Advisor

MEDICAL

Cpt Gail Rawlings

MEDICAL SUPPORT OFFICERS Finding out more about this new and valuable role in the ACF

I

t may not be the most glamorous role in the ACF, but the Medical Support Officer is vitally important to ensure the safety and wellbeing of cadets. Their duties cover a wide range of tasks, from planning medical cover for camps to medical risk assessments, medicine management and ensuring that there is sufficient medical provision in the county. Adult volunteer Captain Gail Rawlings has previously worked as a paramedic and currently works as the Medical Support Officer for Derbyshire ACF. “In the past, we have employed outside agency nurses to cover annual camp,” she says, “but there is nothing better than an adult who knows what the cadets do, have tried the training themselves and can appreciate the cadet experience. “I understand cadets and adult volunteers, as I have been involved for so many years – I listen to them, try to comfort them and be like a parent as much as I can. Being there every year also means I develop a rapport with them.”

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Previously, Gail acted as First Aid Officer and then Area Staff Officer, before leaving due to other commitments. Upon re-joining, she took on this role with Derbyshire ACF, as well as National Course Co-ordinator for the MSO training at Frimley Park. “The MSO course is great for adult volunteers. It consists of sound practical training and teaches the use of medical diagnostic equipment – volunteers will learn how to measure blood pressure, pulse and temperatures,” she adds. “It also aims to give adult volunteers the information and practical knowledge to understand medical emergencies and medical conditions.” The course provides adult volunteers with clear direction on the treatment pathways they should follow for ill cadets, which means that care through the ACF is of an extremely high standard. Gail adds, “The role is great for the ACF, as it enables the correct pathways for treating unwell cadets and means fewer adults need to accompany cadets to hospital or a GP surgery.”

AS THE NEW ARMY CADET National Shooting Advisor, a post he took up in March, Mark is responsible to Regional Command for all Army Cadet shooting, both ACF and CCF. He is also Chairman of the ACF Shooting Committee, which delivers courses for cadets to improve their shooting skills and courses for the adult volunteers who coach them. “My main aims as National Shooting Advisor are to increase cadet participation across shooting disciplines, and to improve their performance so that they do better in competitions and classification,” says Mark. “Shooting has taken something of a back seat in the ACF in recent years and its cadets have sometimes been outshone in competitions by the Air Training Corps. These are trends I’m determined to reverse.” Previously a Company Commander and Shooting Officer with both Hampshire & Isle of Wight ACF and Surrey ACF, Mark has also been a shooter in the Regular and Territorial Army, in target and service rifle disciplines, and has represented his county. “I have a lot of knowledge and experience in shooting and in developing cadet shooters,” he says. “I also have some great people around me. We’re going to impart as much knowledge as we can to the volunteers to raise standards among ACF and CCF shooters at all levels.”


THE DRILL

GETCONNECTED

Add Army Cadets to your professional profile by following us on LinkedIn:

www.linkedin.com/company/army-cadets-force

S PEA K O U T : YOUR LETTERS, EMAILS, TWEETS & POSTS A FRIEND AND MENTOR TO MANY Dr Richard Crawford, SO1 Cadets Policy and Personnel, writes about Col Chris Wood, who recently passed away: “We were saddened to hear that Col Chris Wood died unexpectedly in mid-August. Chris was a member of the Territorial Army for over 20 years, commanding the 3rd Battalion The Prince of Wales Own, before becoming Commandant of Humberside and South Yorkshire ACF in 2003. He continued to

support cadets and volunteers across the north-east of England, and was then appointed as Colonel Cadets for the region. Chris came out of ‘retirement’ to lead the ACF’s Initial Officer Training project, building a superb product and leading an incredibly committed team of volunteer tutors, assessors and syndicate leaders. Fully committed to developing our new officers, one of his last acts was to start putting in place arrangements for those candidates who would be transitioning between the

FRONTLINE ON FACEBOOK

TOP TWEETS ACF in the Twittersphere

We asked “fieldcraft is fun, but what useful life skills does it give you?” Kye S Miles: How to retain a state of mental normality when faced with out of the ordinary tasks.

original Initial Officer Training programme and the revision, being introduced over the coming months. Chris made a huge contribution to the Army and to the ACF, and was a friend and mentor to many. We will be memorialising his commitment in the form of a prize, to be awarded to students on the revised Initial Officer Training course. “Chris leaves his wife, Jan, and his sons, Ben and Christian, who are in all our thoughts.”

We asked: “What’s the best thing about Cadets?”

Carrie Purdom: The ability to laugh in the face of adversity, how to ignore the weather and how to sleep anywhere, in any position.

Robbie Walker: Watching young people grow into their amazing potential as confident leaders and team players!

Jordan Allison: Teamwork, leadership, first aid, cleanliness, self reliance, tenacity, and mental and physical strength.

Tabitha Cook: Watching young people grow into amazing adults. Watching young people achieve things that they never thought they could.

Shona Douglas: Teamwork.

Skye Rendall: The friends and experiences.

GET IN TOUCH Send your letters, comments and ideas for future conversation starters to marketing@armycadets.com

@1hldrsacf Great to see @RossCoyACF help celebrate the 50th Anniversary of Oversteps Care Home in #Dornoch on Saturday by helping at the Care Home’s Garden Party #ACFAdventures @Mayor_of_Ramsey Fantastic day honouring the Army Cadets with the freedom of Ramsey @DCT_BHACF Beds and Herts celebrate 40 years of females in the ACF! Great picture and great representation of today’s women! #inspiring #female #cadets @Ed_Stafford Spending a day chatting to the guys from Norfolk @armycadetsuk while they are on their camp in #swynnerton. Ok I know my arm is bent – first drill in 16 years! #cadets #ccf #britisharmy

ARMYCADETS.COM 11


BEST PRACTICE

BEST PRACTICE

COUNTY FOCUS TWO COUNTY ACFS ARE STANDING OUT FOR EXCELLENCE FOR THEIR CORPS OF DRUMS AND FOR FIRST AID

STAFFORDSHIRE AND WEST MIDLANDS HQ: MoD Stafford Detachments: 39 Cadets: 854 CFAVs: 178 In early June, a group of 34 cadets from Staffordshire and West Midlands (North) ACF’s Corps of Drums, along with six from Gwent and Powys ACF, took centre stage at the Household Division’s Beating Retreat on Horse Guards Parade. “Aside from the excitement of being in the capital and seeing the sights, one of the highlights for the cadets was working alongside the Grenadier Guards, who gave us fantastic support throughout,” says Richard Logan, Commandant of Staffordshire and West Midlands (North Sector) ACF. “It was also a big milestone for the cadets when they were inspected by the Director of Music for the Household Division at Wellington Barracks, prior to the performance,” he adds. Excitement after the first night’s performance and nerves at having to do it all again the next day, in front of Prince Andrew,

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meant sleep didn’t come easily for the cadets. But in the event, they did themselves proud. “Regular Army soldiers commented on how smart and disciplined they were and I think they portrayed young people and the ACF in a very good light,” says Tex Calton, ACF Bands Development Manager. One cadet, Drum Major Jasmine Marriott, received particular praise. After the Corps of Drums had played their set piece, they were joined by Regular Army drummers from the Coldstream and Irish Guards, with Jasmine continuing to command. “She led them all for a piece, which was quite a remarkable thing to do,” says Richard. “It actually made me feel quite emotional,” adds Tex Calton. “She deserves recognition for that achievement.” As regular performers at big events, such as Armed Forces Day, Remembrance Sunday, football matches and local tattoos, the corps of drums is a very visible show of the ACF in public. “As such, people tend to approach us to ask about joining not just the corps of drums, but the ACF in general,” says Tex.

The Corps of Drums attracts much interest in the ACF

Staffordshire and West Midlands Corps of Drums numbers around 50 members and can form up with the other 37 corps within the ACF. Cadets don’t need any musical skills to join, as they’re taught everything they need to march and play a tune, and they leave with a level one BTEC NVQ award, along with other valuable qualities. “It’s a great way to build their confidence and team-working skills, gives them opportunities to travel and looks great on their CVs,” says Tex.


BEST PRACTICE

Merseyside ACF are leading the way when it comes to first aid

MERSEYSIDE ACF HQ: St George’s Cadet Training Centre, Altcar Training Camp, Hightown Detachments: 32 Cadets: 615 CFAVs: 142 Teams from Merseyside ACF have come first and second in their regional first aid competition for the last eight years and at this year’s event, in June, they only narrowly missed out, coming a commendable third and fourth. Counties submit one or two teams of four to the annual competition, with each assessed on how well they respond to an accident scenario. They have 10 minutes to think fast, assess the casualties, record important information for the paramedics and respond appropriately. “This year, the cadets were presented with multiple casualties, including people who were either unconscious or in shock,” explains Geri Burns-McCombe, Merseyside ACF’s Public Relations Officer. The cadets in each team were individually assessed by being presented with a casualty

and having four minutes to ask questions and treat them appropriately. While first aid is offered at every star level to cadets, Merseyside also offers it as a progressive subject towards post 4-Star status, with cadets undertaking three months of continuous learning. Undoubtedly, though, much of the county’s success in first aid is down to the enthusiasm and passion of the instructors involved. “I have an amazing team of trainers around me, who are committed to keeping themselves up to date with current processes and delivery methods,” says Captain Jennifer Richardson, who has been the County First Aid officer for Merseyside ACF for 10 years. “They’re always thinking outside the box.” Methods include using ball games to improve cadets’ memory of procedures and plenty of simulations, helping to prepare them should they ever need to put their skills into practice for real. Indeed, only recently Merseyside cadets hit the headlines for delivering first aid in the community. Two young cadets from Aigburth, Duane Xavier and Lewis Lavelle, are to receive the Lord

Competitions require quick thinking and fast assessments

Lieutenants’ and Lieutenant Governor’s Commendation for assisting an elderly man who had taken a bad fall in Liverpool city centre. Another cadet, Sophie Black, has been nominated for a St John Ambulance Young Hero Award after saving the life of her young cousin, who was choking.

FIND OUT MORE Would you like to see your county featured here? Email marketing@ armycadets.com and tell us about some of the great work you do.

ARMYCADETS.COM 13


1

The aim is to get the team and all the equipment to the finish line

1

Norfolk ACF cadets at Swynnerton

14 ACF AUTUMN 2018

GET INVOLVED We’re always looking for detachments to feature on these pages. Get in touch: marketing@ armycadets.com

Play the pairs game without talking to improve non-verbal communication

2


TEAM BUILDING

1

Bridge over minefield

2

Silent ‘snap’

COMMAND TASKS CADETS AND ADULTS COMPLETED THE TASK DURING EXERCISE SAPPER CADET – MAKING USE OF THE FIXED SET-UP AT CHETWYND BARRACKS, CHILWELL, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE CADETS FROM BRITANNIA COMPANY, NORFOLK ACF, IMPROVISED THE TASK AT SWYNNERTON TRAINING CAMP NEAR STOKE-ON-TRENT

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BRIDGE OVER MINEFIELD

Equipment: Large ammunition box, jerry can or other burden. Pallets, crates and other materials to construct obstacles and ‘hurdles’. Selection of planks and tyres, plus other materials the cadets are unlikely to need. Red tape to mark obstacles and surfaces that the cadets cannot touch. Time: 20 minutes. Where: Outdoors in good weather. Aim: To get the group, the burden and any equipment used from the start line to the finish line, crossing all hurdles and avoiding all obstacles. Benefits: Improves cadets’ leadership, communication and teamwork skills. Instructions: No one and nothing may touch the ground (or any surface painted red or marked with red tape) between the start and finish. No jumping or striding between hurdles. All equipment used must go with the group. Award penalty points for infringements. Make it easier: Provide fewer obstacles and hurdles or increase the time allowed. Make it harder: Set up more obstacles and hurdles.

2

SILENT ‘SNAP’ Equipment: Pairs of images/ photos printed on paper or card (tip – download some images from the Brand Centre: armycadets.com/brandcentre/image-library. Time: 15 minutes. Where: Large indoor space. Aim: Complete the pairs game without talking. Benefits: Improves cadets’ nonverbal communication skills and teamwork. Instructions: Mix up the pairs and lay them, face down, in a grid. Get the cadets

to line up silently alongside the grid. One at a time, they should take turns to turn over two cards. Matching pairs are removed from the grid, non-matching pairs turned back over. Gradually, the cadets should realise that speed is better than spending a long time dithering and (nonverbally) arguing. Make it easier: Use fewer pairs Make it harder: Introduce a time limit per turn

GRADUALLY, THE CADETS SHOULD REALISE THAT SPEED IS BETTER THAN SPENDING A LONG TIME DITHERING AND (NON-VERBALLY) ARGUING

ARMYCADETS.COM 15


ANNUAL CAMP

IT’S NOT EVERY DAY OUR CADETS GET TO VISIT SOMEWHERE THAT’S USED BY THE UK ARMED FORCES ON A REGULAR BASIS Major Andrew Webster

16 ACF AUTUMN 2018


ANNUAL CAMP

DID YOU KNOW? Nearly 23,000 cadets attended annual camp in 2017-18

ANNUAL CAMP

OUTDOOR ANTICS SUMMER CAMPS ARE LOGISTICAL FEATS! VOLUNTEER VISITED ONE IN SENNYBRIDGE, WALES, TO SEE WHAT WENT ON...

T

he highlight of the year for most cadet and adult instructors is Annual Camp – an opportunity for cadets to expand their knowledge, make new friends and take part in fun and challenging activities. As usual, annual camps took place all around the UK (where CFAVs were only too happy to capture the highlights on camera – see p19), while Volunteer joined cadets from Merseyside ACF at Sennybridge in Wales, to discover how they managed to fit a huge number of activities into just one week.

OFF TO SENNYBRIDGE Among the more unusual activities on offer to Merseyside cadets were horse riding and, for the 3-Star and 4-Star cadets, a training in built up areas (TIBUA) exercise. This culminated in final section attacks and an ambush scenario at Cilieni, a renowned military training area constructed in the 1980s during the Cold War. Set deep in the Brecon Beacons, Cilieni was designed to replicate a German village and is one of the largest military training zones in the UK. “It’s not every day our cadets get to visit somewhere that’s used

ARMYCADETS.COM 17


ANNUAL CAMP

Horse riding was one of the more unusual activities on offer

Merseyside ACF at Sennybridge

The activities culminated in an ambush scenario at Cilieni, which had been designed to replicate a German village

Cadets tackling the climbing wall at Llangorse Multi-Activity Centre

THEY’RE RARELY INDOORS AT ANNUAL CAMP, BUT IT’S AN ESSENTIAL PART OF THEIR LEARNING Geri Burns-McCombe, Public Relations

by the UK armed forces and other service personnel on a regular basis,” says Major Andrew Webster, who oversees training for 3-Star and 4-Star cadets at Merseyside ACF. “It created a unique buzz and even the adults were excited to see it play out.” Working in groups, the cadets were given the responsibility of clearing each house on the street, updating the other groups as they went along, which helped to develop their team-working skills. The exercise culminated in a final attack on an ‘enemy’.

A HIGH POINT As well as the physical activities, cadets took part in navigation lessons and an

18 ACF AUTUMN 2018

expedition across the Brecon Beacons. “They’re rarely indoors when they’re at annual camp,” says Geri Burns-McCombe, Merseyside ACF’s Public Relations Officer, “but it’s an essential part of their learning. It helps them to develop tools that will prove invaluable throughout their lives, long after they’ve left the ACF.” The cadets’ time at Sennybridge also helped some of them face their fears head on. During a visit to Llangorse Multi-Activity Centre, cadets participated in a series of rock-climbing activities, ranging from 50ft artificial-featured climbing walls to large bouldered areas and a challenging 60ft caving ladder. Well done to all!


ANNUAL CAMP

1

2

3

AROUND THE UK

5

IN THE PHOTOS: 1: There were lots of activities for Buckinghamshire ACF to get involved in during their time at Chickerell.

4

2: Cadets from Lancashire ACF made the most of their time in the water at their annual camp at Wathgill. 3: Plenty of smiles from Lincolnshire cadets at their annual camp this year. 6

4: Lincolnshire ACF cadets showed their competitive spirit at Altcar. 5: Cadets from Northern Ireland greet a friend at annual camp. 6: Clwyd and Gwynedd ACF took part in TIBUA training while at Wretham. 7: Falling in line! Cadets from Humberside and South Yorkshire enjoyed being outdoors at their camp. 8: Cadets from Glasgow and Lanarkshire Battalion took part in a parachute jump at Longmoor.

7

8

SHARE YOUR IDEAS Thank you for all your fantastic images from this year’s annual camp. If you have more photos that you’d like to share please email marketing@armycadets.com, and we’ll post the best on social media.

ARMYCADETS.COM 19


PARENTS SURVEY

SURVEY RESULTS

A VOICE FOR PARENTS AND CARERS INFORMATION GLEANED FROM THE RECENT ACF PARENTS AND CARERS SURVEY WILL INFORM HOW WE WORK WITH CADETS AND THEIR GUARDIANS

20 ACF AUTUMN 2018


PARENTS SURVEY

IN NUMBERS More findings from the survey that will be taken into account in ACF forward planning

57%

of parents and carers feel they would benefi t from knowing more about the cadets’ activities

Young people need guardian support to become cadets, so it’s important we keep informed of their opinions on the organisation

I

n June, an online questionnaire was made available to all parents and guardians of ACF cadets, giving them a platform to share their views and concerns on a range of issues relating to the Army Cadets. The results of this survey provide a detailed and insightful picture of the ACF from the parents’ point of view. This will help to shape how we develop and inform everything from our recruitment and retention of volunteers and cadets, and our communication channels, to the cadet experience itself. Maintaining the excellent reputation of the ACF among parents and carers is essential, not least because positive word of mouth, within adult networks and among young people, improves our ability to recruit both cadets and volunteers. An overwhelming 93 per cent of respondents to our survey said they’d recommend that other parents look into the ACF as a possible activity for their children, while 39 per cent said their child’s

AN OVERWHELMING 93 PER CENT SAID THEY’D RECOMMEND OTHER PARENTS LOOK INTO THE ACF AS A POSSIBLE ACTIVITY FOR THEIR CHILDREN

12%

decision to become a cadet was influenced by someone else, with friends cited most often as the influencers. The message is clear: good news travels fast. But while it is reassuring to know that most parents are positive about their children’s experiences as cadets, it is more valuable to understand why that is the case. Cadets need their parents’ support to join the ACF and parents can become vociferous critics or keen advocates of the organisation. Learning what they really value about the ACF, and where they feel we could improve, is key. The detailed feedback from the survey will help the ACF build on the strengths of the organisation and identify any areas requiring action.

Staying power Recruitment and retention of cadets is one area where the insight provided by the survey may prove particularly helpful. For example, the results show that parents see many advantages to their children being cadets, with by far the highest scoring benefit being greater confidence. One parent said of their son: “He used to hate going to anything if he didn’t already know someone there. He now goes on camps and weekends away and sometimes he is the only one from his detachment. He’s not afraid, as he knows he will still have a good time and make friends when he’s there. This has

of parents and carers are already involved in the ACF as instructors or in some other way

30%

of those who would recommend the ACF to other parents cited building greater confidence as the strongest reason

73%

said joining the ACF was mainly their child’s initiative

ACF BENEFITS Asked to select the benefits that cadets get from theACF, parents chose these top three options

1 Greater confidence – 89% 2 Learning useful and practical skills – 85% 3 Better behaved/ more respectful – 53%

ARMYCADETS.COM 21


PARENTS SURVEY

improved his confidence massively and in doing so has improved his general outlook on joining in. He also now wants to iron – I can’t say I thought I would ever see the day that happened!” Other benefits of being a cadet that were highly valued by parents and carers included making new friends (88 per cent), learning useful and practical skills (85 per cent), developing more independence (79 per cent), and learning to work with others in a team (81 per cent). In addition, 57 per cent of parents who responded to the question believed that being a cadet helped their child to build resilience and a similar proportion were aware that being part of the ACF gave

their child the opportunity to take free vocational qualifications. As well as ensuring that cadets remain engaged with activities that are varied and challenging, there may be scope to improve how we convey the reasons behind those activities and highlight the benefits of the skills gained. There may also be ways we can help parents and carers better understand the full breadth and depth of the skills, qualifications and personal qualities that cadets can develop in the ACF and, in particular, their potential value to future educational institutions and

A LITTLE MORE DETAIL ON THE ACTIVITIES WOULD BE APPRECIATED, SO THAT AS PARENTS WE KNOW WHAT EQUIPMENT THEY MAY NEED

22 ACF AUTUMN 2018

employers. Armed with this information, parents will be more likely to encourage their children to remain cadets for longer and to make the most of the opportunities available to them. According to the survey, 72 per cent of parents and carers believe their child will continue with the ACF until they are 18, while 20 per cent are unsure.

Joining in When parents have better awareness of the value of being a cadet, they are also more


PARENTS SURVEY

As well as keeping parents and carers informed on cadet activities, we’re keen to give clear guidance on how they can get involved with the ACF as adult volunteers or civilian assistants

MY DAUGHTER HAS HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO CHALLENGE HERSELF IN SO MANY WAYS AND HAS LEARNED A LOT ABOUT HERSELF AND HER CAPABILITIES ALONG THE WAY. SHE HAS GAINED LOTS OF SKILLS, [AND] HAS AN AMAZING CV, WHICH WILL HELP HER GAIN EMPLOYMENT AFTER COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY

likely to spread the good word about the ACF within their personal networks. This will further improve our ability to recruit not just new cadets, but also adult volunteers. Even within the parents of existing cadets there is a sizeable pool of potential volunteers yet to be tapped into. According to the survey, 17 per cent of parents and carers are interested in becoming involved with the ACF as volunteers or instructors. In addition, another 20 per cent said they had not given it any thought before filling in the survey, but they might be interested. Ensuring that there is sufficient and appropriate information available to these adults is key, including clear guidance on how to become a volunteer, what is involved in the role and the benefits of becoming involved. The survey shows us that the majority of parents (69 per cent) have no connection at all with the ACF or armed forces. Any information regarding volunteering should, therefore, be delivered with that in mind, with those on the recruiting end ready to start with the basics and to dispel any misconceptions and fears that parents might have.

Closer communication The survey also provides a snapshot of how well we’re currently communicating with parents and how we can do so more effectively in the future. Encouragingly, 86 per cent of parents said they know some or a lot about the activities that take place in the ACF, but more than half would value even more insight. For example, one parent said: “It’s wonderful the range of activities and the opportunities that the cadets have access to. Just a little more detail on the activities would be appreciated, so that as parents we know what clothing and equipment they may need, and have more notice of timings.” Currently, the main source of information and updates for parents are their own children, followed by their local county Facebook pages. One parent said of their child: “There isn’t enough time for them to tell me about what they did, but they are always excited when telling me!” Many value Facebook and other sources of written communication to keep up-todate on activities. “I would prefer a letter from the Army Cadets with the relevant

info, as my son doesn’t always remember the full details,” said one parent. More than half of parents, meanwhile, would also like to hear about ACF updates and upcoming activities via email from their group leaders. Only 11 per cent currently receive information in this way. Overall, though, the message from parents and carers is that, however it reaches them, more information, received earlier, about the fantastic opportunities available to the cadets would be welcome. This will enable them to help their children to prepare and get properly equipped. It will also help parents and carers to engage more closely with their children about the activities they have participated in, to understand the full value of taking part and to help them make the most of their time as cadets. As one survey respondent commented: “Parent engagement is the key to success!”

FIND OUT MORE Visit www.armycadets.com to see more results from the survey

ARMYCADETS.COM 23


AT TITUDE SURVEY

SENIOR ADVISORS

A VITAL LINK THE COLONEL CADETS PROVIDE ADVICE AND SUPPORT TO THE ARMY ON ALL CADET MATTERS AND ARE A VOICE FOR CADETS AND CFAVS AT BRIGADE HQ

T

hroughout the UK, Colonel Cadets are on hand to advise the Army Regional Point of Command (RPOC) Commander and their HQ team on all issues relating to the Army’s cadets. They also act as an important conduit for volunteers to share

their ideas, concerns and experiences with the ACF and CCF, as well as acting as senior representatives for all CFAVs and cadets in their areas. To be eligible to apply for the role of Colonel Cadets, a candidate needs to have been appointed as either a Cadet Commandant in the ACF or Contingent Commander in the CCF. David Carson MBE

IT’S THE MOST CHALLENGING ROLE I’VE HELD, BUT ALSO THE MOST ENJOYABLE David Carson MBE

24 ACF AUTUMN 2018

is unique among the current cohort in that he has held both positions during his 20 years with the cadet forces and so has first-hand experience of working with cadets and volunteers across both organisations. “It isn’t my job to command anyone, but I do provide informed and experienced advice on any issues to do with cadets that come across the Commander’s desk,” says David. “That could be virtually anything, so it might relate to training, a disciplinary matter, safeguarding or organising a special event.”

Useful overview Prior to his appointment as the first Colonel Cadets for 43 Wessex Brigade (now HQ South West) in 2014, David spent seven years as Contingent Commander of Abingdon


COLONEL CADETS

DID YOU KNOW?

The Colonel Cadet is one of the most senior voluntary positions in the ACF and CCF

Colonel Cadets are becoming more involved in helping CFAVs strain on the wonderful adult prepare for the officer volunteers who give so much selection process

School CCF, followed by three years as County Commandant of Oxfordshire ACF, where he was responsible for commanding around 600 cadets and 120 CFAVs. While he is now more detached from day-to-day cadet activities, he has a valuable vantage point across the seven county ACFs and 52 CCFs in the South West, which includes the Channel Islands. “It’s the variety of the role that I’ve enjoyed the most, as I travel around a lot, meeting many people from different organisations, while representing HQ South West at events,” says David. “I’ve also really enjoyed raising awareness and understanding of the cadets among those in the Regular and Reserve Forces, and also trying to bring the organisations closer together. It’s been the most challenging role I’ve held, but also the most enjoyable and an absolute privilege.”

Speaking up Paul Shepherd OBE TD is Colonel Cadets for 38 (Irish) Brigade and describes the role as one of “a champion and conscience for the Army when it comes to the cadet movement”. “For example,” he says, “we offer a full menu of cadet activities in Northern Ireland, which I’m very proud of, but there’s always a risk that if you commit to too much it can put a

of their time. Sometimes it’s important to take stock and advise when enough is enough.” Paul, who for three years was a Vice President at the Cadet Force Commissions Board, is also involved in officer training and plays a key role in succession planning for new Commandants and Deputy Commandants, something he sees as very important. “Having been Cadet Commandant of the 1st (Northern Ireland) Battalion ACF for six years, I know how vital it is to get the right calibre of individuals for these demanding roles, and to ensure they can commit the time required to fulfil them successfully,” he says. He adds that at the heart of the Colonel Cadets role is good communication. “I’m regularly in touch with all of the CCF Contingent Commanders and the ACF Battalions and with Brigade headquarters, so I’m always contactable,” he says. “My advice to CFAVs and cadets is to remember their Colonel Cadets whenever they think of anything to do with their Brigades, because we’re here to help you. Similarly, when Brigade HQs seek our input and advice on matters relating to cadets, we’re there to look after your interests.”

GET IN TOUCH WITH YOUR COLONEL CADETS If you’re not yet familiar with them, find out who they are and get in touch to find out more about how they can help you. Why not invite them along to an upcoming event so you can get to know them better and share your thoughts, experiences and concerns? Remember, they’re there to champion the organisation and to be the voice of CFAVs and cadets.

ARMYCADETS.COM 25


K WEOYR K FIG NU G RW E IST H Y O U R U N I T

KEY FIGURES

THE ACF IN NUMBERS SOMETIMES NUMBERS SPEAK LOUDER THAN WORDS, SO HERE’S A COMPILATION OF THE HEADLINE FIGURES FROM THE PAST YEAR AT THE ACF

F

rom the number of those involved in the organisation to the attendance on the many courses that have taken place throughout 2017-18, these statistics highlight the level of commitment shown by the ACF’s cadets and volunteers and the depth and breadth of their achievement this year.

Cadets taking part in national sporting activities:

2016-2017 576 2017-2018 1,056

2016-2017

2017-2018

38,810 38,080 Male:female ratio:

Estimated number of hours devoted to ACF activities and training*:

Adults: 16.4 million Cadets: 28.5 million

NUMBER OF CADETS

33%

67% Cadets attending annual camp: (Source: Cadet Reporter)

2016-2017 20,377 2017-2018 22,963

NUMBER OF ADULTS

2016-2017

8,980

2017-2018

9,110

Male:female ratio:

71%

29%

NUMBER OF DETACHMENTS: 1,647 *Excludes standard parade nights

26 ACF AUTUMN 2018


KEY FIGURES

COURSES AND QUALIFICATIONS DOFE PASSES:

2017-2018 OFFICERS CFCB PASSES

2016-2017 125 2017-2018 123 MASTER CADET COURSE ATTENDEES (CTC)

2016-2017 151 2017-2018 188 CHAMPION CADET COMPETITION ATTENDEES (CTC)

2016-2017 15 2017-2018 36 COMMANDANTS AND AREA COMMANDERS COURSES ATTENDEES (CTC)

2016-2017 56 2017-2018 79 SKILL AT ARMS INSTRUCTORS COURSE ATTENDEES (ACF/CCF) (CTC)

2016-2017 253 2017-2018 287

Gold 142

ILM LEVEL 3 AWARDS – REGISTRATIONS (CVQO)

2016-2017 111 2017-2018 166

Silver 382

2016-2017 175 2017-2018 213

Total: 1,584 APC COMPLETIONS: 1 Star 5,657 2 Star 3,053 3 Star 1,168 4 Star 643

CADET FIRST AID QUALIFICATIONS:

2016-2017 5,986 2017-2018 6,942

2016-2017 391 2017-2018 493 CFAV FOUNDATION / INTERMEDIATE SKILLS PASSES (CCAT)

Bronze 1,060

Basic 11,639

CADET (16-18) FOUNDATION / INTERMEDIATE SKILLS PASSES (CCAT)

BTEC LEVEL 1 AWARDS – REGISTRATIONS (CVQO)

CFAV & CADET NATIONAL GOVERNING BODY (NGB) QUALIFICATION COURSE PASSES (CCAT)

2016-2017 28 2017-2018 27

2016-2017 355 2017-2018 645

BTEC LEVEL 2 AWARDS – REGISTRATIONS (CVQO)

2016-2017 488 2017-2018 675 Acronyms explained CTC – Cadet Training Centre, Frimley Park CCAT – Cadet Centre for Adventurous Training

ARMYCADETS.COM 27


TR AINING MATERIALS

TRAINING MATERIALS

A SYLLABUS FOR TODAY’S ACF A PILOT IS UNDER WAY TO PUT AN UPDATED AND REFRESHED ARMY PROFICIENCY CERTIFICATE SYLLABUS THROUGH ITS PACES

N

ow over 40 years old, the Army Proficiency Certificate (APC) syllabus is due an update to better reflect the activities and ethos of the ACF and Army today and to continue to appeal to young people, who now have many distractions and opportunities competing for their time and attention. One of the main changes for cadets will be the way the subjects are offered. The current system, whereby all areas of the syllabus are run at all star levels, will be replaced by a more flexible approach. Core subjects will be offered to all cadets for the first two years, after which cadets will choose certain elective subjects to progress to 3-Star and 4-Star level. There are also discussions around introducing some form of badge or recognition en route to achieving star-level

badges, which are awarded to cadets at the end of each year. “A year can feel like a long time for a cadet, so it’s important to reassure and encourage them along the way that they are making progress and achieving something,” says Lieutenant Colonel Stephen Berry RLC, SO1 Training Development.

Refresh and rethink As well as changes to how the APC is delivered, volunteers will see developments in the training content itself, explains Col Ian Holmes, CVQO Head of Operations and previously Commandant of Merseyside ACF. Seconded to Cadets Branch to lead the syllabus project, Ian has spent a lot of time consulting with senior leadership, and talking to CFAVs and cadets at camps and focus groups about how the syllabus might be improved.

WE RECOGNISE THAT ADULT VOLUNTEERS ARE BUSY PEOPLE, SO IT’S IMPORTANT THAT WE MAKE THE TRAINING MATERIALS AS INTUITIVE AS POSSIBLE Lt Col Stephen Berry

28 ACF AUTUMN 2018

The materials and resources for the first four subject areas are due to be ‘field tested’ in the coming months, says Ian. “Leadership, while currently touched upon in various parts of the syllabus, will become a new subject in its own right, while Cadet in the Community will be renamed Community Action and the content that falls under it will be refreshed and updated.” Fieldcraft is also due to be updated and one of the main changes will be the terminology used throughout. “The syllabus currently uses a lot of Army language, which for many adult volunteers is difficult and time-consuming to understand and implement,” says Stephen. “We recognise that adult volunteers are busy people, so it’s important that we make the training materials as intuitive and accessible as possible.” The fourth subject due a revamp is Physical Recreation, which will be changed to Physical Development, and will encompass not only physical fitness but also information on diet and nutrition, and health and lifestyle.

A progressive introduction The amended areas of the syllabus will now be ‘field tested’ by selected counties from September 2018.


TR AINING MATERIALS

DID YOU KNOW? Last year 11,639 cadets completed Basic training and a further 10,521 completed a 1, 2, 3 or 4 Star APC

“At the Training Officers’ Conference in September, each county will be briefed in detail on the changes and will receive all the supporting materials they need to prepare for and, if they want, start using the new training,” says Stephen. “We hope that over the next year they will become advocates of the new syllabus and will go back to their cadets, put the new training into practice and provide us with feedback. “No one welcomes change,” he adds, “and given that the CFAVs are often fitting their involvement with the ACF into work and home lives, it’s important that any changes we make are introduced smoothly and with as little change felt by the volunteers as possible.”

FIND OUT MORE The new Guide to Cadet Fieldcraft will be available on the Defence Gateway. This will use simpler terminology and include helpful, easy-to-understand graphics.

ARMYCADETS.COM 29


POLICY

ACF UPDATE

DR RICHARD CRAWFORD, SO1 CADETS POLICY AND PERSONNEL, TALKS ABOUT THE NEW ACF SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM THAT WILL GIVE CLEARER DIRECTION AND GUIDANCE TO VOLUNTEERS

NEWS

To subscribe to our e-newsletter go to armycadets.com/ about-us/keepin-touch

NEW GUIDANCE

Safety first

M

any of life’s experiences are exciting because of the element of risk. One thing that’s guaranteed to be the opposite of exciting is safety management. But, while it might not be the most riveting of subjects, it is an important one, and one that everyone in the ACF needs to be aware of. While all the MOD’s cadet forces operate under the Defence Safe System of Training, each of the single service cadet HQs has been directed to set out a safety management system (SMS) framework for its volunteers to use. These aim to guide volunteers or activity organisers through the safety assurance steps that they need to take and define a lessons process for when things go wrong (or indeed right), and they can inform how we run future events. HQ Regional Command Cadets Branch is now developing a SMS for the Army’s cadets. The aim is to create a coherent, comprehensive and efficient approach to safety management that enhances safety outcomes, while empowering CFAVs and reducing bureaucracy. The SMS will create the wider policy and organisational framework required to ensure the Safe System of Training is efficiently applied for all cadet activity. It will make clear where responsibility lies, create greater agility and freedom of action and allow more efficient use of resources. Efficient, streamlined processes will replace the current one-size-fits-all approach, to ensure volunteers spend less time filling in forms and more time running cadet activities.

Focused assurance One of the key changes in the SMS is the ability to pre-authorise certain activities for a set period. This means that counties can carry out

30 ACF AUTUMN 2018

well-defined, lower-risk activities without having to seek authorisation each time. The higher the safety risk that needs to be managed for an activity, the higher up the chain the authorisation needs to come from. This means that assurance is focused where it needs to be. This is not a new approach, and has been used successfully in parts of the CCF, so it’s only natural that the ACF would look to adopt good practice and develop an appropriate SMS that supports its training and activities.

Pre-authorisation Take, for example, detachments with adjoining ranges that often hold air rifle shooting on parade nights. Currently, this requires separate authorisation to be sought for each night that the range is used. Under the new SMS, a Commandant will be able to pre-authorise air rifle shooting in that detachment range for a set period, giving greater flexibility for volunteers in designing their detachment training programme. This will not remove the need to have all the necessary safety procedures in place and the range will still need to be run by current and competent volunteers. To give another example, where cadets are going to carry out a blank firing fieldcraft exercise, separate authorisation will be required, as the safety risk that needs to be managed is higher. In this case, a separate training application form will be required for the exercise to ensure that all safety measures are put in place.


UP DAT E

ACF OFFICERS

The following have been selected for a commission by CFCB PRV RNK

SURNAME

INITIAL COUNTY/BATTALION/SECTOR

PRV RNK

SURNAME

INITIAL COUNTY/BATTALION/SECTOR

SI

BLADON

DT

1ST (NI) BN ACF

SI

BOAG

KA

SSI

HAYNES

CL

1ST BN THE HIGHLANDERS ACF

SSI

KIRKWOOD

PH

GLASGOW AND LANARKSHIRE BN ACF

SSI

WRIGHT

LG

1ST BN THE HIGHLANDERS ACF

AUO

KATEHIS

M

GREATER LONDON SE SECTOR ACF

GLASGOW AND LANARKSHIRE BN ACF

AUO

BROWN

C

1ST BN THE HIGHLANDERS ACF

AUO

STRONG

C

GREATER LONDON SW SECTOR ACF

SI

TILLIER

JD

1ST BN THE HIGHLANDERS ACF

SSI

SUMNER

JS

GWENT AND POWYS ACF

SSI

NICOLSON

S

1ST BN THE HIGHLANDERS ACF

AUO

TWEEDIE

R

ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS BN ACF

AUO

LAMONT

SJ

HAMPSHIRE AND IOW ACF

AUO

BLAKEMORE

KL

HEREFORD AND WORCESTER ACF

AUO

BROWN

A

BEDFORDSHIRE AND HERTFORDSHIRE ACF

SMI

MARSHALL

A

HUMBERSIDE AND SOUTH YORKSHIRE ACF

AUO

HANLON

M

HUMBERSIDE AND SOUTH YORKSHIRE ACF

SI

FITZGIBBON

CJ

BERKSHIRE (ROYAL COUNTY OF) ACF

AUO

ELLIOT

M

BLACK WATCH BN ACF

AUO

BROOKS

C

HUMBERSIDE AND SOUTH YORKSHIRE ACF

SSI

DUDDRIDGE

K

BRISTOL (CITY AND COUNTY OF) ACF

AUO

BENNETT

S

HUMBERSIDE AND SOUTH YORKSHIRE ACF

AUO

CHERRIMAN

PJ

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE ACF

AUO

HAZLEWOOD

DF

KENT ACF

AUO

HALL

B

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE ACF

AUO

JACOBS

P

KENT ACF

AUO

WILLIS

MJ

CAMBRIDGESHIRE ACF

AUO

WAINWRIGHT

E

LEICESTER, NORTHANTS & RUTLAND ACF

SSI

JACKSON

CA

CAMBRIDGESHIRE ACF

SI

LEES

MA

LEICESTER, NORTHANTS & RUTLAND ACF

SSI

BLUNDELL

K

CAMBRIDGESHIRE ACF

SSI

HOWARD

EC

LINCOLNSHIRE ACF

SI

BLUNDELL

JF

CAMBRIDGESHIRE ACF

SMI

PHIPPS

A

MERSEYSIDE ACF

SSI

PROTACIO

JA

CAMBRIDGESHIRE ACF

SSI

CRAWFORD

J

MERSEYSIDE ACF

AUO

EASLEY

N

CITY OF LONDON & NE SECTOR ACF

AUO

MOORE

PW

CITY OF LONDON & NE SECTOR ACF

SI

CASSIDY

KD

NORTHUMBRIA ACF

SI

JUKES

SC

CLEVELAND ACF

SI

MCCORMELLA

JS

NORTHUMBRIA ACF

SSI

EAMES

EE

CLWYD AND GWYNEDD ACF

SI

DONALDSON

L

NORTHUMBRIA ACF

SMI

HIGGS

HA

DEVON ACF

SI

LANSDOWNE

CJ

NORTHUMBRIA ACF

AUO

PARRIN

T

DEVON ACF

SI

DRYDEN

DJ

NORTHUMBRIA ACF

AUO

NORWOOD

L

OXFORDSHIRE ACF

SSI

THOMPSON

MD

OXFORDSHIRE ACF

AUO

SCOTT

N

OXFORDSHIRE ACF

SSI

WHEELDEN

M

SHROPSHIRE ACF

AUO

BOYNE

AL

DEVON ACF

AUO

METCALFE

R

DEVON ACF

SSI

PREVETT

L

DEVON ACF

AUO

PARKER-BROCK S

DEVON ACF

AUO

SANDER MOORE

J

DEVON ACF

SI

SAMPSON

L

SOMERSET ACF

AUO

GUEST

DJ

DEVON ACF

AUO

HALE

R

SOMERSET ACF

ARMSTRONG

JA

SURREY ACF

R

SURREY ACF

SSI

SHEFFORD

C

DURHAM ACF

SI

AUO

TAYLOR

J

DURHAM ACF

SI

DE SOUZA

AUO

DENCH

J

ESSEX ACF

SI

BENSON

SJ

SUSSEX ACF

AUO

WASS

D

ESSEX ACF

SSI

PINZANI BOND

G

SUSSEX ACF

How we develop and use risk assessments will also be looked at in this framework. This will include the opportunity to have pre-written risk assessments for facilities such as obstacle courses, allowing the CFAV leading the activity to focus on the dynamic risk assessment on the day, taking account of variables such as weather. While this approach will not be possible, or indeed suitable, for all facilities and training areas, the

new framework will help to identify those where it is. Cadets Branch will be publishing its draft SMS in the autumn and working with key stakeholders to refine and finesse it. The new Army Cadets SMS will set out how we will learn from activities and take these lessons into our policy and processes, including identifying and promoting good practice where it happens. We will promote and

communicate the SMS to ensure it is properly understood, and adapt our training and publications to reflect any changes. Importantly, the Army Cadets SMS is an evolutionary rather than a revolutionary change. In many ways, it is about doing what we already do, only better, more efficiently and with a more discerning approach to risk management. It will not be another set of forms to fill in or process.

ARMYCADETS.COM 31


G A L L E RY

IN THE FIELD

KEEP IN TOUCH BY SENDING US YOUR PHOTOS FROM THE FIELD. WHETHER THEY’RE SELFIES OR ACTION SHOTS, DRILL OR FUNDRAISING, EMAIL THEM TO EDITOR@ARMYCADETS.COM

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IN THE PHOTOS: 1: Female cadets from East Midlands and East Anglia attended Exercise Sapper Cadet at Chetwynd Barracks, Nottingham. The event was held to encourage cadets to consider careers in engineering. 2: Cadets from 2nd (NI) Bn, Mary, Jodie, Thomas, Kyle and Conan, successfully completed their Gold expedition in the Wicklow Mountains, 24–27 June. 3: Three ways to enjoy the great outdoors! SI Asa Burrows from Essex ACF came across this dog and his owner during a DofE expedition at annual camp. 4: Smiles from Humberside and South Yorkshire cadets at annual camp in Longmoor.

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5: Her Royal Highness The Princess Royal was in attendance, along with Prime Minister Theresa May, at the National Armed Forces Day parade in Llandudno, where cadets from Clwyd and Gwynedd ACF were led by the Corps of Drums. 6: Cadets from Durham ACF Band and Bugles marched in the Disneyland Paris parade in front of thousands of holidaymakers. 7: Pontefract Detachment recently held an open day – well done to all who took part. 8: CVQO Westminster Award finalists cadet Jasmine Roper, from Yorkshire North and West ACF, and cadet Jack Larder, from Suffolk ACF, attended a prize-giving ceremony at the House of Lords. Jasmine was awarded the ILM Achievement Award. 9: Cadets from Oxfordshire, Royal County of Berkshire, Clwyd and Gwynedd, and 1st Northern Ireland Battalion took part in a tour in Gibraltar, meeting the territory’s cadets and mayor.

32 ACF AUTUMN 2018

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THE GALLERY

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6

We want to see your images of ACF life. Send pictures of your detachment’s activities to us by the end of September 2018

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7

SHARE YOUR PHOTOS 8

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Whether you’re at camp, doing command tasks, or any other fun or adventurous activity, send your images to editor@armycadets.com

ARMYCADETS.COM 33


D AY I N T H E L I F E

Kate Dunscombe

I love mentoring people and helping to shape their lives As well as being a Signalling Systems Trainer for London Underground, Kate Dunscombe somehow finds time to be an Army Reservist and a Company Sergeant Major with the ACF It’s careful planning that allows Kate to fit in her important work with the ACF and Army Reserve with her demanding full-time job working for London Underground. Here she diarises one of her typical days...

06.20 Get up, get dressed, breakfast. 07:30 Catch the train from my home near Watford to Acton Town, where Transport for London has its London Underground Signalling School. 09:00 I start work, training London Underground’s future signal engineers, who will be responsible for everything from the control logistics, software and hardware to operating equipment on the signals and points. Every line has a different signalling system, due to the age of technology, so we run various

courses throughout the year. I work in an office with eight other trainers, teaching groups of between four and 16, mainly men.

16:00 I’ll head off home at around this time, although my routine is flexible, depending on what my trainees need from me. When I’m delivering a longer or more intensive course, the students might need additional help, so I’ll stay on and give them as much time as they need.

19:00 Tonight I’m heading to one of the detachments for a senior cadet planning meeting. One of my first initiatives since becoming a Company Sergeant Major around Easter time this year was to set up a Senior Cadet Working Group. It’s an opportunity for all 3-Star and 4-Star cadets in the company to share their views and provide feedback on behalf of the cadets. I’m there to oversee these monthly meetings and to feed back to HQ, helping to ensure we continue to provide the best training possible.

Share your story Would you like to feature in a future edition of the magazine? Write and tell us how you manage a day job and volunteering for the cadets. Email: editor@armycadets.com

34 ACF AUTUMN 2018

MEET KATE Kate Dunscombe Rank: Sergeant Major Instructor, Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire ACF. Sergeant in 65 Works Group Royal Engineers, part of 170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group. Why I volunteer: I loved being an Army cadet. I made many friends and was keen to keep those relationships going. Many of my friends went on to become volunteers. I love mentoring people and helping to shape the lives of the more senior cadets and instructors, who may go on to become future leaders. Transferable skills: Many of the skills and qualities I’ve gained with the ACF have proven to be very valuable in my job with London Underground. I have made quite a few contacts in the rail industry and have seen how keen they are to engage with cadets and get them involved in apprenticeship schemes and work experience. The skills, values and standards that we teach in the cadet forces are highly attractive to these big companies.


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