Page 1

LONDON

Fashion Arts Culture Entertainment


Photographer: Slava Mogutin

LAISSEZ FAIRE -issue 12-

Issue 12 lines-up with a solid art-fest in defence, a head-strong Russian in midfield, and a creative attacking force up-front so stupendous, imaginative, weird and outlandish that it rearranges the contents of your soul - Be warned, issue 12 contains flashing images that may corrupt innocent minds! This hand crafted precision tooled kit began as an illegal street-corner rag containing atheistic sets of evolutionary articles. Now, we boast an Olympian ability to be a real game-changer: forget the Leveson Enquiry, we’ve got MP’s on speed dial! A bit unorthodox we may be, but in our hearts beats a conviction that we are winners, supernovas blazing at the cusp of a momentous shift in the heavens. But for all you know, we may be operating from a roof top estate. So despite all our imperfections, you’ve got to admit, it’s a much better read than the Metro… INIT! Your muckraking editor, Maximus Jo Kerr McGuire

INSIDE: REMOTE CONTROL - Institute of Contemporary Art SIMPLE MINDS - Yoanna Pietryk the minimalist illustrator ACADEMY AWARDS - Tanya Russell at The Art Academy FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE - Slava Mogutin: the rebellious Russian COFI RADIO - Unsigned and amazing live music POLITICAL ANIMAL - Comedian Andy Zalztman BATTLE OF THE BOOKS - Book reviews WHO’ S NEXT - The Miller-Man and Madonna FEELING GOOD ABOUT FILMS - Sundance London Film Festival and more...

LAISSEZFAIRELONDON

LAISSEZ FAIRE LONDON is published by Richmond Media Ltd H.Q: 6 Powder Mill House , 6 Greens Court , Soho , London W1F 0HG www.laissezfairelondon.co.uk editor@laissezfairelondon.co.uk 020 7439 0612 -- 077 7923 8527


FASHION ART

SIMPLE MINDS

Another powerful piece of work. Yoanna Pietrzyk is a dab hand at illustration with great technique and vision. Minimalist in style and minimalist in nature, her ruthlessness is in its simplicity. Whilst dazzling her with my varied and brilliant powers of conversation, I was able to deduce that Yoanna is driven on by an emotional powerhouse. Her work is portrayed through the intricate cogs of her visual mind turning over and over and over and over and over...

I look at your drawings and I find myself asking the question: “What is the meaning of life�, or is that just my philosophical take on it all?

I observe, analyse, then create. It is a thought process... I guess trying to memorise that feeling of satisfaction when I finish a piece of work helps me to continue creating better pieces. So yes. How would you describe your style of illustration?

It changes, but I think it is minimalist. How long have you been an illustrator?

Professionally last 3 years, but prior to that I worked with photography, and in fine arts.


Artist: Yoanna Pietrzyk www.yoannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com www.joannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com

What techniques do you combine to produce these images?

When and where did you begin drawing?

It is a bit of an experiment, I just try to explore new possibilities.

In the kitchen. When I was 2 years old.

What do think of the fashion industry and how does an illustrator like you fit in?

Where do you take your inspiration from?

As much as I appreciate the fashion industry, it is a bit of a monster. But I did some stuff for fashion week, before, so I guess I fit alright.

People. And the map of my heart. Which other artists do you respect and why?

I listen to music.

There are so many, but it is Egon Schiele for his raw form of expression and simplicity, and generally the Pre Raphaelites.

Does illustrating act as a kind of stress release?

What would be your ideal project and why?

It is a form of an expression so it is far more than just a stress release.

I work with guys called Furious Knights, it all relates to music, so I think I am in a right place.

When not drawing, what else do you do?

What type of music do you like?

Everything really.


ART

Words by Zainab Hakim Twitter: @ZLHakim Email: z.hakim@hotmail.co.uk

‘REMOTE CONTROL’

At the Institute for Contemporary Art London 3rd April- 10th June

I’ve always found there to be something quite exciting about the Institute of Contemporary Art. Cleverly disguised amongst the expansive façade of buildings across the Mall, it is a hidden gem. Remote Control looks at an extensive history of television.

Remote Control, Installation View, 2012 Photo: Victoria Erdelevskaya


This assault made by Serra on advertisers and their mobilization of television as a medium for repression, gives its title to a set of live events...

Honouring the digital switch-over which took place in April of this year, Remote Control both questions our relationship with media and the affect which it has on the formation of present day society and its history. I was dubious, to say the least. With a theme like television, it is imaginably quite easy to concede with a negative attitude towards media corporation, banking on an idealistic bohemian vision of a world without the burden of technology. However my fears were lulled by curator Matt Williams.

Felix Gets Broadcasted Mark Leckey, 2007

This assault made by Serra on advertisers and their mobilization of television as a medium for repression, gives its title to a set of live events, which work with the exhibition in order to create a larger body of knowledge. Under the heading of ‘Television Delivers People,’ these events include talks and film screenings, all of which become identified with the message of Serra’s work. In the Upper Gallery, an exploration of the relationship between art and television takes place. Artists such as Adrian Piper, Harun Farocki and Andrei Ujică explore the political aspects of the medium and its use as a source of image production. What is evident here is the role of media representation and the exploitative techniques used to establish a falsified kind of history. Here also are works by internationally known artists from Tauba Auerbach to Hito Steryl. Mark Leckey’s 2007 Turner Prize winning work ‘Felix Gets Broadcasted’ weaves the recognizable image of Felix the Cat with signal disturbances, which fill the upper gallery, interrupting the meditation of any other work.

In the Lower Gallery’s installation by Simon Denny stands a relic of analogue broadcasting hardware used by Channel 4. This mammoth machine, as well as referencing its powerful history, serves to highlight its now defunct nature. This work indicates the human plight of progress, recognizing the development of technology as well as its demise. Also in Denny’s arrangement, sixteen television screens line a wall, playing films by artists, all of which reference the essential role which television plays in our lives. Videos by international artists like Antek Walczak, Dan Graham and Dara Birnbaum, play on a continuous loop, only audible to those able to score a set of headphones. The seminal work by Richard This unusual collection of material is bought together in order to create an exhibition, which Serra entitled ‘Television Delivers People’ (1973) is one of these videos. Juxtaposing lounge music with demonstrates our capacity for the scrutiny of technology. For me the most exciting aspect of the text that questions our sensibility, Serra tells us ‘you are the product of T.V.’ exhibition is that as well as suggesting the inherent power of technology, the control we hold over it is synonymous with the message of Remote Control.


ART

Words by MJKM

ACADEMY AWARDS

I recently caught up with Fellow artist, Tanya Russell, Principal and founder of The Art Academy, to give us a fascinating account on a vision that became reality. Something about Tanya inspired me with awe. Was it her indomitable will, history of achievement, or strength of character? It was like she’d been genetically designed for this particular period of time. Creating The Art Academy is a Herculean job. Nobody could have done it better than Tanya Russell. I guess The Art Academy is a culmination of all your passion and expertise under one roof, but how did you begin your journey as an artist in the first place?

My parents are both sculptors, and they did lots of work on large-scale public sculptures. Later, I did an apprenticeship with them, which was very practical involving all aspects of being an artist. Following that, I ventured out in search of a greater range of influences and techniques to help me develop further. It was through this later journey that I realised what other people might need, and that’s what the Academy is now set up to offer. After successfully being commissioned to produce many fine pieces of sculptures, at which

For us, it’s vitally important for each student to find their original unique vision. We train them to develop a really rigorous design process and critique methodology to develop their own individual vision. They learn traditional and contemporary practical skills with a higher level of tuition time than in most other colleges, along with much smaller class sizes. We can only do this because we have stayed small and can be flexible in a way that the mainstream organisations can’t. We also offer a lot of opportunities for commissions and exhibitions outside the Academy during the diploma course - for example, two of our students have just had a £15000 work commissioned by the Honourable Artillery Company.

point did you decide to start The Art Academy?

It was about 1998. I had met many fine-art students frustrated at the lack of enough essential building You are the Principal and you still teach – is that right? blocks on which to build their practice, develop their own creative process and work as professional Yes, I do – I am still a professional sculptor and students need constant contact with actual working artists to give them the best all-round experience. I find that along with my students I am always artists. learning. My practice inevitably changes and develops, so there are constantly new things for the The Art Academy is branded as an alternative to other fine art institutions. Can you students and I to share. explain in what way(s) that would be?


For us, it’s vitally important for each student to find their original unique vision. We train them to develop a really rigorous design process and critique methodology to develop their own individual vision.

We just passed our 10th birthday and extremely happy that such a large majority of our alumni have had such success since they’ve graduated. I am also particularly proud that there is such diversity in the work that our alumni continue to produce. What’s the definition of fine-art in this ever changing society?

It’s almost impossible to pin down – but I try to make a comparison between visual and verbal languages – if you say something with the express intention of communicating something, we call it language. If we create something that we can see or experience to communicate something, we call it art. This leaves artists free to communicate whatever they wish, using the materials, styles and techniques of their choice, and considerable skill and creative vision is needed to make the best use of all that is available to them. I believe that any kind of expression is valid, in whatever medium or style the artist considers to be the best way to express their intention: figurative, abstract, installation, performance, digital, temporary, site-specific, readymade, land art or anything in between or outside of these categories. They all have their place and most have existed across cultures since mankind first started making art. Artificial barriers have often been erected between them, with the supporters of various ‘traditional’ or ‘contemporary’ movements claiming superiority, but in truth one is essentially no better than any other: some simply have attributes that make them better suited to certain situations or forms of expression.

How has The Art Academy transformed itself over the years and is it now the manifestation of what you imagined?

We’ve expanded in many ways whilst remaining flexible and responsive. Our students now work in a community of over 20 working artists. We now have a body of high-quality and dedicated tutors, who are all professional artists, in many different fields. We constantly expand our programmes and the skills we teach in response to new media and techniques – for example, we’ve just opened a beautiful new print studio, which offers open access for artists. Our original vision remains the same, but the manifestation of it will continually adapt to stay relevant. What kind of courses do you now run and how successful has the academy become?

At the core of the Academy’s teaching is our Fine Art Diploma course, and our new Foundation course - these courses can offer a whole journey towards becoming a professional working artist. Alongside that, we offer short courses to enable anyone to get involved.


When one thinks of sculpture, one thinks of great artists of times long gone, like Michelangelo. Are there any differences in the way they used to create sculptors and the way we are taught nowadays?

Each era has its own emphasis in artistic style and media, based on the ideas that predominate in society at the time. The artistic training in Michelangelo’s time was far more skills-based. Most artists were taught in apprenticeships, where they followed in the tradition of their ‘master’. In the Renaissance there was a huge emphasis on studying the human form, anatomy, proportion etc as the artist’s focus was centred on the ideals of humanism. Today we are very fortunate as artists that society’s ideas are very broad and liberal, we also have a far wider range of materials and processes to utilize. The concepts, process and experience of making and viewing the work are often more important to the artist today than the product and its formal qualities. For this reason, Art education tends to be focused on developing these ideas. The subtleties of the formal language and the means of expressing those ideas are of less importance in the mainstream – this is also a cheaper method of training which suits most university budgets! At the Academy, we place equal emphasis on the understanding of why we are producing art, and teaching people the broad skills which will enable them to manifest that work. What personal projects are you working on now or have lined-up for the foreseeable future?

As well as art I am passionate about animals and animal welfare. Personally, I want make a difference in this area with my art. Each year I offer myself to do commissions to raise money for Battersea Dogs and Cats home at their annual auction. I am always involved in raising awareness to the suffering we cause to animals. Alongside this, I continue to take on numerous public and private commissions, which is my passion after all.


Words by Jon Madge

COMEDIAN

ANDY ZALTZMAN

Andy Zaltzman is a stand-up with live tours, TV appearances, a radio series and a long-running podcast beneath his comedic belt. Now he’s embarking on a new solo show and a weekly political comedy showcase in London’s Soho Theatre. Despite all of that, he found time to tell us all about the new shows and why he’s the only act in comedy daring enough to tell the jokes he tells. How is a solo show different to organising and compering a group of other comedians?

Political Animal

Well they’re quite different. As a compere you have a responsibility to set the gig up for other acts, whereas with a solo show you can just do what you want and sink or float accordingly. I think the difference in structure makes it quite easy to keep the two separate. You’ve been on TV, on the Radio, you’ve done live shows and you host the weekly Bugle podcast, do you have a favourite genre?

The podcast has been great because you have complete freedom to do exactly what you want how Politics and comedy have always had an uneasy relationship in the UK. Whilst America has primetime you want it, and you don’t have to worry about getting shows recommissioned. As a comedian that’s TV satire like the Daily Show and iconic legends like Bill Hicks, we’ve got Have I Got News For You fantastic and we’ve built up a large audience over the years. But the great thing with stand-up is the and eye everything else with suspicion. Why? exhilaration of live performance and the feedback you get that you don’t get with recorded stuff. One of the answers to that question could be that we’re absurdly complicated as a nation. That’s a good If you had to tell audiences to only go to your solo show or Political Animal, which would thing, bear with me. We’re the only country in the world with a ‘two and half party’ political system, you recommend? we’re half democracy, half monarchy and most of us know how we’d run the country if we got half a I’d probably say go to the one that’s geographically closest to you. In London that’s Political Animal. chance. That’s why we don’t have much political comedy in the mainstream, because there are so many That’s me being diplomatic to myself there, I’ve managed not to offend my solo or my Political Animal points of view. And that’s also why our political comedy scene is so good. audience. Political Animal, a new weekly show at the Soho Theatre, makes an immutable truth of that point. What is political animal? Hosted by Andy Zaltzman, a veteran of the political stand-up circuit, the show gives a mix of new and Political Animal is a stand-up show featuring comedians doing comedy that is largely about politics. established comics the chance to talk about big ideas, global issues and all things political. That’s politics in the broadest sense, not just Westminster bickering. I think that as a gig people would The night opened with Nick Doody and Stephen Grant, both of whom covered everything from the probably stay away from. It’s about broad global and national issues. Brixton riots to wheelie bins and religion. The final act was the American Lee Camp, who’s currently I guess I wanted to set up a gig that gave performing a solo show around the country. This line-up of international acts, tasters of larger shows comedians a chance to do comedy about politics and fantastically relatable club comics looks set to be the template the coming weeks will follow and without feeling they have to win over crowds of it’s a great way to do things.

stag parties or suchlike in the audience first.

The old criticisms of political stand-ups, mostly that it’s a night of people shouting ‘we hate the government’, certainly don’t apply here. Each stand-up has a different way of doing things: Doody struts the stage telling deftly crafted self-contained jokes while Grant’s fast-paced observations come almost too quickly to keep up with. Towards the end of the night, Lee Camp mixes hilariously stupid one-liners with an astute grasp of American pop-culture that’s reminiscent of George Carlin.

What made you want to do a regular political stand up show?

I guess I wanted to set up a gig that gave comedians a chance to do comedy about politics without feeling they have to win over crowds of stag parties or suchlike in the audience first. I just wanted to provide a forum to do that kind of material that can be hard to do on the circuit, because it’s not what people at certain gigs have come to see. You’re doing political animal side by side with a new solo show, Armchair Revolutionary,

Weaving together the show is the man who’s also responsible for it happening, Andy Zaltzman. what’s that about? Confessing early on that he’s “not a natural compere”, Zaltzman juggles banter with the audience and Armchair Revolutionary is a development of the show I did at the Edinburgh festival last year. It’s unwieldy metaphors with an honesty that you don’t often get with polished, established comedians. largely about the Arab revolutions and the state of democracy in Britain, plus some puns about dogs and an Edith Piaf joke. So there’s a broad mix of comedy and it’s developed as the global situation has That connection with the audience might have something to do with the venue, which is set out like a developed since I wrote it. 1930s vaudeville theatre, circular tables dotted around in front of the stage. You half expect one of the acts to come on singing and dancing with a feather boa. In that sort of setting it’s hard not to feel like Are you the only comedian currently doing jokes about Edith Piaf and the Arab revolutions the difference between the stage and the seats is really only a matter of semantics. in the same show? I would be confident about that yes. There are probably comedians who do jokes about the Arab Political comedy doesn’t get much rawer or better than this. And in a world with global warming, revolutions and some who are doing jokes about Edith Piaf but whether they have the courage to spending cuts and Rebecca Brooks that’s a good thing, because a good laugh is what we need. combine the two is unlikely.


Interviewed by MJKM

CULTURE

Slava Mogutin

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

In Slava Mogutin we trust, because truth comes at a price. A Russian exile, a gay journalist and poet whose inflammatory works salutes the post-Soviet establishment with a stiff middle finger, whom also happens to have a flair for fine-art, photography, graphic design, poetry and all that stuff we dig at Laissez Faire London. Fleeing Russia at age twenty-one after numerous death threats and successfully gaining political asylum in New York (1995), makes Slava the first Russian to be granted U.S. sanctuary from persecution for sexual orientation. True to form, he became an underground upstart and dedicated the rest of his time fine-tuning the usual artistic street craft into varying degrees of perverse and provocation that has taken Slava Mogutin to an all new level. Slava is never one to be afraid of a test of strength. Inside that street-steady-shell and a too-cool-for-school attitude, Mr Mogutin is a spunky and formidable presence, good natured and jocular despite his fierce rhetoric, and brawler with a grand strategy. We have chosen to focus on some earlier works by Slava, as that was the beginning of his truth seeking mission. Pictures paint a thousand words, but he didn’t need to draw pictures, we both knew he was treading on hot coals. Just look at his burning conclusions! In new Russian, Slava is a bit of a celeb. Beset by questions and queries, riddles and requests, his works of art and books are sold out quickly. Full of bristle-and-bone and a fuck-you attitude, one can imagine him abusing KGB’s through the letterbox and refusing to open the door till he saw the warrant. The more you assume a humble attitude, the more they treat you like that. You need to irritate them a bit. An inspirational story this is; you can come from nowhere and make the grain. However, we’re here to celebrate his creative pizazz and join in any pissing contests along the way...


Independence Day Parade - Russia

Your early beginnings, amidst exile and asylum, all started with a bang. Was it fortunate or unfortunate to have those experiences? Laissez Faire:

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger, as they say. All I’ve always wanted to do as a writer and artist is to express myself in the most radical and honest way. And I was prepared to pay the price. Looking back, I can say that nothing ever fell from the sky and I had to fight for acceptance and my very existence in a totally conservative and oppressive environment. When I came out publicly and started publishing my writings back in the early 90’s, my Russian critics were outraged and labelled me a pervert and psycho, a danger to society, and openly called for my prosecution, imprisonment and even forced psychiatric treatment – something that was commonly used against dissidents in the Soviet times. If I paid much attention to those threats and insults, or if I was praised from my early age, I wouldn’t have accomplished much in life. And I’m happy to say that my example and struggle inspired others in my country and other places to speak out and stand up for their rights and freedoms. Slava:

How were you influenced in your early surroundings that made you push the boundaries of censorship in communist Russia? Laissez Faire:

I belong to the last generation that grew up under Communism, but it’s fair to say that I’m a product of Gorbachev’s Perestroika, which brought us an explosion of previously banned books, movies, art, and music. Undoubtedly, it was the most exciting and euphoric time in recent Russian history and I happened to be in the midst of it when I ran away from my dysfunctional family and moved to Moscow at the age 14. Needless to say, I have slight nostalgia about my Communist childhood, the uniforms we had to wear and all those mysterious rituals we performed in front of portraits of Lenin and other Communist leaders. In retrospect, I think of it as a sort of performance art that we were forced into – it was highly symbolic and idealistic. Perhaps that’s where my attraction to uniforms and rituals of all sorts comes from. And maybe that’s why my Russian pictures are a little more sentimental than the rest of my work. Slava:

Cadets dressing up

Dima & Lenin

I’m trying to figure out how photography became a part of your creative arsenal? Being threatened with imprisonment and fighting for political asylum, did you also squeeze in a few master-classes in photography along the way? Laissez Faire:

My art is a continuation of my writings and I remain a poet in everything I do. I started doing photography at the same time as writing poetry – as a teenager. I had a primitive darkroom set up in our bathroom, where I was printing my first pictures – mostly portraits of friends and underground rock stars. When I moved to Moscow, I became involved in the unofficial art scene, although I was mostly known as a hooligan poet and journalist, and one of few open queers in a country of 150 million people. When I found myself as a 21-year-old political exile in New York, I hardly spoke any English. I wanted to jump over the language barrier and started focusing more on my visual work. I was fortunate to work with great artists and photographers, like Bruce LaBruce, Terry Richardson and Attila Richard Lukacs. This amazing experience gave me enough confidence to move forward and eventually I started publishing and exhibiting my work. Ever since, photography remains my main language and passion. Slava:


They say ‘an artist’s work reflects their personality.’ So from the looks of it, would I be right in calling you: queer, radical, sadistic, dissenter of authority, that just so happens to be an artistic genius? (I mean that in the nicest possible way) But obviously, there is always more than meets the eye. So in your own words, how would you describe yourself? Laissez Faire:

My father, a former Communist and born-again Christian, refers to my work as “anal filth.” I used to take pleasure in playing the bad boy – the damned and the cursed. There’s no point in denying that there was a strong element of provocation in my earlier work. I think being a militant queer or Pinko Commie Fag was the only effective tactic back at the time when I could be destroyed if I didn’t show my fangs and muscles. I still enjoy showing my muscles time to time but I think over the years I became less aggressive and more versatile (in the nicest possible way) and naturally it’s reflected in my work. I don’t need to prove anything to anyone anymore and I don’t care about shock value or scandal. My bad reputation will probably follow me for the rest of my life anyway, so what do I care? Slava:

When you started out in the 1990’s, you were involved in some shacklebreaking projects that told the world to “fuck off and this is who I am”, and you made your point pretty well. Nowadays, who gives a shit if you’re openly gay and flaunting it. How do think your work has helped people to be proud of whom they are and come out bursting from the closet liberated? Laissez Faire:

Guillaume Triptych

I dream of the time when being gay or lesbian or trans-gender is no longer an issue. But if you look at the current events in Russia, it seems like things are getting from bad to worse – in terms of gay rights or human rights in general. I’m getting lots of emails from Russia from gay people who desperately want to leave the country and ask me for help and advice. Luckily, my political asylum case did help a lot of people who managed to escape. I was the first Russian granted asylum in the US because of the homophobic persecution, and many more similar cases followed. Politics aside, I’m now much more interested in the post-gay and post-gender ideals. If you look at my recent work, including my fashion stuff, it’s less about machism and masculinity and more about androgyny and gender-bending. We live in the Age of Aquarius and I’m excited about discovering my feminine side! Slava:

Laissez Faire:

Do you follow politics? If yes, what are your thoughts on this?

I usually start my day with listening to BBC, NPR and a couple of Russian radio stations that I used to work for, Radio Liberty and Echo of Moscow. My boyfriend Brian thinks I pay too much attention to politics and all the bad news bring too much negativity into our life. I’m very much interested in what’s going on in the world and I want to be in the loop of the events – unless I’m on vacation in Costa Rica or Morocco. Then I don’t even miss news or politics – I’d rather be having sex on the beach! Slava:

You are an acclaimed poet, writer, photographer and multimedia artist. What other aspects of art and culture do you wish to explore? Laissez Faire:

I don’t want to be limited by any particular genre or medium and prefer to mix them all – text, photo, video, performance, painting, installation, etc… To me, it’s the same creative process. When Brian and I formed SUPERM back in 2004, it became a perfect platform for our multimedia experiments and collaborations with other likeminded artists. We already did shows together in 10 countries, and many more to come. Ironically, in Russia I’m still mostly known as a poet, and in the West very few people are familiar with my writings. I continue to write in English, although not as much as I used to, and I incorporate text in my visual work. I’m bad at predictions and long-term commitments, but for the time being photography remains my preferred medium. However, this can change in a matter of next years or months, as I’m increasingly more interested in moving image, video and film formats. Slava:

Boot Licker


Phillip & Grant

Sneaker Sniffer


Small Gains

Jesse NYC Go Go

No Love

We’re pretty much the same age, in fact, you are 5 days older I. Do you feel any mellower; chilled out a bit more; taking it easier, or are you just as tenacious, belligerent and hardcore as you were at 21? Laissez Faire:

...I still have the same anger, the same urge against the Machine – the bigotry and hypocrisy of mainstream culture, the moral taboos and stereotypes of mass media, the social injustice that we all face in our corporate, hypercapitalist reality.

I could never imagine myself in my 30’s but here I am in my late 30’s and I still feel like a teenager! I mellowed down in terms of my self-destructive behaviour: I don’t drink as much as I used to, I try not to get into fights or get my ass arrested, I try to restrain myself from shoplifting or breaking the law in some other stupid, childish ways. But I still have the same anger, the same urge against the Machine – the bigotry and hypocrisy of mainstream culture, the moral taboos and stereotypes of mass media, the social injustice that we all face in our corporate, hyper-capitalist reality. And I still remain independent and true to myself – saying what I want to say and doing what I love to do, without compromising or thinking of the right career choices.

Simon Triptych Final

Slava:


Scott St. Sebastian

Duck Tapped

Laissez Faire:

What is next on the horizon for Slava Mogutin and when will you be next in London?

I’m working on a couple of new book projects and some upcoming shows in New York, Amsterdam, Barcelona, Madrid and Bergen. Unfortunately, no plans for London yet, as my former gallery there, Blow de la Barra, closed after the death of Isabella Blow, the late wife of one of the owners, Detmar Blow. The last show Brian and I did there back in 2007 was called But Her Majesty’s Roastbeef Curtains Wouldn’t Open For Him, and the title was about my deportation from the UK. Since I was a Russian citizen, I needed visa but was denied entry on the grounds of some bureaucratic mistake with my paperwork. After spending a night at the immigration holding cell at Luton airport, I was sent back to Berlin, where Brian and I had a studio that summer. It happened in a middle of a diplomatic war between Russia and the UK over the poisoned spy Alexander Litvinenko and it seemed to me that I became a casualty of that war. When I was escorted to the plane by 4 armed immigration officers, I felt like I was in a bad James Bond movie. Recently I came back to London as a US citizen to photograph and interview Gilbert and George on the occasion of their latest show at White Cube. I flew to Luton on a private G5 jet with one of my collector friends, with no questions asked at the customs, no security check whatsoever – a perfect way to forget and forgive and reunite with my British friends! Slava:

Spasiba Slava Mogutin

Andre Wet

www.slavamogutin.squarespace.com


MUSIC

Words by Jon Madge

COFI RADIO Romping home to bag the headlines this month are 5 acts to look out for:

London is an amazing place to see live music Anywhere else in the world, music happens at specific places at particular times of the day on one or two days of the week. But in London, you can walk up a flight of stairs in a small pub on a Tuesday evening and find a DJ setting up or a band plugging in their amps. In fact, it’s not that weird to find both. It’s so much a part of the history and the character of the city that, really, the only downside to the music scene in London is that there might be too much of it. When you’re living in a city of 7 and half million people, hundreds of thousands of gig venues, pubs and clubs, the music scene can seem a bit impenetrable. So that’s why there’s Cofi Radio. Cofi Radio is a newly launched internet radio station. Our mission is pretty straightforward: find new and unsigned musicians in London and share them with the world. You know when you turn on the radio, find a song you don’t like and skip stations only to find it’s playing on them too? We decided we hate that, and then we decided that we should do something about Cameron J Niven it. Why should the same handful of bands with rich record labels get to have their run of the airwaves when there are so many phenomenal bands, DJs, MCs and singer-songwriters playing in venues not You know that golden age of singer-songwriters that every boy with a guitar strives for? When you much bigger than a living room? were in the company of Bob Dylan, Neil Young and Nick Drake, rather than James Blunt? Cameron So on the 23rd of April we started a weekly show, broadcasting from Camden’s SSR studios, featur- Niven takes you right back to that time, with the kind of delicate riffs and genuinely heartfelt lyrics that ing all unsigned acts from in and around London. If they’re playing gigs, we tell you where you can make you realise the effect music can have on you if it only tries. see them. If they’ve got an album out, we tell you where you can get it. But most importantly, we let anyone who wants to listen to fantastic music made by people who aren’t in it for the money, aren’t in Cameron’s a true singer-songwriter and his only real fault, in this humble writer’s opinion, is that he makes you sickeningly jealous that you’re not him whenever he’s playing. it for the fame but just want to make something really worth listening to. That’s who we are, and Laissez Faire has been kind enough to invite us to give our pick of great London www.facebook.com/cameronjniven acts in each issue. You can tune in to Cofi Radio at www.cofiradio.co.uk. If you want to be played on the show, check out the site for details of how to get in touch.


Cameron Cole The White Stripes, the Rolling Stones, the Sex Pistols. They were all acts you had to see live to fully understand or fully get your money’s worth. They all had a commitment to visual performance that’s sadly missing from a lot of music. Cameron Cole makes that commitment. Cole’s live show features costume changes, screaming vocals and pounding Jack White-style garage guitar riffs. He’s touring relentlessly around London at the moment and is definitely worth seeing whether he’s with his backing band, the RS, or playing solo. www.camcole.com

JSA There are two reasons to listen to this Croydon 5-piece. The first is if you’re a fan of fast-paced, intensely catchy rock’n’roll. Their influences span every decent guitar band since the Pixies and I’d wager a fair few before too. Expertly written, their songs are stories of everyday life that probe surprisingly deep where other bands are happy with only scratching the surface of a subject. The second reason is if you’re a fan of saying “I liked them before they were famous” because JSA will be. Very soon. jsamusic.bandcamp.com

Black*Scarr Johnny Black and Emma Scarr, two members of the frankly awesome League of Nations, make up this British bluegrass duo. Their countrified kitchen sink dramas are belted out with an intensity and sense of fun that reminds you of the Pogues at their best or Johnny Cash and June Carter when they were young. Country music has a bad rep but this is fun, catchy and guaranteed to get your toe-tapping or you out of you seat dancing. Plus there’s rarely a Stetson hat or a shirt with tassels to be seen. www.18tilidie.com/blackscarr.htm

Kate Bowen It’s possible that Kate Bowen defies description. Her music is delicate and husky at the same time, made up of guitar-backed ballads about long American highways, rolling plateaus and the people that inhabit them. It’s like taking a ride on a greyhound bus or reading a Cormack McCarthy book in songform (only without the sticky seats and niggling sense of the failings of the human condition). www.facebook.com/Katebowenmusic


BOOK REVIEWS

BATTLE OF THE BOOKS Our literary gem, Britt Pflüger, knows how to tell a story - or two.

By Maria Semple WHERE’D YOU GO BERNADETTE A truly memorable and original novel set in Seattle and Antarctica, about misplaced genius and a mother and daughter’s role in an absurd world. able to communicate with his increasingly distant wife, becomes closer to his ‘admin’ Soo-Lin Lee-Segal, a divorcee and fellow Galer Street mum who adores her boss, a bit of a celebrity in the hallowed halls of Microsoft. But then the FBI turn up and reveal that ‘Manjula’ is indeed the Russian mafia. When he then discovers further proof of his wife’s precarious state of mental health, Elgin decides to stage an intervention to save her – only for Bernadette to flee to Antarctica.

What follows is a madcap race against time to find Bernadette and But Bernadette is far from keen to get involved with the other piece together not only where and how she escaped, but the secrets mums, or ‘gnats’, as she calls them, among them her neighbour of her past in LA... Audrey Griffin, a rather over-zealous Galer Street activist who insists Bernadette has the blackberry bushes removed from her There is so much going on in this richly satisfying comic novel, property ahead of the school fundraiser, an endeavour which shall which has been compared to Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely trigger a chain of events starting with a disastrous mudslide, and Loud and Incredibly Close but also has echoes of This Book Will ending with an epiphany, via a detox in Utah. Save Your Life by A.M. Homes, that a summary can only go so far. It is notoriously difficult to infuse humour with warmth, but while Right now, Bernadette has more urgent problems to contend with it takes a while for it to develop here (I have to confess I initially felt though: having rashly promised Bee a trip to Antarctica if she passes quite detached from the characters), Semple ultimately carries it off certain grades, she and Elgin now have to follow through – not an beautifully. Bernadette in particular is difficult to get a handle on in easy task for an agoraphobic who suffers from severe seasickness. So the beginning, but as her back story is pieced together bit by bit she unbeknown to Elgin, Bernadette hires Manjula, a virtual assistant becomes truly complex and likable, and it is easier to understand in India, to organise the trip for her and basically run her life, which why, having vowed never to build again, she is now a recluse in a includes access to social security numbers, passport details and house which is crumbling around her, resentful of the ‘gnats’ and credit card details. Meanwhile over at Microsoft, Elgin, no longer rainy, provincial Seattle, which becomes a character in its own right here.

Weidenfeld & Nicolson 7 June 2012 336pp £12.99

It is notoriously difficult to infuse humour with warmth, but while it takes a while for it to develop here... Semple ultimately carries it off beautifully.

Told in the form of emails, letters and memos, put together by Bee, her fifteen year old daughter, the novel tells the story of Bernadette Fox, an award-winning architect who left her celebrity status behind in Los Angeles when one of her pet projects was bought and demolished by a British game show host. These days, Bernadette lives in Seattle with Bee and her husband Elgin, a whiz at Microsoft, and rarely leaves their house, apart from when she ferries Bee to Galer Street, a progressive school which, to Bernadette’s chagrin, encourages parents to get ‘involved’.

Where’d You Go Bernadette, by turns moving and hilarious and at times deliciously absurd, is also brimming with satire on modern life, be it on corporate idolatry of the age of technology, soccer moms or relationships. My only quibble is the shift of tone in the last part of the novel. This is set mostly in the Antarctic, and follows Bee and Elgin’s search for Bernadette. One might argue that it was necessary to inject more poignancy here, but in my view it would have been possible to keep some of the previous humour and satire without losing any of the more serious strands. As it stands, the more serious tone, while adding warmth, does not sit easily with the rest of the novel. However, this does not detract from the fact that Semple has woven a wonderfully convoluted and compulsively readable yarn.


BOOK REVIEWS

Britt Pflüger is a literary scout and agent. She also runs literary consultancy Hardy & Knox: www.hardyandknox.com

By M.L. Stedman THE LIGHT BETWEEN OCEANS This is a story of right and wrong, and how sometimes they look the same.

1926: Partageuse is a small town on the Western coast of Australia whose sleepy existence has been brutally marred by the loss of many young men during World War I. Thirty-three year old Tom Sherbourne is newly arrived from Sydney to take up a post as lighthouse keeper on a remote island off Partageuse, and he too has been irrevocably changed by the things he has seen and done during the war. But when he meets the headstrong and vivacious Isabel, he begins to believe that life can still be worth living.

Doubleday 26 April 2012 368pp £12.99

The structure of the novel, which is told forwards and backwards several times, works equally well. A very enjoyable and emotional read from a highly promising debut author.

Tom is not sure whether life on Janus, the small island which has become his home, will suit Isabel, but she is so determined that they are meant to be together that he finally gives in and they embark on an isolated but idyllic life, only punctuated by the twice-yearly visit from the supplies boat and its captain Ralph and his shipmate, young Bluey. As the years pass, Tom and Isabel’s love grows even stronger, but their lives are overshadowed by miscarriages and a stillbirth, making Tom increasingly worried about his wife’s mental wellbeing. Then one day, a boat is washed ashore with the body of a dead man and a live baby girl, and Isabel persuades her reluctant husband to keep her as their own – a deception which is all too easy to carry off in front of her parents but shall have devastating and far-reaching consequences for all involved...

And then, on the day of Lucy’s christening on a rare visit to Partageuse, Tom and Isabel discover ‘Lucy’s’ gravestone in the churchyard and discover the tragic circumstances which led to her arrival on the island. The Light Between Oceans is an exceptionally moving and gripping novel about war, grief, guilt and love, and one that transcends setting and time. The central metaphor of light, which ties in with the war theme, is convincing throughout, and very cleverly executed. Although Stedman does not use actual flashbacks to the war, its legacy becomes all too clear, for both Tom himself and the sleepy coastal town in Australia which has lost its sons; not only the ones who were killed in the trenches but also those who returned damaged beyond ‘repair’, and almost unrecognisable to their loved ones whose experiences and suffering mirrors that of Lucy’s birth mother when she is finally reunited with her daughter.

Tom in particular is a threedimensional and utterly likable character, a man who always tries to do right by others and finds it hard to reconcile his moral stance with what he had to do during the war. Isabel and Hannah meanwhile are somewhat more complex (and at times spiky) as the women whose maternal instincts overrides almost everything else. There is also a great cast of minor characters, above Isabel and Tom decide to name the girl Lucy, in honour of the all Ralph and Bluey and the sympathetic police officer Knuckey, lighthouse and Janus. Isabel’s parents back in Partageuse, still who is determined to get to he bottom of the truth. grieving for the two sons they lost in the war, are overjoyed at having a grandchild at last, and Ralph and Bluey become doting ‘uncles’. The structure of the novel, which is told forwards and backwards But Tom, a man whose principled lifestyle makes him the perfect several times, works equally well. A very enjoyable and emotional lighthouse keeper, is haunted not only by the memory the men he read from a highly promising debut author. killed during the war, but also by guilty thoughts of the mother who has lost her baby daughter: ‘He struggles to make sense of it – all this love, so bent out of shape, like light through the lens.’


Words by Steve James Miller

MUSIC

WHO’S NEXT?

Music maestro Steve James Miller gives us the latest instalment in his search for truly great music in London.

Photo by Siebbi

The recent death of Donna Summer sees a well-known pop music icon cast into the history books, which got me thinking about more recent deaths of relative giants of the pop world, such as Whitney Houston and, not too long ago, Michael Jackson. How many really big names are left? Can you imagine a future without big names? The legends are falling, and not a lot seems to be replacing them. Donna Summer's death was as a result of cancer, however, as soon as I saw the news of her death by way of a headline on a popular news website, my suspicions came to the fore. Even so, once my suspicions were put to sleep, I couldn't help but think back to just how suspicious I felt after Whitney Houston's death. Like Michael Jackson, she had her problems, but also like Michael Jackson, her death seems to have left more questions than can be answered.

I thought he should have taken a leaf out of Kurt Cobain’s book, but it was too late: Jacko was 50 years old, not 27. Nevertheless, dying at 50 is a lot better than dying at 80, especially if you are a pop star, especially if you want your record sales to increase. I suppose you can look at a dead pop star and consider what they were, what they were truly: were they an icon representative of a certain epoch? Were they a talented performer; a genius perhaps? Or were they a commercial venture? Of the three possibilities, only one can be certain, and that has little to do with talent. Where the powers that be are concerned, only one certainty is of any real consequence: money! What do you do with a legend that has become a liability? Can you really imagine that if James Dean, or Janis Joplin, or Kurt Cobain, or any bright young thing had been allowed to get a blue rinse and a bus pass, they could possibly be immortalised? Premature death, for the famous, is the ultimate career move, and probably the most lucrative, and of course, the profits go to the anonymous living associates. Michael Jackson died at 50 years old, Whitney Houston at 48 years old. They probably went just at the right time: middle aged, but somehow preserved in their youthful image, but only just. Any older, and that commercial viability would have withered. So who’s next? It would seem that allowing a really big star to become ‘elderly’ is just not very likely. After Michael, and Whitney, who’s the next big thing? I mean, who’s the next really big one?

Now, I'm not usually one to believe in conspiracy theories (usually, when people say this, they tend to mean "I do believe in conspiracy theories, but not the really mad ones, like... you know, David Icke's stuff, so bear with me..."), but Whitney Houston's death made me think back to the furore surrounding Michael Jackson's. Remember when Jacko claimed he was going to do a big tour to promote his new material, and everyone was saying "no way pal, you'll collapse half-way through the tour"? Remember how his death came shortly after this announcement? Remember how it was observed that Michael Jackson's record sales went through the roof after his death? Before he died, and as soon as he announced his apparently doomed tour, I wondered about a Michael Jackson living on into old age. I wondered about how his image would fall further as he cancelled show after show because he simply couldn't hack it. I wondered how his fan base would diminish as his legendary Madonna, if I were you, I’d be keeping one eye over my shoulder. status would diminish in his own lifetime. I didn't think his tour would be a good career move.


FEELING GOOD ABOUT FILMS

SUNDANCE LONDON

Follow Brian Mills at: www.facebook.com/pages/movies-by-mill/124445137614043

The first-ever Sundance Film Festival came to London in April to the 02 Arena for 4 days bringing some of its films which were screened at its festival in Park City, Utah in January. Brian Mills found 4 films to get excited about:

LIBERAL ARTS - FOR ELLEN - SAFETY NOT GUARANTEED - CHASING ICE

Directed by Josh Radnor Starring Josh Radnor, Elizabeth Olsen, Richard Jenkins

Directed by Colin Trevorrow Starring Aubrey Plaza, Mark Duplass, Jake M Johnson

When Jesse Fisher (Radnor) is invited back to his alma mater by a retiring professor, he falls for a young student named Zibby (Elizabeth Olsen) which causes him confusion and complications because of their age difference. He works out the math but the gap is too wide for him to rationalize around it and make it work for him. Zibby gives Jesse some home truths and tells him that there are some things that you do because they make you happy, like reading the Twilight books, but it fails to break through his cultural snobbery. Another student, the manic depressive Dean (John Magaro), offers Josh a distraction to unravel his complexity. One of the films’s really uplifting moments is when Zibby burns off a CD of her favourite classical music for Josh to take with him when he returns to New York. A scene of Josh walking through Manhattan with music playing in his head and having total strangers smile at him as they pass by as though they can hear the music too, is truly magical. I was hoping for a feel-good ending for Josh which came but not in the way and with whom I expected. UK release date: October 5

The pitch of this film is irresistible: a man places a classified advertisement in a newspaper: Man seeks a companion for time travel, must supply your own weapons, safety not guaranteed. When a magazine editor asks her staff to come up with a good idea for a story, Jeff (Jake M Johnson) reads the time-travel ad. Jake gets the assignment and asks for two interns to go with him and gets geeky Darius (Aubrey Plaza) and a young shy Indian Amau (Karan Soni). Darius is a girl with a dark past and her own reasons why she would like to travel back in time. The aspiring time-traveller is Kenneth (Mark Duplass) and he fits the role perfectly: a weird reclusive hoarder. Government’s agents are watching him, suspecting him of being a spy. Darius has to decide whether she thinks Kenneth is genuine and actually believes that he can time-travel or whether he is a total lunatic ripe for certification. The closer she investigates Kenneth the nearer she gets to her own truth about herself. A golden thread of reasoning is that there is something out there bigger than us. We may not know what it is, but we know that we need to trust and believe in each other if we are to survive in this crazy world. The film delivers on all its promises and when it reaches its climax you are left feeling that it was fun to be invited to take the journey and realize what a magical experience it had been. I plead with you to see this charming film if and when it gets released.

th

Will Sundance return next year to London? With sell-out performances at all venues, it seems certain that it will. Directed by James Orlowski Starring James Balog

Directed by So Yong Kim Starring Paul Dano, Jon Heder, Shaylena Mandigo

A breathtaking documentary following photographer Joby Taylor (Paul Dano) is a struggling musician who meets James Balog as he embarks on a massive photography with his lawyer to sign some legal papers with his estranged project placing 30 cameras across three continents to wife Claire (Margarita Levieva) but then discovers that she gather visual evidence of the Earth’s melting ice. We will receive full custody of their daughter Ellen (Shaylena witness the tragic results of man’s interference with Mandigo). Joby reacts by finding a way of winning her Nature by emitting carbon into the hemisphere and back but when this fails he divulges a secret about his ex causing global warming. Balog takes huge physical risks that grants him some quality time with his daughter. The as he crosses the Arctic using time lapse photography highlights of the film are the scenes between Dano and to record the world’s disappearing mountains of ice Shaylena because they are so convincingly real. The little and the effect it is having on the rest of the Earth which girl has never acted before in a film and she is faultless is experiencing natural disasters, climate change and and there is another scene when she is in a toy store with rising sea levels. Chronicled too is the personal and Dano and she takes her time by looking at everything and emotional story of James Belog’s quest, the multiple reading the boxes while Dano patiently waits for her to knee operations he has had to endure yet defying choose something, despite the length, the scene plays well. medical advice to quit because of his focused passion to An earlier scene when Joby rocks away in a bar betraying his frustration with life in music is excellent his mission. He is supported all the way by a loving wife and a dedicated team of climbers. and of course in reality Dano is lead guitarist and singer in a band called Mook. No theatrical release This was the big surprise at Sundance. No UK release date scheduled at present. scheduled at present.


THE JOKER

Illustrated by: Alvaro Arteaga www.alvaroarteaga.com

LAUGHTER TO THE BRAIN IS LIKE EXERCISE TO THE BODY# Thanks for all the jokes you have sent in. You lot clearly love this page! Try to keep them clean though London, some of these are really pushing it. Sorry for any offence caused.

Owen Hargreaves said that he won’t retire after leaving Man City. Winning the Nobel Prize A man is driving down a country road, when he spots a farmer As he already did that the day they signed him. standing in the middle of a huge field of grass. He pulls the car HUSBAND: Shall we try a different position tonight? over to the side of the road and notices that the farmer is just WIFE: That's a good idea... you stand by the ironing board while I standing there, doing nothing, looking at nothing. sit on the sofa and fart. The man gets out of the car, walks all the way out to the farmer Rumour has it that Didier Drogba has left Chelsea to pursue his and asks him, "Ah excuse me mister, but what are you doing?" dream of becoming a professional diver. The farmer replies, "I'm trying to win a Nobel Prize." "How?" asks the man, puzzled. My wife asked me for something that does nought to sixty in 5 "Well, I heard they give the Nobel Prize . . . to people who are out seconds for her birthday. standing in their field." I bought her a set of bathroom scales. A man was walking along when he spotted a small boy busily A reporter was interviewing a 104 year-old woman: "And what do constructing something. He approached the boy and was shocked you think is the best thing about being 104?" She simply replied, to see him playing with cow manure! For lack of anything better to "No peer pressure." say, he asked, “Little boy, what are you doing?” The boy replied, “I am making George Bush with this manure, Two drunks were walking home along the railway tracks. Mister.” The first drunk says, "There's a hell of a lot of steps here." The second drunk says, "I'll tell you what's worse, this hand rail is Now thoroughly taken aback, the man asked, “Why are you making George Bush? Why not make, er, Bill Clinton?” bloody low down" The boy answered, “Oh no Mister, I can’t make Bill Clinton.” I tried to buy my dad a World’s Greatest Dad mug for his birthday “But why not?” asked the man. today. The boy replied “Well, Mister, there isn’t enough here to make Bill The cashier told me that I was too late. Somebody else’s dad Clinton.” already is. Q. What do you call a man with no arms or legs that can swim Just got a text from my mate saying he was going to kill himself across a pool? and ignored it. A. Clever Dick “Don’t you think you should do something?” asked my girlfriend. BBC Weather Update: Cloudy later with a 50% chance of rain. “He’s on T-Mobile,” I replied, “the funeral was last week.” So it’s either going to rain or it’s not? I keep going to Amsterdam to shag hookers but when I get there There once was a man from Kent, whose cock was so long it bent. all I ever do is watch them through the windows... Tto save himself trouble, he put it in double, and instead of I think I must be buy-curious. cumming he went. Q. What do you call a deer with no eyes? There once was a man from Peru, who fell asleep in a canoe A. No-Eye Deer. (sound like No Idea) while dreaming of Venus he played with his penis, and woke up all Q. What do you call a deer with no eyes and no legs? covered with goo. A. Still no eye deer. Q. What do you call a deer with no eyes, no legs, and no sexual organs? A. Still no f@%king eye deer.

While proudly showing off his new apartment to friends, a college student led the way into the den. "What is the big brass gong and hammer for?" one of his friends asked. "That is the talking clock," the man replied. "How's it work?" "Watch," the man said and proceeded to give the gong an ear shattering pound with the hammer. Suddenly, someone screamed from the other side of the wall, "Knock it off, you idiot! It's two o'clock in the morning!" An eight-year-old boy went into a grocery store and picked out a large box of laundry detergent. The grocer walked over and asked the boy if he had a lot of laundry to do. "Oh, no laundry," the boy said, "I'm going to wash my dog." "But you shouldn't use this to wash your dog," said the grocer. "It's very powerful and if you wash your dog in this, he'll get sick. In fact, it might even kill him." But the boy was not to be stopped and carried the detergent to the counter and paid for it. A week later, the boy was back in the store to buy some candy. The grocer asked the boy how his dog was doing. "Oh, he died," the boy said. The grocer said he was sorry, but added, "I tried to tell you not to use that detergent on your dog." "Well, the boy replied, "I don't think it was the detergent that killed him." "Oh? What was it then?" "I think it was the spin cycle!" An artist asked the gallery owner if there had been any interest in his paintings currently on display. "I've got good news and bad news," the owner replied. "The good news is that a gentleman inquired about your work and wondered if it would appreciate in value after your death. When I told him it would, he bought all fifteen of your paintings." "That's wonderful!" the artist exclaimed, "What's the bad news?". With concern, the gallery owner replied, "The guy was your doctor." Q. Did you hear that Fed Ex and UPS are going to merge? A. Yeah. They're going to call it FED UP! What four animals does a woman like to have in her house? A tiger in bed, a mink in her closet, a jaguar in her garage and a jackass to pay for it all. Send in your top jokes to: editor@laissezfairelondon.co.uk


HUMOUR-SCOPES

Artist: Yoanna Pietrzyk in collaboration with Facehunter. www.yoannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com / www.joannapietrzyk.carbonmade.com

The planetary charts this June are ruled in bulk directly by the Moon and Mercury in mutual reception with each other. This co-ruling of the charts spells a very chatty period. Every single issue is up for discussion. As usual, a disclaimer is needed as these are only the premonitions of our grumpy star gazer and not the views of Laissez Faire!

Aries

Taurus

Gemini

Cancer

Leo

Virgo

It’s all about communication this month, but it’s not all good news. Delivering bad news must be in person, privately, and in advance – especially in situations where officials are involved. Hey, we’re not going to candy coat it… June sucks. The money may be gone from payday on Friday. Unless you’re enjoying the summer off, a sabbatical or being independently wealthy, it’s probably back to work. Weekend’s are just too short.

Undergoing mental turmoil is all part and parcel of Taurus’s make-up, but cool it for June – don’t push it ‘because the stars are not with you especially if you engage in confrontational matters. So employ more than usual caution and by all means use this cycle to sift through the adverse debris and take that which can be used as information. After all, you are the king of the bull (shit, that is).

Non-productive (love) relationships tend to end during solstice days. Clue: If the relationship is not broken, no need to try to fix it; if the relationship does need patching up – then, it will be wise to move on to something more meaningful and allow intuition and the stars to guide you to romantic safety!

You have an inventive mind and are inclined to be progressive. You lie a great deal. You make the same mistakes repeatedly because you are stupid. Everyone thinks you are a jerk. Get some perspective and mature yourself.

It may be hard at times to separate unfounded fears from healthy paranoia, but in either case it will be difficult to throw caution to the winds for a while so be alert dear Lion, whatever covalent scheme you are hatching.

Things haven’t been this sane and balanced for me in years. Most of the month of June is gonna be very nice days for completing some unfinished business matters. Make sure you take your time – be very levelheaded with your undertakings and all will turn out POSITIVE and in your favour!

Libra

Sagittarius

Capricorn

Aquarius

Pisces

Your shit-picking attitude is sickening to your friends and co-workers. You are cold and unemotional and often fall asleep while doing it, therefore, adopt artful strategies to cope. Don’t keep those partnership ideas on the back burner because as this month continues to unfold you will clearly see your advantages for the upcoming months during the balance of this 2012 year. Virgos make good bus drivers and pimps.

Folkloric wisdom has it that the moon’s waxing and waning affects the minds of those afflicted by mental turbulence. Howling at the moon is one symptom of these phases. It’s not the best time to schedule any activity that calls for tact, diplomacy, or caution, as you are inclined to be extremely straightforward, direct, and to the point in all of your interactions. If you speak your mind NOW you will not win in the end!

You are conservative and afraid of taking risks. You are basically a chicken-crap in the shape of a golden hen sitting on eggs, which symbolises making a fortune. But how would the feng shui master characterise a Capricorn’s nerve centre for negativity? A nervous Sturkey sitting on an empty nest?

Because of special influences from planets the URANUS and NEPTUNE, June deserves alertness when those around you are discussing secretive matters. Because of URANUS, (no comments please), phone conversations with close associates you’ve not been in contact with for quite some time will be very, beneficial. You have been too sympathetic and understanding to other people’s problems of late, which makes you a sucker.

Physical thrills and excitement have a strong appeal for you now, however, it will be in your best interest to do what is logical rather than doing what pleases you. You are a pioneer type and think most people are dickheads. You are quick to reprimand, impatient and full of advice. You do nothing but piss-off everyone you come in contact with. Advice: Use common knowledge dear fish and make wise decisions especially when it comes to your personal endeavours!

Scorpio

You are shrewd in business and cannot be trusted. But BEWARE in the month of June. Your chances of selecting the topperforming funds of the future on the basis of their returns in the past are about as high as the odds that Bigfoot and the Abominable Snowman will both show up in pink ballet slippers at your next cocktail party. In other words, your chances are not Zero – but they’re pretty close.


CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

THE ART ACADEMY For full course listings visit: www.artacademy.org.uk Tel: 020 7407 6969

Email: info@artacademy.org.uk

SUMMER 2012 SHORT COURSES SUBJECT

START / END

TIME / DAY

COURSE CODE

COST

Creative Painting in Cornwall***

9 - 13 July 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104041

£295

Young Artists

13 - 16 August 2012

Mon - Thurs (10 - 5)

SC1104019

£230

Drawing for All

13 - 17 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104009

£280

Sculpture for All

13 - 17 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104003

£280

Kiln Formed Glass

13 - 17 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104007

£280

Painting for All

20 - 24 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104013

£280

Creative Sculpture

20 - 24 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104036

£280

Young Artists

28 - 31 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104119

£230

Sculpture Masterclass

28 - 31 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104038

£290

Painting Masterclass

28 - 31 August 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104015

£290

Stone Carving

3 - 7 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104010

£280

Life Drawing

3 - 7 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104001

£280

Introduction to Oil Painting

3 - 7 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104037

£280

Hand Built Ceramics

3 - 7 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104047

£280

Water-based media

3 - 7 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104050

£280

Metal Clay Jewellery Making

10 - 13 September 2012

Mon - Thurs (10 - 5)

SC1104035

£290

Stone Carving the Simplified Figure

10 - 14 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104110

£280

Figure & Portrait Painting

10 - 14 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104006

£280

Painting the Cornish Landscape***

17 - 21 September 2012

Mon - Fri (10 - 5)

SC1104

£295

***These courses are being held in Porthleven, Cornwall.

DIPLOMA COURSE Fine Art Diploma - 3 years F/T

Full year

D1201

See website

Fine Art Diploma - 4 years P/T

Full year

D1201

See website

Full year

C1201

See website

Full year

F1201

See website

CERTIFICATE COURSE Fine Art Certificate - 2 years

FOUNDATION COURSE Fine Art Foundation - 1 year

15 Gresse Street, London, W1T 1QL | www.fashionretailacademy.ac.uk | 020 7307 2345

Email: shortcourses@Fashionretailacademy.ac.uk

Tel: 020 7307 2345

PART-TIME COURSES

CONTACT: shortcourses@fashionretailacademy.ac.uk

SUBJECT Targeted CV Writing and Interview SkillsCareer

START Planning for Retail

June 2012 Introduction to Fashion Blogging July 2012 Introduction to Forecasting and Customer Profiling July 2012 Advanced preparation for a Career in Fashion Retail: - Buying, Merchandising & Management 11th June

PRE-REQUISITES Over 18 years of age Over 18 years of age Over 18 years of age Degree qualification or considerable retail experience

COST £260 £350 £350

Contact us

FULL-TIME COURSES CONTACT: info@fashionretailacademy.ac.uk

SUBJECT

START

PRE-REQUISITES

ENROL

Level 2 Diploma in Fashion Retail BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Art & Design (Fashion Clothing) BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Art & Design (Graphic Design) BTEC Level 3 Extended National Diploma in Business (Retail) Level 3 Diploma in Fashion Retail Level 4 Buying & Merchandising Level 4 Visual Merchandising Higher Certificate Fashion Retail (Merchandising) Foundation Degree Fashion Management

1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12 1/9/12

No formal entry requirements 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 4 GCSES inc English Lang. Refer to website for alternative routes 5 GCSES inc English Lang and Maths. Refer to website for alternative routes 1 A Level Pass plus 3 GCSE's A-C inc Maths and English 1 A Level Pass plus 3 GCSE's A-C. Refer to website for alternative routes 1 A Level Pass plus 5 GCSE's A-C. Refer to website for alternative routes 80 UCAS tariff points. Refer to website for alternative routes

Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12 Sept 12


CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

BIRKBECK UNIVERSITY OF LONDON For full range of courses visit: www.bbk.ac.uk Tel Helpdesk: 020 7631 6316

ART & ARCHITECTURE SHORT COURSES 2012/2013 ENTRY SUBJECT

START

CODE

TIME

LENGTH

VENUE

Arabic Calligraphy: Practising Naskh Script

24/09/2012

FFWO034H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Architecture and Society in Eighteenth-Century England

24/07/2012

ARVC030S4ACB

10:00 - 17:00

22 meetings

Central London

Architecture, Landscape and Modernity, 1890-1940

20/05/2013

ARVC136H4ACB

10:30 - 16:30

5 meetings

Central London

Art and Architecture in Sixteenth-Century Rome and Venice

26/09/2012

ARVC028S4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

22 meetings

Central London

Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece and Rome

25/09/2012

ARVC023S4ACB

14:00 - 16:00

22 meetings

Central London

Art and Society in the Age of Alexander the Great

25/04/2013

ARVC126H4ACB

18:00 - 22:00

11 meetings

Central London

Art in Rome 1590-1650

25/04/2013

ARVC083H4ACB

18:00 - 22:00

11 meetings

Central London

Art in the Shadow of War: Britain 1918-1939

08/01/2013

ARVC084H4ACB

14:00 - 16:00

11 meetings

Central London

Art Nouveau: Art and Design in Eastern Europe

25/09/2012

ARVC127H4ACB

14:00 - 16:00

11 meetings

Central London

Beauty and Magnificence: The Imperial Arts of the Ottoman Court

25/09/2012

FFWO116H4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

11 meetings

Central London

British Design

25/09/2012

ARVC135H4ACB

18:00 - 22:00

11 meetings

Central London

But is it Art? Art and the Masses from Courbet to Tate Modern

24/09/2012

ARVC130H4ACB

18:00 - 22:00

11 meetings

Central London

Chinese Brush Painting for Beginners

27/09/2012

FFWO123H4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

11 meetings

Asia House

Chinese Calligraphy

27/09/2012

FFWO129H4ACB

18:00 - 22:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Collectors and Collections in London

10/06/2012

ARVC140H4ACB

11:00 - 17:00

5 meetings

Central London

Discovering Galleries and Museums

27/09/2012

FFAH011N0ACS

11:00 - 13:00

10 meetings

Central London

Discovering Galleries and Museums: The Modern Period

24/04/2013

FFAH018N0ACS

11:00 - 13:00

10 meetings

Central London

Exhibiting Now: Art in and Beyond the Museum

18/05/2013

FFAH241H4ACB

10:30 - 16:30

4 meetings

Bishopsgate Institute

Exploring London’s Past: Archives, Architecture and Oral History

08/10/2012

SSHC031H4ACB

18:30 - 20:30

10 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Architecture and Landscapes

24/09/2012

FFAH004S4ACB

14:00 - 16:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Architecture and Landscapes

25/09/2012

FFAH004S4BCB

18:00 - 22:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Art

24/09/2012

FFAH002S4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Art

25/09/2012

FFAH002S4BCB

11:00 - 13:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Art

26/09/2012

FFAH002S4CCB

18:00 - 20:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Art

27/09/2012

FFAH002S4DCB

18:00 - 20:00

22 meetings

Central London

Foundation in History of Art

09/01/2012

FFAH002S4ECB

14:00 - 16:00

22 meetings

Central London

From Hogarth to Reynolds: English Art of the Eighteenth Century

10/01/2013

ARVC129H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

Central London

Gods and Saints: Introducing the Arts of India

22/04/2013

ARVC139H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Hidden Pleasures, Public Lives: Introduction to Japanese Prints

24/09/2012

ARVC125H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

History, Memory and Post-War Art

27/09/2012

ARVC132H4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

11 meetings

Central London

Improve Your Research Skills in World Arts and Artefacts

06/10/2012

ARVC068N0ACS

10:00 - 16:00

1 meeting

Central London

Improve Your Research Skills in World Arts and Artefacts

19/01/2013

ARVC068N0BCS

10:00 - 16:00

1 meeting

Central London

Improve Your Research Skills in World Arts and Artefacts

04/05/2013

ARVC068N0CCS

18:30 - 21:00

1 meeting

Central London

Interpreting the Tower

02/02/2013

FFHI199H4ACB

10:30 - 16:30

5 meetings

Tower of London

Introductions: Learning to Look (Visual Arts and Media)

02/10/2012

FFHE024S41CC

10:00 - 13:00

15 meetings

Rosetta Art Centre

Introduction to European Art before 1800

10/10/2012

AHVM058S4AAA

18:00 - 19:30

20 meetings

Central London

Introduction to Modern Art

08/10/2012

AHVM034S4AAA

18:00 - 19:30

20 meetings

Central London

Introduction to the Visual Arts: Forms and History

05/02/2013

ARVC105H4ALB

10:00 - 13:00

8 meetings

Rosetta Art Centre

Introduction to World Arts and Artefacts: Africa

10/01/2013

ARVC008H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Introduction to World Arts and Artefacts: The Americas

27/09/2012

ARVC011H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Introduction to World Arts and Artefacts: West Asia

07/01/2013

ARVC009H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

Investigating the Archive: Photographic Collections of London

12/01/2013

FFWO099H4ACB

10:30 -

11 meetings

The Photographers’ Gallery

Iznik Tiles: Floral Motifs in Dynamic Arrangements

10/01/2013

FFWO115H4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

11 meetings

Asia House

Key Concepts in Cultural Analysis: The Production of the Human

10/10/2012

ENHU008S4AAA

18:00 - 19:30

22 meetings

Central London

Media Genres: Reporting the Arts

25/04/2013

FFME043H4ACB

19:00 - 21:00

11 meetings

TBA

Museums and the Collecting of World Arts

25/04/2013

ARVC012H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

New Light on Seventeenth-Century Dutch Painting

24/09/2012

ARVC123S4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

22 meetings

Central London

Psychoanalysis and Art

10/10/2012

FFPA018H4ACB

10:30 - 13:00

9 meetings

Birkbeck, Central London

Psychoanalysis and Art

01/05/2013

FFPA018H4BCB

10:30 - 13:00

9 meetings

Birkbeck, Central London

Redefining Renaissance Art: Italy and the Netherlands

24/09/2012

ARVC141S4ACB

11:00 - 13:00

22 meetings

Central London

Study Skills for Art History Students

27/10/2012

FFAH001N0ACS

10:30 - 16:30

1 meetings

Central London

Study Trip to Moscow

20/05/2012

ARVC137H4ACB

-

7 meetings

TBA

Study Trip: Vienna 1900 and Beyond

15/04/2012

FFAH272H4ACB

-

7 meetings

TBA

The Alternative Tradition: Realism in Twentieth-Century Art

24/09/2012

ARVC106H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

Central London

The Art of Islamic Pattern I: An Introduction

25/04/2013

FFWO041H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

British Museum

The British Empire in Art and Architecture

25/09/2012

ARVC138H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

Central London

The English Town

11/05/2013

ARVC080H4ACB

10:30 - 16:30

5 meetings

Central London

The Russian Experiment in Art

09/01/2013

ARVC134H4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

11 meetings

Central London

The Victorian Garden

26/09/2012

ARVC092S4ACB

18:00 - 20:00

22 meetings

Central London

What’s the Point of an Art Museum?

23/04/2013

ARVC104H4ALB

10:00 - 13:00

8 meetings

Rosetta Art Centre


10% discount. All Courses

CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

Quote: ‘Laissez Faire’

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN For full short course listings visit: www.csm.arts.ac.uk/shortcourse Tel: 020 7514 7015

shortcourse@csm.arts.ac.uk

SUMMER SCHOOL 25TH JUNE TO 14TH SEPTEMBER SUBJECT

START

END

DAY

TIME

LENGTH

VENUE

Computers for Fashion

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 17:00

1 Week

King's Cross

Computers for Textile Design

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 17:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Creative Fashion Design with Illustrator

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Digital Design for Furniture and Fashion Fabrics

28/08/2012

31/08/2012

Tue - Fri

10:00 - 17:15

4 days

King’s Cross

Digital Fashion Illustration and Communication

06/08/2012

10/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Digital Print on Textiles

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King's Cross

Illustration for Footwear Design - Evenings

25/06/2012

18/07/2012

Mon & Wed

18:30 - 21:00

4 Weeks

King’s Cross

Bag Design and Communication

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Bag Making

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Illustration for Footwear Design - Evenings

25/06/2012

18/07/2012

Mon & Wed

18:30 - 21:00

4 Weeks

King’s Cross

Millinery Workshop

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 17:15

1 Week

King’s Cross

Millinery Workshop

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Tue - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Shoe Design for Beginners

20/08/2012

24/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Shoe Design for New Professionals

03/09/2012

07/09/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Shoe Pattern Cutting for Beginners

10/09/2012

14/09/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Vintage Bags and Framed Purses 2

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Vintage Clutch Bags and Framed Purses 1

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Swimwear for Men

25/06/2012

29/06/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Creating New Concepts in Fashion

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Creating New Fashion Silhouettes

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Cutting Edge Fashion

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Designing a Commercial Fashion Collection

30/07/2012

30/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Designing a Fashion T-Shirt Collection

06/08/2012

10/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Draping Womenswear Design

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Exploring Your Fashion Design

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Design for Graduates and Professionals

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Design Summer School

16/07/2012

10/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

4 Weeks

King’s Cross

Fashion London

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion London

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Mix

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

How To Design a Couture Collection

20/08/2012

24/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Introduction to Fashion Design

25/06/2012

29/06/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Introduction to Fashion Design - Evenings

02/07/2012

25/07/2012

Mon & Wed

18:30 - 21:00

4 Weeks

King’s Cross

Introduction to Fashion Design - Evenings

30/07/2012

22/08/2012

Mon & Wed

18:30 - 21:00

4 Weeks

King’s Cross

Menswear Design Portfolio

03/09/2012

07/09/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Menswear Styling, Design and Accessories

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

New Approaches to Fashion Design in London & Paris

Call for further information

-

-

-

-

-

Summer Study Abroad - Fashion Design

02/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

3 Weeks

King’s Cross

Sustainable Fashion

16/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Creating a Fashion Sketchbook

06/08/2012

17/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

2 Weeks

Back Hill

Fashion Drawing for Absolute Beginners

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Drawing Summer School

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Drawing Summer School

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Illustration Techniques

Call for further information

-

-

-

9 Days

-

Improve Your Fashion Drawing

06/08/2012

10/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Life Drawing for Fashion Designers

03/09/2012

07/09/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Technical Drawing for Fashion

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Advanced Creative Make-up Studio

28/08/2012

30/08/2012

Tues - Thurs

10:00 - 16:00

3 Days

King’s Cross

Art Direction for Fashion

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Cool Hunters London

10/09/2012

14/09/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Cool Hunting Fashion

25/06/2012

29/06/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Cool Hunting Fashion

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Create Your Own Fashion Film

20/08/2012

31/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

2 Weeks

King’s Cross

Fashion and Culture in London & Paris

Call for further information

-

-

-

-

-

Fashion and Culture in London and Milan

Call for further information

-

-

-

-

-

Fashion and Textile Forecasting

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Business, Branding and Marketing

Call for further information

-

-

-

-

-

Fashion Communication Summer School

13/08/2012

31/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

3 Weeks

King’s Cross

Fashion Design and Marketing

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Magazine Business

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Photography

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Photography

30/07/2012

03/08/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Styling and Image Creation

Call for further information

-

-

-

-

-

Fashion Styling for Beginners

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

1 Week

King’s Cross

Fashion Styling for Professionals

13/08/2012

24/08/2012-

Mon - Fri

10:00 - 16:00

2 Weeks

King’s Cross

LENGTH

VENUE


CLASSIFIEDS -- FASHION -- ART -- DESIGN

10% discount. All Courses

CHELSEA COLLEGE OF ART & DESIGN For full short course listings visit: www.chelsea.arts.ac.uk/shortcourses Tel: 020 7514 6311

Quote discount code: ‘LAISSEZF10’

ccwshortcourses@arts.ac.uk

SHORT COURSE CALENDER JUNE-JULY 2012 SUBJECT

START

END

DAY

TIME

LENGTH

VENUE

Introduction To Business Management For Interior Designers

02/06/2012

09/06/2012

Saturday

Weekend

2 weeks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Adobe Photoshop - Basic Essentials

06/06/2012

08/06/2012

Wed - Fri

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Dreamweaver Web Design

11/06/2012

20/06/2012

Mon & Wed

Evening

2 weeks

Chelsea College of Art & Design

3DS Max - Lighting & Rendering

11/06/2012

15/06/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Digital Design

11/06/2012

15/06/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

3DS Max - Advanced Lighting

18/06/2012

22/06/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Dreamweaver Web Design

25/06/2012

26/06/2012

Mon - Tues

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Art History

25/06/2012

28/06/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Camberwell

25/06/2012

30/06/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Camberwell College of Arts

Adobe Illustrator - Basic Essentials

27/06/2012

29/06/2012

Thurs - Fri

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Promoting Yourself & Your Ideas

29/06/2012

29/06/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Lighting For Residential Interiors

02/07/2012

04/07/20122

Mon & Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Adobe Photoshop - Basic Essentials

02/07/2012

04/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Colour Workshop

02/07/2012

04/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Life Drawing

02/07/2012

04/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Autocad

02/07/2012

05/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Chelsea

02/07/2012

06/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Art Handling And Installation

04/07/2012

06/07/2012

Wed - Fri

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Creative Copywriting

06/07/2012

06/07/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Picture Researching

06/07/2012

06/07/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Drawing

09/07/2012

11/07/2011

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Vectorworks

09/07/2012

12/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

In -Focus Corset Making

09/07/2012

12/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Wimbledon College of Art

Introduction To Textile Print Design

09/07/2012

12/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Oil Painting

09/07/2012

12/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Book Illustration

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Curating Contemporary Art Exhibitions

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Drawing And Painting - Stage One

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

History Of Architecture & Interior Design

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Graphic Design At Chelsea

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Wimbledon

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Wimbledon College of Art

Technical Drawing For Interior Designers

09/07/2012

13/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Architectural Drawing For Designers

11/07/2012

13/07/2012

Wed - Fri

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

An A - Z of Doing Up Your Home

12/07/2012

13/07/2012

Thurs - Fri

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Freelance Photograhy

13/07/2012

13/07/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

The Art of Cameraless Photography -In Focus

16/07/2012

17/07/2012

Mon - Tues

Daytime

2 days

Camberwell College of Art

2D Vectorworks for Interior Design

16/07/2012

17/07/2012

Mon - Tues

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Art Direction

16/07/2012

18/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Watercolour Painting

16/07/2012

19/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

3D Workshop - Design & Make

16/07/2012

19/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Fashion Illustration

16/07/2012

19/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Graphic Design

16/07/2012

19/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Portfolio Preparation 18+

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Chelsea

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Contemporary Art Workshop For 11 - 15 Year

16/07/2012

20/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Interior Design Module One

17/07/2012

03/08/2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

12 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction to Flash Animation

17/07/2012

18/07/2012

Tues - Wed

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Adobe InDesign - Basic Essentials

18/07/2012

20/07/2012

Wed - Fri

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Interior Decoration And Design

18/07/2012

24/07/2012

Wed - Tues

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Proofreading

19/07/2012

19/07/2012

Thursday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Get To Grips With Grammar

20/07/2012

20/07/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Creative Thinking

20/07/2012

20/07/2012

Friday

Daytime

1 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Getting The Most From Your Digital Camera

23/07/2012

24/07/2012

Mon - Tues

Daytime

2 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Copywriting Explored

23/07/2012

25/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction to Photography -In Focus

23/07/2012

25/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Camberwell College of Art

Experimental Drawing

23/07/2012

25/07/2012

Mon - Wed

Daytime

3 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Building Websites With Css & Html

23/07/2012

26/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Illustration

23/07/2012

26/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Fashion Jewellery

23/07/2012

26/07/2012

Mon - Thurs

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

3d Studio Max - 3d Modeling

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Critical Theory In Contemporary Art Practice

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Portfolio Preparation 18+

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Pre-Foundation Portfolio Preparation At Chelsea

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Digital Pattern Design & Print

23/07/2012

27/07/2012

Mon - Fri

Daytime

5 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Introduction To Painting

24/07/2012

27/07/2012

Tues - Fri

Daytime

4 days

Chelsea College of Art & Design

Portrait Photography

25/07/2012

25/07/2012

Wednesday

Daytime

1 day

Chelsea College of Art & Design


Transform the end of the day into the beginning of your future Birkbeck opens doors to a better job, a bigger income and a broader outlook. We specialise in evening learning, and help 20,000 Londoners fit study into their lives every year. We are a leading research university and have the best teaching and some of the most satisfied students in London.

So, if you’re thinking about your future, think Birkbeck.

You can afford to go to university If you’ve never done a degree before, and you’re from the UK/EU, you can get a student loan to study for an undergraduate course.

laissez_june2012.indd 1

Open Evening: Thurs 21 June www.bbk.ac.uk London’s evening university

24/05/2012 17:07

LAISSEZ FAIRE LONDON  

Fashion Arts Culture Entertainment

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you