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Aarhus School of Architecture

Constructing an Archive Yearbook 2015/2016 Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK)

Leticia Izquierdo (ES)

Hlynur Axelsson (IS)

Farina Koehnecke (DE)

Khedidja Benniche (GB)

Edvard Lindblom (SE)

Martina Blom (SE)

Louise Linthwaite (GB)

Siv Bøttcher (DK)

Brad Mitchell (AU)

Claudia Carbone (DK)

Nella Konnerup Qvist (DK)

Jazmin Charalambous (GB)

Rikuro Sakaushi (JP)

Panwad Chawalitanont (TH)

Bianca Sciuto (AU)

Kia Evon (FI)

Emre Senoglu (DK/TR)

Georgia Flint (AU)

Astrid Stjernholm (DK)

Alice Francis (AU)

Sissel Sønderskov (DK)

Angus James Hardwick (AU)

Halfdan Trolle (DK)

Karin Hedqvist (SE)

Izabela Wieczorek (PL)


Aarhus School of Architecture

Constructing an Archive Yearbook 2015/2016 Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK)

Leticia Izquierdo (ES)

Hlynur Axelsson (IS)

Farina Koehnecke (DE)

Khedidja Benniche (GB)

Edvard Lindblom (SE)

Martina Blom (SE)

Louise Linthwaite (GB)

Siv Bøttcher (DK)

Brad Mitchell (AU)

Claudia Carbone (DK)

Nella Konnerup Qvist (DK)

Jazmin Charalambous (GB)

Rikuro Sakaushi (JP)

Panwad Chawalitanont (TH)

Bianca Sciuto (AU)

Kia Evon (FI)

Emre Senoglu (DK/TR)

Georgia Flint (AU)

Astrid Stjernholm (DK)

Alice Francis (AU)

Sissel Sønderskov (DK)

Angus James Hardwick (AU)

Halfdan Trolle (DK)

Karin Hedqvist (SE)

Izabela Wieczorek (PL)


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Constructing an Archive

Colophon Constructing an Archive—Yearbook 2015/2016 contains a collection of student works conducted during the Fall semester of 2015 and the Spring semester of 2016 at the Aarhus School of Architecture. 1. Edition Published digitally on ISSUU by the Aarhus School of Architecture July 2016 The publication has been designed and edited by the students and teachers of the studio Constructing an Archive. Editors: Claudia Carbone Teaching Associate Professor, Master of Arts (MA) in Architecture Affiliation, Platform Architectural Experimentation Izabela Wieczorek Teaching Associate Professor, Architect, M.Sc., Ph.D. Affiliation, Platform Architectural Experimentation Layout, design and dtp: Mathias Skafte Andersen Proof reading: Khedidja Benniche, Jazmin Charalambous and Brad Mitchell All names included in the publication have been arranged alphabetically according to last names. Paper: The publication is printed on Scandia 2000 Smooth Natural 115 gs/m Cover: The cover is printed on Scandia 2000 Smooth Natural 240 gs/m

Aarhus School of Architecture

Type: The publication is set in Brandon Grotesque

Nørreport 20 8000 Aarhus C

Unless otherwise stated, material shown in this publication has been created

Denmark

by individuals connected to Studio Constructing an Archive. In case of not

a@aarch.dk

obtained rights, please contact Studio Constructing an Archive at The Aarhus School of Architecture.

ISBN: 978-87-90979-58-4


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Introduction—p.6 Study Trip—p.16 Student Works Fall 2015—p.22 Studio Events—p.100 Student Works Spring 2016—p.110 DLAB Competition—p.178 Index—p.186 Acknowledgements—p.188


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Constructing an Archive

Introduction

Claudia Carbone Izabela Wieczorek

Studio Constructing an Archive operates as a dynamic workspace in which collective experimentation intersects with individual production. The archive is understood as a constantly evolving construct—a collection of material and immaterial traces, processes and results. With an understanding of the architectural practice and production as cumulative and transformative processes, all material produced throughout the semester is considered valid, becoming a vehicle for artistic individual development as well as for critical collective dialogues. Based on the assumption that construction of such an archive requires experimentation and exploration rather than the application of prescriptive methods, the students and the studio supervisors form a team that engages in weekly work sessions and discussions. These take different formats – always with the students’ production in focus, encouraging a proactive attitude and engagement in the daily life of the studio. This years’ studies, framed by the theme VERTIGO Ecosistemic Verticality, focused on investigations within a specific context; a relation and oscillation between the vast immensity and the immense density in cityscape/New York, and formation of the landscape/ The Grand Canyon. This counter position and embedded dialectical tension became instigators for formulating and constructing architectural programmes for inhabitation as speculative proposals. The combination of the studio’s mode of operation, pedagogical and didactical approach, the theme, the school’s overall curriculum, the incorporation of collaborations within the school and with external agents (mentors from practices), has then taken shape in a study programme. This conjunction of the heterogeneous agents and conditions has then been addressed by the students in their projects. In this context, a project is a visionary construct – driven by innovation and creativity –seen as a catalyst for exploring diverse means of representation, for con-structing critical discourses, as well as for foregrounding spatial experiments and developing practical design vocabularies.


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During the fall semester of 2015 under a heading ”On the Edge/ Above”, instrumental investigations of sites in New York City, NY and Grand Canyon, AZ, were carried out, relating intermediate translations, findings and motifs. This was executed (collectively and individually) through experi-ments with media of representation that include site-specific readings, notations, mappings, models, words, films and other constructs. These served as the foundation of a speculative programme for an architectural intervention, challenging the conception of the contemporary habitat and dwelling as a state of being. This programme was followed by the spring semester of 2016 – ”On the Edge/ In-between” – where the projects continued and unfolded collective investigations performed in the previous semester. Located in the same site(s), the projects explored the dynamics of the inhabitation of the vertical gap / in between in relation to the already formulated speculative proposals, and responding to the site’s environmental and physical conditions. The intertwinement between the actual and the speculative explored in the fall semester became the instigator for adapted / adopted visions for a new parasitic architecture. These conditions, chosen tectonics, construction methods, materials and scale were parameters that have defined a specific programme for the activities and events introduced in this context. This publication is an attempt to record the journey undertaken during this year of studies. Its organisation corresponds to the experimental approach of the studio, intertwining pieces of collective and individual works, which can be read and experience as a heterogeneous assemblage, hopefully opening up new paths of enquiry.


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Constructing an Archive

[VERTIGO Ecosistemic Verticality]

“That is how it begins. The place is New York, the time is the present, and neither one will ever change.” Paul Auster, The New York Trilogy, London: Penguin Books, 1990. 161.

“The sense of vast immensity is not phony; the desert measurably offers immeasurable space. It is therefore an environment in which ‘Modern Man’ ought to feel at home—his modern painting, as in the works of Mondrian, implies a space that extends beyond the confines of the canvas;” Reyner Banham, “The Vast and the Empty”. In Landform Building, Edited by Stan Allen and Marc McQuade. 328-344 Lars MüllerPublishers, Princeton University School of Architecture, 341.

Word origin and history of ‘dwell’—(v.) Old English dwellan ”to mislead, deceive,” originally ”to make a fool of, lead astray,” from ProtoGermanic *dwaljanan (cf. Old Norse dvöl ”delay,” dvali ”sleep;” Middle Dutch dwellen ”to stun, make giddy, perplex;” Old High German twellen ”to hinder, delay;” Danish dvale ”trance, stupor,” dvaelbær ”narcotic berry,” source of Middle English dwale ”nightshade”), from PIE *dhwel-, from root *dheu- (1) ”dust, cloud, vapor, smoke” (and related notions of ”defective perception or wits”). Related to Old English gedweola ”error, heresy, madness.” Sense shifted in Middle English through ”hinder, delay,” to ”linger” (c.1200, as still in phrase to dwell upon), to ”make a home” (mid-13c.). Related: Dwelled ; dwelt ; dwells. The sense ‘abide, stay’ was adopted from ON., to which the present existence of the word is mostly due. To dwell (a state and action) and home (a place (an archive) for memories and things (collections)) To dwell is to provide spaces and places for habitation. To dwell in its widest meaning insists on the notion of a state of trance. If the places and spaces are made for this state or adjacent activity, it then creates possibilities to provide specific conditions for architectural interventions.


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We explored and developed architectures defined by the edge condition between the real world and the imaginary world that coexist within a space of dwelling. In this context, both New York and Grand Canyon offered sites for reflection, allowing us to address the most pressing contemporary challenges. The aim was thus to explore new opportunities for the built environment within a context of horizontal (fall semester) vs. vertical (spring semester) systems, limited space and resources. In doing so, we developed a range of design tools and methods focused on structures (or open systems) adaptable to dynamic environmental and urban conditions, also to a programmatic and social diversity. In other words, operating within such a framework, as explorers, we discovered new territories never before documented and experienced. Located in such a multi-layered scenario the project provided areas of opportunity for the exploration of the habitat from the large to the bodily scale, questioning how events, rituals, habits, phenomena, dreams and desires inform the shaping of the built environment – i.e. the production of space. The ambition was to perform evolutionary experiments that involve a synergetic intertwinement of human and non-human, man-made and natural, addressing social, environmental, productive, and technological aspects that call for the re-invention of the notion of domesticity. Dwelling on the edge—above and in-between—within the formation of the cityscape or its landscape counterpart. Dwelling alone or together, or with other living beings (bees, birds, insects…) in a specific site, developing new forms of togetherness. For that urban/natural landscape—the more unstable edge/vertical plane—the architectural intervention is then adaptive or abusing, providing shelter in the most inhospitable conditions. The focus of these studies were on method and process, with a particular interest in the implication of chance, uncertainty and improvisation as drivers for experiments with different means of representation. We aimed at developing a creative and diverse approach by incorporating into the programme elements such as current agendas, internships, architectural practices, workshops, theory seminars, studies abroad, co-operations, etc. so that all elements of the programme address the studies to as great an extent as possible.


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Modus Operandi

“[T]he concept of the archive is synonymous with the trace and the document: in each we are able to measure not only a relation between the past and the present, but between the event and evidence of its occurrence, and between the fabric of everyday life and its representation.” Paul Ricoeur, “Archives, Documents, Traces.”In The Archive. Documents of Contemporary Art by Charles Merewether (The MIT Press, 2006), 66-69.

Constructing an Archive is tantamount to constructing a space of and for encountering: a space in which different diciplines and methodologies interact, stimulating and supporting alternative thought and representation of architecture. a space of multiscalarity and transversality, creating a platform for constant experimentation and for expansion of an architectural domain; a particular collection not of designed artefacts but design procedures and creative processes, extending into realms of events and phenomena. What is more, the name of the studio denotes action, action which transcends fixed limits, creating situations through which hidden layers of knowledge are revealed, constantly moving from space of collaborative reflection and production to space of individual creation. Here the capacities and meanings of different media of representation – analogue and digital, traditional and innovative – are exploited from aesthetical, methodological and epistemological perspective; a space where design is understood as a research practice based on experimentation rather than prescriptive methods, involving multiple actors and embracing uncertainty, and challenging conventions; a space in which an act of building extends to the design stage, including spatial analysis (notations,


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mappings), reading and understanding of the complexity of the built environment in order to contribute to its construction – to transform it; a space in which observation becomes the initial component of the chain of events that introduces possibilities of chance encounters and discoveries, with an aim of translating this phenomenological and empirical experience into architectural propositions; a space in which architecture is not reduced to an object (a building) but is approached as an open and dynamic system – sensible and responsive to the environment; a space in which the material and the immaterial, the pragmatic and the visionary, the physical and the digital, the intuitive and the empirical, are being considered mutually supportive and explanatory rather than conflictive; In short, constructing an archive is about creating a condition for the formation of architectural (critical) practice as well as for imagining alternative pedagogies, in which “everything [is] an experiment” and “nothing is a mistake”. 1

Corita Kent “Rules & Hints for Students & Teachers.” In Learning by Heart. Teachings to Free the Creative Spirit by Corita Kent and Jan Steward

1

(New York: Allworth Press, (1992) 2008), 176. The ten-point rules, written in the late 1960’s, were popularised by John Cage (to whom they are often contributed) and became a Decalogue for the studio of Merce Cunningham.


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Constructing an Archive

Glossary*

Archive [From Late Latin archivum, from Greek arkheia—public records, arkhe—literally: beginning, origin, first place]

“Clearly archives are not neutral; they embody the power inherent in accumulation, collection, and hoarding as well as that power inherent in the command of the lexicon and the rules of language.” Alan Sekula, “Reading an Archive. Photography between labour and capital.” In Visual Culture. The Reader, edited by J. Evan and S. Hall (London: SAGE Publications, 2005), 184.

Construction [From Latin constructionem (nominative constructio), from construct-, past participle stem of construere; make by fitting things together, accumulate; build, make, erect, in 15c interpretation, the creating of something form ideas, opinions and knowledge] “The act of construction develops its own momentum” Rosalind Williams, Notes on the Underground (The MIT Press, 2008), 20.

“[T]he very idea of construction, which means passing from disorder to order and using the arbitrary to attain the necessary, fixed itself in my mind as the most beautiful and most complete type of action that man can possibly undertake.” Paul Valéry, “The History of Amphion, (To the Audience)”. In The collected works of Paul Valéry, edited by Jackson Mathews. Translated by Denise Folliot and Jackson Mathews (New York: Bollingen Foundation, 1960), 213.

*The definitions of the terms are based on the following sources: C.T Onions (ed.), Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology (Oxford: Oxford At the Clarendon Press, 1996); S. Wehmeier; C. McIntosh; J.Turnbull and M. Ashby (eds.), Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005); http://www.oxforddictionaries.com and http://www.etymonline.com


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Experiment [mid-14c., action undertaken to discover or test something; an observation or trial; also piece of evidence or empirical proof; feat of magic or sorcery, from Old French esperment: practical knowledge, cunning; enchantment, magic spell; trial, proof, example; lesson, sign, indication] “His quest is total even where it looks partial. Just when he has reached proficiency in some area, he finds that he has reopened another one where everything he said before must be said again in a different way. The upshot is that what he has found he does not yet have. It remains to be sought out; the discovery itself calls forth still further quests.” Maurice Merleau-Ponty, “Eye and mind”. In The Merleau-Ponty aesthetics reader: philosophy and painting, edited by Galen A. Johnson, translated by Michael Bradley Smith (Evanstone, Illinois: Northwestern University Press, 1993), 148.

Representation [from Latin repraesentare, make present, set in view, manifest, show, exhibit, display; presence, appearance] “The drawings offer a unique insight into the constructive possibilities on the boundary of actual and imagery space – in other words, an insight into the representative power of our imagination, challenged by the conceptual power of our invention.” Dalibor Veselý, ”Modernity, Freedom and Destiny”. In Architecture in the Age of Divided Representation. The Question of Creativity in the Shadow of Production by Dalibor Veselý (The MIT Press, 2006), 21.


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Constructing an Archive

Exploration [The action of exploring an unfamiliar area] “It is a matter of describing, not of explaining or analysing. (…) All my knowledge of the world, even my scientific knowledge, is gained from my own particular point of view, or from some experience of the world without which the symbols of science would be meaningless.” Maurice Merleau-Ponty, “Preface.” In Phenomenology of Perception by Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Translated by Colin Smith (London, New York: Routledge (1945) 2002), ix.

Production [c. 1400, a coming into being, from Old French, production, exhibition (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin productionem (nominative productio), from past participle stem of Latin producer, bring forth, the act of process of making, bringing into existence] “Every work of art, even though it is produced by following an explicit or implicit poetics of necessity, is effectively open to a virtually unlimited range of possible readings, each of which causes the work to acquire new vitality in terms of one particular taste, or perspective, or personal performance.” Umberto Eco, “The Poetics of the Open Work.” In The Open Work by Umberto Eco. Translated by Anna Cancogni, 1-23 (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1989), 21, emphasis in original.


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Practice [action rather than ideas; from early 15c. as to perform repeatedly to acquire skill, to learn by repeated performance; mid-15c. as to perform, to work at, exercise] “[P]ractice is not a static construct, but is defined precisely by its movements and trajectories. There is no theory, there is no practice. There are only practices, which consist in action and agency. They unfold in time, and their repetitions are never identical. It is for this reason that the “knowhow” of practice (whether of writing or design) is a continual source of innovation and change.”

Stan Allen, “Introduction: Practice versus Project.” In Practice: Architecture, technique + representation, by Stan Allen, XI-XX (New York: Routledge, (1989) 2009), XIII. emphasis in original

Mapping [An operation that associates each element of a given set (the domain) with one or more elements of a second set (the range).] “As a creative practice, mapping precipitates its most productive effects through a finding that is also a founding; its agency lies in neither reproduction nor imposition but rather in uncovering realities previously unseen or unimagined, even across seemingly exhausted grounds. Thus, mapping unfolds potential; it remakes territory over and over again, each time with new and diverse consequences. Not all maps accomplish this however; some simply reproduce what is already known. These are more ‘tracings’ than maps, delineating patterns but revealing nothing new.” James Corner, “The Agency of Mapping: Speculation, Critique and Invention.” In Mappings, edited by Denis Cosgrove (London: Reaktion Books Ltd., 1999), 213.


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Constructing an Archive

Before we begin— Study Trip—New York— Chicago—Las Vegas— Grand Canyon—Fall 2015

Opposite page: Top—Route 66, Nevada, photo by Mathias Skafte Andersen Bottom—Reflections, New York, photo by Alice Francis


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This page: Top—New York roofs, New York, photo by Bianca Sciuto Bottom—Venetian Icecream, Las Vegas, photo by Alice Francis Opposite page: Top—Lexington Avenue, New York photo by Bianca Sciuto Bottom—Streetscape, Chicago, photo by Emre Senoglu


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Constructing an Archive

This page: Top—Corner, New York, photo by Alice Francis Bottom—Grand Canyon, Arizona, photo by Mathias Skafte Andersen Opposite page: Top—Flamingos, Las Vegas, photo by Mathias Skafte Andersen Bottom—Shadowplay, New York, photo by Alice Francis


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Constructing an Archive

Student Works— Fall 2015 With an introduction by Claudia Carbone and Izabela Wieczorek


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Constructing an Archive

On the Edge—Above

Masters- and guest students (7th—9th semester) / respond to the general study programme: Mathias Skafte Andersen Hlynur Axelsson Panwad Chawalitanont Georgia Flint Alice Francis Angus James Hardwick Farina Koehnecke Louise Linthwaite Rikuro Sakaushi Emre Senoglu Bianca Sciuto Astrid Stjernholm Sissel Sønderskov Halfdan Trolle

New York, Totemized Hunting a City Birds and Other Kinds of Weeds Labyrinth Beyond a Glance Towards a Performative Dwelling Event Atmospheric Rehab Temporal Dwelling Library of Babel Seclusion, Shelter Cabin I Think, Therefore I Am The Space Between Us The Leviathan

Thesis students (10th semester) / formulate a project with a conscious connection to their former studies and respond to the studios’ general mode of operation: Siv Bøttcher (DK) Nella Konnerup Qvist (DK)

Collections // Quotation Machines Correlate

Students in internships: Karin Hedqvist (SE) Edvard Lindblom (SE)

Junya Ishigami + Associates Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner, AG


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Programme

The constituent parts of the semester Structured around four consequent phases, the project was set up in relation to its context(s). The specific and unique spatial and environmental qualities of this context(s) constituted a scenario for the projects, providing a foundation for the envisioning of new conditions and innovative architectural typologies. In the city, the project unfolded embracing the places in which the roofscape not only acted as a support for the already existing infrastructures or offered extended vistas, but also provided new territories for appropriation and inhabitation. Thus maximising its potential and responding to the city’s dynamics and spatio-environmental constraints (congestions, pollution, light noise, or the coexistence with other species…). In the landscape, extreme physical and environmental conditions became a living reality. The project aimed at reconstructing/sustaining (like a corset) the earth from the natural aggressive conditions (climate, erosion), making it possible to harvest its energies and vistas. The first phase was the initial formulation of a “manifest/programme” that outlined an individual position in relation to the subject matter: to dwell. The second phase - a preparation for site explorations. The third phase was the development of an architectural proposal and, consequently, the execution and production of a specific narrative derived from the performed investigations and the produced archive, aiming to communicate the project in the fourth phase.


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Constructing an Archive

Throughout the project development, we worked with the Critical Written Reflection. Building on relevant references (texts and works from a wide range of disciplines), as well as combining theory and practice – that is, critical thinking and artistic experimentation – the written reflection was understood as a catalyst for project development. Inhabiting Worlds through Words (CWR) focused on gathering experiences (the explorer CWR I) and questioning architectural possibilities (agent of transformation CWR II) through an exploration of what it means to be an inhabitant—re-imagining new habitats suspended in the city’s or landscape’s vastness, layered or inserted within the existing environment—nested within the surroundings; exploring a creative loop of narrative, production and representation—that is, relating creative processes in writing and making and understanding a project as a productive intertwinement between theoretical speculation (or even provocation) and practical investigation.

Georgia Flint: New York Walks


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phase #1 to dwell above [14.09.- 28.09.15]

“The writer is an explorer. Every step is an advance into new land.” Ralph Waldo Emerson. Journals of Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1820-1872 [1876] ed. by Edward Waldo Emerson and Walod Emerson Forbes. Cambridge: Riversode Press, 1909-1914, 322

“A house functions like a transformer, where forces come to rest, like a high-energy filter or converter.” Michel Serres. “Visit to a House.” In Daidalos n.41 Provocation of the Senses. (September 1991): 88-91. 8

In this phase the aim was to formulate a vision, a speculative programme for an architectural intervention, and a manual: making maps on the way. Through mapping, the objective was to understand and interpret the context in a manifold way, exploring its physical, environmental, temporal and social layers. Through reflections upon different forms of togetherness and acts of inhabitation in deep relationship with designated site(s), a potential scenario for the projects was defined, challenging familiar assumptions about such concepts as ’house’ and ’home’ and a contemporary habitat (in the context of the cityscape or landscape).


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Constructing an Archive

phase #2 expedition (grand tour) [28.09.15- 02.11.15] Inhabiting Worlds through Words (CWR)

“[T]he hand that writes does not cease to draw. It can therefore move quite freely, and without interruption, in and out of writing.” Tim Ingold. “Drawing, writing and calligraphy” in Lines. A Brief History. London, New York: Routledge 2007, 124.

The aim was to develop methods for notation of the site’s environment, and patterns, in multiple ways. Notation of procedures as the explorer, the traveller in the expedition; both exploring on-site and also preparing and staging these explorations before the journey.

(off-site) explorations Mapping the archaeology of becoming

“The wayfarer is continually on the move. More strictly, he is his movement. (…)The experience of habitation cannot be comprehended within the terms of the conventional opposition between the settler and the nomad, since this opposition is itself founded on the contrary principle of occupation. Settlers occupy places; nomads fail to do so. Wayfarers, however, are not failed or reluctant occupants but successful inhabitants.” Tim Ingold. “Up, across and along” in Lines. A Brief History. London, New York: Routledge 2007, 75, 101.

Addressing intentions regarding the planned act of inhabitation/occupation/observation etc. of the city/ land-scape, the initial descriptions of the land (site/scenario) and field of operation were defined.


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In order to obtain a possible (optimal) condition for the site explorations, a manual was drawn to support a specific procedure and optic. Nevertheless, at the same time, it was open-ended, enabling an unknown (condition) to occur and to be incorporated. The procedures defined in the manual occasionally required preliminary tests to be performed (off-site) in Aarhus (DK), so that the necessary tools and techniques they implicated could be adjusted, thus ensuring their performance during the expedition—(on-site) explorations (US). “They wander through the sectors of New Babylon seeking new experiences, as yet unknown ambiances. Without the passivity of tourists, but fully aware of the power they have to act upon the world, to transform it, recreate it. They dispose of a whole arsenal of technical implements for doing this, thanks to which they can make the desired changes without delay.” Constant Nieuwenhuys, “New Babylon”, available at: www.notbored.org/new-babylon.html, 1974 [accessed September 1st, 2015]

phase #3 palimpsest and construct [02.11.15-05.01.16]

Aimed at bringing the information such as notations, findings and narratives together in one representation (drawing, relief, text) that worked as a traceable palimpsest (multiple layers/exposures) as well as to construct a (one) recollection of the explored sites as a collective model. “‘House’ means shelter, and implies edges, walls, doors, and roofs – and the whole repertory of the fabric. ‘Home’ does not require any building, even if the house always does. You can make a home anywhere: a little tinder, even some waste paper, a few matches, or a cigarette lighter is all you need.” Joseph Rykwert. “House and Home.” In Social Research, 51-62. Vol. 58, No. 1 (Spring1991), 54.


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collection of experiences v. collective experience

All material – recordings, mappings and collected samples, data (on- and off-site) – is presented as a collection, giving an insight into individually performed investigations/experiments. Traces of the inhabitation – two collective models (GC + NY) + palimpsest. This data was collectively translated into two models of the site(s) developed through teamwork. The models served as both an archive of experiences and as a background for project development allowing multiple readings.

agent of transformation CWR II*

Located in such a multi-layered scenario, the model, the word and the drawings, offered areas of opportunity for the exploration and construction of the habitat oscillating from the large to the bodily scale, including evolutionary experiments that involved a synergetic intertwinement of human and nonhuman, man-made and natural, addressing social, environmental, productive, and technological aspects that called for the re-invention of the notion of domesticity. A speculative approach was adopted, stressing the importance of a fiction and the ability to imagine possible “presents”. Dwelling on the edge - above - within the formation of the cityscape or its landscape counterpart. Dwelling alone or together, or with other living beings (bees, birds, insects...) in a specific site, developing new forms of togetherness. The above described processes entailed the following questions to be addressed: What are the parameters that define a speculative approach, and what question do they raise? What forms of togetherness are considered?


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In which space do they take place, and what and/or who are involved? What does the defined togetherness imply – what impact does it have on an existing context? What and how does it appropriate, transform (in positive or negative way), enhance, expand or diminish, replace or add? How might it potentially contribute to the existing fabric in environmental, social, cultural, or political terms? These questions constituted a framework for an architectural proposal and, consequently, the execution and production of a specific narrative derived from the performed investigations and the produced archive, aiming at communicating the project in the fourth phase.

[CWR the dossier] all material produced throughout project development was organised in an individual dossier.

[CWR the excerpt] embedded former studies and production with a reflection about the making of the narrative – and in the influence of existing theories and practices in the written work.

phase #4 collections from the archive [18.01.16 – 28.01.16]

The material was edited in a semester publication in such a way that it contributed to a future work. This publication was to be considered as a status report of studio activities and production, as well as a draft for this yearbook. Constructing

an

Archive Fall 2015 Aarhus School of Architecture


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New York, Totemized

Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK) 8th Semester “The Totem embraces everything that exists; both in animate and - to us -inanimate nature: plants, trees, pools and waterplaces, stones as well as stars. All possessed a life and a soul, all could be a Totem.” 1 This project proposes a contemporary urban reinterpretation of the Native American Totem Pole. Using Manhattan as both case and site, the project notes how Native Americans would inhabit land through the use of cultural narratives told through Totem Poles, whereas, a Western approach utilizes massive physical manifestations of ownership and power; the infrastructural grid and the skyscraper. Acknowledging Sigfried Giedion’s definition of the Totem as an all-inclusive term, the project argues that an urban environment is both compatible with and could benefit from the implemention of totemism. Through video-explorations, model-studies and paintings, the project exhibits a progressive modulation of the Totem Pole from a sculptural entity into a vibrant and inclusive space embedded in the urban fabric of New York City.

Sigfried Giedion, The Eternal Present, (New York: Bollingen Foundation, 1962), 270

1


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About the Dwellers In Futurist theory, the idea of rest is not acknowledged. It is argued that no object is ever at a halt - what is percieved as rest is rather an observation, of a certain stage in an objects movement. As such, an object does not end where another begins or is percieved to end. It casts trajectories into space and intersects and intertwines with other objects. To dwell is merely another pace on the scale of movement. Dwelling contains the velocity of distance travelled and distance to be travelled. Dwelling causes an interpenetration of the planes making up the space around the dweller; it negotiates a dynamic space in which the trajectories of the dwellers meet. The city dweller is constantly on the move; as nomadic as the Native American rushing to the forest to gather food or into the canyon to meet his Totem spirits. To influence the city dweller one would need to intersect with his path, to capture a moment in time in which he - as always - is moving. It would be to incapsulate his velocity along with the velocities of people, objects and architectures around him. It is here, in a space, in a staged juxtaposition of the dweller and his surroundings that he will be brought to notice his intersection with the world. It is here he will meet his Urban Totem.

Anthony Vidler, �Warped Space: Art, Architecture and Anxiety in Modern Culture, Cambridge�, The MIT Press, 2000

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Hunting a City

Hlynur Axelsson (IS) 9th Semester The focus of this project is the individual survival and adaptability to ones surroundings. The premise is based upon a personal hunting experience combined with an incident when I got lost in a snowy blizzard in the wilderness. I walked into New York as a city hunter and it is my vision that the people in the city bring it to life. Thus I needed to hunt the people of New York in order to understand the city. To be able to do so I constructed a map with information given to me from New Yorkers. Using this fragmented map, I got lost in the city. The mapping continued on the streets as I hunted the people that I met. All of them were so kind to give me insight into their world. The subject in my project is an illustrator, named Korby. When I met him I discovered that he had been stuck in New York City on his journey towards his dreams for 45 years. Through his experience I wanted to illustrate the dream world that I encountered. The site that I choose is at Saint Bartholomew Episcopal Church at the South Eastern corner of E 51st St and Park Avenue. At the church there is a homeless shelter and it was here that I saw people who were in the same shoes as Korby, thus I saw this to be his next stop. The moment of this next stop would be a critical one for Korby to escape into his dream world or to follow up on his dreams and leave New York.


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Yearbook 2015/16

About the Dwellers The dwelling is the reflection of the dream world that I encountered in the city by the people of New York. Korby started on his dream journey 45 years ago and got stuck in New York but in his mind his dreams are even clearer than when he first arrived in the city. The aim of the project is to make a dwelling within New York City. In my case I was creating a dwelling for Korby, even though New York was the last place he wanted to dwell. As he is still stuck in his dream, the creation of his dream space became his nightmare as it reflected his everyday life in New York. Korby loves to draw portraits even though he has been stuck like this for so long. In New York he has the chance to do what he loves. However, the city only privdes him with enough subjects to survive his day to day withing the city, keeping him from pursuing his dream. The space that I created reflects his dream as he can constantly draw portraits. At the same time it is his nightmare, he is stuck in the city. In this loop he is forever addicted to the city. There is a thin line between a dream and a nightmare when the turning point is a waking up.

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Birds and Other Kinds of Weeds

Panwaad Chawalitanont (TH) 9th. Semester

Under the vastness of the cityscape, New York City has been a major port of entry for immigrants into the United States, which makes it a most populous and cultural city. One of the most visible aspects of culture, apart from people and language, is food. What we eat, how we eat, or even where we eat tells a lot of stories. In the beginning of the project, I was interested in how cultures are embedded into the context of the city and how this can form space. In a collection of articles written in the 1970s and 1980s, Bernard Tschumi explains that �there is no space without event, no architecture without a program� 1. This later led me to explore even further into the relationship between space and culture, which can be identified even more accurately as hybrid architecture. Here, the different social groups can co-exist together, creating a potential for social encounter.

http://tschumi.com/ history/ [accessed October 1st 2015 ]

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About the Dwellers The idea of food production evolved from thinking how different species can not only encounter but also benefit each other by obtaining the available rooftop space and using the existing structure as a parasite. Wild nature and animals, such as birds, rats or cats lead a parasitic way of life. They are in fact part of the urban machine. They have no home; they exist everywhere and at the same time nowhere. Their territory makes them visible but remains invisible. In this project I aim to explore the exchange between human life and nature, the coinciding existence and the interference of these two entities. By challenging the hierarchy of this relationship the project searches for a deeper understanding and analysis of social culture and nature. It shows that by strengthening this connection all species can benefit from one another much more than they do today, creating a stronger and more harmonious environment.

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Labyrinths

Georgia Flint (AU) Guest student

Michel Serres’ “Visit to a House”1 prompted discussion into how ultimately recollection is what directs how people respond to a space. Carl Jung states, “Fundamentally, the human persona is nothing real: it is a compromise between individual and society as to what a man should appear to be.”2 Children are exempt from this compromise as they construct understanding of the world by first hand experiments of touching, playing and imagining. My final proposition aims to utilise forms of play in order for adults to experience a new urban fabric. With a lasting fascination into labyrinth and maze journeys, my project analysed the two sites within these frameworks. A maze is defined as “a network of interconnecting pathways through which one has to find a way.”3 New York City can be seen as a maze, allowing for a number of routes to be taken. An active engagement is required for an individual to navigate their way, a powerful tool enabling externalization of their thoughts within the city. A labyrinth is defined as “a single through-route with twists and turns but without branches.”4 The Grand Canyon’s Bright Angel Trail has only one path, thus the need to find the route does not occur permitting the visitor to internalise their thoughts – it is a spiritual experience navigating a labyrinth.

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Michel Serres, ”Visit to

a House”, Daidalos 41 Provocation of the Senses, (September 1991): 88-91 2

Carl Jung, ”Carl Jung on the

Persona” www.carljungdepthpsychology. wordpress.com/ category/persona (Accessed September 21, 2015) 3

Merriam-Webster ”Defini-

tion of a Maze” www.merriam-webster.com/ dictionary/maze (Accessed October 7, 2015) 4

Franco Maria Ricci. Laby-

rinths: The Art of the Maze. (New York: Rizzolo, 2013) 15. 5

Tim Ingold, Lines: A Brief

History. (London: Routledge, 2007): 102.


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About the Dwellers Tim Ingold states in “Lines”, “travel is no longer an experience of movement in which action and perception are intimately coupled, but has become one of enforced immobility and sensory deprivation”5, hence I wanted the pathway I created to be one where diverse sensory experience is celebrated through a new form of travelling and dwelling in the city using play. I came to the conclusion that what is placed upon the final destination of the roof is irrelevant, the importance and curiousness of the “unknown” becomes the motivation for travelling up the pathways. A suggested site for the labyrinth journey is the Trump Tower and IBM building as whilst walking through the streets of New York I stumbled upon a glass saw-tooth roof plaza between these two corporate edifices. In addition, the program for the final rooftop destination is temporal and changing to add to the mystery. Examples explored include a swimming pool, a camping site, a labyrinth garden and a giant sundial.


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Beyond a Glance

Alice Francis (AU) Guest student

The subconscious mind and visual perception of human beings in connection to the environmental realities of the world around us are the main themes of this project. Closely related to the structure of the human eye and the concept of visual perception, photography has been utilized as the most important tool in physically materializing the moments of reality I encountered and captured between natural light and the urban landscape of New York City. The objective is that further exploration and interrogation of these moments (integrated into both process and final architectural outcome) may persuade the observer to consider and understand the aim of this work; to create individual connections back to environmental realisms, truths and ephemeral nature of the world surrounding us as human beings.

Located in Midtown Manhattan and positioned 246 meters above ground level, the rooftop of the MetLife building allows overlooking views of mega-icons. By providing a physically elevated disconnection from the busy and distracting aspects of Manhattan, while still interweaving visual connection with some of the most iconic places in New York City, this encounter will aim to allow a distanced reflection for each interaction.


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About the Dwellers Dwellers of this intervention will reflect individually and be influenced by interactions with a series of freestanding screens and enclosed chambers. These elements will utilize the natural daylight as a creative medium in conjunction with the irregular openings of the shadow scores created from the original photographic outcomes from the field trip to New York City. The shadow scores, finally assembled at varying scales and treatments, will act as light modulators sculpturing the received natural light from the New York sky above and forming fleeting and shifting shadow shapes of visible energy throughout the day as a reflection of the Manhattan streets below. The hope is for dwellers to consider and provide thought of these sculptured shadow forms beyond the usual neglect and therefore inspire a reconnection with the world, as it truly exists outside of our individual selves.

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Toward a Performative Dwelling Event

Angus Hardwick (AU) 9th Semester

I aimed to investigate the dwelling spaces of various human, non-human, and human-non-human actors: how they affect their surrounding context, and my body. I consider that this dwelling occurred at many levels, from the complex co-habitation of a chronic virus in the human body, to vast networks shifting in urban and natural landscape sites. The proposal included a choreographed rooftop art event: The Prelude, Arrival 1, The Negotiations, and Arrival 2. These events, distributed over a series of blue fields, give us, as participants a new understanding of our boundaries and horizons. This project has two sites. My Body Operating as a parasite within the [city/nature]-scape. I was provoked by specific stimuli-actors. Positioning my body, with the [city/nature]-scape behind and the textile screen in front, I expressed the stimuli through a series of gestures. The constructed textile acted as a measuring device and became a field to record the location of these performances. The Seagram Building Rooftop Philip Johnson’s 1958 interiors for the Four Season’s Restaurant within The Seagram Building gave attention to the pleasurable activities of the visiting patrons. A photograph taken on top of the main tower suggests a second large plaza, as a counterpoint to that on the ground, a new field for pleasurable activities.1

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I refer specifically to Ezra

Stoller’s 1958 photographic series.


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About the Dwellers To dwell: is not to be passive and the space of this is perceived from within a dwelling sphere. In dwelling a mediation between the dweller and a stimulus or reciprocal source (the outside world) occurs. This dwelling sphere and the relationship it negotiates with the outside world is not simple or singular. It is complex described as a: casing; membrane; skin, and coating.2 Dwelling arises from an active mediation between ‘safe’ interior and ‘threatening’ exterior. The exterior world is always positioned as being in a state of constant threat or crisis. The reverse of this is that because dwelling is an active state both the dweller and the dwelling stimulus leaves traces and marks on the exterior world. In crossing the boundary between dweller and world, or interior

Act 1 I Prelude

Act 2 I

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and exterior, a transformation occurs as the dwellers renegotiate themselves with the stimuli (physical and mental) of their world. At the core of all building is the transformation of unspecified space into places. An open and interconnected interchange, or gathering, between dweller, their activity, and the location occurs, allowing this transformation.3 Michael Serres, ’Visit to a House,’ Daidalos 41 - Provocation of the Senses, (September 1991): 88-91. 3 Martin Heidegger, Albert Hofstadter trans., Poetry, Language, Thought, (New York: Harper Perennial Classics, 2001): 151. 2

I Negotiation 1 Act 3 Negotiation 2

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Act 4

I The Arrival 2

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Atmospheric Rehab

Farina Koehnecke (DE) 9th Semester The contradiction of the two sites - the Grand Canyon and New York City – inspired this study of the relationship between human behaviour, architecture and natural elements. With the focus on air, this project questions a controlled urbanity, which manipulates the elements for the comfort of the inhabitants. Human dwelling is readable in the way it occupies air through its characteristics of odour, humidity, temperature, sound etc. It describes a flexible parameter that alters with time, mood and season. Simultaneously, it describes the level of pollution through the city. A strong sensation of man-guided air appears along the 5th Avenue where powerful air machines support the customers’ satisfaction inside the luxury stores. The filtering, cooling and heating mechanisms are placed in tubes hidden inside the building. They carry comfort from room to room to finally spew the used air as a polluted element out into the atmosphere. My approach is a reversal of this transformation, a rehabilitation facility that helps air to dwell back into its natural condition, whilst also providing experiential stages for visitors. Thereby the proposed structure becomes a catalyst that unfolds the full potential of the spatial importance of air, by using it for a new kind of dwelling in a healthier environment.


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About the Dwellers A building frames perception, relations and actions by providing the base for people to inhabit and make it their personal experience. My proposal focuses on an active transition through the stages of air cleaning. Visitors experience the different conditions of air instead of a stagnant climate existing in one room. ... A room catches me in the centre. It is quiet, too lazy to talk. It feels as if a soft wind puts a silky coat around me. Air that is falling down on me like a heavy rain in a tropical forest... ... Various shades of green that seem to change their intensity as I walk through. Is it alive? The space seems to vibrate, the membrane that limits it seems to breathe. As I chase the appearing curves, my laziness disappears as if the surrounding membrane is absorbing it to survive itself and help me survive‌

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Temporal Dwelling

Louise Linthwaite (GB) 9th Semester The human body is a prevalent theme throughout the built environment, this is how we, as humans, recognise and understand spaces, textures and atmospheres. This apprehension is a subconscious condition of the mind and the body working simultaneously. This study seeks to discern and visualise this interpretation of space, specifically, dwelling. This study will examine the concept of dwelling as an internal, intuitive dynamic between user, memory and space. It will continue to discuss whether the built is merely a frame for experiencing these processes and furthermore, the progression of dwelling becoming entangled in thought and internalising surroundings. One can compare the house to dwelling as you would compare a human organ to the body, the first cannot function in its entirety without the other, the second enveloping it with purpose. There are two sites in which to explore these hypotheses, 1 square mile in Manhattan, NYC and 1 square mile in the Grand Canyon, Arizona, where a series of smaller field studies took place; examining my body’s relationship to its surroundings via pulse, temperature, texture and thought process. From these sites, one specific place was chosen and studied, the MetLife Building in New York City and a space next to the Rim Trail on the South rim of the Grand Canyon.


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About the Dwellers On the rooftops of Manhattan, the skyline takes over the periphery. What if the intervention on the rooftop could focus on the light and sky above? This would be a place to find silence, to dwell, in a personal way, with an understanding of togetherness. This space can be returned to and inhabited in an individual way. This can define the verticality of the city by framing the vertical plane with the intricate spaces explored. At the Grand Canyon, the axis runs horizontally across the vast, incomprehensible landscape. The intervention would frame the context, externally contrasting the organic mass of the canyon, internally complimenting. The understanding of void, landscape, ground and wall place is augmented via the body. This relies primarily on vision and tactility, but also other more ephemeral notions, Juhani Pallasmaa writes, �Experience is multi-sensory in its very essence, but it also involves judgements beyond the five Aristotelian senses, such as the senses of orientation, gravity, balance, stability, motion, duration, continuity, scale and illumination.� 1 The interventions seek to challenge and reintegrate these states of conscious into dwelling, while sustaining a relationship with each opposing site.

Juhani Pallasmaa. "Space, place and atmosphere. Emotion and peripherical perception in architectural experience.� Lebenswelt. Aesthetics and philosophy of experience. N.4, (2014): 230-245, 231. http://riviste.unimi.it/index.php/ Lebenswelt/issue/view/571/showToc [Accessed 15 January 2015]

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Library of Babel

Rikuro Sakaushi (JP) 9th Semester There is an architecture formulated with words, The Library of Babel by Luis Borges would be a good example1. Library of Babel is the tower that compressed the entire humanity. There is no intention to read his myth as an allegorical description, but to configure and draw its space would be the ultimate goal. My project mainly states ‘journey’ in which one can travel through different inspirations I encountered. The project adds on top of Borges written propositions travelling through far reaching theory, history and most importantly my imagination.

Jorge Luis Borges, ”Library of Babel” in Collected Fictions, translated by Andrew Hurley, Penguins Books, London, 1998, p 112 - 118

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About the Dwellers Since I did not go to New York, my role is to try to collect memories and simulate the itinerary as a scenario writer. My architectural proposal was to instill abstraction of physical horizontal pilgrimage routes into its perpendicular spiral structure, with compartments that dwell traveler’s memories along its double interlocking slopes. These represent New York and the Grand Canyon.

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Cabin

Bianca Sciuto (AU) Guest student The disposition of my project is based on the concept of place, space and the in between, and how architectural interventions can redefine the use of space into a place where one can dwell. The way in which we encounter these spaces between places begins to uncover a deeper investigation into undiscovered space that holds avenues for exploration, intervention and investigation. The way we dwell and where we dwell can take on many different forms and structural designs. I see a dwelling as a structure that provides the inhabitant with a situation that allows one to look, focus and observe the environment that surrounds them in a way that challenges their original perspective. Since choosing the Grand Canyon as my site, I wanted to explore how we could dwell on the vertical planes of large, vast terrains. Using the canyon wall as a place to dwell, how could we then create a space to dwell in, and how can these spaces be accessed. I wanted to explore ways of living that differ from our day-to-day life. Researching into Native American housing and lifestyle revealed living situations that could condition to this vertical lifestyle. These native homes take forms of tunneled pathways that then open up to views that frame the horizon in ways that differ from a standard window.


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About the Dwellers Spaceless place uncovers the act of contemplation and reveals the inner state of the daydreamer. These spaceless places want to challenge the way space is encountered by leaving a mark on the world that shows the infinity of space. Spaces between places produce an attitude unlike any other. This is exposed through the concept of infinite space that exists between places by uncovering architectural interventions that are not always evident to the human eye. These spaceless places expose a unique and unfamiliar way of experiencing the mode in which we define a place. What exactly is a place, space or spaceless place? Can these spaces between places expose a new dimension in the way we design or encounter a space? Dividing up or intersecting into places, could reveal new spaces between places where we can begin to dwell.


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Seclusion, Shelter

Emre Senoglu (DK/TR) 8th Semester We can now pose a question: Where does the daydreamer go in the city? Where can he escape? How can he survive the demanding life of the city? How does he feel at peace without having to abandon everything? Where is his shelter? Where does he get to be entirely alone in order to dream in peace? How can a particular space be able to provide feelings of shelter and protection without the need of exclusion from society? In other words, how can a space be safe, whilst being in the middle of an unsafe space, in this case, the urban environment? Escapism in the city occurs in the switch from city life (public) to home (private). Where do these places belong in the city and how does the transition between the two occur? What are the spatial effects from the lack of transition? The project aims to bring together the comforts of retreat into an urban context, dealing with the spatial limits of an urban area. The aim is then to define a space that an inclusive seclusion can occur.


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About the Dwellers This space is intended to allow open use for the public despite being hidden. It is a gathering place for those who have chosen to live in the city, and yet have become exhausted by its intensity. It is an interior space with the characteristics of a suburban retreat. Its dwellers are fond of its seclusion, and the easy accessibility. Inside, there are two rooms with a function: an eating room; for lunch breaks or spontaneous gathering, and a reading room; a silent space made for those who bring along a book or a magazine.

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I think, therefore I am

Astrid Stjernholm (DK) 7th Semester

A project about the worlds.

Worlds that occur birth.

Each world follows a reality – realities of which we consist.

Should these worlds be understood and perceived independently? What would happen if we let our realities become visible? If we made the hidden visible? What if our realities could meet and merge into a whole?

Set them free. Let them become one.

Materials act as building blocks for memories. Reflective materials are in high demand in New York, these reflections make the buildings become one; they merge into a unit. The reality is non-existent. The buildings are left behind as sterile monuments. The senses and the bodily response are absent – the memories remain homeless. The architecture in New York is trying to distance itself from reality. The transparency and reflection, give an impression of infinity. We need to understand that we are subjected to the passage of time; architecture confirms our presence, our experience of being in a world, a reality.


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About the Dwellers Contemporary architecture often lacks the interaction between the body, the imagination and its surroundings. Materiality is essential for the place created; it is in the material that dreams occur. The metropolis of New York needs a place to store its memories, it needs an architecture where buildings and bodies interact with each other. A place where we meet ourselves, and meet architecture that brings the world into the most intimate contact with the body. A rethinking of the dream catcher that seeks to create a place of memories, impressions and dreams. This is a place where memories are created, assembled and shown with a structure that is subjected to change. The people who use it bring on change; the structure reveals the personality and variability located inside show.


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1. Constructing an ArchiveDenes dolest, sequi derovid mos eic te praecepedit aspelicta ventibus. On corro offictotam que verum non corpore nis num veliquam ipid quae eos aceatis dolorem is alia voluptibus. Soluptas sus dolorem quas miliquo estem fugiatur? 2. Rum nempe pa sinve totam que verum non corpore nis num veliquam ipid quae eos aceatis dolorem is alia voluptibus. Soluptas sus dolorem quas miliquo estem fugiatur?

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1. Constructing an ArchiveDenes dolest, sequi derovid mos eic te praecepedit aspelicta ventibus. On corro offictotam que verum non corpore nis num veliquam ipid quae eos aceatis dolorem is alia voluptibus. Soluptas sus dolorem quas miliquo estem fugiatur? 2. Rum nempe pa sinve totam que verum non corpore nis num veliquam ipid quae eos aceatis dolorem is alia voluptibus.


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The Space Between Us

Sissel Sønderskov (DK) 7th. Semester This project has been based on the sometimes very unpleasant and inconvenient meetings with other people in public spaces. These meetings were explored through investigations at Grand Central Station, New York. The choreographies and the movements of the people passing through were notated and further analysed, especially considering bodily contact and touch. The project has tried to unfold the meeting or touch between two bodies in three steps: the origin, the incision and the repercussion. In what way do these meetings impact and influence our movements and what kind of mark or scar is left behind? Focusing on the idea that by acknowledging the unpleasant in these meetings, we can change the way we associate with each other. By recognizing the existence and the presence of others, there may arise a fleeting love story, as described in the Critical Written Reflection: ”Lad os danse”. For just a brief moment, we are managed and controlled by each other, conscious of the bodies’ positions in space, enrolled in a dance with a stranger.


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About the Dwellers The boundary line between the body and the space is identified by our senses. Our contact with the space takes place through the skin of the body – through all parts of our enveloping membrane. All the senses, including vision, are extensions of the tactile sense. The senses are specialisations of skin tissue, and all sensory experiences are modes of touching. Contact. The skin is the medium for both pain and pleasure. It is a tactile device for sensory perception, a sensorium. A membrane we live through, experience through. The complexity of the skin evolves with every living moment; it gets marks, wounds and scars. These scars give us a relation not only to our body, but also to the surrounding space.


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The body contains, like the architecture, an international understanding, a cosmic position. This is a common language, which to a small extent is challenged by cultural dialects. The body cannot lie and a language barrier does not hamper its form and movement. We respond to the movements of others, manipulated by their choreographies. We communicate with the body – to the body, the bodies talk undisturbed, answering each other. In unity we allow ourselves to dwell in each other. Let us dance.

5TH AVE.

MADISON AVE.

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The Leviathan

Halfdan Trolle (DK) 9th Semester What happens if you no longer own anything? If all you use during your everyday life was something you rented, borrowed or loaned? With this question the project plunges into the providence ocean in an attempt to uncover the nature of the economic and political spaces that reside in our dwellings. The spaces of regulations, laws, market value, toxic assets and fortune. Invisible spaces that manifest in something as simple as the electrical current flowing through the wall socket, allowing your phone to tell somebody where you are. Right now. In an overheated property market, where the right to air is a commodity, New York is a perfect testing ground for the thought experiment. How would you find it? On the top of a building finding yourself renting a dwelling for the night. Who are your neighbours? Underpaid illegal aliens, a three-legged dog, middleclass white America, hobo fashionistas, deranged homeless people, the evergreen hipsters? Would you enjoy the sunsets in your very own penthouse? Would you see the city in a different way? Would you always be on the hunt for somewhere new? Would you be spawning a new economy in the process? Such is the nature of the leviathans and those who seek them out. Like the ill-fated Captain Ahab chasing the whale.


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About the Dwellers You head for the empty room the one at the far end of the rooftop. The last resident was Darleen the Butcher – a renowned chef who primarily stays on this side of the river. Darleen always smiles and cracks jokes when she is around the rooftop. During the nights she will be in charge of the kitchen of the Fat Duck restaurant. You follow Darleen through the early hours of the morning as she paces around the illegal bars and old city opium dens. Darleen is the daughter of a famous politician that you can never remember the name of despite the fact that he appears on posters everywhere. Before you can think any further, the door to No. 15 slides open. For a moment the sun shining through the window opposite the door blinds you. Fearing the worst you stand in the doorway for a moment and adjust to the light. Here is the room where Darleen last stayed. 15x15 feet. It has wooden floors, a chair in one corner, a drop box that leads to the storage facility downstairs and a divan next to the large east-facing window. Seven bamboo plants stand neatly arranged on the window­sill. The room smells of fried duck and green Fur – a native tree on the New York Mountain Range. You walk over to the bed. Crow, the dog, has paced around the room and now gently pulls on the blanket. It falls to the floor and reveals a small lead box. You pry the lid open and stare into the space – it is empty.

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Collections // Quotation Machines I am (in) Venice

Siv Bøttcher (DK) Thesis Project (10th semester)

Reflective excursion* // Unsummarized Repetitions

How deep is Venice?

With Venice as the point of departure, accumulated extracts (quotations) operates as a generator for the project in multiple ways. In a more traditional way as a methodological tool to generate both spatial predispositions and programs for a designated context. Simultaneously, the extracted collection opens up to reflections concerning the implications of conservation, archiving and temporality. The collection of data is not only a documenting procedure, it becomes a speculative machine producing possible architectonic narratives. The extracts are therefore not interesting as autonomous actions, but as relational orchestrated parts staged to (re)construct a place.

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SAMMENSTILLINGSTEGNING Mulig sammenstilling af Citatmaskiner. Plan med udfoldede opstalter. Samt opstalt med kig fra citatmaskinen “III_Overgangen” mod “II_Hjemstavnen” og “I_anløbet”.


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Forcastings.

Trajectories.

Representations. - Parallel mapping. Unfolds through mediations. Fragments in compilation. Translations.New meanings have evolved.

Maybe, authentic tourists are consumers and cocreators. Motives are recalled. In an attempt to collect and archive, a meditation happens, discursive displacements, something new arises. But not something less important. The quote machine produces realities / constructions --


Yearbook 2015/16

It constructs a place - imposes its own readings.

It constructs a Venice. I am (in) Venice.

p. 91


p. 92

Constructing an Archive

Correlate

Nella Konnerup Qvist (DK) Thesis Project (10th semester) “Words, when well chosen, have so great a force in them, that a description often gives us more lively ideas than the sight of the things themselves.” 1 Joseph Addison A correlation between the curiosity of the unknown and the fascination of what one cannot grasp, between logical deduction and representation. How does the narrative affect these? The project unfolds and creates spaces of the narrative in a locally known tomb on Morocco’s west coast. Here, the narratives/narrative about a place continuously create an absurd programme and catalyse a returning storyline: Sidi Kaoukis tomb now functions as a primitive “hotel” wherein the surrounding villages each have a room they use when they perform an important rite of passage: The cutting of hair of a seven day old child (!) With this as an offset, the project discusses the function of narratives in architecture, the flux of tradition, factual history and contemporary actions that correlate with the architectonic conglomerate.

1 Joseph Addison, Essays on the pleasure of the Imagination (Antwerp: Duverger & Co. 1828), 22


Yearbook 2015/16

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p. 94

Constructing an Archive

Bagved er et atrium

Mange a f åbningerne er fyldte m e d s t e n , man er derfor i tvivl om b y g ningen er ved at forfalde, -eller ved at blive konstrueret.

E n forhenv æ rende b æ rende søjle e r vandret ud p å siden fordi d e r ikke længere er noget a t bære

Ingen er gamle nok til at huske hvilket lag er ældst, og man må derfor stole på historierne

En trappe har gået op, her på ydersiden af bygningen. fra dengang bygningen var større. Før resten faldt i havet.

To bygningsvolumener presser sig sammen om et tredje: som kontinentalplader.

Bygning oven på bygning oven på bygning

Bygning uden på bygning uden på bygning

H e r vokser et træ, hvor bygningen er blevet til jord igen. Her er e t vindue, inden i e t vindue

et hulrum hvortil du kun kan komme hvis du balancerer på ruinerne af fortet. her ses ofte en person som ved at det er et godt sted at være alene.

Han besøgte landsbyens rum, hvor slægten har tilbragt natten i generationer. Madrassen på gulvet der rummer aftryk af adskillige kropskonturer og en akkumulering af sterinlys opsummerer ærligt de m a n g e overgangsriter foretaget gennem tiden.


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 95

På taget sidder tommelfingeren fra Fatimas hånd

En trappe leder op på en balkon, som man ikke kan se. Kun en låge anes.

Man kan ikke længere tælle hvor Som på alt andet, er hjørnerne forvitrede.

mange

takker

Når han betragter kuppelloftet, tænker han på om han, for tolv år siden, så på aftegningerne i loftet, da hans far holdte hans nakke, og de barberede hans syv dage gamle hovedbund. Som han står der, hænger ragekniven stadig over ham. Han ser den.

E t biolog i s k produkt af to menneskers ægteskab, af blanded e genpuljer, fragtes i n d gennem en dør. Ind ad døren og ned.

Og mureskeen. Overleveringen siger at Sidi Kaouki som ligger dér i kisten, var murer. Kunne han have bygget sit eget gravkammer ?

Du går ned ad trapp e n . Der er mørkt. Der var mørkt: Det var det du drømte. D i n hjerne husker d e t , fordi d e t ligger gemt i d i n e gener.

Døre n har e n dybd e : Den b e v æ g e r s i g i n d - o g ned

Op og ud. E t fuldtbyrdigt medlem a f familie n , religionen og traditionerne bæres ud en dør.

or-

Jeg kan ikke se om k u p l e n sidder i midten af gravkammeret

na-


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Constructing an Archive

Internship at Junya Ishigami + Associates

Karin Hedqvist (SE) 9th Semester KARIN HEDQVIST Intern at junya ishigami+associates, fall 2015. Roppongi, Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Photo: Karin Hedqvist

Entrance door, Junya Ishigami + Associates Tokyo, Japan

Entrence door, junya ishigami+associates.


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 97

Photo: Karin Hedqvist

A corner of KAIT: Kanagawa Institute of Technology Workshop Shimoogino, Atsugi, Kanagawa Prefecture

A corner of KAIT. Kanagawa Institute of Technology Workshop. Shimoogino, Atsugi, Kanagawa Prefecture.


p. 98

Constructing an Archive

Internship at Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner, AG

Edvard Lindblom (SE) 9th Semester EDVARD LINDBLOM Praktikant Architektur, Atelier Peter Zumthor & Partner AG Haldenstein, Switzerland, 2015-2016

Martinskirche, Chur, Switzerland Afternoon sun falling on church entrance Martinskirche, Chur, Switzerland

Afternoon sun falling on church entrance.

ŠEdvard Lindblom


Yearbook 2015/16

Calanda, Kanton Graubünden, Switzerland

p. 99

©Edvard Lindblom Morning after a rainy night Calanda, Kanton, Graübunden, Switzerland

Morning after a rainy night.


p. 100

Constructing an Archive

Before we continue— studio events— exhibitions—site visits— pin-ups—Fall 2015— Spring 2016

Opposite page: Top—”Top of the Rock”, Rockefeller Centre, October 2015, photo by RC Bottom—DLAB Celebration with Peter Wilson, March 2016, photo by Claus Peder Pedersen


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p. 102

Constructing an Archive

This page: DLAB Exhibition, The Library of the Aarhus School of Architecture, Feburary 2016, photo by Izabela Wieczorek Opposite page: Top—Workshop with Maciej Siuda, March 2016, photo by Jazmin Charalambous Bottom—Site visit, Rømerhus (E+N Arkitektur), June 2016, photo by Claudia Carbone


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p. 104

Constructing an Archive


Yearbook 2015/16

This page: The babtism of Maloo, October 2015, photo by Claus Peder Pedersen Opposite page: Pin-up in studio, September 2015, photo by Emre Senoglu

p. 105


p. 106

Constructing an Archive

This page: Open Studio Exhibition, January 2016, photos by Mathias Skafte Andersen Opposite page: RIBA Exhibition, November—December 2015, Curated by Karen Kjaergaard, photo by Claudia Carbone


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 107


p. 108

Constructing an Archive

This page: Site Visit, Sonnesgade (Sleth Architects), photos by Jazmin Charam Opposite page: Open Studio Exhibition, June 2016, photos by Emre Senoglu


Yearbook 2015/16

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Constructing an Archive

Student Works— Spring 2016 With an introduction by Claudia Carbone and Izabela Wieczorek


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 111


p. 112

Constructing an Archive

On the Edge—In-between

Masters- and guest students (7th—9th semester) / respond to the general study programme: Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK) Khedidja Benniche (GB) Martina Blom (SE) Jazmin Charalambous (GB) Kia Evon (FI) Leticia Izquierdo (ES) Brad Mitchell (AU) Emre Senoglu (DK/TR)

The Museum of Nine to Five F.U.N. Palace Pier Co-op Dwelling Lab Endotic New York: The Kiosk Society The GCD Hotel Exploring—Excavating Confessions of a Donor / Donor (Back)Stage Dwelling

Thesis students (10th semester) / formulate a project with a conscious connection to their former studies and respond to the studios general mode of operation: Hlynur Axelsson (IS) Panwad Chawalitanont (TH) Angus James Hardwick (AU) Karin Hedqvist (SE) Louise Linthwaite (GB) Halfdan Trolle (DK)

The Glacier Paradox Please Mind the Gap Paradoxes of the Pellucid Navigating and Building Through —Scapes Poetic of Transition Good Copy

Students in internships: Sissel Sønderskov (DK)

AVPD


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 113

Programme

The constituent parts of the semester “Parasite. The prefix para- means ‘near,’ ‘next to,’ measures a distance. The sitos is the food. In this open mouth that speaks and eats, what is next to eating, its neighbouring function, is what emits sound. Para measures a difference between a reception and, on the contrary, an expansion. The latter makes one’s own what is in common and what will soon be even more one’s own, the living body. It already eats space.” Michel Serres, The Parasite. Translated by Schehr, Lawrence R. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982, 144.

Structured as four consecutive phases, the has project unfolded the collective investigations performed in the previous semester. Located in the same site(s), the projects explore the dynamics of the inhabitating the vertical gap / in between in relation to the already formulated speculative proposal and responding to the site’s environmental and physical conditions. The intertwining of the actual and the speculative explored in the fall semester was an instigator for adapted / adopted visions for a new parasitic architecture. These conditions, chosen tectonics, construction methods, materials and scale were parameters that defined a specific programme for the dwelling/dwellings introduced in this context. An archive of possible parasitic architectures was made, during the first phase. This work was continued by making conceptual models that addressed the spreading/infiltration/penetration of the proposals and their architecture in relation to the existing physical conditions; envisioning and investigating the dual condition as both a sustaining element and spatial frame for inhabitation of the developed structures. The third phase focused on the execution and production of a specific set of architectural representations that compose the project, demonstrating how the structure and the infrastructure are thought to be integral parts of the project, as bones and veins in organisms, and how the verticality affects the organisation of the proposal and its relation with its surroundings.


p. 114

Constructing an Archive

Throughout the project development, the work focused on Design Realisation (Written Reflection), this in an experimental approach, incorporating mentor(s) from architectural practices and other related fields. “To what extent could the literary narrative shed light on the organization of events in buildings, whether called ‘use,’ ‘functions,’ ‘activities’ or ‘programs’? If writers could manipulate the structure of stories in the same way as they twist vocabulary and grammar, couldn’t architects do the same, organizing the program in a similarly objective, detached, or imaginative way? For if architects could self-consciously use such devices as repetition, distortion, or juxtaposition in the formal elaboration of walls, couldn’t they do the same thing in terms of the activities that occurred within those very walls? Pole vaulting in the chapel, bicycling in the laundromat, sky diving in the elevator shaft? Raising these questions proved increasingly stimulating: conventional organizations of spaces could be matched to the most surrealistically absurd sets of activities. Or vice versa: the most intricate and perverse organization of spaces could accommodate the everyday life of an average suburban family.” Bernard Tschumi. Architecture and disjunction, MIT Press, 1996. 21
.

phase #0 immersion [01.02.-10.02.16]

Mapping the field of operation from the previous semester work(-s) and proposal (-s) was the task to relate to: adapted or adopted – site, adapted or adopted – setting, adapted or adopted – programme, and to reinterpret these defining the framework for the project. Following questions were addressed: Where? What? Why? How?, translating them into individual maps (dimensions 70x70 cm)


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 115

DLAB competition [10.02 -23.02.16]

A proposal for the new DLAB Archive (drawing of the year competition) “Constructing An Archive Constructs An Archive - a competition of ideas”. The brief was formulated in parallel to the main assignment in collaboration with Betinna Odgaard, Trine Bertholt and Karen Kjaergaard. (see: p.178)

phase #1 parasitic taxonomy [29.02.16 - 03.03.16]

Drawn upon the investigation of existing examples and alternative modes of inhabitation, the set of attributes and characteristics (constitutional parameters) for defining behavioural genealogy were displayed. During this phase an archive of possible parasitic architectures was made, building an exploratory framework, which informed the subsequent architectural propositions. The work was carried out in groups of three, each exploring a particular mode of parasitism. > Infiltration: Bradley Mitchell | Gunborg Martina Blom | Sinna Asgari > Penetration: Kia Evon | Emre Senoglu | Jazmin Charalambous > Spreading: Leticia Izquierdo Garcia | Mathias Skafte Andersen | Khedidja Benniche The chosen work(s) – associated with one of the above categories – were analysed, addressing the following: > General information about the species / focusing on general characteristics and morphology > Grow Patterns / focusing on a life cycle > Mechanisms and Elements of an Assemblage / with a focus on the relation between host and the parasite The explored characteristics and relations were illustrated and communicated in three separate plates.


Constructing an Archive

ll

g in om

ee

itt

m

m

co

ee

itt

elc

W

m m Co

The virus infiltrates the host with its ‘keys’ hoping to fit the lock attached to cells surface. A key to unlock the fence.

e rs pe dis

le su ap sc ru Vi

st bur

us le

uc

N

Once the dna of the virus has entered the nucleus it immediately gets recognised by a molecule that replicates the virus structural code. The copied recipe then heads out of the nucleus, gets fed with protein and returns, where it reassembles, moves up to the surface of the cell where an eruption of viruses occurs

If cy un cl su e cc beg es in sful s ag th ai e n

This unsuspecting cell has now been tricked into guiding these virus recipes into the nucleus (The command centre)

Deception and mimicry

Infiltration

If cy un cl su e cc beg es in sful s ag th ai e n

The release: The virus is released with a sneeze and is carried through the air seeking a new host to infiltrate

ce rfa Su

If cy un cl su e cc beg es in sful s ag th ai e n

cell

Ce

If cy un cl su e cc beg es in sful s ag th ai e n

p. 116

Incubation

Parasite leaves, is killed by the host or the host dies

Reaction

Success rates feed into the evolution and refinement of the cycle

nest

The parasite and the host continuely evolve together in an ‘arms race’ The Cuckoo bird infiltrates the host’s nest by removing an egg and replacing it with one of its own - the Cuckoo can lay its egg as fast as 6 seconds. If the infiltration is successful, the egg will hatch in 12 days, 2 days before the host’s eggs. The Cuckoo will lay between 16-26 eggs in one season compared with two or more clutches of 3-4 eggs laid by the host species.

Brood Parasite The Cuckoo bird is a Brood Parasite. It does not raise it’s own offspring, but instead relies on other birds to do this for them through deception and mimicry of the host.

Uninhabited levels on north side of building. + heliport

Uninhabited area, gym terrace

Electricity breakers on all floors up to level 28

Water pumps

Temporary accommondation for flood victims

Housing

city

If the Cuckoo is successful, the chick will soon begin its life as a Brood Parasite, leaving the adopted parents exhausted and without any offspring.

#01_Parasitic Taxonomy

Studio Constructing an Archive

”SPREADING”

The Aarhus School of Architecture 04.02—2016

What will happen to the Tower of David is not clear, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro have admitted there are very few alternative uses for the tower, indicating its demolition is imminent.

On 22 July 2014, the Venezuelan government launched socalled “Operation Zamora 2014” to evacuate hundreds of families from the tower and relocate them into new homes in Cúa, a city over 50 kilometres outside the capital. Aug. 2, 2015, reports that the last residents were relocated in July, 2015.

Over time, Torre David became more than a squat, it evolved into homes and also hosted other facilities; shops, beauty salons, Internet cafes, a football pitch, a basketball court and an church among others.

Mathias Skafte Andersen

Khedidja Benniche

#01_Parasitic Taxonomy

Leticia Izquierdo Garcia

PROTOZOAN

04.02—2016

SOLID ectoparasitism

What can be spreaded throgh the air or with its help?

VECTORS

LIFE CYCLE

What happen inside the mosquito

Protozoa are eukaryotic organisms with a membrane-bound nucleus, the membrane exists

Flagellate and Ciliate protozoans are transmitted via two means; when you ingest or consu-

From Cilliate form to Flagellate:

as a structurally and functionally independent cell. They are single cell organisms which

me water which has been contaminated with pathogens and secondly if your skin comes in

(EXCYSTATION/ ENCYSTAION)

lar: flagellum) which undulate to propel

have have developed quite complex subcellular features , such as the membranes which

contact with contaminated water, for instance when bathing, washing hands etc. Though

the cell through liquid environments.

enable them to survive the rigours of their environments. Most protozoa are microscopic

what often occurs is the use of contaminated water during food production and the proto-

Flagella are ‘whip-like’ extensions of

organisms, only a few grow to a size large enough to be visible to the naked eye.

zoans are ingested through the affected food.

TYPES

1. Gametocytes 2. Zygote 3. Oocyst 4. Sporozoites

the cell membrane with an inner core

VECTORS

What happen with the mosquito as a vector

Protozos: group of unicellular eukaryotic organisms. Bacteria: constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of its habitats. Virus: small infectious agent that replicates only inside the living cells of other organisms. Viruses can infect all types of life forms, from animals and plants to microorganisms, including bacteria and archaea. Spores: unit of asexual reproduction that may be adapted for dispersal and for survival, often for extended periods of time, in unfavorable conditions.

“ Agents who transmit a disease from one hodt to another”

2+9 configuration (2 single central mi-

1 1 10

Fertilized Macrogamete GIARDIA LAMIBIA

facilitate attachment in the intestinal

LIFE CYCLE

Widely know ectoparasites are the Bed Bug, Fleas, Lice, Mites and Ticks. They prefer different types

Ectoparasites transfer via the meeting of two solids—be it a person touching a surface, a person touching

of hosts and habitats and move in different ways. Some spread via their eggs and others as adults—by

a person or a person touching an animal. Ectoparasites are able to morph to suit their host, which

crawling, jumping or sticking.

means that an ectoparasite is able to become an endoparasite if it finds an entrance into its host. The

5

ectoparasite is itself a vector for several diceases and can spread heavily.

What happen inside the human

Ookinete

MOSQUITO

Dientamoeba fragilis: without external flagella 9-12 um

3

G. lamblia uses its two sucking disks to

VECTORS

1

Fig.3

Giardiasis or lambliasis is the disease caused by the parasite Giardia Lamblia.

TYPES

1. Gametocytes 2. Zygote 3. Oocyst 4. Sporozoites 5. Asexual body cycle 6. Merozoites (at the end of the cycle) 7. Liver stage (8,9,10: Mosquito life cycle) 8. Larva 9. Eggs 10. Pupa 11. Mosquito takes up gametocytes or injects sporozoites

A

crotubules surrounded by 9 peripheral

CHARACTERISTICS

In the firt case the infection requires an intermediate host vector. Not in the second one, the microorganism has been spreaded by itself from one person to another and so on. -

Cycle explanation

of microtubules arranged in a specific

The Aarhus School of Architecture

3

GAS

LIQUID

TYPES

Studio Constructing an Archive

”SPREADING”

Mathias Skafte Andersen

1

doublets).

Bakery, housing

Convinience store, housing

Convinience store (sim-cards, cigars and bread) housing

Convinience store (groceries, chicken), housing

Main water tank

Housing

Childcare servives, convinience store, icecream store, housing

convinience store arcade, housing

Khedidja Benniche Leticia Izquierdo Garcia

CHARACTERISTICS FLAGELLATES/TROPHOZOITE

convinience store, housing

Those who entered the complex on the first evening of invasion and the days following quickly staked out space in the ground floor lobby, establishing communal kitchens, setting up tents and other makeshift shelters and delimiting their territory.

2

Flagellates use elongate flagella (singu-

Housing

04.02—2016

parking, housing

The Aarhus School of Architecture

parking, housing

Water pumps

Studio Constructing an Archive

”SPREADING”

Mathias Skafte Andersen

parking, housing, sale of basic goods, textile workshop

#01_Parasitic Taxonomy

Leticia Izquierdo Garcia

parking, housing, hair salon

Venezuela’s massive housing shortage led to an occupation of the building by squatters in October 2007. It grew to be a city within a city with 800 homes inhabitated by around 2,500 people.

Khedidja Benniche

The first squatters rigged basic wire and a swithbox that siphoned electricity from the city via a pole on the street.Later when the cooperative was fully established, a delegation approached the state electricity institution and formalized a contract that would provide a more stable service.

On September 17, 2007 a group of people had been evicted from a squat in La Candelari; searching for shelter, they turned their gaze toward Torre David. In a heavy rain, a large number of families appered at the entrance to the complex. The two guards on duty took one look at the mass of drenched humanity, turned over their arms, and opened the gates.

Torre David is a 45-story unfinished skyscraper in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. The construction of the tower began in 1990 but was almost complete when it was abandoned following the death of its developer in 1993. During the banking crisis of 1994, the government took control of the building and it has not been worked on since.

Guarded entrance, guarded football and basketball courts. parking entance

The residents got water into the tower by connecting to a city water main. Water got trasported up all the way to the 28th with use of several pumps and tanks. Once a week the residents filled up their private 500 liter tanks using a hose that was plugged into one of the main tanks.

Torre David

If the deception and infiltration is successful, the Cuckoo chick, still blind and featherless, will push the other eggs out of the nest thereby leaving itself as the only surviving chick in the nest. The host bird will feed it as if it were its own; unaware that it has been deceived.

The targeted species have also developed mechanisms inorder to defend themselves against the Cuckoo. These include: refining egg colour, pattern and size, early exposure of mothers call to the unhatched chicks, and nesting close to other birds who help to defend the nests.

2

Bed Bug

Cycle explanation

The Bed Bug is a common ectoparasite. It gets its name from its favorite vector and

2

habitat—the bed. Its spreads hatches and

4

spreads by the touch of textile.

Fig. 2

cells which can cause intestinal irritation

Fig. 1

to the host. The parasite is able to avoid

Inmature oocyst

the host’s immune system by attaching

Preschizont

itself in the villi or within the intestinal

Liberated sporozoites

mucus. This attachments can cause the

8

the intestines leading to deficiencies.

Retortamonas intestinalis: 2 flagella 1 nucleus 5-7 um

te measuring 10-20 um. When examined its ’falling leaf’ motility can be demon-

Fig.7

Fig.1

Micro ganetocyte

4

3

alteration of substances absorption in The trophozoite, is a pear-shaped parasi-

Trophozoite (ring form)

9

MAN

around its host as well as jump, crawl or fly

Tick

A

with eyeglasses’ appearance.

Sporozoite enters red blood cell

CHARACTERISTICS —

Fig.5

Enteromonas hominis: no cystome 7-9 um

CILIATES/CYST Fig.6

11

Fig. 2

Aedaes Aegypti mosquito can be recognized by white markings on its legs and a marking in the form of a lyre on the upper surface of the thorax. The mosquito originated in Africa, but is now found in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the worl.

Fig.4

Ciliates use numerous small cilia (singu-

Adult

As an adult, the ectoparasite is able to move

strated, it has two sucking disks in its ventral surface, constituting the ’old man

7

The Tick lives primarily on mammals.

to another host. It is as an adult that the

Fig. 3

ectoparasite multiplies.

Its spreads by laying eggs on the ground.

6

Sporozoite enters liver cell

Larvae picks up the eggs and transfer them to mammals where they hatch and live.

Fig.3

Fig. 7

lar: cilium) which undulate in waves allowing cells to swim in fluids. Cilia are Infected person!

‘hair-like’ extensions of the cell mem-

Aedes aegypti is a vector for transmitting several tropical fevers. Only the female bites for blood, which she needs to mature her eggs. To find a host, these mosquitoes are attracted to chemical compounds emitted by mammals.

3 - 5 mm

brane similar in construction to flagella but with interconnecting basal elements facilitating synchronous movement. The cyst is of oval or ellipsoidal in shape and

Fig.4

has the size of 8-19 um, a ’halo effect’ can be noted around the outer part of the cyst’s wall.

Pentatrichomonas hominis: 5 flagella 1 nucleus 10-12 um

Fig.8

Ciliated cells are found in specialized tissues and organs in many other higher life-forms. The Ciliates or Cyst can also be found in the stool with formed consi-

B

12

B

Refers to infectious agents that are spread via air. These organisms can survive outside the body and remain suspended in the air for long periods of time. They infect others via the upper and lower respiratory tracts." [7] Diseases that are commonly spread by coughing or sneezing include bacterial meningitis, chickenpox, common cold, influenza, mumps, strep throat, tuberculosis, measles, rubella..

13

2. 16. LIBERATED 14

10. 15. MATURE 4. 16. SEGMENTATION 8. 9. 10. GROWTH

How these microorganisms can be spreaded?

15

1

Flea

The Flea is a jumping ectoparasite. It transFig. 5

fers by jumping over long distances or laying eggs as its host is resting—after which the eggs might be picked up by another host.

5. 15. 16. REPRODUCE Fig.6

1. 5. 16. DENSIFICATION 17. DEATH Giardia Lambila: 4 pairs of flagella 2 nuclei 12-15 um

Fig. 8 Fig. 4

Fig.5

9. EGGS 1. 5. FERTILIZED

Chilomastix mesnili: with cystome 10-12 um

transported via vectors or collisons.

5. A-SEXUAL CYCLE

Fig.9

its hosts and stick to new ones. They are

CHARACTERISTICS

— Fig.1

contaminations occur.

Egg

Eggs of the ectoparasite cluster, fall off Louse

The Louse lives in hair and transfers primarily by the touching of hair—head or pubic. It can survive in short amounts of time on textile.

What A and B have in common?

stency, this is the infective stage of the parasite, and where most transmissions/

Aedes aegypti distribution has increased in the past 2–3 decades worldwide, and considered to be among the most widespread mosquito species.

The average wing length of female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes varies greatly from 3 to 5 mm, depend on the enviorment is sourronded by.

11. TRANSIT

16

11. 12. PENETRATE IN THE ORGANISM

12. The spread is from person to person , and is produced directly by infected saliva microdroplets . 13. The virus enters the body through the nose , eyes or mouth . 14. housed inside cells . 15. It reproduces within the cells . 16. New viruses come out and infect other cells. 17. When the cells die cause the symptoms of the flu.

17

Larvae

As a larvae, the ectoparasite is mobile by itself, but does not yet take on the role of parasite. It is able to crawl and to transfer via collision.

Mite

Fig. 9

Mites can live in nature or other habitats for long times until a host comes near. It lives off

Fig. 10

of blood and dead skin on mammals.

Fig.2

Fig.11

Fig.1: Fig.1: Protozoan in Cyst/ Cilliate form in fected water bodies such as Outdoor reservoirs Fig. 2: As the protozoan can withstand old water temeratures for several months the cilliate finds itself transported via the water system, e.g The upstate Croton Network Fig. 3: The water is stored in reservoir where the cyst continues to survive from the nutrients in its membrane

Fig. 4: The parasite is ingested through the contaminated water Fig. 5: EXCYSTATION- Trophozoites are released from each cyst in the intestinals Fig. 6: BINARY FISSION- Trophozoites multiply in lumen of proximinal small bowel. They attach to the mucosa ventral via the use of their sucking disk.

Fig. 8: Both forms of protozoan; the ciliate and the flagellate continue to survive in the excrements, though only the ciliate in infective at this stage. parasite in the stage of Giardia Lamibia does not survive in the process.

Fig.9

Fig. 6

Fig.7

Fig.8

flight, nobody is going to be infected. Symtoms would appear in the bitten person.

Fig. 8:

How the virus spreads ? 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.

Fig. 5:

Bitten person is sourronded by some more people who can not spread the bacteria because the mosquito is not there.

Fig. 9:

How the human body receives this microorganism and what interior organs will be affected.

Person has been bitten by Aedes Aegypti mosquito. It is explained all the proccess than happen inside the human body.

Fig. 6:

Fig. 3:

Totally infected person after the spreading of the bacteria by the mosquito and after all the proccess took place inside him.

Microorganism can be spreaded by themselves in this case. The do not need a vector, the bacteria or virus is spreaded when a person cough, speak o sneeze.

Fig. 10 : A human has been spreading and he is infected. He looks totally red. And he can spread this microorganism only through speaking.

Fig. 7:

If the speed of this microorganism is really slow, the small particules will remain in the soil or some another place. The way of spreading would change.

Fig. 4:

What happen if the infected person take a flight? If the vector mosquito isn´t in the

Fig. 11 : It doesn´t need a vector. It doesn´t need a mosquito. The virus has been spreaded by itself from one person to another and so on.

Fig. 2:

Fig. 9: Filtering of water before continuing to the reservoir only the ciliate survives, the

Fig. 7: ENCYSTATION- Transition to colon the Giardia Lamibia and any remaing cilliates

2/3

Fig.10

Aedes Aegypti mosquito life cycle. Egg - larva - pupa - mosquito (Fem. more eggs. Mas. nothing) Big figure mosquito is biting the human arm, spreading the bacterias inside.

Fig.1: Touching an infected doorhandle allows ectoparasites to hatch on

Fig. 5: A mosquito is an effective vector of ectoparasites and transfer both to and fro hosts.

Fig. 2: A kiss not only means the touching of skin and hair—also the clothes might touch and several

Fig. 6: Pets might carry ectoparasites and transfer to humans—and vice versa.

different ectoparasites might transfer

Fig. 7: If one is infected and goes to the beach with one’s girlfriends, skin on skin and clothes on clothes

Fig. 3: Sitting close—as in a subway train—allow clothes to touch and ectoparasites to spread

will allow ectoparasites to spread.

Fig. 4: Being in nature not only makes one vulnurable to parasites—if one is already infected, vectors

effectively acts as a vector and can carry both adults and eggs from one host to another. Fig. 10: Sexual activity allows rich oppertunities for ectoparasites to spread. Skin on skin, hair on hair, body heat and moist environment. In fact, sexual activity is also a way for an

Fig. 8: Getting into a fight is an effective way of spreading ectoparasites as both hair, clothes and skin

like mosquitos might transfer ectoparasites onto other hosts

Fig. 9: Sharing personal belongings—such as a towel—is a way of transfering ectoparasites. The towel

ectoparasite to become an endoparasite—one that lives on the inside.

might touch. 3/3

3/3

II Crustaceans

III AUDRICUS COLLARI

DEATH by predators Blue tits (Parus Caeraleu)s 0r Great tits (Parus Major)

Bud-gall (2 mm)

1. DESTRUCTION + ADDITION

DEATH by 3 parasitoids Mesopolobus fuscipes

hatching in spring gall falls off!

Sexual generation (1,5 mm lenght) Males and females

hatching in spring

inserts eggs into Turkey Oak

mating & female lays eggs on Q.Robus & Q.Petraea English & Sessile Oak Native in the flower buds

growing (following year)

growing

growing

second cohort wintering in gall Parthenogenic generation (5 mm lenght) female only asectual

inserts eggs into flower bud of Turkey Oak (Quereus Cerris)

POSSIBLE STARVATION by 4 inquilines Synergus Veinhardii

first cohort hatching in autunm

Marble Gall (8-30 mm) Agamic gall

DEATH by 8 parasitoids Torymus Hiteus larva feeds on gall tissue

2. scale 10:1

MANIPULATION

DEVELOPMENTAL ANATOMY Ungalled tissue

GALL MORPHOTYPES Patterns of cell elongetion in gall valve

Audricus Coriarius Epiderm

Palisade parenchuloma Paravenal parenchuloma

Spongy parenchuloma

3. EVOLUTION Epiderm

1. Cymothoa Exigua Otherwise known as the tongue-eating louse, this parasite enters fish through the gills, and then attaches itself to the fish's tongue. The female attaches to the tongue and the male attaches on the gill arches beneath and behind the female. The female parasite severs the blood vessels in the fish's tongue, causing the tongue to fall off. It then attaches itself to the stub of what was once its tongue and becomes the fish's new tongue. 2. Sacculina Carcini Sacculina is a genus of barnacles that is a parasitic castrator of crabs. The female Sacculina injects its soft body into the crab and grows a root-like structure that extends throughout the crabs body emerging as a sac. After this invasion of the Sacculina, the crab is unable to perform the normal function of molting, which impairs its growth. When the parasite’s eggs are fertilised, the infertile crab (male or female) cares for them as if they were its own. The shell changes to become like a female crab by widening and flattening. The female Sacculina then forces the crab's body to release hormones, causing it to act like a female crab, even to the point of performing female mating dances.

Characteristics: abnormal growth of the host plant, provision of shelter and food for the gall-maker, constant shape and form arising from a particular gall-maker, entirely plant tissue, made from the host’s cells, the larva of the causer remaining in the gall until maturity. The diversity of galls found in nature is a result of specific events occured due to interference imposed by the gall-inducing agent on the standard cell differentiation pattern of its host organ. Through anatomical analysis of each gall morphotype it is possible to check ways the insect change cell polarity, growth and divisions in differernt tissue layers, from merismetic non-galled tissue to the mature phase of the gall. Each gall morphotype is the product of repetitive patterns in cell devision and differentiation, which culminate in a neoformed multicellular organ. Gall morphogenesis raptures the patterns of cell polarization and expansion in relationto their host organs throught cell differentiation, which results in changes in their functionality. As so gall tissues guarantee nutrition, protection and favorable microenvironment to the gall-endurer.

3. Parasitic Cycle The cycle of these parasites is based on a relationship of codependence. The rise of the host affects the number of parasites and vice versa. Some parasites actively induce additction and induce a sense of dependency on the host who would be unable to survive without the parasite, which is evident in both cases. Being a successful parasite requires a certain degree of specialisation and ability to modify behaviour and adapt to the environment. This results in continual evolution.

constructing an archive | phase #1: parasitic taxonomy | group #1: penetration

constructing an archive | phase #1: parasitic taxonomy | group #1: penetration

Audricus Conglomerate


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phase #2 the collection of possibilities [07.03.16 - 06.03.16]

Speculative sketches were drawn focusing on potential ways of positioning the parasitic structure within its context - zooming in on the productive or antagonistic intertwinement between the two. This phase consisted of a range of different tasks, and reflected the complexity of the mode of working when different types of knowledge, design tools and intentions are brought together.

Workshop [Zooming] in collaboration with Maciej Siuda [09.03.16 -11.03.16]

In this context, model making was understood as a supportive and reciprocal design activity – staging, rehearsing and performing; a speculative, creative and critical tool informing the production and realisation of spatial propositions, exploring and exposing understanding of the site.

This page: Maciej Siuda Workshop, March 2016, photo by Claudia Carbone Opposite page: Parasic taxonomy plates, March 2016 Top row: Sinna Asgari, Martina Blom and Brad Mitchell Middle row: Mathias Andersen, Khedidja Benniche and Leticia Izquierdo Bottow row: Jazmin Charalambous, Kia Evon and Emre Senoglu


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Constructing an Archive

phase #3 the dwellings and their architecture [07.04.16 - 08.06.16]

“The way in which man lives in his house is called dwelling. And so we must first examine this concept if we want to determine man’s relationship with his house. Dwelling is a basic state of human life whose full significance is only slowly being recognized. Man dwells in his house. In a more general sense, he also dwells in a town. But dwelling is more than merely existing or being located; for both these states are in only an external relationship with space.” Otto Friedrich Bollnow, Human Space. Edited by Joseph Kohlmaier. Translated by Christine Shuttleworth. (London: Hyphen Press, (1963) 2011), 121.

The spaces and their inhabitants: organization, materiality, dynamics of use, areas of relationality, their appearance in contrast to the existing. This phase focused on the execution of a specific set of architectural representations that composed the project, demonstrating how the structure and the infrastructure were thought to be integral parts of the project as bones and veins in organisms – i.e. explored how they could be processed spatially. It also posed a question of how the verticality as well as the human body affect the programme and organisation of the proposal, as well as how the parasitical approach (the immediate relation to the existing) were translated into architectural elements and manifested through material qualities. This was addressed and communicated through a set of plans, sections and models. Throughout this phase of project development, the work unfolded in parallel with the Design Realisation (Written Reflection). In a final stage of the project development and in accordance to the character of each proposal the students were asked to submit a specified set of architectural representations that would facilitate an understanding of the project. This was discussed during pin-ups and tutorial sessions.


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 119

phase #4 the archive [09.06.16 - 01.07.06]

As a collective work the studio edited the outcomes of the performed experiments and investigations in a publication and an exhibition. “….He told me his book was called the Book of Sand because neither sand nor this book has a beginning or an end. He suggested I try to find the first page. I took the cover in my left hand and opened the book, my thumb and forefinger almost touching. It was impossible: several pages always lay between the cover and my hand. It was as though they grew from the very book ( …)The number of pages in this book is literally infinite. No page is the first page; no page is the last. I don’t know why they’re numbered in this arbitrary way, but perhaps it’s to give one to understand that the terms of an infinite series can be numbered any way whatever.’ Then, as though thinking out loud, he went on. ’If space is infinite, we are anywhere, at any point in space. If time is infinite, we are at any point in time.’” Jorge Luis Borges, The book of Sand in Collected Fictions, translated by Andrew Hurley, Penguins Books, London, 1998, 481 - 482 .

“The document, then, is no longer for history an inert material through which it tries to reconstitute what men have done or said, the events of which only the trace remains; history is now trying to define within the documentary material itself unities, totalities, series, relations.” Michel Foucault, Archaeology of Knowledge, Routledge classics, Psychology Press, 2002, 7.


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Constructing an Archive

The Museum of Nine to Five

Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK) 9th Semester

Manhattan, New York, has a daytime population of about 4 million people. 1.4 million of those people actually live in Manhattan, while 1.6 million are commuters entering the island for work in the morning and leaving in the evening. This project proposes a building to tell the commuter’s story—and to write it into history. It is called ‘The Museum of Nine to Five’.

2.

1.

The Museum of Nine to Five is a cultural institution dedicated to the research and exhibition of the worklife routines of commuters in Manhattan. Through a sequence of spatial manipulations, visitors will be exposed to abstractions on phenomena encountered by a commuter on his or her route from the subway station to the office. Each space is to be developed based on a mapping of the site with considerations made; to motion, materiality, light and sound. Each exhibition space of the Museum will be its own entity connected by an external circulation. The Museum is relevant to both tourists who are interested in gaining a new perspective on life on Manhattan as well as locals who have an opportunity to be immersed in their everyday lives as spectators rather than participants.

3.


Yearbook 2015/16

1. Diagram A programmatic mapping of on-site events becomes the catalyst for the development of space. The proposal is divided into a sequence of exhibitions—each with a reference to a certain point in time as described by the mapping 2. Collage A series of spatial concepts is developed with regard to light, materiality and movement as main focuses for the design. 3. Siteplan The proposal is placed on site, attached as a parasite to the Doubletree Hilton Hotel. It is surrounded by office buildings and busy

p. 121

4. streets. To keep structural integrity, the Museum must retain a narrow vertical shape. The previously developed spatial concepts are arranged one on top of the other. 4. Isometric drawing The Museum of Nine to Five in context. The Museum is suspended from two large trusses anchored through the roof of the Doubletree Hilton Hotel. The Museum cantelievers over the sidewalk and the street, reaching towards a bodily scale and marking the entrance through the hotel.


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Constructing an Archive

5.

5. Fragment of section through existing building and parasite The Museum is entered through the Hotel lobby, where an elevator brings visitors to the first floor. The exhibition spaces of the Museum are placed on top of each other, each containing its own universe and atmosphere. The exhibition spaces are connected by a ramp that envelopes the sides of the Museum and inhabits the space between it and the Doubletree Hotel.

6.

6. The facade of the Museum is characterized by a square grid of opaque white glass panels. The glass extends further towards the street than the Museum itself, creating an enveloping entrance situation. Small variations in the interior can be seen through the glass as shifting tones of light and dark.


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 123

7.

7. Exploded isometric All spaces in the Museum are constructed inside the same framework of steel beams and columns. Here, the first floor of the Museum—the lobby floor—and the top exhibition floor is shown in a description of the layers that make up the spaces.


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Constructing an Archive

The F.U.N. Palace Pier 2.

Khedidja Benniche (GB) 7t. Semester “Roll up! Roll up!” Presenting: The F.U.N. Palace Pier Play, Produce, Participate! Free entry for all. Situated in its prime East River Location, the F.(un) U.(nited) N.(ations) Palace Pier (FPP) provides an alternative universal platform of representation for the general public. Neighbour to the U.N. headquarters, the FPP is a proposal for the people of New York, both local and global. The key word here being accessible, far too often the typology of ‘representational’ architecture such as Embassies and UN agencies are far too exclusive both programatically and with their physical built language. This only continues to feed into the culture of misconceptions of others. The FPP contests the use of walls and barriers as means to restrict public access and involvement by doing away with such things! By utilising a flexible structural and circulation systems this allows all spaces to become potential platforms for participation and engagement.

1.


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FDR Drive

x Junction between Promenade and Pier

x General Assembly

x Economic and Social Bartering Pods

3.

x Boat dock

x Security Council

4.

x Suspended Pier

5.

6.


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Constructing an Archive

x Suspended Pier

1. Collage of arrangement of events and activities to be housed in the Fun Palace Pier. Left to right: Catering and Accomodation for visitors attending overnight events, public baths and recreation facilities for leisure time and play along the main promenade. This leads to the ‘Pier of Participation’ promoting citizenship engagement through performance and interaction through a series of ‘theatre’ spaces based on the UN council chambers. 2. Model moments exploring materiality of the wrapping

membrane and atmosphere within. 3. Mapping of the foreign embassies and cultural centres in the New York Square Mile. Exploring the porous nature of cultural institutions in contrast to the impenetrable nature of the embassies and UN headquarters. 4. Model detail of the General Assembly, Security, Economic and Social platforms leading off the main promenade route. 5. Plan of the Fun Palace Pier at ground level, a series of platforms are orientated off the central promenade route which responds to the


Yearbook 2015/16

p. 127

x Main tensile mast

x Economic and Social Bartering Pods

x Boat passage

Existing Highway Infrastructure 7.

existing council chambers at the UN Headquarters; General Assembly, Trusteeship, Security, Economic and Social. These are the foundations of the Pier of Participation which offers an alternative architecture of the council chambers promoting open access and oppurtunity for debates and exchange. The spaces have been designed as a continuous form of circulation so that anyone may enter at any point. 6. Roof plan of pier showing the fabric membrane which wraps the entire space extending over

the suspended pier. The structural strategy utilises tensile systems in order to convey the light and open qualities the proposal promotes. This also allows for a flexible use of the space below, which can adapt to host events ranging in scale. 7. Long section showing the journey across the entire pier, and transitions across the different platforms including The Economic and Social Bartering Pods stretching up to the ceiling where any visitor is welcome to trade and exchange goods or services.


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Constructing an Archive

Co-op dwelling lab

Martina Blom (SE) 8th Semester

’Co-op dwelling lab’ focuses on a new housing model for young people in New York. The aim is to respond to the untenable housing market and offer an alternative to those who want to live, study and work together within the city.

Despite the built density in New York, it is full of potential sites for the co-op dwelling labs; flat rooftops, narrow spaces in between buildings and blind walls. The presented work focuses on a site located at the corner of East 58th Street and 1st Avenue, but the project should be seen as a general proposal that can be applied to different sites around the city.


Yearbook 2015/16

1. Co-op dwelling lab seen from East. The open white metal structure of the facade provides the building with a transparent expression in contrast to the existing brick building.

p. 129

2. The housing structure is designed with two floors, the upper floor includes private units and the lower level works as a shared living, cooking and working-space. Besides the private units, and living spaces the building includes communal programs as meeting rooms, roofgarden, projection spaces, pool, sauna and laundry.


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Constructing an Archive

Shared rooftop Raingarden

changing room

Sauna

Pool Wood deck

Private units

4.1 Shared floor Study / working Textile space dividers

Shared floor Private units

Shared floor Laundry Outdoor space

Meetingrooms

Watertank Stairs/Projection space

4.2

3. Programme overview

4.1 Typical private unit plan. Plywood walls and floors that follow the gridded steel structure makes it possible to create variable floor plans with the same components. Openings in the plywood floor give the space its full height and creates connections between the collective and the private part of the building.


Yearbook 2015/16

5.

4.2 Typical plan for the shared living and working space. A system with curtains is introduced to make it possible to create more intimate rooms in the otherwise open floorplan.

5. Rooftop view over the communal pool and garden area.

p. 131


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Constructing an Archive

Endotic New York: The Kiosk Society

Jazmin Charalambous (GB) 8th Semester

1.

New York is one of the largest and most powerful cities in the world. The many institutional and corporate powers which occupy and surveil the city cause a feeling of powerlessness to pervade, with very few public places left for the discussion of critical and free thought. But what if the everyday news kiosks, ubiquitous along the city’s sidewalks, could be used to provoke discussion and to realize a new form of social empowerment?

The Kiosk Society are a fictional group of neo-Situationists who operate by challenging critical thought in New York City. Their infiltrated headquarters is used to create site-specific kiosks for disadvantaged individuals to help allow a reimagining of the world. The HQ functions as a workshop, social space, and public exhibition where the ground surface membrane relays between everyday life above and the happenings of the society below. MANHATTAN

2.

QUEENS


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3.

I. PNEUMATIC MANHOLE

III. CON.ED STEAM SYSTEM

IV. SOLAR POWERED

V. LIGHT PIPE

VI. RESPONSIVE

TAPS TO VENTILATION

SIGNAGE

BOLLARD

KIOSK IN ACTION

II. NEWSPAPER VENDING MACHINE PERISCOPE

1. The Kiosk Society Diagram The newsstand has lost its relation to NEWS(!) and what it means to provide people with real insights, but what if you are able to gain more than a Mars Bar from such a place? The Kiosk Society collaborate with disadvantaged individuals, allowing them freedom of exchange. This becomes a form of localized news, whereby the harmless kiosk is reinvented as a social tool. 2. Location Plan The society’s strategic positioning within the city.

4.

3. Everyday NYC Storyboard Scenes from everyday life in New York City depicting power, play and normative systems. 4. The Para(SITE) System Situated in an abandonned underpass, the parasitic intervention makes use of the existing as well as the climatic characteristics of the site, utilizing these for ventilation, lighting, heat, and energy. Devices are camouflaged in order to keep the society’s use of the space secret.


p. 134

Constructing an Archive 60 ST.

2 AVE.

Q. BORO BRIDGE

THE KIOSK 59 ST.

SOCIETY

5.

PROJECTIONS ONTO STRUCTURE

PERISCOPES ALLOW VIEWS TO WORKSHOP

6.

5. Ground and Lower Floor Plan The plan demonstrates the use of 35000m² of the 85000m² area available being used by the subterranean society, and is developed to emphasise its location with respect to the existing surrounding. It draws upon the language of the public park directly opposite whilst also taking aspects of its original function as a trolley car terminal to create new links through the underpass. The design of the plan demonstrates the society’s infiltration of the space; a space that can grow and change with time.

6. The Kiosk Society HQ: Long Section The site of the headquarters is at the point of a major intersection in Manhattan crossed by hundreds of New Yorkers everyday on their daily commute, and offers the advantage of being viewed from an aerial perspective by the Roosevelt Island tram. Devices are used to allow passers-by to glimpse into the HQ as well as to become a part of the space. The pneumatic inflatable structure released from a manhole provides the members with an event space for impromptu gatherings.


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ROOSEVELT TRAM PASSES OVERHEAD

EXISTING ABANDONED TROLLEY KIOSK USED TO EXHIBIT EVENT TRACES

PNEUMATIC BREATHING STRUCTURE CREATES TEMPORARY EVENT SPACE

MIRRORED WALL

NEW PUBLIC

REFLECTS LIGHT

THOROUGHFARE

XH

IT IB

II. T AC

II I .E

UPWARDS

7. The Programme Diagram The systemic programme has 3 parts; the underground workshop, which is a space used to PRODUCE the specialized kiosks. [I] For one month the kiosk keeper then goes out to ACT in the city with the kiosk itself, exchanging freely. [II] Finally the outcomes of events are put to EXHIBIT in the abandoned trolley kiosk situated above, which provides the society with a public frontage. [III] I. PRODUCE

7.


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Constructing an Archive

The GCD Hotel

Kia Evon (FI) Guest student

The location of the project is in Grand Canyon, precisely in Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). The project operates on the mega-scale that relates to the scale of geological formations and micro-scale at of crystallisation whilst at the same time, trying to translate the processes from one scale to another. The physical manifestation of the GCD stretches far from the point of its location. It was built in 1963 to provide Hydropower for the several states. The parasitic nature of the dam is the reason for locating the project at this particular location.


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p. 137

1.

2.

3.

4.

6.

7.

1. The micro-process of crystallisation is behind the reality of the canyon. It determines the features, such as colour and shape. 2. Programmatic simulation of this process to extract the concept. 3. Conglomeration of crystals begins to grow from the ground level. The vertical (Z-axis) represents time. 4.Interlocking of several crystals allows the construction to be free-standing and well balanced. When every level acts structurally as an independent

unit, the crystals become more stable. 5.The structure still includes the cross substructure, but in this case it became a truss-structure in itself. 6. + 7. The final conglomeration of shapes takes into consideration the physical qualities of the site, such as direction of light and views, and at the same time is a product of aesthetical studies The interlocking and inter-growing of the crystals play an important role in the composition.


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Constructing an Archive

5

5

1. Typical hotel floor plan

1. The centre shaft serves as main logistical link between the floors. The individual hotel rooms are oriented 45 ° from the floor orientation to 1. Typical hotel floor plan maximise the quality of view. 2. + 3. The project involves solving structural, programmatic and conceptual issues all at the same time. The hotel and conference centre have specific programme in terms of space and logistics. The towers are set up on three

different bases: directly from the dam’s wall, free-standing on the bottom of the dam and based on the cliff-rock. Regarding the design of the hotel, the focus was on the point of view of the visitors, the interior spaces and uniqueness of the place. In terms of the stability of structure the interlocking of several towers is important, which reflects back to the concept.


Yearbook 2015/16 5

2. Functional diagramme

1. Typical hotel floor plan

3. Programmatic diagramme

2. Functional diagramme

4. The core spaces of the hotel are pulled back 4m from the facade mesh to allow the visitor to observe the mega-structure of the facade.

4.

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p. 140

Constructing an Archive

Exploring—Excavating

Leticia Izquierdo (ES) Guest student

There are three types of sculptors; those who remove material, those who “add” material, and those who take away and add as stated by Leon Battista Alberti. 1 The chosen site to work in was the Grand Canyon. Investigations into the Grand Canyon unveiled evidence on various caves which are thought to have once served as an Egyptian funerary complex, millions of years ago, of which today little is still understood or accessible. The intention is to work with a duality between removal and addition. An archeaeological investigatory centre is paired with a museum, which serves a vestibule between the surface above, and the caves below, explaining the uncoverings of the site. The access through the escarpment completes the intervention.

see: Luke Morgan, The Monster in the Garden: The Grotesque and the Gigantic in Renaissance. University of Pennsylvania Press: 2016, 143.

1

How to cross the mountain? How to make this an experience in itself? How to show on the top in the museum what happens below?


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p. 141

A section in which one we see the 2nd floor of the museum-research center and roof plan of the yards along the mountain that correspond to the different tubes included in the terrain.

-45 m

-80 m -110 m

-140 m

-170 m

-200 m

N1

-220 m

N2

-230 m

N3

-260 m

The luminosity in excavated architecture force the construction and the introduction of these tubes systme near by the outer side of the mountain.

N4

0

10

30 m

Colorado river

1. 1. Floor plan of the intervention. Section of the museum archeological center. Two floors including the upper museum exhibition area on the right, free travel area and cafeteria, as well as a shop and reception to the left. Between the two areas, the projection stairwell patio, which is the first of the courtyards giving access to the caves. On the lower floor, the classrooms and research area, which is structurally a more isolated zone.

As we descend to the caves through the stairwell, the excavated shafts allow us to cross the escarpment and continue our tour. From above some of these shafts are shown. Following a technique used in mining, tunneling shafts are built from screen-walls introducing a number of typologies.


p. 142

Constructing an Archive

C’

b

C

B’

X L

DET C

V

C

C

V

Communication

3.

Elevator Stairs Spiral stairs Ramp Direct access Direct exit

L

V Spaces in between Inner spaces Spaces that over looks the ourside Communication gateways

B

B

L Light Inner yard Outer yard Inputlight

V

Auxiliar

C

Emergency exit

Ventilation

0

BB ’and AA’ The two main floors of the building are shown, as well as the first section of stairwell. A drop built from digging into the mountain itself, leaving part of it as supporting pillars. AA ’. On the first floor two types of structures are observed. DET1, DET2 Precast concrete arches are supported by reinforced concrete beams which run in parallel.

10

DET1, DET2 Both beams and arches are resting on in situ cast concrete walls which run throughout the floors. The increased depth of the shear wall allows for vertical circulation as well as accommodating other programmes, which include installations, bathroom and kitchen services. CC’ A second structure on the first floor, which houses the exhibition areas of the museum.

30 m


Yearbook 2015/16

B

A

p. 143

a

DET

A’

1

W

X

Y

Z

A A’

a

Floor 0

A A’

a B C

Floor -1

C

B

DET

2

Floor -4

C’

B’ b

DET

3

DETC, Y-Z Structurally a series of metal box girders grouped to allow the entry of light and to allow a cantilever of between 15 and 18 meters. These beams are supported on the structural nucleus of the lower floors. BB’ Once the building is completed, the shaft construction system will facilitate the tunnels that allows visitors to reach the Egyptian caves. This system can be adapted for further expansion. Inside the yards of the tubes

DET

4

0

10

30 m

It consists of: a series of vertical circular tubes that intersect with the terrain of the escarpment, which are connected by galleries (horizontal or inclined). The shafts are then supported by premanufactured pieces, creating the spatial connections from the surface to the caves. Through repetition and relationship thereof, it is made possible communication from the surface to the interior of the caves. DET3,DET4, Hanging components


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Constructing an Archive

1.

Confessions of a Donor / Donor

Bradley Mitchell (AU) Guest student 2 donors family 2 documenters (weekly rotation) 2 resident nurses 1 resident physician 2 resident psychologists 1 on request resident chaplain 2 house keepers 2 chefs 2 admin 3 maintenance 1

fly in specialist surgeon team (surgeons, anaesthetist, technologist, nurses)

1-5

recipients per donor

1. New York’s secondary infastructure utilised for parasitic interventions

2.


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3.

4.

5.

6.

2. Transverse Section showing interactions to dwelling, balcony, corridor, void, garden, landscape, weather. The stilted structure is veiled by a fluttering milky glass mesh fabric which blurs the interior volumes, light and shadow, and blurs the landscape colour as the dwellers move through the fluctuating space until opened and revealed. 3. Axonometric view. 4. The passing of wellness and wisdom. The influence of one on another, a part of one in another, one place at another. Ephemeral influence and

perpetual memory captured, documented and literally installed into another. Two moments, one fixed, one ever shifting, are connected and interact, influence and contribute in symbiosis. Stories of lives lived and lost, but told and available, not a carved stranger on stone. 5. The window washer - a common parasitical occurrence in the glass city. 6. Longitudinal Section. Fluctuating volumes between weatherboard clad solids and softly folded fabric divisions sitting above the cathedral garden.


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Constructing an Archive 8.

7. 9.

10.

11.

7. New York parasitic interventions explore capturing a moment and projecting it into a foreign environment. 8. Colour TV. A virtual sky captured from the Grand Canyon in analogue flips, creating sound, movement and tilting above the path below. 9. Solitude. Requested access to be removed from below and stand above. 10. Requested inflation invades open space and formed an impressed interior. 11. A light blinks and a donor requests a chat. 12. Your new daily locations mapped.

12.


Yearbook 2015/16 The Grand Canyon Organ Hospice is the source of captured memory and narrative. Documented conversation and confessions of and bewteen donor and reciever transpire

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Constructing an Archive

(Back)Stage Dwelling

Emre Senoglu (DK/TR) 9th Semester The backstage of a theatre scene is perhaps the most mystical part of a play. Despite not being visible for the audience, the backstage is where the unseen work of a play happens. The changing level of transparency and the choreography of what is visible to the audience and what is not are the critical spatial configurations of this scenography. The backstage is also the backdrop of a performance. New York is famously used as a backdrop or setting in all kinds of media: films, plays, musicals. Whilst preserving its image, this fame also makes it equally difficult to use New York as a place to dwell. (Back)Stage Dwelling brings these two together in an parasitical and temporary structure. With Middle Manhattan being the focus, there are three key spots that the dwelling relates itself to: MoMA, Park Avenue Building and the Navy Yard. The parasite begins its life in Navy Yard, where the scrap metal from the dismantled ships are molded into the structural frames. The parasite is then transported to its host, Park Avenue Plaza. Being a busy hub for all kinds of artists, MoMA is the main venue for the parasite’s users: a group of four performance artists, residing in New York. 26.

floor

25.

floor

24.

floor


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The parasite attaches to the side of SOM’s Park Avenue Plaza Building. Built in the 1970s, this 45 floor office tower offers a suitable environment for the parasite to attach: a modular glazed facade and a simple structural skeleton. The artists then begin their stay at the parasite. Their daily life is split between the main performance venue - MoMA - and the parasite.

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1.

1. When the parasite is transported to the host building, a crane on top of the host building lifts up the parasite. Like the annual MoMA Ps1 ceremony, the day the parasite is lifted is celebrated each year on the same date, June 1st. The structure is then assembled in place and stays open for 3 months each summer and acts as a beacon for the art scene.

One elevator is assigned to work only between the lobby and the 24th floor during the 3 month period. The parasite has three entry points: two leading directly into the sleeping spaces, and one main entry leading to the foyer area. Sleeping spaces are pushed to the ends of the parasite forming corridors to put emphasis on privacy. The central area is designated for meetings and coffee breaks.


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3.

2.

2. The dwellers of the parasite enter Park Avenue Plaza’s lobby and take the elevator up to the 24th floor where the parasite entrances are located. The offices located on the floor continue their daily rythym whilst the parasite makes use of the host building’s facilities. A part of the bathroom is converted into a bathroom for the parasite. When not in use by the artists, the parasite is a meeting spot for the office employees.

3. The parasite is built in the Navy Yard, in the hangars near the dry docks. The steel frames are welded together to form the seven modules that are internally stable. The polycarbonate walls and aluminum foam floors are also added in this stage. The modules are then transported to the host building, and assembled on site. On the day of assembly, a crane that is built on top of the host building lifts up each module. Within a week of its departure from the hangars, the parasite is ready for use.


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Glacier Paradox A proposal for an architecture that responds to the dynamics of Vatnajรถkull glacier

Hlynur Axelsson (IS) Thesis Project (10th semester) The Glacier Paradox represents an image of our dynamic world that consists of motion; from the motion of every atom to the constant motion of our universe. At the same time scientists are exploring the motion of Vatnajรถkull glacier in Iceland in order to understand its nature and make predictions for the future climate. The project is a reaction to the need for a dynamic dwelling which creeps along the tail of the glacier as it retreats. The design of a creeping structure would therefore bind together a society of scientists in a Nature Research Centre at the borderline of the glacier. The Glacier Paradox demonstrates resistance to the rules that we humans had once constructed, but now use blindly as guidelines for our future. Although appearing paradoxical, in reality the need for this dwelling type is real, just as every other dwelling we create. The problem is that we do not yet fully understand this need and the language necessary to communicate it.


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The project reveals that the scientist’s need for dynamism can be set into context with their own predictions, i.e. climate change. This will force millions of humans to leave their homes because of droughts, floods, storms, and rising sea levels in the next two decades. There is a strong need to extend the architectural language of these extreme environments so that they can also incorporate the dynamic needs of the future. Recent events in Syria caused 45% of the population to abandon their homes due to the extreme drought. The absurd need for a dwelling in motion, henceforth, becomes substantial. The basic human need for dwellings can come in forms other than buildings or shelters, and can appear as creeping or dynamic structures.


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Please mind the gap Spatial activators to foster interaction between the city and community

Panwaad Sai Chawalitanont (TH) Thesis Project (10th semester)

Hearing with the ears is only part of our audio-physical perception. In Architecture, visual experience is always regarded as a dominant perception. In this project, the aim has been to continue my research on the idea of place and culture using the method of sensorial perception, sound, in my hometown, Bangkok to capture and portray a story or sequence of lives in the community, as, we, human beings depend upon our sensorial perceptions in order to rationalize and negotiate space.

1-2 R. Murray Schafer, “Sound of the city”, in Sense of The City: An Alternate Approach to Urbanism, ed. Emily Thompson (Canada Centre for Architecture

The project acts as a timeline that guides you through unique identities of the city. It arrives with a general analysis based on my personal walk experiences, soundwalk. Cartographic media, a sound map and sound recordings, will be used to represent the data collected concerning the sounds required through recordings and other graphical techniques as well as a narrative to describe the sonic environments, sound marks, of a specific place. The project departs with my individual discussion that the acoustic, ears, plays an important part in creating the city’s sense of place as well as visual, the eyes.

and Lars Muller Publisher, 2005), 163.


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No. 1

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The Secret Duck Noodle Shop W 3.5m x D 6.5m x H 2.2m (Precise location, unknown) I stumbled on this shop by accident when I was walking along Yaowaraj Road or the China Town. The shop has no name but the sign stated that they’re selling yellow noodles, thick rice noodles and

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duck noodles, all for the same price, 40 baht (8 kr). I called it, ‘the secret duck noodle shop’. The shop is located in a tunnel-like space that looks like an old parking entrance to a cheap hotel. The shop is contained in a rectangle space with 2 openings, front and back. The walls are made out of concrete and the only permanent furniture are

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the lightings and electrical wires. Although the shop is located here,

Pedestrian path of The Grand Palace

somewhat, permanently but the other furniture are mobile. The plan

Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang,

of the space is a free-form plan. So customers can grab the plastic

Phra Nakhon, Bangkok,Thailand

chairs and rearrange the table anywhere they want.

The pedestrian path in the most popular and active public area of Bangkok. This pedestrian, in particular, is the widest and most com-

The view (of Wat Arun, the Temple of Dawn)

fortable with a width of 8.4 m and a row of trees planted in the center.

Maha Rat Rd, Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang,

The main activity apart from the illegal activities of pork scewer

Phra Nakhon, Bangkok 10200,Thailand

vendors is lottery traders. Since the path is connected directly to an amulet market, some amulet traders can sometimes be seen as well. Most of the street vendors here can speak a Thai-English or a Tinglish

The best thing about alley way is that they take

language. Some can even speak some words of Chinese, Japanese,

you to unexpected places. This one is to a view of

Korean or even a certain European luaguages depending on tourist

the beautiful Wat Arun or the Temple of Dawn. The

season. Since it is a touristic area, be expected to get approach by

alley itself has no particular importance, it serves

tourists asking for directions

as a back of the house, where cars are parked and vendors selling food at random location. The frame to the view or the walls are the 3 storey buildings of about 10 meters heigh.

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Vendors on Yaowaraj Road Yaowaraj Road W 5m Yaowaraj Road aka China Town aka the dragon road because of its shape is 1410 m. long. There are a lot of smaller alleys that connect from the main street. Most of the street of China Town are occupied by the street vendors, all selling food and beverage. Most of the food here are authentic chinese with restaurant qualities. Some vendors sell also seasonal vegetable, fruits and chinese herbs. There are no the colourful umbrella as their main space as well as an indicators to their shops location. The shops seen on this picture are located on the same level as the road so while shopping for food, you should watch out for cars, motorcycles and pedestrians as well.

No.3

Tawang Community

Tawang is the smallest community in the area and it doesn’t exist on

Soi Tha Wang,

google map. It consists of one main road with a width of 1.6 m. The

Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang,

wall on the right is a 1.8 m heigh brick wall where it is also being used

Phra Nakhon, Bangkok,Thailand

a kitchen area from some families. The opposit wall is not really awall, it is the front of the house so basically when you open the door then you are immediately outside in a public space. The width of the road makes an amazing public space. Apart from being a kitchen and a

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walk way, people from the community also play chess and pokers together or just sitting and chatting there.

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Tawang Community Soi Tha Wang,

No.5

ขนมจี

Soi Tha Wang, Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang, Phra Nakhon, Bangkok,Thailand

Phra Borom Maha Ratchawang, Phra Nakhon, Bangkok,Thailand

ย ำ นน

Tawang Community, the stair

Located at the end of the road of Tawang Community is the stair.

สะพ

ธ นพุ at the steps

101 Chakphet Rd, Khwaeng Wang Burapha Phirom Khet Phra Nakhon, Bangkok 10200,Thailand

This is a surprise element to me because one stair create an amazing public and private zone. I was uncertain whether or not I am allow to This small alley is connected from the main road of Tawang commu of people passing but you have to move to your side in order for the other person to pass. The two walls are actually houses so basically

be behind the stair but luckily I got a permission from a local lady that was around. Behind the stair lies 2 houses that has full access to the water. But anyone from the community is allowed to go through as well.

The steps, in fact pedestrian path, houses the best restaurant. This one is called ‘Kanomjeen Namya Sapanphut’ (white round noodles

you are walking through a row of someone else’s windows. I didn’t

with sauces). The form of the restaurant follows the form of the path.

walk to the end which came up to be a dead end. Although the space

All of the furniture are mobile so you just fold everything when pack-

seemed very private but at the same time walking there doesn’t feel

ing up. They have been selling here for 20 years. You can like their

like your invading too much privacy.

page on facebook. Find them on ‘facebook/

ย ำ นน

ขนมจี

สะพ

ธ นพุ .com’

-

1. Every city has its own distinct aural environment. In Bangkok, the sound made from transportation combined with its context produces an entirely different sound than in Denmark. Many people would say that those sounds produced by auto or mechanical devices like engines from cars and railroads are noises, an unwanted sound, and any undesired sound. Noise is the wrong sound in the wrong place.1 But for Bangkok, the combination of those noises is what I would call, ‘soundmarks’,

sounds that have been in a particular place for a long time. Like landmarks, they define its essential character, rendering it unique. That is why the most beautiful public square or the street of Bangkok would be destroyed without the sounds of noisy engines and people chatting. The cool breeze would be missing without the boats making waves hitting the shore. Not much would be left of the special atmosphere without the odours of the smoky pork skewers.


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1. Mechanical Devices and Man Sound + Flower Odours / Arriving to the market

Street Ambience

Street and Vendours Ambience

2. Man and Man Sound + Flower Odours / Dwelling in the market

Flower Odours

Arrival, Entrance to the market

Dwell, Market Ambience and Flower Odours

3-4 B. Truax, in Geographies 3. Man and Nature Sound + Cool breee and River odours / Departing from the market

of Urban Sound, ed. Torsten Wissmann (Ashgate Publishing Limited), 2014, 86.

Departure, Exiting the market

River Odours and breeze

Courie r

Cour i er

Touri st s Tourists

Flowers (Odour) Temporary Stalls Permanent Stalls Noise

Midnight

1 a.m.

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3

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Noon

1 p.m.

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Pak Klong Talat [Flower Market] - Sound Event Map An attempt to relate areas with similar and contrasting acoustic environments, from R. Murray Schafer, The Soundscape (Rochester, VT: Destiny Books, 1994), 265. The market is a complex and heterogeneous space that is surrounded and separated into two spaces by residential shop houses. Hundred of flower stalls are housed under these one-storey warehouse structures. A sound event map of the market, according to R. Murray Schafer, was plotted in attempt to relate areas with similar and contrasting acoustic environment. According to the sound event map, the identity of the market is built up upon mixtures of different sound events that occur around and on site resulting in the present situation. Specific events were chosen to define appropriate programs to stimulate its original sonic identity. ‘Real sounds’ were extracted from those sound events and were deconstructed into fragments to define a spatial timeline of events that occurs through the place. ‘But no recording is an exact reproduction of living sound’3 that means that the new constructed soundscapes are not designed to be an exact replication of nature but a ‘creation of an imaginary world with processed sounds of various origins’.4 The use of ‘real’ environmental sounds suggests that I, as a composer, could express or reproduce my personal perspective on sound to compose a new unique space. The new compose space can be described as an ‘acoustic communication’, where each space are thought of to be at specific location

9

10

11

Midnight

and containing a certain unique soundscape, in this case, one that either enhance or soften the ambience in order to create a pleasant space for people to hear and smell. The fragments of selected events were placed back on site according to the events occurred and were then combined to generate an aggregated sound of the place revealing its ambience of the market. The new soundscape evolved after previous studies speak of a new form and elements that could intercede to have the most effect on transforming the area. The aim was to keep the richness and complexity of the place as it is and strengthen it in with a new language from my reflection on sound by : - Adding an extension of sound space to connect the two markets together through the community. - Enhancing the existing (pleasant) sound or ambience of the place (Human Sound) to dimming the other unwanted sound. (Noise from Mechanical devices) - Offering a place for silence, an inner courtyard, that can be shared between the market and the community and at the same time, offering a sounder odour and nature for the entire community.


Place of Solitude Exposing your soul to nature

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Diagramatic Plan

Transition into the next place Following the sound of your footstep, the breeze, and the smell of the flowers.

Di ag r amat ic F low er Pla n

Imaginary Ambience

Entering the market expose to a lively market space


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Paradoxes of the Pellucid An architectural wayfaring encountering the carnal, conflictive, and performative

Angus James Hardwick (AU) Thesis Project (10th semester) How can something coherent and stable be contradictory? This paradox has been materialised in a new spatial intervention at Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London, informed by two ‘picturesque’ gardens: Sir John Soane’s House and Museum, and Philip Johnson’s Glass House Estate, as well as the investigative lenses of the carnal, conflictive, and performative. The project had three goals: to communicate the experiential qualities of architectural projects both existing and projected; to practice an alternative working methodology that uncovers new opportunities for spatial interventions; and to produce a speculative intervention imagining a possible ‘present’ that foregrounds the human experience. The work was produced in three interconnected phases that engaged a range of communication techniques including a site-specific performance, three-dimensional ‘story-boards’, drawings, scale models, and digital processes. 1.


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2.

1.


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4.

5. 1. Excerpt from the drawing ‘Agents of the Fields’: A site specific performance that unfolded the historic personas of the gardener, the street-sweep, the lamp-lighter, and the watchman. 2. Section revealing the proposed intervention providing a new visitor’s underground entry to the Sir John Soane House and Museum, and an elevated Research Perch and Residence that has a distinctive mirrored belly.

6. 3. Site section revealing the unfolded field condition expanding Sir John Soane’s House and Museum into Lincoln’s Inn Fields. 4. Excerpt from the drawing ‘Script for an Intervention’: Specific scenarios unfolding the picturesque condition of Lincoln’s Inn Fields were identified with magnifying lens’, housed in unique 3D-printed and mirrored casings.


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8.1-8.3

9. 5. Excerpt from ‘Sir John Soane’s House and Museum Storyboard’: An assembly of images and words, were filmed, to stage a reading of this picturesque ’garden’ conveying an alternate documentation of the house’s experiential qualities. 6. Internal model perspective of proposed visitor’s entry and archive ’blurry’ wall

7. Photograph of sectional model with Research Perch above Sunken Court oposite the Sir John Soane House and Museum. 8.1 Detail of supporting steel prop. 8.2 External view of Scholar’s Room and viewing lens. 8.3 On the ground. Model photograph on edge of Lincoln’s Inn Fields underneath the Research Perch. 9. Plan of Research Perch.


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Navigating and Building through —scapes An exploratory approach to site specific architectural interventions

Karin Hedqvist (SE) Thesis Project (10th semester)

The project derives from an interest in how we position ourselves in the context of –scapes. It is an explorative approach to site-specific architectural interventions, including a process of site-analysis, programme formulations and form finding by approaching a site through a series of -scape paintings. The result is an architectural proposal including three structures located in the –scape of Viamala, an ancient and notorious section of a walking path along the Hinterrhein River between the villages Zillis-Reischen and Thusis in the Canton of Graubünden in Switzerland. To be able to build in a -scape one must first construct the -scape itself. This assumption is the starting point and catalyst for the evolution of the project. In order to create a -scape, a series of sketches has been used as a method to create an archive of the –scape, depicted and generated throughout an explorative way of reading the site. A series of sketches, by the painter William Turner (1789 – 1862), has been used as a vehicle for approaching the site and was my guidance and framework when I was going to the site in Switzerland, becoming the second observer. Turner´s sketches have been used as a tool for both discovering, approaching and creating the -scape. In doing so, the study of the series has been undertaken in order to reveal and prove the affective relation between the -scape and the observer. The architectural intervention became the mirrored image of the process of unfolding the –scape depicted. As As


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As a result of this process I am proposing an artefact - a painting. A painting not in its ordinary sense but consisting of a series of structures spatially detached from the traditional framing of an artwork. The framing is instead represented by the choreographed views that the structures evoke, and the motives that the painting holds are not fixed but constantly changing in unison with the third observer (the user) as well as the continuous flux of the –scape. The program, including an artists residence + atelier, an exhibition hall and sleeping facilities (added to an existing programme on the site) is a response to the observer´s need, inviting the user to continue the process of creating, depicting and observing the ever-changing motive – the -scape.

1. The entrance to Viamala. View from Thusis. Photo by Karin Hedqvist.

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2. House for -scapes, map of project. 1:200 (on 700x1000mm canvas).

3. Plan of House for Turner + Atelier and Exhibition hall. 1:50 (on 700x1000mm canvas).


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4. View towards House for Turner and the Atelier. Model 1:100. Photo by Karin Hedqvist.

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Poetics of Transition (Proposal for) an architecture for the body and mind

Louise Linthwaite (GB) Thesis Project (10th semester)

This is a study of a ruin, its revitalisation, and relationship to the city and the body; executed by the exploration of fragmented contextual devices across the mediums of models, reliefs, collage and drawing. The location of this exploration is set in Bristol, southwest England, a historic city with around 1million inhabitants in the metropolitan area. In a deprived, yet central area of the city, lies Bristol Carriage Works, built in 1862; a prime example of Byzantine architecture, it has stood derelict for 25 years. The community of the surrounding area, Stokes Croft, has put together a movement to defend this icon from gentrification, they aim to claim it back from developers and allow it to regain its civic involvement. This is a site in transition, encountering new principles for programme and interactions with people and configurations throughout the city. The focal point of this study is the notion of transition in two different states, the body and the place. The proposition exists in the middle ground between the two; conducting investigations via models, finally suggesting a spatial scenario. The poetic nature of the project is initiated in the idea that, through their shared degradation the ruined site gives solace to the fragile nature of the body, reminiscent of a nest around an egg.


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1. Sketch Section; Pencil and marker on trace Louise Linthwaite, February 2016 2. The Child’s Face & The Lizard’s Eye [illegal additions], Westmorland House Louise Linthwaite, February 2016 3 & 4. 1:100 Working model photographs Louise Linthwaite, February 2016

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5. A Compilation; Ink, watercolour and acetate Louise Linthwaite, April 2016


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1. Image caption

1. Image caption

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6. A Fragment Model; Plywood, cast plaster, cast wax, acrylics, & metal wire. Louise Linthwaite, April 2016


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GOOD COPY* —An exploration of the translational cut faces in architectural narratives.

Halfdan Trolle (DK) Thesis Project (10th semester)

Can architectural representation be used to identify simultaneously occurring spaces that inhabit the narrative of a place? And can we by doing this transform the narrative into an operational mode for architectural practice? That is the offset of this exploration. The stage for the narrative is a building on Manhattan, in New York named Lorraine. The vehicle for the undertaking is the sectional cut that runs through both physical and immaterial spaces. The representations presented here are fragments from the exploration.

* GOOD COPY is a term used in radio communications to confirm that a message has been recieved and understood clearly. (Tim Bartlett, VHF handbook. Southampton: The Royal Yachting Association, 2009)

1.


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2.

1 - 2. Context model + Isometric section AA through the Lorraine Building In economic space Manhattan is constructed from block numbers, cadastral numbers and financial speculation in the airspace above buildings. In the cut face between economic space and the city landscape architecture is forced into the hollow of neo-capitalism. However, the void also holds the potential for lived space - that of human interaction and memory - to unfold.

3.

3. Section BB In the void, the possibilities for new narratives of ’lived’ space starts to emerge. However, what is the relationship between lived space and measurable place?


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3.

3. 1:50 sketch model A machine is implemented to notate the social actions performed in ’lived’ space. Continuously circling the building over the course of a day the machine cuts through walls and floors. The machine is a spatial intervention to be used as a tool to discern a place’s narrative. It is the sectional machine.

4. Fragment section CC The sectional machine reveals the architectural narrative of the Lorraine building as a unity of fragments. A fragment is constructed from a series of minor narratives that support spatial phenomena such as connections through multiple levels and types of spaces.


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4.

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Internship at AVPD

Sissel Sønderskov (DK) 8th Semester

Week 18 [070516] The Bridge To.. Christianshavn Canal, Copenhagen


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Week 19 [100516] Summertime Kultorvet, Copenhagen


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DLAB— competition brief— proposals


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Constructing an Archive Constructs an Archive Background

The drawing is one of the architects’ oldest and most important tools. The drawing process can lead to new realisations and develop new ideas in the person who draws; at the same time, it is a means of conveying ideas to others. It can communicate, seduce and convince. Drawings provide a foundation for dialogue. Aarhus School of Architecture is therefore both pleased and proud to succeed – for the third year in a row – in holding the competition ”Drawing of the Year”, a competition that is open to all students of architecture. ”Engaging through Architecture” is the overall strategic foundation at Aarhus School of Architecture, and it was also the theme of ”Drawing of the Year 2013” – because we wish to get involved in the world around us, cooperating with our surroundings in creating better settings for people’s everyday lives and in finding solutions for the global challenges of our day. The theme for the 2014 competition was “Transformation” – one of the big challenges of our day, as the development of our society creates tremendous changes in our cities, something which also necessitates reutilisation and adaptation of buildings and facilities. The contributions showed that transformation can be interpreted in many different ways, on many scales and from political as well as poetic perspectives. Across borders and schools, the drawings contribute to specifying current debates on everything from the development of society and the role of the architect in this context, to the architectural drawing as a means of communication and production. The theme of Drawing of The Year 2015 is ”Sustainability”.


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Competition brief By Karen Kjaergaard

Together with GXN, the School of Architecture has developed a material lab, MLAB, where new building materials are emphasized and exhibited. In the same spirit, we wish to have a Drawing of the Year lab, DLAB, which is to be a vivid and inspiring place/ piece of furniture for the presentation of drawings, techniques and film. DLAB will be placed on the first floor in the school’s library. DLAB is to contain a curated selection of submitted drawings from the three competitions, which are, at present, kept in files in a depot under the exhibition building. The drawings are to be pulled out and stored away again as in a traditional drawing cabinet. In addition to that, it must be possible to show films in connection with the place/ piece of furniture, to look up drawings that are not in the archive and, possibly, to draw directly for a digital archive. Integration of new technology and communication is encouraged. The piece of furniture must relate wholly or partially to the three themes described above, and it must be possible to include it in a mixed range of bookshelves, different furniture and, of course, thousands of books. The colour must be either black or – as with other newer furniture in the library – orange. The choice of material is free, but material as well as construction must be able to withstand daily use. Realisation The task will be carried out in the beginning of the spring semester 2016 as part of a Design Realisation course at the Studio Constructing an Archive, led by Claudia Carbone and Izabela Wieczorek. One of the submitted suggestions will be selected for production 1:1 in the school’s workshops. Existing hardware (screens, iPads or Raspberry Pis) from the school’s IT Team will be for your disposal. Estimated budget for materials: DKK 15,000. An artistic performance or happening that demonstrates the function of the place/ piece of furniture, may be included in connection with the inauguration. Betinna Odgaard, Trine Bertholt and Karen Kjaergaard will participate in the selection.


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Constructing an Archive Constructs an Archive A competition of ideas

Individual entry Requirements: 1 board 70x70 cm (printed /original): DLAB - a subtitle A random number five digits A brief written description of the concept A budget Drawings in scale (1:10) • relating to the proposed location in the library • relevant schematics (revealing movable parts) • envision of the functionality addressing the user and the keeper’s interaction as well as how the cabinet facilitates room for its content Description of materials and joints can be handed in as samples and models or incorporated in the board In addition: A 1:10 model A sealed A5 white envelope marked with the five digits (containing your name) Questions: Is (and how?) the cabinet performing whilst not in use? How is the archived material available? Has the cabinet multiple positions?


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First Prize: Jazmin Charalambous The Drawing Hearth

Jury Statement: “The ‘Drawing Hearth’ has been chosen because it is in principle a convincing architectural response, a response to its particular and specific library wall, the axial approach, its smuggling between bookshelves. It also achieves credibility and authenticity through its familiarity, the hearth/fireplace precedent. The drawing of the month framed above the hearth will ensure an ongoing interest. The material choice makes it a ‘strange bird’ in its context – this is also an aspect that requires further detailed study and resolution prior to construction. The ‘physical hearth’ compliments and trumps the virtual fire around the corner in the library. As the ‘seat of the analogue’ (drawing) it promises to anchor this wall – it is an eminently simple and useable device, one which unfolds to tell its story.” The jury consisted of Peter Wilson (Bolles+Wilson) | Mikkel Frost (Cebra) | Karen Kjærgaard Curator and Head of Exhibitions AAA | Betinna Odgaard Librarian


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Runner-up: Mathias Skafte Andersen The Caravan ”This ‘Drawing Cart’ is nicely and carefully designed, showing that it contains something special and very valuable. The fact that it moves around, is both a strength and weakness. On one side, it holds the possibility of somehow operating on the whole floor or even moving to the future school on Godsbaden. On the other, the library is probably too small for a mobile/pull out concept that risks getting in the way or even tipping over.”

Runner-up: Emre Senoglu The Theatrical Display ”The Jury was intrigued by the clever rope and counterweight system as well as the simple frontally layered display of drawings. The information depth created by layering relates to building up a drawing from first thin traces to final strong lines. In terms of design, composition and detailing the piece has been, however, questioned by the jury.”


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Leticia Izquierdo, Programmatic rib wall

Kia Evon, Analog cloud

Sinna Asgari, The block


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Martina Blom, Manifold

Khedidja Benniche, Webshelf

Brad Mitchell, Dimension


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Index


Yearbook 2015/16

Mathias Skafte Andersen (DK)

P. 17, 18, 20, 21, 32, 33, 34, 35, 104, 116, 120, 121, 122, 123, 183

Hlynur Axelsson (IS)

P. 36, 37, 38, 39, 152, 153, 154, 155

Khedidja Benniche (GB)

P. 116, 140, 141, 142, 143, 185

Martina Blom (SE)

P. 116, 128, 129, 130, 131, 185

Siv Bøttcher (DK)

P. 88, 89, 90, 91

Claudia Carbone (DK)

P. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 103, 104, 155

Jazmin Charalambous (GB)

P. 103, 108, 116, 132, 133, 134, 135, 182

Panwad Chawalitanont (TH)

P. 40, 41, 42, 43, 156, 157, 158, 159

Kia Evon (FI)

P. 116, 136, 137, 138, 139, 184

Georgia Flint (AU)

P. 26, 44, 45, 46, 47

Alice Francis (AU)

P. 17, 18, 20, 21, 48, 49, 50, 51

Angus James Hardwick (AU)

P. 52, 53, 54, 55, 160, 161, 162, 163

Karin Hedqvist (SE)

P. 96, 97, 164, 165, 166, 167

Leticia Izquierdo (ES)

P. 116, 140, 141, 142, 143, 184

Farina Koehnecke (DE)

P. 56, 57, 58, 59,

Edvard Lindblom (SE)

P. 98, 99

Louise Linthwaite (GB)

P. 60, 61, 62, 63, 168, 169, 170, 171

Brad Mitchell (AU)

P. 116, 144, 145, 146, 147, 185

Nella Konnerup Qvist (DK)

P. 92, 93, 94, 95

Rikuro Sakaushi (JP)

P. 64, 65, 66, 67

Bianca Sciuto (AU)

P. 18, 19, 70, 71, 72, 73

Emre Senoglu (DK/TR)

P. 19, 72, 73, 74, 75, 104, 109, 111, 116, 148, 149, 150, 151, 183

Astrid Stjernholm (DK)

P. 76, 77, 78, 79

Sissel Sønderskov (DK)

P. 80, 81, 82, 83, 176, 177

Halfdan Trolle (DK)

P. 84, 85, 86, 87, 172, 173, 174, 175

Izabela Wieczorek (PL)

P. 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 155

p. 187


p. 188

Constructing an Archive

Before we end— acknowledgements


Yearbook 2015/16

Studio Constructing an Archive wishes to thank the following people for their support, contributions and participation in studio events:

Cecilia Alvarez

Michael Kruse

Jeppe Aagaard Andersen

Søren Leth

Kätte Bønløkke Andersen

Helene Bredgaad Garde Lind

Sinna Asgari

Espen Lunde Nielsen

Jesper Back

Tine Nørgaard

Trine Bertholt

Betinna Odgaard

Anne Mette Boye

James O’Leary

Ellen Braae

Poul Bæk Pedersen

Vagn Christensen

Lars Mach Pedersen

Andrew Clancy

Claus Peder Pedersen

Morten Daugaard

Robert Schlemmer

Mikkel Frost

Maciej Siuda

Karianne Halse

Chris Thurlbourne

Rasmus Grønbæk Hansen

Anne Elisabeth Toft

Leif Høgfeldt Hansen

Robert B. Trembe Jr.

Anne Hassel

Walter Unterrainer

Jørgen Hedegaard-Jensen

Johan Verbeke

Nanna Gro Henningsen

Peter Voldstedlund

Karen Kjaergaard

Stephen Willacy

Per Smidt Kristensen

Peter Wilson

p. 189


Constructing an Archive: Yearbook 2015/2016  
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