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MEET THE HEROES OF HEALTH CARE! PLUS... MODERN NURSING TURNS 200! THE ENDURING LEGACY OF FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE HOW TO CHOOSE THE RIGHT NURSING SCHOOL Special Advertising Supplement of the Arkansas Times


ctor of Student Services Arkansans’ choice for their health care needs. We have a variety of nursing opportunities, ctor of Enrollment a Level III NICU to a 90-bed Critical Care rsing from area. Baptist Health offers top quality beneArkansasfitsfor Medical Sciences, for employees. We look for nurses who

as a Champion for Children, visit www.archildrens.org or call us at (501) 364-1398

page @UAMSNurses.

MEET THE SCHOOL & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS

think critically and are compassionate and service-oriented. We want to offer a “World only health science center in ArkanClass” environment for everyone. Please apply f the region’s It includes five online atlargest. baptist-health.com.

ing, Medicine, Pharmacy, Health d Public Health) and a graduate with a hospital, statewide network nters, affiliations with ArkanHospital and Central Arkansas hcare System, and seven UAMS e clinical, academic and research focused on specific diseases The UAMS College of Nursing elor’s, master’s (MNSc), Doctor of ce (DNP), and Doctor of Philosophy Jessicathan Burks,800 M.A.,students. BSN Education Counselor; ms to more Amanda Abramovitz, M.A., RN to BSN, MSN, ne programs help RNs BSN to to DNP and existing Post-Master’s DNP Education Brenda Trigg, DNP, GNP, RN, Counselor; Susan Wood, M.S.,CNE BSN Education N or MNSc. The college is engaged Director of Nursing Counselor d interprofessional partnerships Ouachita Baptist University, Arkadelphia MS colleges thatSCHOOL promote OF scholarly UCA NURSING Our innovative dual degree RN-to-BSN “The University of Central Arkansas proSchool search and service to the university gram pairs is thecommitted strengths of of Nursing to Ouachita educatingBaptist students sion and society. for University withRecruiting the strengths of Baptist levels Healthas at the undergraduate and graduate College Little Rock. Ouachita is a nationale of Nursing than ofinforming leaders is in more the delivery quality health care ly-ranked liberal arts college founded in 1886 and the advancement of the nursing profession. e student about ourofprograms. It is withoffer a mission fostering a love of God and We both online and on-campus program cing them to a career field that al-diverse a accommodate love of learning. Baptist Health College to theAnd needs of our popuLittlelearners Rock a recognized leader in completion health be lifelong and caregivers. lations: theison-campus BSN, online care education since 1920 and anMSN integral program RN to BSN, the online Nurse han justpart educate nursing students,health care of Baptist Health, Specialty, the largestas Educator with Clinical well as the em to care theDoctor totalLearn and systemfor in Arkansas. how you can earn Post-Master’s ofpatient Nursing Practice (DNP)

two degrees BSN) in 4 years at obu. and BNS to (AAS DNP & (Family Nurse Practitioner). edu/nursing or callPractice (870) 245-5110. Doctor of Nursing (DNP) students mation on our programs, contact us must come to campus for a few preplanned events. 224, byWhether email students at conadmissions@ are looking for the traditional PM experience or to advance their current isit our college website at www.nursing. degree, UCA School of Nursing is an affordable and high quality option. For more information, please visit www.uca.edu/nursing.” PM

Gigi Flory Candice Rhea, Senior Recruiter Nursing Recruiter Tonya Toney, SeniorMedical Recruiter Jefferson Regional Center, Pine Bluff Jessica Cedillo, Recruiter Jefferson Regional Medical Center serves

Terri McKown, DNP, APRN, FNP-BC Rose Schlosser, M.Ed., Articulation Programs, to DNP and Post-Mas Terri McKown a 10-countyMSN, area, soBSN our nurses must be Professor of Nursing, Assistant Head CHI ST. VINCENT Arkansas Tech University (ATU) Department of ter’s DNP;Susan Wood, M.S., BSN Education Counselor; Jessica Burks, M.A.. prepared for a busy and diverse patient “CHIFrom St. Vincent Infirmary is Arkansas’s Nursing offers many options to acquire nursing base. neurology to cardiology, from first BSN Education Counselor ARKANSAS hospital to achieve Magnet status for profeslicensure. We work TECH with youUNIVERSITY and for you to surgery to orthopaedics, JRMC has a medical Arkansas Tech University (ATU) Department University of Central Arkansas sional nursing practice. As a health system with achieve the career choice you desire. From Listaff that represents 25 different specialties, of Nursing offers Nursing many options to acquire nurs- facilities located throughout the state, our focus censed Practical (LPN) or an Associate The University of Central Arkansas School nursing committed to educating so our of program offersismany different nursing ing licensure. We work yousister andcamfor you is the health and well-being of Arkansans. We Degree in Nursing (ADN)with at our opportunities for our staff to experience. We students at the undergraduate and graduate levels as leaders in the of to the tocareer choice you desire. of From have served Arkansas since 1888 with adelivery histopusachieve in Ozark, a pre-licensure Bachelor pride ourselves on patient-centered care and a Licensed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Associry of many firsts. When you join CHI St. Vincent quality the advancement the nursing profession. We Science inhealth Nursingcare (BSN) and Registered Nursing familyof atmosphere among our employees, andoffer ate ininNursing (ADN) at our sister cam- you will enjoy the career you deserve, the qual(RN)Degree degree Russellville. Want more? We both online and on-campus programs to accommodate the needs of we go the extra mile to help our nurses beour the diverse pus Ozark, to a pre-licensure Bachelor ofthey life you’ve been looking for, acompetitive comprehenofferin bridge programs for working men and of ity best can be. JRMC provides student populations: the on-campus BSN, online completion programs RN to Science Nursinga (BSN) Nursing sive benefits package for you and your family, women toinachieve higher Registered level of educapay and benefits, including additional compen(RN) degree in Russellville. Want more? We continued education opportunities, and much BSN, the online MSN, Nurse Educatorsation andforClinical nurse Leader tracks, tion: LPN to BSN at our Russellville campus, nurses with advanced degrees, and as well offer bridge for Come working men and more! To join our team of health care heroes, or our ADN toprograms BSN online. tour our Sima Practice six-month nurse residency program for nurses Nurse as the Post-Master’s Doctor of Nursing and BSN to DNP (Family women to achievehave a higher level SimNewB, of education: apply online at chistvincent.com/careers.” ulation Labs—we SimMom, just (DNP) out of school. Your success is our success, Practitioner). Doctor of Nursing students must come to campus fo LPN to BSN at our Russellville campus, orPractice our SimBaby, SimMan, multiple Nurse Anne’s, and and it all benefits our patients, who are the ADN to BSN online. Come tour our Simulation much ATU’s nursing faculty are experts students a fewmore! preplanned events. Whether are for the colleg reason we arelooking all in the health caretraditional profesLabs—we SimMom, SimNewB, SimBain their fieldhave adding breadth and depth to both sion. If you’reUCA interested in a nursing career atis an experience or to advance their current degree, School of Nursing by, multiple Nurseeducation. Anne’s, and much yourSimMan, classroom and clinical Come JRMC, contact me at florygi@jrmc.org. affordable, high-quality option more! nursing faculty are experts inwith their award-winning results. For more information join usATU’s at ATU...where “Every Student Counts.” fields adding and depth to both your please visitbreadth www.uca.edu/nursing. classroom and clinical education. Come join us at ATU...where “Every Student Counts.”

NATIONAL PARK COLLEGE

PM

Janice Ivers, MSN, RN, CNE Dean of Nursing & Health Sciences

2 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

Janice Park Ivers, MSN, CNE of National College is inRN, the business changing one student& at Health a time! Choosing Deanlives, of Nursing Sciences nursing as a career canCollege change the trajectory of National Park an individual’s life as well as their family’s lives. ParkNursing College is in and the abusiness of changing lives, one student at a ti We National offer a Practical program Registered Nursing programas with traditional Choosing nursing a acareer can Belinda change the trajectory of an individual’s life Nix, Academic Counselor track, as well as LPNfamily’s to RN options. National well as their lives. We offer a Practical Nursing program and a Regis Park College nursing programs have offered an UNIVERSITY ARKANSAS Nursing program with degree a traditional track, as well asOF LPN to RN options. Nati Associate of Science in Nursing since LITTLE ROCK 1976 and College a Practical nursing Nursing Certificate sincehave offered an Associate of Science in Nurs Park programs For over 50 years, the UA Little Rock De1958. Whether you just graduated from high degree since 1976 and a Practical Nursing Certificate since 1958. Whether partment of Nursing has inspired and guided school or are changing careers, National Park individuals toward the dynamic profession of Colle just can graduated fromyour high school College help you meet goals. Appli-or are changing careers, National Park nursing. Our faculty and staff are dedicated cation traditional entry goals. begins in canperiod help for you meet your Application period for traditional entryto begins January and runs through the first Monday in improving the health care of all Arkansans by January and runs through the first Monday in March for fall admission. Please March for fall admission. Please go to www. educating professional, thoughtful and compassionate nurses. We offer an Associate of Applied We wo to our website www.np.edu for more detailed admissions information. np.edu for more detailed admissions informaScience (AAS), BSN, LNP/Paramedic RN and tion.love We would love with to meet withand you get and get to meet you you on the path to meeting your toeducation and you on the path to meeting your education and online BSN completion program. Our advice for career goals. For more information on our programs please contact the Divisi career goals. For more information on our pro- students is to take ownership and get as much information as possible aboutAt theNational nursing profesNursing at (501) 760-4290 or atemail at jivers@np.edu. Park Coll grams please contact the Division of Nursing sion and degree options. Don’t be to ask (501) 760-4290 or email jivers@np.edu. student success isatour focus! At questions. Do this early and often!afraid Visit: www. National Park College, student success is our ualr.edu/nursing or email bknix@ualr.edu for adfocus! ditional informa-tion. Special Advertising Section


Caitlin Castellani, MSN, RN-BC, Nurse Recruit- Gigi Flory, Nursing Recruiter er and Nurse Residency Program Coordinator Gigi Flory

Susan Erickson, RN, MNSc, BC-NA, CHCR Senior Nurse Recruiting Manager

UAMS “Whether just graduated, pursuing a second REGIONAL Nursing JEFFERSON Recruiter career or looking for a new work family, nursJefferson RegionalMedical Medical Center serves CONWAY REGIONAL Jefferson Regional Center, PineaBluff 10-county area, so our nurses must be prepared es are the heart of UAMS. Working side by “At Conway Regional Health System, weJefferson Regional Medical Center serves for a busy and diverse patient base. From neu- side with the very best health care providers, McKownare accountable to the communities we servea 10-county area, so our nurses must be our nurses deliver compassionate care each rology to cardiology, from surgery to orthopaeto provide high quality, compassionate health nsas Tech University (ATU) Department of dics, JRMC a medical that represents forhas a busy andstaff diverse patient and every day to those in need. By joining the care services. We are very proud to have re-prepared ng offers many optionsawards to acquire nursing 25 different specialties, sotoour program offers ceived numerous and quality rankingsbase. From neurology cardiology, from UAMS Team, you will get the unique experience many different nursing opportunities for our of working in the state’s only academic medical sure. Weforwork withand youcompassion and for you to to oursurgery the care provided orthopaedics, JRMC hason a pamedical center. You and your immediate family can also staff to to experience. We pride ourselves patients.choice In 2020, recognized ve the career youwedesire. Fromover Li- 200staff that represents 25 different specialties, employees as exceptional performers based tient-centered care and a family atmosphere enjoy a generous tuition discount of up to 50% ed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Associate throughout the UA System. In addition to comour employees, and wedifferent go the extra our program offers many nursing upon their achievements in the field. In 2020,so among ee in Nursing at was our named sister campetitive salary and benefits, including 11 paid mile to help our nurses be the best they can be. Conway(ADN) Regional to the nation-opportunities for our staff to experience. We JRMC provides competitive pay and benefits, holidays with separate sick and vacation accrun Ozark,al Modern to a pre-licensure Bachelor Healthcare’s Best Placesofto Workpride ourselves on patient-centered care and a in Healthcare forRegistered the third consecutive year, as including additional compensation for nurses als, UAMS provides up to a 10% match to retirece in Nursing (BSN) Nursing family atmosphere among employees, and savings – five times what many employers with advanced degrees, and aour six-month nurse ment as Arkansas Business’ Best Places to Work degree well in Russellville. Want more? We program for nurses justour out of school.be offer. go the extra mile to help nurses the To join the more than 10,500 team memfor the fourth consecutive year. Additionally,weresidency bridge programs for working mentheand bers who have made a career for life, check Your success our JRMC success,provides and it all benefits Conway Regional was named Best Hospi-best they can isbe. competitive our patients, who are the reason we are all in out our website @ nurses.uams.edu or join our en to achieve a higher level of educatal in Arkansas in AY Magazine’s Best of 2020pay and benefits, including additional compenAwards. We looking for exceptional the health care profession. If you’re interested Facebook page @UAMSNurses!” LPN to BSN at ourare always Russellville campus, sation for nurses advanced careerwith at JRMC, contact degrees, me at flo- and performers who are dedicated to providing ex- in a nursing r ADN to BSN online. Come tour our Simrygi@jrmc.org. a six-month nurse residency program for nurses cellent care. We offer a smaller patient-to-nurse n Labs—we have ratio than canSimMom, be found inSimNewB, most metro hospitalsjust out of school. Your success is our success, along with a familyNurse atmosphere, career growthand it all benefits our patients, who are the aby, SimMan, multiple Anne’s, and opportunities, and tuition are reimbursement. more! ATU’s nursing faculty experts Wereason we are all in the health care profesare also on the Magnet Journey. Positions are ir field adding breadth and depth to both available in a variety of areas including Criticalsion. If you’re interested in a nursing career at classroom and clinical education. Come Care, Surgery, Oncology, Medical/Surgical JRMC, contact me at florygi@jrmc.org. and Women’s Services. If you would like to join us at ATU...where “Every Student Counts.” the Conway Regional Family, please visit our website at www.conwayregional.org. You may also contact Caitlin at Caitlin.castellani@ conwayregional.org or 501-513-5198.”

2020 NURSES GUIDE PUBLISHER

ALAN LEVERITT

NURSES GUIDE EDITOR DWAIN HEBDA

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING PHYLLIS A. BRITTON

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

BROOKE WALLACE, LEE MAJOR, TERRELL JACOB, KAITLYN LOONEY

Talent Acquisition team (L to R) Evie Rodgers, Laura Spies (Manager, Arkansas Children’s Northwest), Geo Cobb, Yvonne Pendergraft, Janise Sanders, Meggan Spicer

ARKANSAS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Children are at the center of everything we do. Since Arkansas Children’s is the only hospital system in the state dedicated solely to caring for children, we are able to uniquely shape the landscape of pediatric care in Arkansas, which is important now more than ever. Arkansas Children’s Hospital has joined the elite 6 percent of hospitals in the world that have Magnet Status. Arkansas Children’s offers a wide range of opportunities for nurses, from direct patient care to staff education, research, administration, nursing informatics and much more! To learn more about a rewarding career serving as a Champion for Children, visit archildrens.org or call us at (501) 364-1398. Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 3


E SCHOOLMEET & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS THE SCHOOL & HOSPITAL RECRUITERS

*use same photo Ken Duncan, Recruiter, Conway Joni Stephenson, Recruiter, Manager Michelle S. Odom, RN, MSN (pictured, third from left) April Robinson, Recruiter, Little Rock Hospitals Director of Recruitment and Retention Whitney Brewer, Recruiter, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Little Rock North Little Rock Hospital Children are at the center of everything we do. Arkansas Children’s is the only h Kelli Hopkins, Recruiter, Regional system in the state solely dedicated to caring for children, which allows our orga Hospitals (not pictured) tion to uniquely shape the landscape of pediatric care in Arkansas. As Champio Baptist Health Medical Center Children, Arkansas Children’s Hospital has joined the elite 6 percent of hospital Our belief atYarberry, BaptistChief Health is that we are a Jennifer Nursing Officer healing ministry. We provide quality patient Belindaworld Nix that have Magnet Status. Arkansas Children’s offers a wide range of oppo Jennifer Yarberry nities for nurses, from direct patient care to staff education, research, administra PINNACLE POINTE BEHAVIORAL Counselor Chief Nursing Officer care services to all Arkansans with a caring Academic SYSTEM UA Little Rock informatics and much more! To learn more about a rewarding career se Pinnacle HEALTHCARE Pointe Behavioral Healthcare System, nursing and comforting heart. That is why we are the UA Little Rock Depart-visit www.archildrens.org or call us at (501) 364-1 Pinnacle Little Rock Pointe Behavioral Healthcare Sys- For over as50a years, Champion for Children, Arkansans’ forto their healthdelivering care needs. are Pinnacle Pointe Behavioral Healthcare System tem is choice committed consistently a ment of Nursing has inspired and guided e high is committed to consistently delivering a system We have a variety ofbehavioral nursing opportunities, system of quality health care with individuals toward the dynamic profession of ces. nursing. Our faculty and staff are dedicated to ofLevel qualityto health care with integchildren and in concert from aintegrity IIIbehavioral NICU to aadolescents 90-bed Critical Care merrity totheir children and adolescents concert and improving the health care of all Arkansans by with parents, caregivers, in guardians area. community Baptist offers The topguardians quality and bene- educating professional, thoughtful and comcare with their Health parents, caregivers, professionals. team at Pinnacle fits for employees. We look for nurses who s. In community professionals. The team atand PinnaPointe Hospital is both passionate highly passionate nurses. We offer an Associate of ees cle Pointe Hospital is both passionate and experienced. Our dedication to the highest think critically and are compassionate and Applied Science (AAS), BSN, LNP/Paramedic heir highly experienced. Our dedication the standard of quality helped usoffer attainto presti- to RN and online BSN completion program. service-oriented. We want to athe “World been highestGovernor’s standard ofQuality qualityAchievement helped us attain the Our advice for students is to take ownership gious Award. Class”This environment for everyone. Please apply Work and get as much information as possible about prestigious Quality Achievement awardGovernor’s recognizes Pinnacle Pointe HospiWork Award. This award recognizes Pinnacle onlinetal’s at baptist-health.com. commitment and practice of qualityPointe princi- the nursing profession and degree options.

We are Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Do this early Hospital’s commitment and practice quality ples through a thorough process of of excellence. ers who Visit and often! Visit: www.ualr.edu/nursing or principles throughtoaapply: thorough process of our website pinnaclepointehospire. We tal.com/career-opportunities/ email bknix@ualr.edu for additional informaexcellence. Visit our website to apply: pinnan can tion. clepointehospital.com/career-opportunities/ with portuAshley Davis, MNSc, RN, PhD(c) e also Executive Director ailable Arkansas Center for Nursing, Inc. Care, The Arkansas Center for Nursing was started nd by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson oin Foundation in 2011 in response to the recomit our mendations that were published in the Institute of ou Medicine’s “Future of Nursing” report. The ACN llani@ was established to promote a culture of health for 8. the citizens of Arkansas by advancing nursing

education, practice, leadership and workforce development. CAN offers several different leadership training programs in working toward their mission to empower and equip the current and Brenda Trigg, DNP, GNP, RN, CNE future nursing workforce, including the 40 Nurse Director of Nursing Leaders Under 40 award program and the BSN Young Leaders program. Individual memberTerri McKown BAPTIST ship of ACN is free. You can find membership Brenda Trigg,OUACHITA DNP, GNP, RN, CNE UNIVERSITY Arkansas University (ATU) Department of information, as well asTech information regarding Director Our of Nursing innovative dual degree RN-to-BSN pro- ACN programs andoffers workforce reports, on their Nursing many options to acquire nursing Ouachita University, gramBaptist pairs the strengths of Ouachita Baptist website, www.arcenterfornursing.org. licensure. We work with you and for you to University with the strengths of Baptist Health Arkadelphia achieve the career choice you desire. From LiCollege Little Rock. Ouachita is a nationallyOur innovative dual degree RN-to-BSN proranked liberal arts college founded in 1886 censed Practical Nursing (LPN) or an Associate gram with pairsa mission the strengths of Ouachita Baptist of fostering a love of God and Degree in Nursing (ADN) at our sister cama lovewith of learning. And Baptist Health College University the strengths of Baptist Health pus in Ozark, to a pre-licensure Bachelor of LittleLittle RockRock. is a recognized leader health care College Ouachita is ain nationaleducation since 1920 and an integral part of Science in Nursing (BSN) Registered Nursing ly-ranked liberal college founded in 1886 Baptist Health,arts the largest health care system in (RN) degree in Russellville. Want more? We with aArkansas. missionLearn of fostering a love of God and how you can earn two degrees offer bridge programs for working men and & BSN) in 4And yearsBaptist at obu. edu/nursing or a love(AAS of learning. Health College women to achieve a higher level of educacall (870) Little Rock is a245-5110. recognized leader in health

care education and an integral 4 OCTOBER 2020since ARKANSAS1920 TIMES part of Baptist Health, the largest health care system in Arkansas. Learn how you can earn

Special Advertising Section tion: LPN to BSN at our Russellville campus, or our ADN to BSN online. Come tour our Simulation Labs—we have SimMom, SimNewB,

Gigi Flory Nursing Recruiter Jefferson Regional Medical Ce Jefferson Regional Medical Ce a 10-county area, so our nurs prepared for a busy and dive base. From neurology to card surgery to orthopaedics, JRMC staff that represents 25 differe so our program offers many d opportunities for our staff to e pride ourselves on patient-cen family atmosphere among our we go the extra mile to help o best they can be. JRMC prov pay and benefits, including ad sation for nurses with advance a six-month nurse residency p just out of school. Your succes


HEROES. #MORETHANEVER

Now more than ever, nurses are the heart of Arkansas Children’s Hospital. Join our team of Champions for Children. Nurses at Arkansas Children’s Hospital experience: • A focus on safety for employees, patients and families • Coordinated and collaborative teamwork that provides the highest level of family-centered care • Compassionate care for a wide range of patients, ages, diagnoses and severity of illness • A team that strives for excellence in a kid-savvy environment View job openings at archildrens.org/careers EOE, Drug-Free, Nicotine-Free, Inclusive Workplace

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 5


2020: YEAR OF THE NURSE DISTINGUISHED PAST, UNLIMITED FUTURE By Dwain Hebda

UA Little Rock Nursing students review simulation data.

N

urses are America. Comprising a melting pot of shapes, sizes, colors, ages and specialties, nurses are the first line of defense against the darkness of disease; they’re at your bedside, checking over you at night, the steadying hand on a loved one’s shoulder. Nurses are fearless: They are the first to stand a post in times of pandemic and the last to go home, bone-weary, at the end of a long shift. Nurses stand united; when one is attacked or overwhelmed by sickness or tragedy, their sisters and brothers in scrubs come running to the rescue. Nurses are tough: tough enough to turn a patient, tackle an emergency, look death in the eye. They are in schools, clinics and physicians’ offices; they work in factories and government offices and homeless shelters. They leave their children to watch over yours. They mourn the loss of your loved one as their own. They’ll get up and do it again tomorrow. When 2020 dawned, no one could have predicted the coronavirus sweeping America and what it would demand of this time-honored profession. And yet there were the nurses, parking fear at the door, walking every day into the teeth of the pandemic. Nursing had always been a dangerous and exhausting profession, 2020 just pushed it to the forefront for all to see. What we saw were heroes. No one wants the coronavirus, but since it’s here, let’s call it like it is: If ever there was a way

6 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

to spotlight the necessity of nursing in this, the International Year of the Nurse, the pandemic is doing that and more. “From our first days in nursing school, nurses are taught two basic concepts of care: One, care for the whole person, and two, prevent the spread of diseases and infection,” Dr. Ashley Davis, executive director of the Arkansas Center for Nursing, said. “Nurses have made incredible improvements in care along the way, but all of them can be traced back to these two foundational principles. “In the polio epidemic, it was nurses who changed the standard of care and discovered the benefits of range of motion exercises and movement to improve the health outcomes of children with polio. It was also nurses who discovered that sunlight could cure jaundice in infants. And nurses were seen as mavericks for their holistic approach to caring for patients with AIDS. While these accomplishments have had industry-shifting impacts, they were achieved by nurses’ abilities to look at care from a wider lens and to understand the basics of infection control.” Many of the foundational concepts upon which nursing was built were established two centuries ago by Florence Nightingale, an English nurse who is considered the mother of the modern profession. “Florence Nightingale organized and formalized training of women to become nurses,” Catherine Buzbee, care manager at the Special Advertising Section

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, said. “Prior to her development of the professional nursing role, anyone off the street could call themselves a nurse. Her passion to create professional standards for education, behavior and performance of duties is the bedrock of the current nursing profession. “Nurses still recite the ‘Nightingale Pledge’ on graduation as a link to our professional heritage. Nurses hold themselves to this standard. We still think of Florence Nightingale and all those that came after her as modern nurses carrying out our duties. It inspires us to perform our duty to our patients as a calling and not merely a job.” So profound was Nightingale’s impact, in fact, that in other years, International Nurses Day is annually held on her birthday, May 12. International Year of the Nurse and Midwife 2020, as designated by the World Health Organization, coincides with Nightingale’s 200th birthday. Nightingale’s attitudes on patient advocacy and her courageous stance as the leading health care reformer of her day are still sources of admiration among today’s nurses. “Florence laid the groundwork for us, she gave us guidelines to follow,” Janet Smith, associate degree program director with National Park College in Hot Springs, said. “She was a statistician who used science to improve the outcomes of her patients. As a trailblazer, she laid the path for amazing nurses who broke down


WHO WAS FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE?

social barriers. “Today, we are not just order-takers or followers or who only apply bandages; we are professionals like any other group. We have a body of knowledge that is technical and based upon scientific knowledge. We are managed and held accountable by a community of peers, including professional organizations. And we are a service organization that abides by a code of ethics. That all started with her.” For all of its history and heroism, nursing has struggled for decades to attract enough new nurses into the profession. This matters because multiple studies have shown adequate, informed staffing is a key element in patient outcomes. And because nurses are the primary advocates for patient care and improved protocols, the low numbers stifles innovation as well. “As a result of the Nightingale legacy, nurses know the role they play in preventing illness and contributing to evidence that shapes policy,” Dr. Lisa Harless, associate professor of nursing at Arkansas Tech University, said. “This legacy is reinforced in both classroom and clinical settings. Students are educated on how to read, interpret and conduct research. They are challenged to implement evidence-based practices. In the workplace, nurses can contribute through application in patient care and education, producing evidence as a researcher, and participation in organizational committees to generate, modify and evaluate policy. “I am grateful to be a part of a noble profession and privileged to be able to educate both current and future registered nurses. We want our students to influence the communities in which they live and work. We teach them how to use nursing processes in any setting. Although COVID-19 has forced some significant changes in how we teach and learn, it will not change the legacy of nursing to serve others.” There has arguably never been a better time to become a nurse, from level of training to job opportunities and stability to options for building a meaningful career in virtually any environment and medical specialty. That is perhaps the most substantial legacy of Nightingale’s contribution, to see the profession reach the level of respect and professionalism that it has. “Florence was a trailblazer. She took a profession that was not for the respectable and turned it into one of the most respected and trusted careers ever,” Shelly Washburn, case manager for the Family Medical Center, UAMS Health, said. “Her integrity and drive lives on in all of us as we fight to help our patients get well with all the dignity we can provide for them. “All nurses want to perpetuate Florence’s dream. We want to learn everything we can. We want to try everything we can. And we want to teach everything we can. This legacy of knowledge passed down from Florence and all of her heirs is our gift to pass on to future nurses.”

When asked to describe the impact Florence Nightingale had on the nursing profession, Barbara Erby, nurse manager for CHI St. Vincent Infirmary in Little Rock, pulled no punches. “Florence Nightingale was a fire starter,” Erby said. “She opened the doors for nursing advancements that have elevated us to a level that makes nursing one of the most trusted professions today.” Considered the mother of modern nursing, Nightingale is one of the most famous figures the profession has ever known. She was born into British wealth and privilege on May 12, 1820, and grew up in the Victorian era, when women of a certain class were expected to live a domestic and quiet life. But from a young age, she determined her life would follow a radically different course. By the time of her death in 1910 at age 90, she had changed the course of medicine the world over in ways that are still foundational to health care today. At 16, Nightingale had a religious awakening and was convinced a God-given purpose for her life lay in helping others. She chose nursing, a decision that met with her parents’ disapproval, given the society of the day frowned on a nursing career for people in her social class. Nevertheless, Nightingale trained at the prestigious Kaiserswerth nursing school in Germany. She set an early example for health care for all, caring for governesses and prostitutes alike in her early nursing roles. The transformative event of her life was being dispatched during the Crimean War to the Barrack Hospital at Scutari, where British soldiers experienced abhorrent conditions. In three deployments over two years, Nightingale forced operational changes to reduce unimaginable suffering and death, including sanitation processes, reducing overcrowding, segregating contagious patients from the general population, insulating walls against the cold, increasing ventilation and improving food. These simple acts, commonplace today, were revolutionary and dropped the death rate in

Scutari from 43 percent to 2 percent in just a few months. In doing so, she set the template for modern nursing and hospital procedures. Despite these results, Nightingale was frequently at odds with her superiors, mostly because they didn’t like taking orders from a woman, especially one as headstrong and opinionated as she. But Nightingale did it anyway, documenting patient outcomes in mathematician-like detail. By the end of the war, she had compiled data that showed more British soldiers died from disease linked to sanitary conditions — as much as 10 times over — than from battle wounds. Her groundbreaking statistical analysis (which included the invention of the pie chart) led to widespread reform in the way hospitals were run in Britain and, over time, worldwide. Throughout her life, Nightingale would continue her statistical analyses on various aspects of health care as one weapon in her tireless campaign to improve health standards. She founded the first professional training school for nurses — the Nightingale Training School at St. Thomas’ Hospital — in 1860. Her graduates, dubbed Nightingale Nurses, were recruited to start additional nursing schools all over the world. She published more than 200 books, reports and pamphlets on hospital planning and organization, with innovations ranging from nurses’ uniforms to wards that helped in infection control. She also lobbied for nurses in wartime to be deemed noncombatants, allowing them to administer to the wounded on the battlefield, an effort that inspired the founding of the International Red Cross. Combined, her contributions helped shift the very image of nursing to the respected career it is today. Her constant push for quality, accessible health care for the poor, mentally ill and other societal outcasts changed the philosophical landscape of medicine as a human right. SOURCES: Smithsonian Magazine, History. com, Florence-Nightingale.co.uk

THE NIGHTINGALE PLEDGE I solemnly pledge myself before God and in the presence of this assembly to pass my life in purity and to practice my profession faithfully. I shall abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous, and shall not take or knowingly administer any harmful drug. I shall do all in my power to maintain and elevate the standard of my profession, and will hold in confidence all personal matters committed to my keeping and all family affairs coming to my knowledge in the practice of my calling. With loyalty will I endeavor to aid the physician in his work, and devote myself to the welfare of those committed to my care. Source: Vanderbilt School of Nursing Special Advertising Section

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CHOOSING THE RIGHT NURSING SCHOOL

The key to producing the next generation of qualified nurses lies with top-quality education. Arkansas is blessed with many nursing schools, but how do you know which one is right for you? Donna Gullette, associate dean for practice at the UAMS College of Nursing, offers these suggestions.

ASK QUESTIONS This is vital in selecting any institution of higher learning. Some good questions to ask are: Does the curriculum match my career goals? How long does it take to complete the program? How large are the classes? Does the school offer scholarships? Are resources available for students who are having trouble passing courses? What is the student-to-faculty ratio? Nursing education is demanding, so you need to find a place that fits your needs and meets your criteria. VITAL CREDENTIALS One good measurement of a nursing school is its graduation pass rate on the NCLEX or other professional certification exam. These tests are necessary for nurses to be licensed, and if the pass rate is high, it means the quality of in-

struction is, too. Also, ask about the school’s accreditation; you should always choose a school accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education or Nursing Education Accreditation. A school should be fully accredited and not on probation. CHECK THE TECH New technology arrives almost every day, from new simulation equipment to new Blackboard formats for courses. Textbooks now are available online. All exams are taken online instead of with paper and pencil exams. Faculty and students are always trying to stay ahead of new technology, which can sometimes be difficult. Keep in mind, online courses have some hidden issues to consider. Timeliness of instructors responding to students’ questions can be slow-

er, and online courses may take more hours than originally advertised. Also, some courses require a lab component to learn skills that can be very difficult to complete digitally. THINK LONG-TERM An associate or bachelor’s degree can serve a person well, but many nurses opt to continue their education to learn more skills, increase pay and provide more opportunities for advancement. Nationwide, the move is toward graduate school, transitioning from a master’s degree to a doctorate of nursing practice (DNP). The UAMS College of Nursing offers a pathway from MNSc to DNP to allow students a seamless transition to become a DNP-prepared nurse practitioner.

I am a St. Vincent Nurse. Nancy has been a nurse for 30 years and continues to choose CHI St. Vincent as her work family.

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“I’m St. Vincent strong because I have found a place I can call part of my family. I truly love my work and being a part of the CHI St. Vincent vascular team has been the most rewarding position of my career so far!”

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WHY NURSING? Throughout this magazine, you will read about the many career directions a nursing education can take you. But why should you really consider nursing? We asked a panel of experts to weigh in on the 10 most compelling reasons to make nursing your life’s work.

1. EARNING POTENTIAL According to Nursesalaryguide.net, average pay in Arkansas for a licensed practical nurse is $38,000; for a registered nurse it’s $59,000; and for a nurse practitioner, $95,000. “How much you make will vary, depending upon the type of nursing you go into, the work environment and the shift you work. But, in general, for the cost of a two-year program, the earning potential for nurses can provide a household with a stable income.” Janet Smith, director, Associate Degree Program National Park College 2. FLEXIBILITY OF SCHEDULE “Nurses can choose any schedule they want. If you are a 9-to-5 kind of person, you got it. If you would rather work nights, done. If you want to stay home during the week and make really good money working two shifts on the weekend, no problem. The possibilities are endless.” Melissa Drake-Rowe, clinical assistant professor UAMS College of Nursing 3. VARIETY OF WORK/TASKS “In nursing, you are frequently multitasking, learning new skills, educating yourself and patients. There are many different areas you can work in, such as floor nursing, clinic nursing, travel nursing, home health, hospice, rehabilitation hospitals, nursing homes, management, education, schools, infusion clinics, etc. During any given day, I use many work skills, including starting IVs, drawing labs, accessing ports, calculating medications prior to administration, administering a variety of IV medications including chemotherapy, educating patients on medications, dressing changes, wound care and much more.” Eryn Zimmerebner, Short Stay Outpatient Unit Conway Regional Health System

4. JOB STABILITY “There is a shortage of nurses and advanced practice nurses that remains in our state and nation. We need nurse leaders in the hospital and community to fill this gap. Additionally, we continue to face a significant primary care shortage in our state, especially in rural communities. We need more nurses to fill the primary care gap and improve health for all Arkansans.” Teresa Whited, associate dean of Academic Programs UAMS College of Nursing 5. PERSONAL SATISFACTION “Nursing is a profession where you are valued and trusted by families, parents, doctors and co-workers. Every day you have an opportunity to be the difference in patients’ and families’ lives. What could be more satisfying than to give to those who need it most? Smiles, laughs, praises, hugs and cards are only the beginning of the cherished moments that happen on a daily basis.” Kayla Harrington, RNV-Neonatal ICU UAMS Health 6. EMPLOYEE BENEFITS “There are always job perks and benefits. These will depend on the job, but as a nurse educator, I have off every holiday, spring break, Christmas vacation and during summer vacation. It is a great job!” Janice Ivers, dean of Nursing & Health Science National Park College 7. RESPECTED PROFESSION “Nurses are the backbone of any medical facility. We’re on the front line. We learn about patients’ medical and psychological health, make a care plan to better their health, and assist with other medical personnel to let the patient feel at ease. Everyone remembers their nurse; we either make or break a patient’s stay as a good experience or a bad one.” Nancy Haese, Vascular Access CHI St. Vincent

8. LOCATION OPTIONS “Clinics, hospitals, surgery centers, schools, educational settings, courtrooms, sales offices, conference centers, political arenas and corporate America are common places to find nurses. In nursing, you can know what you want to do and achieve it, or you can see where the career takes you. Either way, you’re in for an adventure.” Holly Langster University of Central Arkansas 9. CONTINUING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES/LIFELONG LEARNING “Nurses have several ways to continue learning throughout their careers. Obtaining national certification in your area of specialty demonstrates your dedication to excellence in practice and provides a wealth of continuing education credit opportunities. Attending professional conferences allows you to network with experts on a particular facet of nursing or medicine. Being a member of a professional nursing organization, particularly if it is associated with your area of practice, will give you access to contemporary research findings.” Kayla Bond, Cardiac Nurse Conway Regional Health System 10. OPPORTUNITIES FOR ADVANCEMENT “Traditionally, one would have thought nursing was for the bedside only, taking care of people inside a hospital who are very sick. Over the last 10 years or so, nursing has been given new opportunities for not only the bedside nurse, but also for nurses who want to work in a clinic, with medical technology or many different specialties. The options are endless; being a nurse, you can work anywhere.” Rhonda Reed, quality management coordinator UAMS Health

1783 JAMES DERHAM, A SLAVE FROM NEW ORLEANS, BUYS HIS FREEDOM WITH MONEY EARNED WORKING AS A NURSE. HE WOULD LATER BECOME THE FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN PHYSICIAN IN THE UNITED STATES. 1859 FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE PUBLISHES NOTES ON NURSING, THE WORLD’S FIRST NURSES MANUAL. Sources: University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Women’s Achievements in Medical History, Harris School of Business, NursingOnPoint.com, American Sentinel University, Nurse.org, University of California San Francisco

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NURSING NEWS

Stop the Bleed Instructors from Arkansas Tech University in Russellville (left) teach high schoolers life-saving skills. UAMS Health personnel (right) pose with the organization’s new COVID-19 mobile testing van. ARKANSAS TECH UNIVERSITY More than 290 Russellville School District students are certified in bleeding control techniques thanks to a fall 2019 initiative led by two members of the Arkansas Tech University faculty. Dr. Cheryl Monfee, professor of nursing, and Dr. Carey Laffoon, associate professor of nursing, worked with community partners and ATU alumni to help the Russellville School District meet the provisions of Act 245 of the 92nd Arkansas General Assembly, requiring Arkansas students in grades 9-12 to receive this training. “Stop the Bleed” is a national program launched by the White House in 2015 in recognition of the fact that bleeding is the leading cause of death from injury. Fifteen ATU Bachelor of Science in Nursing students completing their leadership and management clinical rotation participated in the training as associate instructors. Additional community service efforts and educational outreach are in the works to aid school districts in their pursuit of Act 245 compliance. CHI ST. VINCENT HEALTH CHI St. Vincent Infirmary ranks first in cardiology, heart surgery and orthopedics among Arkansas hospitals, according to the latest Best Regional Hospital rankings released by U.S. News & World Report. The magazine also ranked the Little Rock hospital first in gastroenterology, geriatrics and pulmonology among Arkansas hospitals. The Mission: Lifeline® Gold Plus Receiving Quality Achievement Award has been presented to CHI St. Vincent Infirmary for implementing specific quality improvement measures outlined by the American Heart Association for the treatment of patients who suffer severe heart attacks. CHI St. Vincent Infirmary’s protocols reestablish blood flow to blocked arteries in heart attack patients coming into the hospital directly or by transfer from another facility, a critical step to prevent death. CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs has been named 10 OCTOBER 2020

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as one of the 2020 Best Places to Work in Best Companies Group’s eighth annual survey and awards program. The program identifies, recognizes and honors the best employers in Arkansas, benefiting the state’s economy, workforce and businesses.

northwest corner of the state. Arkansas’s Marshallese population is second only to that of the Republic of the Marshall Islands itself, and has grown exponentially over the past few decades after enactment of the Compact of Free Association between the United States and the RMI.

CONWAY REGIONAL HEALTH SYSTEM Conway Regional Health System has partnered with the University of Central Arkansas to provide tuition assistance to registered nurses interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree. The RN-to-BSN Advancement program pays 100 percent of tuition upfront, eliminating all out-ofpocket tuition costs for the student.

UAMS HEALTH UAMS Health recently put into service a van to perform community COVID-19 testing. The vehicle was purchased with a $61,000 grant from the Blue & You Foundation, the charitable arm of Arkansas Blue Cross and Blue Shield, and is operated by the UAMS Office of Population Health. The Bank of America Foundation also awarded $76,500 to UAMS to equip and supply the mobile unit. The mobile clinical team consists of trained and experienced nurses and medical professionals from UAMS’ COVID-19 triage program in the Integrated Medicine Service Line. They register, swab and collect testing specimens for up to 200 community members at each site visited. Patients do not have to get out of their vehicle, and all mobile unit staff and volunteers wear appropriate personal protective equipment. UAMS was recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the top hospital in the nation for ear, nose and throat care. It was also cited as the best hospital in Arkansas in several areas, including COPD, knee and hip replacement, colon cancer and lung cancer surgery and heart failure treatment. The UAMS Health Women’s Center opened in August. Many services for lifelong women’s care are now located under one roof, including care for routine and high-risk pregnancies; Arkansas’s only Centering Pregnancy program; gynecology services, including routine checkups, labs, ultrasounds and a uterine fibroid clinic; menopause treatment services; genetic and nutritional counseling; and behavioral health services.

UAMS COLLEGE OF NURSING UAMS recognized recipients of the Dr. Edith Irby Jones Excellence in Diversity and Inclusion Awards. These awards honor the legacy of Dr. Jones, who demonstrated ongoing courage in breaking racial and gender barriers in her commitment to provide health care to those in need. Two College of Nursing members were nominated for the award — Jessica Ellis, Ph.D., associate dean of Administration and Finance; and Ava Coleman, assistant director of Student Enrollment — for their achievements and personal commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion. In addition, Mary Davidson, a UAMS College of Nursing student, was nominated in the student category. Dr. Laura Hays, an assistant professor within the College of Nursing Science Department, heads two piloted research studies investigating the role of genetic variants in the disproportionately higher rates of diseases in the Marshallese population in Arkansas. Hays has two funded pilot research studies: one by the UAMS College of Nursing and one by the UAMS Vice Chancellor for Research and Innovation. Future National Institutes of Health grant funding is pending. There are an estimated 15,000 Marshallese individuals living in Arkansas, mostly in the Special Advertising Section


UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS LITTLE ROCK The success of nursing students is the highest priority of UA Little Rock. All UA Little Rock School of Nursing courses have a faculty/student mentor component. The nursing school also makes various study tools available to students through a lending library. These resources assist students with study and test-taking skills. In addition, study sessions and workshops are offered outside of scheduled class times based on student needs. These measures have been effective in boosting student retention. The Blue & You Foundation for a Healthier Arkansas presented UA Little Rock with a $68,357 grant to support continuing education for health care professionals. UA Little Rock welcomed six new nursing faculty members: Hunter Spence, Shelia Brooks, Carolyn Hunter-Layne, LaKeisha Falls, Judy Staley and Ferrin Michalek. Meanwhile, Cindy Gilbert retired in May after 22 years of service to the Pat Walker School of Nursing. Instructors Janet Fletcher, Kimberly Porter and Josh Young were nominated for the Arkansas Nurse Educator of the Year Award.

The School of Nursing is represented by faculty members on 13 university- and college-level committees, including several leadership positions. Faculty members are also represented and active in various national and state nursing organizations. In 2019, nursing school faculty were invited to present at local, state and national conferences in Canada, Kentucky, Georgia, Missouri, Arizona and Arkansas. UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL ARKANSAS University officials and guests gathered to break ground last fall on UCA’s new Integrated Health Sciences Building. The 80,000-squarefoot, four-story facility will be home to the School of Nursing and the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, along with the Nabholz Center for Healthcare Simulation and Interprofessional Teaching Center to be utilized by the entire College of Health and Behavioral Sciences. The integrated design of the building aims to foster an interprofessional educational environment that is most conducive to replicating real-life health care scenarios. The third-floor Nabholz Center for Healthcare Simulation offers a state-of-the-art simulation lab that will

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more than double the space of the current simulation lab, providing students with lifelike training scenarios. Primary funding for the project is provided through a $37.7 million bond appropriation by the UCA Board of Trustees, plus an additional $5 million to be raised through a capital campaign. The university’s Bachelor of Science in Nursing to Doctor of Nursing Practice (BSN to DNP) program was ranked among the top programs in the nation by rntobsnprogram.com. The award recognized both the school’s online and on-campus curriculum. UCA’s Doctor of Nursing Practice to Nurse Practitioner program (DNP to NP) has been noted for affordability, including Top 5 Affordable Online DNP-NP Programs, and Top 20 Affordable Online Post-Master’s NP Certificate Programs, both by npschools.com. The UCA School of Nursing donated PPE items to Conway Regional Health System in April to aid in its efforts to protect nurses and other staff during the coronavirus pandemic. The donated items included 150 isolation gowns, 100 surgical masks, 11,600 gloves and 200 surgical caps.

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NURSING SPECIALTIES IN DEMAND Bedside care is only one application of a nurse’s skill. The range of jobs and specialties nurses occupy are many, probably more than you realize. Every year the Arkansas Times Nurses Guide surveys working nurses and nurse educators to identify a few of the fulfilling careers that are in particularly high demand.

Nurse educators are in high demand and essential to creating the next generation of nurses, like those in this class at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia. NURSE EDUCATOR At the very basic level, nurse educators are responsible for teaching future nurses. However, these professionals also fulfill a variety of roles in designing, implementing and evaluation nursing curriculum. “Nurse educators serve as leaders and advocates for both the nursing profession and the patients and families they serve,” Pamela Ashcraft, a professor at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway, said. “The goal of all nurse educators is to teach skills and disseminate knowledge necessary to providing the best possible patient care.” Nurse educators play a vital role in ensuring the nursing profession continues to move forward. They enjoy dynamic career options for where they work and what audiences they teach, Dr. Larronda Rainey with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing said. “Nurse educators are employed primarily in hospitals and educational institutions; however, their education and training allows them to work in various locations,” she said. “A few of the nurse educator responsibilities include teaching, advising, mentoring, inspiring, leading and serving others. “Nurse educators are essential in preparing future nurses. Without nurse educators, the number of nurses overall would decline, creating deficiencies in patients’ health care services.” Basic qualifications in this field generally take 12 OCTOBER 2020

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the same amount of time to earn as it takes to become a registered nurse, but most instructors choose to expand their credentials. “At minimum, you must be a registered nurse; however, most nurse educators complete a master’s degree in nursing,” Dr. Julie B. Meaux, professor and Undergraduate Program coordinator for UCA, said. “Many nurse educators who teach in colleges and universities have a terminal degree, of which there are two in nursing. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is a research-focused degree and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) is a clinical-focused degree.” With the retirement of many baby boomer-age nurse educators, job opportunities are at an all-time high. “Yes, there are jobs!” Janice Ivers, dean of Nursing and Health Sciences for National Park College in Hot Springs, said. “A nurse educator can wear many hats, so the potential to earn a good paycheck is certainly there. As with other professions, the further you advance in your education, the better your chances for an increased salary.” Brenda Trigg, director of nursing at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, said demand is particularly high right now as the medical field strives to attract more nurses to all segments of the health care industry. “As the nursing shortage continues across the nation, the work of the nurse educator in the university setting is even more important,” she said. “According to AACN Baccalaureate and Special Advertising Section

Graduate Programs in Nursing, tens of thousands of qualified nursing students are turned away from nursing school, in part, due to a shortage of nursing faculty. “Nurse educators who teach at the baccalaureate level have the privilege to prepare nursing graduates for entry into professional practice as generalist nurses. Now more than ever, the nursing profession needs these educators.” ADVANCED PRACTICAL PSYCH NURSE A psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) is an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) who provides mental health services to individuals and families. These health care professionals work in a wide variety of settings, including outpatient clinics, community health centers, private practices, emergency departments, hospitals, schools, prisons and substance abuse programs. They may also serve as consultants or educators. “Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners assess, diagnose, treat and manage mental health problems and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and substance use disorders,” Carol Campbell, clinical instructor with UAMS College of Nursing, said. “They may conduct psychotherapy, prescribe medications, order and interpret labs, and provide a broad range of diagnostic and therapeutic services. With a focus on improving mental health care across the lifespan, PMHNPs are committed to promoting mental health through


preventive health care.” To become a PMHNP, students first earn their RN license and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. In addition, completion of an approved Master of Science in Nursing (MSN), Master of Nursing Science (MNSc) or Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is required to become a PMHNP. “Completion of an approved PMHNP program qualifies a graduate to take the PMHNP certification examination to become board certified through the American Nurses Credentialing Center,” Campbell said. “After successfully passing the certification exam, the PMHNP may apply for an APRN license and prescriptive authority through their state board of nursing. “As a PMHNP myself and co-coordinator of the PMHNP Program in the UAMS College of Nursing, I would highly recommend candidates gain experience working as a psychiatric nurse before applying for a PMHNP program. Obtaining experience in mental health is critical as it prepares you for future PMHNP practice.” As more attention is paid to mental health issues in general, the important work of mental health care workers has become increasingly more visible. “One of the major concerns for individuals with mental health issues is access to mental health care professionals,” Campbell said. “Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners are well-equipped to provide that care, as well as preventive strategies. And, PMHNPs are essential advocates for individuals and families in need of mental health services.” COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING Like many nursing specialties, community-based nurses are in very high demand and enjoy a variety of work environments. Practitioners in this area of nursing also get the additional self-satisfaction of directly helping improve health conditions and wellness for the entire community. “A community-based nurse is a specialty nursing profession, focusing on providing care to families and individuals within the community where they live, work and function,” Dr. Stephanie Trotter, clinical professor with UAMS College of Nursing, said. “A CBN manages acute and chronic conditions of families and individuals from birth to end of life, and places an emphasis on disease prevention and health promotion. They achieve this in person and through the use of telehealth. “A CBN can work in a wide variety of unique work locations. Some examples include a local health department, client homes as a home health nurse, schools, prison facilities, client workplaces as an occupational health nurse, even places of worship and community centers. When telehealth is available and utilized, it can

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE. ONLINE FLEXIBILITY. LIFE-CHANGING IMPACT. Grounded in a love of God and a love of learning, Ouachita’s BSN program offers TWO TRACKS to prepare nurses with excellence and compassion. LEARN ON CAMPUS at Ouachita and Baptist Health College Little Rock for a start-to-finish nursing education, earning both BSN and AASN degrees. Or for those who already have an RN license or diploma, STUDY FULLY ONLINE to take your career to the next level.

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HERO SPOTLIGHT

THEN AND NOW

Dr. Patricia Cowan, dean UAMS College of Nursing It is crucial that nurses commit to lifelong learning in order to improve the health of our citizens. You will definitely learn more after you graduate from nursing school than you learned while in school. During my undergraduate nursing education, I’d never heard of HIV or AIDS. As a new graduate, “clean technique” was commonly used for dressing changes. Gloves were sparsely used, and I had no concerns about an exposure to body fluids, whether caring for a patient post-operatively or going back to the delivery room to care for a premature baby. About that time, we were just starting to hear about a new disease with no cure that was being diagnosed in San Francisco. Six years later, as I was working in New Jersey, I witnessed whole families and neighborhoods being lost to AIDS. There was no treatment. I cared for HIV-infected newborns who were “boarded” in our medical center, because we did not know whether they would develop AIDS and it was considered too risky to place them in foster care. And I cared for young adults who were isolated from families who were afraid to touch them. Now, advances in HIV treatment and prevention are considered to be one of the major health care accomplishments of the last 35 years. All I ever learned about HIV and AIDS, I learned after graduating from nursing school. Nurses will always be on the front lines, therefore we need to be diligent in protecting ourselves while still providing the best evidence-based care possible. We see the need for that today as we learn how the novel coronavirus is transmitted and effectively treated. If I had one thing to say to the nurses of today and the generation that is to come, it’s: Be committed to lifelong learning. Throughout your career as a nurse, you need to expand your knowledge and skills for the good of your team and the benefit of your patients.

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further decrease barriers to care, such as lack of transportation and lack of access.” A bachelor’s degree in nursing is preferred for community-based nursing jobs, along with a few years of nursing experience. Experienced nurses within this specialty can attain a certification in public health nursing. RNs with advanced degrees in either community health or public health are also needed, and can attain advanced public health training and certification (APHN-BC). Trotter said an emphasis on wellness and greater attention to providing health care access in underserved neighborhoods are pushing demand for these nursing specialists “The future is bright for CBNs, because there is a growing societal emphasis on the importance of health promotion and disease prevention across the lifespan,” she said. “CBNs working in a variety of community settings will help decrease individuals’ and communities’ risks of developing chronic diseases and improve the quality of life over time. “CBNs are vital to health care, because they work to preserve, protect and promote the health of those within their community. Working with families and individuals, a CBN ultimately helps clients develop autonomy and identify ways to care for themselves. Healthy persons within a community can, in turn, positively improve the community as a whole.” SCHOOL NURSE One familiar role within community-based nursing is also one of the most familiar. School nurses provide essential health care that enhances the ability of students to be academi-

cally successful and develop the life skills and attitudes of healthy, productive members of society. “School nurses work in both private and public schools, pre-K to high school,” Rochelle McFerguson, clinical instructor with UAMS College of Nursing, said. “There are also nurses who work in college and university student health clinics.” School nurses help provide health care services to students in a way that minimizes disruption in their education day. Many times these services can be provided onsite at the school rather than pulling the student out and having them miss class for an outside appointment. And in a growing number of cases, the school nurse is becoming the most accessible health care option a child’s family may have, particularly among low-income populations. “School nurses provide screenings, treatments, physical assessment and, in some cases, diagnosis and prescriptions,” McFerguson said. The qualifications of the school nurse depend on school district hiring requirements. They can be a licensed practical nurse, registered nurse or an advanced practice registered nurse. Even in the era where coronavirus is disrupting school operations and keeping many kids home, the school nurse is a vital member of the faculty. “The need for the school nurse is in every school district, but not always the funding. This means that in some districts one nurse may be responsible for as many as 1,000 students,” McFerguson said. “That means there is a particularly desperate need for school nurses, especially in rural or poorer school districts.”

1909 UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA NURSING SCHOOL OPENS, THE FIRST CONNECTED TO A UNIVERSITY RATHER THAN A HOSPITAL. 1949 YALE UNIVERSITY OFFERS ADVANCED PROGRAM IN PSYCHIATRIC NURSING ALONG WITH CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS IN MIDWIFERY AND PUBLIC HEALTH. THE ONE-YEAR PROGRAM GRANTS A MASTERS OF SCIENCE IN NURSING. 1996 THE HEALTH INSURANCE PORTABILITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (HIPAA) BECOMES LAW. 2002 SPECIALIZED MEDICAL MANIKINS ARE IN PLACE AT 66 NURSING SCHOOL NATIONWIDE. LESS THAN A DECADE LATER, NEARLY 1,000 SCHOOLS EMPLOY THE COMPUTERIZED GENDER-SPECIFIC DEVICES. Sources: University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Women’s Achievements in Medical History, Harris School of Business, NursingOnPoint.com, American Sentinel University, Nurse.org, University of California San Francisco

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HERO SPOTLIGHT

WONDER WOMAN

Hannah Ray University of Central Arkansas/Conway Regional Health System I came into college having never really thought about nursing. My intentions with starting nursing school my junior year of college was so I could become a pediatric nurse. A year later, 2016, I took a job as a patient care tech in the critical care unit at Conway Regional Health System and fell in love with intensive care. I graduated in 2017, joined a critical care unit here and I absolutely love it. I joined the unit because I wanted to be challenged. I am the type of person who loves to learn, so I wanted to step foot in my job every day and learn something. I think that’s what I love most about critical care — I come to work every day and something is different. I have worked full-time in the COVID unit since March. I volunteered to work in the unit the minute that the virus started appearing in Arkansas. I’m not going to sugarcoat it: It still, to this day, is just as challenging as Day One was. Our lives at Conway Regional have changed over the past six months. We have gone from working in one unit with nurses from all over the hospital to now just working in our home critical care unit with mainly just the critical care team. We’ve had to go through relocations, new staff members, new training. It has been incredibly challenging, but we’re making it and we’re doing it. My husband and I both work at the hospital and we’re both nurses. It’s a calling; I don’t think everyone is called and I think it’s perfectly fine that not

MASTER YOUR CRAFT

Pursuing a master‘s degree in nursing may seem like a daunting task, particularly with the long hours that a nurse already puts in on the job and at home. However, having an advanced degree opens multiple career possibilities, including higher pay and greater opportunities to lead. Here are a few things to consider, per Teresa Whited, associate dean of Academic Programs for UAMS College of Nursing: WHY A GRADUATE DEGREE? The Master of Nursing Science (MNSc) and Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) degrees open many doors for a nurse to become a leader in health care. These graduate degrees allow advancement, autonomy and the opportunity to improve health care through quality improvement, research and preventative care. WHAT DO THESE PROFESSIONALS DO? The work of an advanced practice nurse is rewarding. It allows you to see patients and families throughout the lifespan and through the ups and down of their health care journey. It requires dedication to detail, a commitment to lifelong learning and an ability to provide excellent care with patient advocacy.

everyone is. I know in my heart a patient that has the coronavirus deserves just as much care as any other patient that comes into the hospital and I know I can provide that type of care. Our patients know we’re here for them and they rely on us to give them the best medical care and treatment we’ve got. It speaks volumes about Conway Regional in general that our patients feel secure in us that we’re going to walk in every day and say, “No matter what happens today, I’m going to do my 100 percent best I can.” That makes a difference. It also takes a toll. You wear down and just become exhausted with the amount of physical exertion your body goes through taking care of COVID patients three, four, five days a week. I’m not going to say our spirits are down, because we’re still motivated. But there’s days where we feel defeated because we’ve given every ounce of energy we have to help people recover and while many of them do, some don’t and that’s what’s defeating. But you also have days like when the very first COVID-19 patient was discharged from Conway Regional. That very first patient was with us for a little over a month. We rolled him out in a wheelchair, but as soon as we got outside, he said, “Can I get up? Can I walk?” When he was able to walk out the door, hug his family for the first time in a month, we shed tears. The patient cried and we cried. That moment right there was like, yes, this is why I do what I do. As hard as this has been, this makes it all worth it.

HOW DO I BECOME ONE? Pursuing an advanced practice registered nurse role takes about two additional years of study after becoming a registered nurse and requires additional licensure and prescriptive authority. There are four roles of the APRN, including: Certified nurse midwife, who provides primary and specialty health care for women. Certified nurse anesthetist, who administers anesthesia and provides care to patients before, during and after therapeutic, surgical, obstetrical and diagnostic procedures. Clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner are two very distinct specialties. Clinical nurse specialists often lead a department of nursing either at a private practice location or in a hospital setting, with the education and expertise to lead the nursing staff in education and improving the patient care process. Nurse practitioners work under the indirect supervision A graduate degree enables nurses of a physician and use their expertise to to shape educational curriculum and consult on patient care, diagnose chronic serve in other leadership roles. illnesses, manage acute episodes, promote disease prevention, perform health assessments, and order and interpret diagnostic tests. Special Advertising Section

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OCTOBER 2020 15


TECHNOLOGY THE NORM IN TODAY’S NURSING WORKPLACE

Arkansas Tech students receive training on the latest technological tools of the nursing trade.

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o matter where a nurse ultimately chooses to spend his or her career, it’s a certainty that technology will be part of everyday work life. The days of mercury thermometers and hot water bottles are long gone, replaced by an array of technological tools that help nurses do their job with more precision and accuracy than ever before. “Technology has changed so much since I began my career in 1991,” Nancy Haese, a nurse in Vascular Access with CHI St. Vincent, said. “It has become more complex. When I started nursing, even taking a blood pressure was done by a machine only in intensive care areas. On the floor, it was taken by hand. “The nursing field I work in now has changed. Back then, doctors were the only ones to place central catheter lines, as peripherally inserted central catheters weren’t even around. Now, because of technology, I am able to place PICC lines.” Given that technology has expanded the tasks that nurses are able to accomplish, most see these advances as a positive, Haese added. “I appreciate advances in technology,” she said. “It gives nurses more opportunities to advance their knowledge of nursing care and, most importantly, helps nurses like me have more options and take better care of our patients.” The steady march of technological progress means nursing schools have had to evolve in how they educate students to keep up. In many cases this means investing in training and simulation tools that are themselves leaps-andbounds ahead of previous teaching models. “Our nursing program has grown from using static manikins and low-fidelity task trainers to high fidelity, lifelike manikins,” Shellie Maggard, assistant professor and simulation coordinator for Arkansas Tech University in Russellville, said. “Our high-fidelity simulators include a Sim-Man, two Sim-Man 3Gs, a Sim-Mom, a Sim-Newby and a Sim-Baby. We currently use

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a dedicated debriefing room that enables students to view simulations concurrently or previously recorded, reflect on their experiences and connect theory to actual practice. “In addition, ATU has added an IV Arm virtual computer program that enables students to practice their IV skills and access a simulated ventilator, a chest tube manikin trainer and a defibrillator/EKG trainer. These technological advancements have enabled our program to transform nursing students into the practice-ready nurses they need to become for a seamless transition into the workforce.” Jennifer Gernat with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing said other technology has found a place in the classroom. “We use technology in a variety of ways to enhance classroom and clinical experiences for our students,” she said. “Undergraduates utilize iPads to provide an interactive environment that enhances learning. The ability of the students and instructors to interact in real time allows for good communication and learning to take place. Students retain more from lectures and the clinical experience because of this interaction.” Gernat said the customization features available through today’s technology allow students to receive and process information in a manner that best suits them. “Online applications are used to provide students with quizzes to help with learning and studying. Students have more control over their learning and can tailor classroom and source materials to their learning style,” she said. “They also have access to a large variety of online learning materials at their fingertips. Plus, at-risk students can be identified more quickly so that instructors can help them put a plan in place to help them succeed.” One of the most visible and exciting developSpecial Advertising Section

ments in the medical field overall has been wider use of telemedicine. Dr. Nicole Ward, clinical assistant professor with UAMS College of Nursing, said the advancement not only helps connect people in remote areas directly from their homes, it allows nurses and other medical professionals to expand their reach and opens up new career options for nurses in rural areas. “For nurses, the challenge is usually deciding which job they would like to take rather than having the challenge of finding a job,” she said. “Nurses who work in a large, urban setting have access to the most advanced medical technology and usually care for the sickest patients. This gives them unique experiences that nurses practicing in rural areas may not encounter. “At the same time, one big need in the state of Arkansas is primary care providers in rural areas. This is a great opportunity for nurses who would like to live and serve patients in rural areas. With the advancement of telemedicine, sick patients who once had to travel to large urban centers are now able to receive care in rural locations. This is fundamentally transforming the environment within rural hospitals in Arkansas.” The future promises even more remarkable advancements, but no matter how science fiction things get, Maggard said, high-touch will remain the foundation for excellent nursing care. “Although our program has advanced technologically, we still embed the foundational nursing core concepts throughout our curriculum that are necessary to produce safe, qualified nurses,” she said. “ATU Nursing strives to remain current with advancements in health care while upholding the ‘high-touch’ relationship necessary between nurse and patient. It is essential to maintain that personal, trusting relationship with patients and their families.”


HERO SPOTLIGHT I was assigned to the Brooklyn Methodist Hospital, which had roughly the same bed capacity as the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, where I work. Before COVID-19, Brooklyn Methodist had around 30 intensive care unit beds; two weeks after its first COVID-19 positive case, 120 patients were on ventilators. At one point, over 90 percent of the patients in this 500-bed hospital were COVID-19 positive. At the time of my arrival, Brooklyn Methodist had moved its pediatric ICU and psychiatric patients to sister hospitals and converted both units to adult COVID-19 ICUs. Before our arrival, the ICU nurse-to-patient ratios had been as high as 1:5. These patients had extremely high acuities, they were vented and sedated with multiple organ involvement. The shifts were long and hard with the added stress of wearing personal protective equipment. Luckily, ICU care is universal. A nurse may not know the charting system or how a certain pump works, but a competent ICU nurse can usually jump right in to care for the patient, which is what we did. One thing that stuck out the most to me was the Brooklyn Methodist staff. In one of the

A NEW YORK STATE OF MIND

Richard Milam, Critical Care Division UAMS Health Earlier this year I got the opportunity to be part of a group of nurses and respiratory therapists participating in an outreach program to assist the New York-Presbyterian Health System. As most people are aware, New York City had high numbers of COVID-19 cases, and I knew before departing it was going to be shocking. It was everything I expected and then some.

hardest-hit COVID-19 areas, they had been at ground zero, landing in the worst possible scenario from a nursing standpoint. Yet they handled it with determination and an attitude that was awe-inspiring. These nurses and staff put their critical thinking and expertise to work to meet the daily challenges. Eight weeks into this pandemic, they were still so helpful, upbeat and caring. Even though they kept calling all of us visiting health care workers “heroes,” the real heroes were the New Yorkers who were there in the beginning, at the peak and after all the relief travelers were gone. They truly are incredible—a shining light and an example we could all learn from in this challenging time. With so many COVID-19 cases reported in our own state, I’m sure health care workers and Arkansans as a whole wish this would all just go away. I’m happy to report that I reached out to the ICU manager at Brooklyn Methodist and they are doing much better, down from 120 patients on ventilators to around 30. They are a testament that, if we work together and stay “UAMS Strong,” we can make it through these challenging times, too.

Nursing Is More

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Contact Jefferson Regional Nursing Recruiter at 870-541-7774 or by email at florygi@jrmc.org

Apply now to the Jefferson Regional School of Nursing! You can receive an Associate of Applied Science in Nursing degree in just 17 months at the Jefferson Regional School of Nursing! High fidelity training, small class size and easy access to hospital experience combine to develop a well-rounded educational background. Tuition assistance is also available. Application deadline for the January class is November 1, 2020.

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HERO SPOTLIGHT

HOMETOWN HERO

Aaron Baxter, RN to BSN online student UA Little Rock/UAMS By Angelita Faller, UA Little Rock Nurses quickly get used to the fact that much of what they do goes unnoticed and unrecognized. It’s just part of the job. But one health care professional, Aaron Baxter of Benton, recently was the exception in a big way, being recognized before the U.S. House of Representatives with the Hometown Hero Award. “Aaron’s superiors say that he is a team player who stands out due to his high regard for patient care and safety,” Arkansas 2nd District Rep. French Hill said in his remarks while presenting Baxter for the award this summer. “I thank Aaron for his dedication to protecting the health of Arkansans during this time. He and frontline workers like him are vital to us overcoming COVID-19 as a nation.” “I’m definitely honored by this recognition and I hope that everyone understands that, as nurses, we have to rely on each other,” Baxter said. “Nursing is a team occupation. I could not do what I do without the people I work with. To me, this is an honor for all the folks that I’ve worked with.” Baxter got his first taste of health care as a volunteer emergency medical technician. He

joined UAMS Health in 2015 as a patient care technician after nearly two decades working in the energy and manufacturing sectors. While at UAMS, Baxter attended nursing school at UA Little Rock in 2017, obtaining his associate degree in nursing in 2018. “UA Little Rock has an accelerated option for the nursing program,” Baxter said. “My goal was to get into the accelerated program so I could quickly get back to work. As a working adult, that was my deciding factor.” Baxter, who will graduate from UA Little Rock with his bachelor‘s degree in nursing next spring, took on additional responsibilities during the pandemic, working as both a COVID nurse and a D-officer. In the latter role, he helps colleagues make sure they are properly using and removing protective equipment. “Working in any kind of critical care unit is stressful,” Baxter said. “Adding the coronavirus and all the unknowns to that has been stressful, but we’ve had a lot of support. As a team, my unit has done the best job we could in order to provide exceptional care. That hasn’t changed because of the coronavirus.”

We Our Students

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HERO SPOTLIGHT

FROM THE HEART

Daniel Melendez, Medical ICU CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs I worked my entire adult life as a landscape designer and project manager. After the housing market crash in 2008, I had to go from doing residential projects, where I had a lot of artistic freedom, to managing commercial and municipal projects. I kind of lost my love for it. As I started looking into different careers, I had a little checklist of things I absolutely had to have in a career. I wanted to do something where I could stay on my feet, because I didn’t want to sit behind a desk all day. I’m not too good at that. I wanted to do something where I could interact with people, something where there was always something new to learn and always something different to do. The biggest part of it was, I wanted to do something positive within the community. Before I officially went back to school, my wife had been working on her nursing degree, so I got to see firsthand everything that she was doing. Nursing pretty much checked all the boxes. I went to nursing school at National Park College in Hot Springs and graduated in 2015.

I started out working at a nearby hospital in inpatient psychiatric care. My wife, Jacqueline, was working in a surgical intensive care unit and once again I got to see what she did every day. I thought, man, this is something that I can definitely get into. It’s difficult work, but it keeps you on your toes. There’s a great supportive team and it just seemed like a good fit for me, so I decided to make the move to more traditional nursing as opposed to psychiatric care. Now, I’m part of the medical ICU at CHI St. Vincent Hot Springs and she works in the emergency department after working in the surgical ICU for quite a while. That’s put us at the forefront of COVID-19 cases. People ask me what that’s like and I tell them we always manage extremely sick people in the medical ICU. A ton of our patients are already critical in nature. This adds some new methods and some new protocols. It’s an extremely difficult illness to manage and it’s something everybody’s still getting accustomed to. One thing I can say is our facility is really

doing everything that they can. The communication’s been great when things change. Everybody works together to make sure that we can enact the new policy changes as they happen. It might sound kind of crazy but, if anything, [COVID-19] taught us how to be more effective at our job, working together. One thing I’d tell the next generation of nurses would be the absolute most important part of nursing is to maintain the focus on compassion. We get sick people, some of whom don’t recover. We do our best to provide them with the best possible experience and outcome that we can. We play a lot of different roles in the process. You really have to remember what the end goal is. Nursing takes patience. Nursing school is difficult — very, very difficult. It takes a whole team to get one person through nursing school. And, man, you’ve really got to be motivated. The thing is, if you can make it through the trials of nursing school — and you survive your first day at work — it’s one of the most rewarding jobs you’ll ever do. That’s worth it.

Choose the Best. Choose UAMS. Whether you’re looking for the right place to further your education or the right place to start your nursing career, UAMS is the best choice for you.

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ARKANSAS DHS PROVIDES FULFILLING, VARIED CAREER POSSIBILITIES

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he Arkansas Department of Human Services is a far-reaching state agency tasked with ensuring the health and welfare of Arkansas families. Nurses are needed across a variety of job specialties and facilities that serve children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, adults and seniors with disabilities, and more. Two departments in which nurses can play a substantial role include the Division of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) and Division of Aging, Adult and Behavioral Health Services (DAABHS). The Division of Developmental Disabilities Services provides quality services for children and adults with developmental disabilities and delays. Providing clients and their families choices when selecting appropriate services in the local community, DDS provides an array of services through Medicaid-funded programs and federally funded grants. Among these services are: • Developmental screenings, therapy and care plans for infants and toddlers;

Day treatment programs for children and adults; • Community-based services and supportive life skills; • Applied behavior analysis for children with autism and specialized autism services; • 24-hour care in human development centers and private intermediate care facilities; • Occupational therapy, speech therapy and physical therapy; • Helping coordinate care needs and case management services. The Division of Aging, Adult and Behavioral Health Services ensures an integrated system of publicly funded mental health care and alcohol, tobacco and other drug prevention and treatment services to Arkansas residents. DAABHS provides the majority of state-funded behavioral health services by contracting with community providers in multiple regions to ensure statewide coverage. These community health partners provide a full array of traditional and specialized ser-

vices, including (but not limited to) crisis screenings, drug and alcohol assessments, diagnostic evaluations, medication management, case management and a variety of counseling services. State-funded mental health and substance use/misuse treatment services are available in all 75 counties, serving adults and children with varying levels and stages of mental illness, including those who have been previously incarcerated or admitted to the Arkansas State Hospital and other treatment facilities. Certain Arkansas populations within DAABHS are identified as priority populations, served through substance use/misuse treatment contracts, including: • Pregnant women using drugs by injection; • Pregnant women using drugs/alcohol; • Intravenous drug users; • Clients with the greatest clinical needs; • Clients from the designated region. Visit https://humanservices.arkansas.gov to learn more.

OUR SUPERHEROES WEAR MASKS AND SAVE LIVES, TOO. Providing education, advocacy, community and resources to Arkansas’s hospitals and health systems for 90 years.

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SETTING THE STANDARD FOR PEDIATRIC CARE : ARKANSAS CHILDREN’S

Arkansas Children’s is one of the premier pediatric health systems in the country.

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or more than 100 years, Arkansas Children’s Hospital has continuously evolved to meet the unique needs of the children of Arkansas and beyond. Arkansas Children’s first opened its doors in 1912 as The Arkansas Children’s Home Society, a safe haven for orphaned children. A little over a decade later, Dr. Orlando Christian led the effort to open a children’s hospital at the present site of the current hospital. Since then, philanthropy has played an essential role in how Arkansas Children’s serves the 700,000plus children of Arkansas. In 1983, the organization became the primary Children’s Miracle Network Hospital for the region. The accomplishments of Arkansas Children’s are rivaled only by the health needs of the state’s children, continuing through to present day, as Arkansas ranks 40 out of the 50 states in overall children’s health and well-being. To create a healthier tomorrow for Arkansas’s children, ACH has evolved from a single-site hospital in Little Rock to a comprehensive pediatric health system that includes two pediatric hospitals, a pediatric research institute and USDA nutrition center, a philanthropic foundation, a nursery alliance, statewide clinics and many education and outreach programs — all focused on fulfilling a promise: Unprecedented child health. Defined and delivered. The flagship hospital, Arkansas Children’s 22 OCTOBER 2020

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Hospital (ACH) in Little Rock, is a 336-bed, Magnet-recognized facility. It offers the state’s only Level I pediatric trauma center; the state’s only burn center; the state’s only Level IV neonatal intensive care unit; the state’s only pediatric intensive care unit; the state’s only pediatric surgery program with Level 1 verification from the American College of Surgeons (ACS); the state’s only magnetoencephalography (MEG) system for neurosurgical planning and cutting-edge research; and the state’s only nationally recognized pediatric transport program. Additionally, ACH is nationally ranked by U.S. News & World Report in pediatric cardiology and heart Surgery, nephrology, pulmonology and urology specialties. Arkansas Children’s Northwest (ACNW) is the first and only pediatric hospital in the Northwest Arkansas region. It opened in Springdale in early 2018 and operates a 24-bed inpatient unit; a surgical unit with five operating rooms; outpatient clinics offering over 20 subspecialties; diagnostic services; imaging capabilities; occupational therapy services; and Northwest Arkansas’s only pediatric emergency department, equipped with 30 exam rooms. The health system also includes two clinics in Little Rock, a clinic in Jonesboro and is in the process of opening a clinic in Pine Bluff. ACH’s mission is carried out every day by a diverse team of more than 4,500 employees Special Advertising Section

who operate daily within an inclusive culture, to fulfill the goals of an ambitious five-year strategic plan. That plan focuses on solidifying Arkansas Children’s as a destination for pediatric care, strengthening the continuum of care, addressing and improving the whole health of the child and acting boldly to develop safer, healthier communities. These pillars of care are made possible through three core drivers: • Digital transformation, which will harness the power of technology and systems to extend reach, efficiency and engagement. • Focusing on partnerships that build mutually beneficial, well-defined relationships to galvanize networks. • Continuously advocating for children, promoting a child-first agenda that reprioritizes child health and advances public policy and community action. Each of these priorities and pillars make up the foundation Arkansas Children’s is building on for the next five years. The organization is dedicated to delivering on its promise of a healthier tomorrow for the children of Arkansas. Learn more about the outstanding career opportunities available through Arkansas Children’s at www.archildrens.org.


Your Voice. Arkansas Our Fight.

nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to vote from home or in-person.

HERO SPOTLIGHT

NEVER TOO LATE

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For more information on how you can vote safely PAID FOR BY AARP and make your voice heard, visit aarp.org/ARVotes

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facebook/AARPArkansas | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR As our nation battles a pandemic and economic DeeDee Moline PAID FOR BY AARP CHI St. Vincent Infirmary downturn, the health and financial security of voters Arkansas Master’s degree candidate at UAMS PAID FOR BY AARP over 50 are on the line. That’s why AARP Arkansas is I always wanted to be in health care, but I Arkansas fighting for your voice to be heard. was unsure of which capacity I wanted to be in. I grew up in Camden and I’d always been very AARP Arkansas wants to make sure that you know all science-oriented. At one point I even started a business where I worked from home in medical of your voting options and that all Americans—from transcription. In my own way I nurtured that sciworking parents to family caregivers to seniors in ence nerd part of me. nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to I was a mom for 27 years at home, during which time I raised five kids. Then, when they vote from home or in-person. got older and didn’t need me all the time, I went back and started nursing school in 2014 at UA For more information on how you can vote safely Little Rock. As our nation battles a pandemic and economic and make your voice heard,PAID visit aarp.org/ARVotes FOR BY AARP There were a handful of us, what you’d call As our nation battles a pandemic and economic downturn, the health and financial security of voters “mature” students. It was really interesting to facebook/AARPArkansas | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR downturn, the health and financial security of voters As our nation battles a pandemic and economic over 50 are on the line. That’s why AARP Arkansas is see; there were some really young nursing stuover arevoice on thetoline. That’s why AARP Arkansas is dents who’d done a lot with concurrent credit fighting for50 your be heard. downturn, thebattles healthaand financial security of voters fighting for your voice to be heard. As our nation pandemic and economic in high school and lots of people my children’s AARP Arkansas wants to make sure that you know all age. I didn’t realize how diverse nursing was, over 50 arethe on the line. That’s why AARP Arkansas is know all AARP Arkansas wants to make surevoters that you downturn, health of but that showed me there really was a place for ofand your financial voting optionssecurity and that all Americans—from of your voting options and that all Americans—from everyone in this profession. There is a way to working parents to family caregivers to seniors fighting for on your voice to be heard. over 50 are the line. That’s AARP is in in workingwhy parents to familyArkansas caregivers to seniors develop the talents that you have as an individnursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to ual in nursing, no matter what they are. fighting for yourwants voicevote tofrom be heard. or in-person. I’m a cardiac nurse. I wanted to specialize in AARP Arkansas to make that you know all votehome fromsure home or in-person. that because the heart has always intrigued me For more information on how you you can can votevote safely Forthat more information on how safely of your voting options and all Americans—from and I was drawn to learn more about it. Heart AARP Arkansas wants to make sure that you know all and make your voice heard, visit aarp.org/ARVotes and make your voice heard, visit aarp.org/ARVotes disease is plaguing our society right now; heart working parents to family caregivers to seniors in attacks and heart health are a top medical priof your voting options andfacebook/AARPArkansas that all Americans—from | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR facebook/AARPArkansas | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR ority. I really enjoy being able to perfect that nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to working parents to family caregivers to seniors in education, familiarize myself so much with that particular part of the body, and bring it down vote from home or in-person. nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to to the patient level. I started working at CHI St. Vincent Infirmavote from home or in-person. ry in Little Rock when I graduated from nursFor more information on how you can vote safely ing school in 2017 and I went through the same learning curve As as any new nurse. and make your voiceon heard, aarp.org/ARVotes ourother nation battles a pandemic and economic For more information how visit you can vote safely I learned that, number one, you have to overthe health andand financial security of voters come your fear. Whatdownturn, I tell new nurses today make your voice heard,| visit aarp.org/ARVotes facebook/AARPArkansas @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR is, do not be afraid to realize that you have to over 50 are on the line. That’s why AARP Arkansas is perfect your skills. Have confidence in yourself, follow the rules, don’t take shortcuts and be willfacebook/AARPArkansas | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR fighting forwilling yourtovoice to be heard. ing to learn from anyone. If you are collaborate and nurture, you can flourish in any multidisciplinary team.AARP Arkansas wants to make sure that you know all One thing I remember very clearly was, because of my age, patients assumedvoting that I’d been of your options and that all Americans—from a nurse for 300 years. There could be a younger nurse that’s been a nurse for longer parents than me andto family caregivers to seniors in working my patients would still look to me first. I was very well-trained at UALR and I felt like I had very good nursing homes—can vote safely whether they choose to knowledge, but that was heavy on me. I felt that vote home extra burden until the very firstfrom patient of my ownor in-person. said, “You are one of the best nurses I’ve had. How long have you been doing this?” I said, “You Forshemore on how you can vote safely are my first patient.” And said, “I information do not believe you.” That gave me such confidence. and make your voice heard, visit aarp.org/ARVotes I’m in school now at UAMS working on my master’s of nursing administration and education because I believe nursing is facebook/AARPArkansas a practice, we | @ARAARP | aarp.org/AR never perfect it, we can always get better. Approach it with a sense of excited humility. Realize that people look to you to ease their minds and their hearts. They look to you for strength. They look to you for education, for compassion, for help.

Arkansas

Your Vote. Your Voice. Our Fight.

NURSING NEEDS YOU.

NP.EDU/NURSING

Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 23


TEAMWORK: THE HEART OF ALL NURSING SUCCESS

Teamwork makes the dream work at Arkansas Children’s.

O

f all the skills a new nurse must develop, the ability to work within a team is arguably the most critical, especially in a hospital setting. And, as the nursing profession continues to work to expand inclusiveness and diversity in the ranks, the ability to work with people of varying backgrounds is more important than ever before. “Looking back over my 27 years as a nurse, it was never a surprise to see that every nurse has a strength that they bring to the team,” Barb Erby, nurse manager in orthopedics/neurology for CHI St. Vincent Infirmary in Little Rock, said. “People of all backgrounds, genders, ages and different personalities bring their talents to the table along with their unique work and life experiences. No one on the team is just a secretary, just a tech or just a nurse. We are a nursing team from different backgrounds, but our common goal is to carry out our mission as health care providers to serve those in need of our care. “Diversity is needed because it builds a united front in your community to display the teamwork that is maintained in a world of uncertainty.” As any veteran nurse will tell you, no nurse can do it alone in health care, and for new nurses, teamwork is particularly crucial as they work to familiarize themselves with the job and find their stride in a world that’s very different from classroom simulations. “The most difficult aspect of working in the team environment for new nurses is being over-

24 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

whelmed,” Delia Litan de los Reyes, clinical supervisor of Float Pool/Clinical Registry at CHI St. Vincent, said. “There are unique challenges in coming on board and not knowing everyone on the team, the processes to follow, how to communicate with physicians and other departments, and how to adjust to rapidly changing situations. “The most important thing for brand-new nurses to remember as they come into that work environment is to reach out to other members of the team and to their leader. They should not feel alone. We always work together as a team. We have resources and tools that can guide them to achieve their maximum potential and be successful in this profession.” Nurses have developed a reputation over the years for “eating their young,” but today’s health care professionals say much of that attitude is a thing of the past. Nursing shortages and the high level of accountability for patient outcomes have seen nursing teams evolve to be more supportive of newcomers. “My organization promotes collaboration among nurses with all levels of experience,” Taylor Steele, clinical instructor with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences College of Nursing, said. “Currently, I am the least experienced faculty member in the college, but that does not deter my co-workers from listening to my plans or ideas. I have been extremely fortunate to work with amazing nurses over the past seven years, and I truly believe you get out of your team what you put into it.” Special Advertising Section

Such is not to say that teamwork comes naturally to everyone. Steele said it’s not solely on incumbent members of the team to be inclusive; the new nurse must work hard to fit in and work well with others, too. “A 12-hour shift is an extremely long time, but it’s especially long when you have to spend it with toxic co-workers,” she said. “A team member who exhibits a sense of entitlement can definitely interfere with the cohesive team environment. These particular team members expect everyone’s help, but they are nowhere to be found when their co-workers are in need. During these times, it is important to use effective communication skills to possibly break down that barrier between you and a difficult co-worker.” A cooperative spirit is all the more essential when differences in race, gender or ethnic background are added to the mix. Michelle Gonzalez, director of the Nurse Anesthesia Program and clinical associate professor at UAMS College of Nursing, remembers the challenges of fitting in. “When I was in my undergraduate nursing program, I was the only Hispanic student in the entire college, which was approximately 2,000 students,” she said. “Because there was no one else like me, I tended to make friends with other minorities. Looking back on it, we had a unique microcosm in our friend group, consisting of one Black male, one LGBT male, an Italian and a Latina. “I felt very different and separate from the


THREE STEPS TO BEING A GOOD TEAMMATE

Often the most complicated relationships boil down to the simplest elements. So it is with being a good teammate. We asked Joan Tackett, a member of the faculty at UAMS College of Nursing, for three good ways to be a productive member of the team. majority of white females that attended my nursing program. Living off-campus due to affordability also intensified that feeling of being an outsider. I didn’t feel connected to the university or university life.” Gonzalez said going through that experience created in her a default attitude of seeking diversity and inclusiveness, something that has only intensified today as she sees more men and people of color entering nursing school. “I tend to look at people for who they are, as well as their contributions and insights,” she said. “I’m very curious by nature and tend to ask a lot of questions, particularly if I’m not familiar with someone’s culture or customs. “My frame of thought is, if I can increase my knowledge and awareness of people who are different from me, then I can extend that respect and acknowledgment and be an example for others. Oftentimes we never know what others have been through, but they have overcome and achieved, and those are insights they can bring to benefit the team.”

HERO SPOTLIGHT

MAMA BEAR Courtney Stepp National Park College

DEVELOP SOLID COMMUNICATION SKILLS Good communication skills are imperative in nursing. As a nurse you need to possess good communication skills so you can interact with your patient and their family members and friends. Learning as much as you can about good communication skills and practicing them will produce positive outcomes. You should always feel free to ask appropriate questions or speak up to increase your understanding and knowledge, and when advocating for your patient it is your duty to speak up in an appropriate manner. FOCUS OUTWARDLY AS YOU DEVELOP INWARDLY If you keep in mind that what you’re doing is for someone else, and that it’s not about you, that often helps keep your emotions positive and frustrations minimal. Singing, even if it’s in my head, helps me stay positive. Smiling

I was one of the first ones at National Park Medical Center, where I work, to be exposed to the coronavirus. My health nurse called me at home and said, “Courtney, you need to start taking your temperature.” Now, I’m a mom; I have two sets of twin boys who are 7 and 8. It’s like raising quadruplets. And all I could think about was how I’d been around my kids for the last 36 hours before anybody told me this. I know I hugged them. We watched a movie together. They were so much closer than 6 feet. It really scared me. It was the first time in my life that I felt like I had complete lack of control over my situation. Something had threatened my life, and my children’s lives, that was beyond my means. I never wanted to be a nurse growing up. My mom’s a nurse and my whole life I remember how she smelled like a hospital. I liked to argue and I liked to stand up for people, so I said I was going to go to law school. As I started my journey doing all that, I got an internship at a law office that was a big eye-opener. Yes, I did want to help people, but I didn’t want to do it through law. When I became a mom, my education got put on the back burner, but I discovered how much I enjoyed caring for them. So it hit me that maybe my mom was right all along, and in 2017 we moved to Hot Springs for me to go to nursing school at National Park College. I graduated with my LPN in 2018 and I graduated with my RN in Special Advertising Section

is contagious, so I practice that as well. Asking others about themselves and sharing stories that are appropriately funny can help everyone stay positive, even on a more challenging day. Praising others for a job well done usually produces a smile as well. LET THINGS GO Nursing is a most rewarding field, as we have the opportunity to serve others. However, because most individuals are sick during that time, they are often not at their best, or normal self, and may be grumpy. Do not let that influence you negatively; smile and continue to provide appropriate care. And, by the way, caring for someone in the last moments of their life is a great privilege. Thinking of it in that way has helped me deal with the loss of patients for whom I have provided care, and for whom I cared very much. Always remember, you are only one person and can do only so much.

2020. So, now, here I was, not knowing what to do and faced with a really hard situation. I had to ask myself some tough questions. You see, as a nurse, I’m an essential worker. We don’t get to stay home and quarantine for two weeks just for exposure. (I never became symptomatic, thank goodness.) When I was exposed, I was confused. This was March and COVID-19 was all brand new. I was scared, but I was essential. At first, it was “I have to be there for my patients.” Then it became less of a have-to and more of a want-to because the number of cases was growing. I didn’t want to be one of those people who said, “I’m throwing the towel in when times get hard.” Now I’m mad that it’s here. I’m mad that it happened to someone. I hate cancer, I hate COVID, I hate it all, so I’m here to help minimize it. If me going to work and caring for somebody and putting myself out there for somebody else makes a difference, then I’m going to do it. I don’t regret anything about my life as a nurse. Not at all. Through the fear, the pissed-off, the excitement, the need, it all gives me satisfaction that what I do is worth it. There are lives that we have lost and that’s something that you live with. You don’t ever forget. But for the ones I know that I made a difference, who I know that I helped, it makes it where it’s worth it for me to go in and clock in for my next shift. I’m not scared anymore.

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 25


WHAT I’VE LEARNED “The physical, mental and emotional demands of this profession are significant. It is stressful to be responsible for someone else’s life. But you are never alone. Seek help from other nurses when you need it, take 3 minutes of quiet if you need it. And then, take a deep breath and get to work.” Allison Tucker, nursing faculty University of Central Arkansas “New nurses in the field should know that nursing is not just a job to get paid. It’s a career that is full of great satisfaction. You must be passionate about doing what’s ethical for your patients. New nurses should remember that all nurses have that same idea about doing what’s right by their patients so everyone is on the same page.” Nancy Haese, Vascular Access CHI St. Vincent “Being a patient advocate means being able to give high-quality care and give a voice to the patient for their safety and rights. Help them make informed decisions when they may not understand and help them speak up when they might have concerns.” Johnna Askins, cardiac nurse Conway Regional Health System “Nursing is ever-changing to meet the needs of our society and culture. We have been the ones to hold the hands of the first AIDS patients in the 1980s without judgment, and we have fearlessly gone to other states to take care of COVID-19 patients with limited supplies and knowledge of the disease itself. We accept all and provide care with all we have to give.” Janet Smith, Associate Degree Program director National Park College “The saying ‘silence is golden’ doesn’t apply when something wrong is going on or a patient’s life or health is being compromised. It comes to a point when a person has to look within themself and know when to speak up or stay quiet. If there is a strong urge to speak up because something wrong is going on, speak up.” Veneine Cuningkin, clinical assistant professor UAMS College of Nursing “Nursing is not a static profession. Patient situations are constantly changing. It is important that you know the standards of the profession, but then you must also analyze a particular situation and make decisions regarding how to best meet the needs of the patient. You must be able to problem-solve and develop a plan to implement.” Leslie Blackwell, instructor University of Central Arkansas “Nursing, no matter which specialty, can be very challenging on one’s mental and physical health. You spend so much time taking care of 26 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

your patients that you have to remember to take care of yourself! It is very important to maintain a healthy work-life balance. Make sure to take mental health days, limit overtime and stay positive.” Jennifer Yarberry, chief nursing officer Pinnacle Pointe Hospital “Bottom line: You will make mistakes! When a mistake occurs, own it, notify all parties involved, do what you can do to rectify the situation, learn from it and forgive yourself. Remember, you are only human.” Lori Reynolds, Short Stay Outpatient Unit Conway Regional Health System “Nurses are the best at adapting and overcoming. There has been confusion, emotions, frustrations, and some tears have been shed, but we are keeping our heads up, working as a team and doing the best we can. If we can make it through a pandemic, we can make it through anything.” Carrie Knauer, Emergency Department UAMS Health “When dealing with difficult patients, stay calm and focused! Just because you think it doesn’t mean you should say it.” Rebecca Gray, APRN University of Central Arkansas “We need to support families through the process of losing a loved one, but know that it takes a personal toll on nurses as well. Be prepared to acknowledge the pain or sadness you might be feeling and do some self-care measures following a loss. Sometimes you just need a good cry or sometimes you need something more. Don’t be afraid to reach out for help; you can’t care for others if you don’t have anything left to give.” Teresa Whited, associate dean of academic programs UAMS College of Nursing “Difficulties and stress will always be present to distract nurses, but this also gives us strength and an advantage in every challenging situation. I handle stress by focusing on the reasons why I chose nursing not only as a profession, but a vocation. It always brings me back to being there for people who need someone in a time of need, when they are feeling weak. I have learned that every opportunity has a noble reason why it’s happening.” Delia Litan de los Reyes, clinical supervisor CHI St. Vincent “None of us go into nursing for the accolades. We do this because we have a heart for helping others. The public oftentimes has no idea what the role of the nurse is. This pandemic has shed some light on what our job is publicly, and Special Advertising Section

I do feel that people have become appreciative of what we do overall.” Sarah Launius, Intensive Care Unit/E4 UAMS Health “You are not only a team player within the nursing profession, but within a multidiscipline team of doctors, respiratory therapists, physical therapists, dieticians, radiologic technologists; the list goes on and on. No matter what is going on in your personal life, you must check it at the door. You are a nurse, you are there to care for sick people; they are not there to hear about you or your ‘sickness.’” Janice Ivers, dean of nursing and health sciences National Park College “You can never be too prepared. There are many aspects of care and many products that we have taken for granted. Are you consistently caring for patients in the safest manner? Are you thinking of everything? Will you always have products available, even when everyone needs greater quantities of the same supplies? Suddenly, we have had to think creatively every day.” Jeff Crowson, infection prevention specialist UAMS Health “Find a mentor! One skill I believe my mom’s generation of nurses possessed moreso than the newest generation is the ability to connect on a personal level with patients. Newer nurses are trained with incredible technological advances, but high-level listening and communication skills are not gained through texting and social media platforms. They are passed down from seasoned nurses and taught through mentoring relationships.” Ashley Davis, executive director Arkansas Center for Nursing Inc. “There is always something new to learn in this profession and you have to be open to learning new things. I love that our team is always looking for ways to improve care for our community.” Mindy Moore, Short Stay Outpatient Unit Conway Regional Health System “The nursing profession is one of the most diverse professions there is. You can find a place to grow your strengths within the profession no matter what they are. You can perform patient care, inpatient, outpatient, generalized or specialty. You can teach, you can perform research, you can enter administration or manage a clinic, hospital or private industry. There is a place here for everyone.” Dr. Laura Hays, assistant professor UAMS College of Nursing NOTE: Kate Franks, director of clinical communication for UAMS, contributed to this article.


UCA NURSING START A REWARDING CAREER The School of Nursing at the University of Central Arkansas is committed to educating undergraduate and graduate students to become leaders in delivering quality health care and advancing the profession of nursing.

DEGREE PROGRAMS Pre-licensure BSN RN to BSN*

• Flat rate tuition of $285/credit hour with no additional fees • Complete in 12 months

Master of Science in Nursing* • Nurse Educator with Clinical Specialty (NECS) • Complete in 5 semesters

ALL PROGRAMS CCNE ACCREDITED

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) • BSN to DNP (Family Nurse Practitioner) • Post-master’s DNP

Our BSN to DNP (FNP) and Post-master’s DNP graduate programs have been ranked in the top 5 most affordable in the country (NPSchools.com and OnlineU). *100% online programs.

INTEGRATED HEALTH SCIENCES BUILIDING Opening fall 2021

uca.edu/nursing Speak with our nursing education counselor (501) 450-3119


Arkansas College/University

Yrs/Public Private

Calendar

Degree Offered

Length Of Program

Living Arrangements

Aid Deadline

Arkansas State University - Jonesboro • 870-9723074 (nursing) • 870-972-3024 (admissions)

4 yr public

Semester

Traditional A.A.S.N. LPN-to-AASN LPN - AASN (Online) RN-to-BSN (Online Program - must have an RN license) 2nd Degree Accelerated, B.S.N. Traditional B.S.N.

varies

on campus housing for Jonesboro; off campus for online RN-BSN

July 1st; Online students pay apply year around

Arkansas Tech University, Russellville • 479968-0383

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, LPN to BSN, RN to BSN, MSN, RN to MSN

BSN-4yrs, RN to BSN-1yr, MSN-2yrs

on campus housing

varies

Harding University, Searcy • 1-800-477-4407, 501-279-4682

4 yr private

Semester

BSN, MSN FNP, Post Graduate

BSN 4 yrs; MSN FN - 2yrs, PG - 2yrs

on campus housing

February 1st

Henderson State University, Arkadelphia • 870-230-5015

4 yr public

Semester

BSN (traditional); RN to BSN online; RN to BSN online enrollment both fall and spring; LPN to BSN on campus; MSN online,Online HSU Nursing Education Certificate

4 yrs for the Traditional BSN and LPN to BSN on Campus; RN-BSN Online in 1 year (3 semesters)Online MSN has two different tracks: Family Nurse Practitioner and Nursing Administration, both take 2 years to complete. Online HSU Nursing Education Certificate take 1 summer or 2 summer options.

on/off campus

June

Ouachita Baptist Univeristy, Arkadelphia • 870-245-5000

4 yr private, faithbased

Semester

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN Completion (Ouachita Baptist University and Baptist Health College Little Rock), RN-BSN Online

Dual Enrolled RN-BSN 4 yrs, BSN Online Full or Part-time: 9-12 months

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: On campus housing at Ouachita first 4 semesters; commuter campus while attending BHCLR; off campus for final semester online, RN to BSN Online, off campus

Priority Dec. 1

Southern Arkansas University, Magnolia • 870-235-4040

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, Online RN-BSN Completion

4 yrs BSN, 1-4 yrs online RNBSN Completion program

on campus housing

July 1st

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville • 479-5753904

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, RN-BSN (online program), MSN (online program), DNP (online program)LPN-BSN (online program)

4 years for BSN, 3-5 semesters RN to BSN, 2 years part-time MSN, 3 years full-time / 4 years part-time post-BSN-DNP, 2 years part-time post-MSNDNP

on campus housing for BSN students

March 15th

Univeristy of Arkansas, Little Rock, Department of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-569-8081

4 yr public

Semester

AAS, BSN, RN-BSN Completion

AAS program 18 to 24 months, RN-BSN online 12 or 18 month track

on/off campus housing

April 1st

University of Central Arkansas, Conway • 501-450-3119

4 yr public

Semester

BSN, RN TO BSN, MSN (Nurse Educatior with Clinical Specialty), Post-Master’s DNP and BSN to DNP (Family Nurse Practitioner)

BSN 4 yrs, RN to BSN 12 mos 100% online, MSN 5 semesters, 100% online, PMC varies, DNP 2yrs, BSN to DNP (FNP) 4 yrs part-time

on campus housing available

July 1st

University of Arkansas - Fort Smith • 479-7887841, 1-888-512-LION

4 yr public

Semester

BSN

4 yrs for BSN/Varies for RN-BSN

on campus housing

Priority Oct. 1st

University of Arkansas at Monticello • 870460-1069

4 yr public

Semester

AASN (LPN-RN), BSN, RN-BSN, LPN-BSN

2 to 4 yrs

on campus housing

contact financial aid (870) 460-1050

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-686-5224

4 yr public

Semester

RN to BSN, BSN, MSNc (APRN and Admin), BSN to DNP (APRN), DNP (Leadership), and PhD. Post Masters options available.

BSN generic: 2 full calendar years/ RN to BSN: 1 yr full time/ MNSc, DNP & PhD: students have up to 6 yrs to complete degree requirements.

on campus housing

varies, visit nursing.uams.edu. Click on Financial Assistance under Future Students

Arkansas Northeastern College, Blytheville • 870-780-1228

2 yr public

Semester

AAS Nursing

2 year

commuter campus

Priority April 15

Arkansas State University - Jonesboro • 870-9723074 (nursing) • 870-972-3024 (admissions)

4 yr public

Semester

D.N.P., M.S.N., B.S.N., AASN (LPN to AASN and Online LPN to AASN offered at A-State Jonesboro;Traditional and LPN to AASN offered at ASU MidSouth, and ASU-Mountain Home)

varies

on campus housing for Jonesboro

July 1st

Arkansas State University - Mountain Home • 870-508-6266

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in RN- LPN/Paramedic to RN

30 hrs pre-req courses, plus 1 yr LPN/Paramedic, Plus 1 yr RN

commuter campus

Nov. 1

Arkansas Tech University - Ozark Campus, Ozark • 479-667-2117

public

Semester

AAS in Allied Health-Practical Nursing and AAS in Registered Nursing

3 semesters-PN; 2 semesters - RN

commuter campus

Priority April 15

College of the Ouachitas, Malvern • 800-3370266 ext 1200

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing (PN), Associate of Applied Science in Nursing (LPN/Paramedic to RN), Certified Nursing Assistant, Medication Administration Program

12 months

commuter campus

open

East Arkansas Community College, Forrest City • 870-633-4480

2 yr public

Semester

AASN

2 yrs

commuter campus

April 15th

Mississippi County Community College, Blytheville • 870-762-1020

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in Nursing

2 yrs

commuter campus

Priority April 15 - Rolling

National Park College, Hot Springs • 501-7604290

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Science in Nursing (RN) traditional & LPN to RN, Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing (PN)

2 yrs RN, 1 yr PN

commuter campus

open

North Arkansas College, Harrison • 870-7433000

2 yr public

Semester

AAS in Nursing-traditional. LPN, RN Bridge

RN-2 yr; RN Bridge-1yr; PN-1yr

commuter campus

Pell Grant June 30

Northwest Arkansas Community College, Bentonville • 479-636-9222, 800-995-6922

2 yr public

Semester

AAS, RN

68 credit hours

commuter campus

June 1st and November 1st

Ozarka College, Melbourne • 870-368-2024 (Admissions) 870-368-2077 (Nursing)

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Registered Nursing

12 mos

commuter campus; limited housing units available on campus

none

Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, Helena-West Helena, Stuttgart • HWH 870-338-6474 x1254; Stuttgart 1-870-6734201 x1809

2 yr public

Semester

AAS

63 credit hrs, 5 semesters

commuter campus

Federal and state deadlines observed.

Southeast Arkansas College, Pine Bluff • 870543-5917

2 yr public

Semester

AAS: RN, Generic RN & LPN/Paramedic to RN. Technical Certificate: PN

PN-1 yr, Generic RN-5 Semesters

commuter campus

open

University of Arkansas, Little Rock, Department of Nursing, Little Rock • 501-569-8081

4 yr public

Semester

AAS/LPN to RN/BSN

4 semesters

on/off campus housing

April 1st

BACCALAUREATE

ASSOCIATE DEGREE

28 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

Special Advertising Section


Scholarship Deadline

Required Exams

Application Deadline

Comments/Home Page Address

February 15th

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ASSET; HESI A2 Nursing Admission Exam or HESI LPN to ADN Mobility Exam

varies

Nursing programs are accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. www.astate.edu

varies

BSN-ACT or COMPASS, TEAS, RN to BSNNone, MSN-GRE or MAT

BSN: Mar 1, Oct 1; RN to BSN: Mar 1, Aug 1, Oct 1; MSN: Ongoing

RN to BSN can be completed in as little as 1 year. Excellent Faculty. www.atu.edu/ nursing

Rolling

ACT or SAT

Rolling

Quality nursing education with a focus on Christian service and professionalism. www.harding.edu

varies

ACT, SAT, or COMPASS

August ( August 1) and January ( apply by January 1)

The school with a heart. Small classes. CCNE Accredited. www.hsu.edu

Priority Dec 1

ACT or TEAS (BHCLR)

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: Priority Dec 1 (OBU); November 30 (OBU & BHCLR), RN to BSN Online, Ongoing,

Dual Enrolled RN to BSN: Earn two degress in four years in this innovative, affordable program (AAS from BHCLR, BSN from OBU).RN to BSN Online: Small classes, Can be completed in 9-12 months, Entry into program 5 times per year.

Priority March 15, Final August

ACT, TEAS at least 60%

BSN Spring: Jan. 15-Mar. 1 for Fall Admission, Sep. 10 - Oct. 31 for Spring Admission; RN-BSN Completion Program Aug. (prior to classes beginning for Fall Admission, Jan. (prior to classes beginning for Spring Admission)

www.saumag.edu/nursing

November 15th

SAT, ACT, and BSN-DNP

Varies

We offer generalist and advanced nursing degree programs to prepare nurses to meet the health needs of the public in an ever-changing health care environment. The DNP offers two options: family nurse practitioner and acute-geriatric nurse practitioner. nurs.uark.edu

February 1st

ACT/SAT for students with less than 12 credits.

AAS application Jan 5-February 28 classes start during the summer semester, RN-BSN online program rolling admissions

BSN completion for current RNs or recent graduates of an accredited nursing program. UA-Little Rock students can earn an AAS and ladder into the online BSN and graduate within 4 years. www.ualr.edu/nursing

February 15 - University Scholarships | March 9 Foundation Scholarships

No entrance exam required for nursing major.

varies by program, see website for dates

Student-centered, NCLEX-RN 1st time pass rates are consistently above state and national average. All programs are CCNE Accredited. www.uca.edu/nursing

June 1st

ACT/Accuplacer

Oct 1st for Spring/ March 1st for Fall

RN-BSN is an Online Completion Program. Http://health.uafs.edu/programs/rnto-bsn; health.uafs.edu

March 1st

Entrance

March 1st

Achieve your nursing goals with us. http://www.uamont.edu/pages/school-of-nursing/degree-programs/

varies, visit nursing.uams. edu. click on Financial Assistance under Future Students.

TOEFL for int’l students, ATI TEAS V for BSN applicants.

RN to BSN: Jan. 1, Mar. 1, Jun. 1, Sept. 1, Nov. 1/ BSN generic: Mar. 1/ MNSc: Sept. 1 & Feb. 1/BSN to DNP: Feb 1/ PhD: Mar.1, Jun. 15, Nov. 15

conadmissions@uams.edu • www.nursing.uams.edu

Priority April 15

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ACCUPLACER and PAX-RN

RN- March 31

ANC offers the RN, LPN, and LPN to RN programs of study. www.anc.edu

February 15th

ACT or SAT or COMPASS or ASSET; HESI A2 Nursing Admission Exam or HESI LPN to ADN Mobility Exam

varies

The mission of the School of Nursing is to educate, enhance and enrich students for evolving professoinal nursing practice. Nursing programs are accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Education in Nursing, Inc. www.astate.edu

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER plus HESI LPN-ADN or HESI EMS-ADN

Oct. 15, March 15 (ASUMH starts a second cohort in Summer 2020)

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asumh.edu

varies

PN: TEAS, RN: HESI

March 15th, October 1st-PN; March 15-RN

Clinical experience in hospitals of varying size, physicians’ offices and geriatric facilities. www.atu.edu/ozark

Fall-May1, Spring-Dec 1

COMPASS/ACCUPLACER for the PN Program & Kaplan for RN Program

2nd Friday in Sept. for Jan. admitance; 2nd Friday in Feb. for May admittance to RN program

www.coto.edu for additional information.

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER / Nursing Pre-entrance exams

varies

Allied health program offering RN-Nursing degree (basic students, LPN completion). www.eacc.edu

Priority April 15

PAX-RN

March 31st

www.mccc.cc.ar.us

open

ACT, SAT or College Entry Exam & TEAS

First Monday in March

Options for LPN and new High School seniors. www.np.edu

June 15th

ACT, ACCUPLACER

varies with program

Northark’s students receive excellent healthcare education leading to rewarding careers in nursing. www.northark.edu/academics/areas-of-study/health-and-medical/index

April 1st

HESI A2

Track I: May 1st, Track II: Dec. 1st, LPN to RN: Nov. 1st

The college of the NWA community, member of Northwest Arkansas Nursing Education Consortium. www.nwacc.edu/academics/nursing. The NWACC Nursing program is ARSBN approved and ACEN accredited

April 1st

NACE test

Aug. 31/Spring entry (application window: Jan 1- Aug 31)

Providing life-changing experiences through education. www.ozarka.edu

none

Nelson Denny Reading Test 10th grade level and 55 on the ATI Critical Thinking Exam

June 1st

ACEN accredited. www.pccua.edu

none

ACT, COMPASS, PAX for PN,KAPLAN Admission Exam

Second Friday in March

Changing lives…one student at a time! www.seark.edu

February 1st

ACT/SAT/Compass for students with less than 12 credits.

Priority Application Deadline Feb 28/ Applications accepted until class full.

LPN/Paramedic to RN (1 year). Traditional AAS (2 years). Accelerated AAS (18 months). See above for BSN information. www.ualr.edu/nursing

Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 29


University of Arkansas Community College at Batesville • 870-612-2000, 800-508-7878

2 yr public

Semester

AAS-Generic RN, AAS-LPN-to-RN Online or Traditional, TC-Practical Nursing

AAS-Generic RN 16mos, ASS-LPN-to-RN 12 mos, TC-Practical Nursing 11mos

commuter campus

varies

University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana • 870-777-5722

2 yr public

Semester

Associate/RN; LPN (Hope); LPN (Texarkana)

12 months (excludes prerequisites)

commuter campus

July 15th

Baptist Health College Little Rock • 501-2026200, 800-345-3046

private, faith-based

Semester

diploma/PN, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing/RN

RN traditonal track 3 semesters + general education courses PN 1yr. RN Accelerated 1yr (LPNs or Paramedics).

commuter campus

March 1st priority

Jefferson Reg. Med. Center School of Nursing, Pine Bluff • 870-541-7858

private

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Nursing

79 weeks

off campus only

none

Arkansas Northeastern College, Blytheville • 870-780-1228

public

Semester

Technical Certificate of Practical Nursing

13 months

commuter campus

Priority April 15th

Arkansas State University - Beebe • 501-2076255

public

Semester

Certificate LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

varies

Arkansas State University - Mountain Home • 870-508-6266

public

Semester

Technical certificate in PN

11 mos

commuter campus

varies

Arkansas State University - Newport • 870680-8710

public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

11 mos

commuter campus

contact financial aid

Arkansas Tech University - Ozark Campus, Ozark • 479-667-2117

public

Semester

AAS in Allied Health-Practical Nursing

3 semesters

commuter campus

Priority April 15

ASU Technical Center, Jonesboro • 870-932-2176

public

Semester

LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

none

Baptist Health College Little Rock • 501-2026200, 800-345-3046

private

Semester

diploma/PN, Associate of Applied Science in Nursing/RN

2 semester PN

commuter campus

Priority March 1st

Black River Technical College, Pocahontas • 870248-4000 ext. 4150

2 yr public

Semester

AAS/RN, Certificate/PN, Certificate of Proficiency/Nursing Assistant

AAS/RN 3 semesters, Certificate/PN 3semesters, Certificate of Proficiency/Nursing Assistant 5 weeks.

commuter campus

contact financial aid office

College of the Ouachitas, Malvern • 800-3370266 ext 1200

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

12 months

commuter campus

Spring-November;Summer-April

University of Arkansas - Cossatot, DeQueen and Nashville • 870-584-4471, 800-844-4471

2 yr public

Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters

LPN Technical Certificate, RN Associate of Applied Science

LPN DeQueen Day Program 11 mos, LPN Nashville Evening Program 18 mos, RN (transition from LPN) Nashville Evening Program 11 mos.

commuter campus

varies

Crowley’s Ridge Technical Institute • Forrest City • 870-633-5411

public

Semester

LPN

LPN: 40 wks

commuter campus

Please call 870.633.5411 for more information

National Park College, Hot Springs • 501-7604160

Public

Semester

Certificate in Practical Nursing

11 mos FT

commuter campus

none

Northwest Technical Institute, Springdale • 479-751-8824

public

Semester

diploma/PN

3 sem. & 1 Summer session (includes Pre-Reqs)

commuter campus

July 1/Fall, December 1/Spring

Ozarka College, Melbourne • 870-368-2024 (Admissions) 870-368-2077 (Nursing)

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in LPN, LPN-RN track offered

11 mos. track or 18 mos. track

commuter campus with limited housing units available on campus

none

Phillips Community College of the University of Arkansas, Helena-West Helena, DeWitt • HWH 870-338-6474 x1254; DeWitt 1-870-946-3506 x 1511

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate

42 credit hrs; 3 semesters

commuter campus

Federal and state deadlines observed.

University of Arkansas Pulaski Technical College, North Little Rock • 501-812-2200

2 yr public

Begins in early August and ends in mid-June of each school year

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing/PN

11-month traditional track/22month non-traditional track

commuter campus

April 15 for upcoming fall semester

University of Arkansas Rich Mountain, Mena • 479-394-7622

2 yr public

Semester

Associate of Applied Science in Registered Nursing, Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing, CP in Nursing Assistant

11-12 mos

commuter or on-campus housing available in 2020

varies, contact financial aid office

SAU Tech, Camden • 870-574-4500

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate

11 mos

commuter campus and on-campus

N/A

South Arkansas Community College, El Dorado • 870-864-7142, 870-864-7137

2 yr public

Semester

ADN,LPN

11 mos

commuter campus

June 1, November 1, April 1

University of Arkansas at Monticello College of Technology, McGeHee • 870-222-5360

2 yr public

Semester

Technical Certificate in Practical Nursing

January to December

commuter campus

varies

University of Arkansas Comm. College at Morrilton • 501-977-2000

2 yr public

Semester

Practical Nursing (PN) Technical Certificate; Registered Nursing (RN) Associate of Applied Science degree

PN is 12 months; RN is 12 months after prerequisites are met

commuter campus

prior to semester

University of Arkansas at Hope-Texarkana • 870-777-5722

2 yr public

Semester

certificate/PN

10.5 or 12 months (excludes prerequisites)

commuter campus

July 15th

PRACTICAL NURSING

*** for Basic nursing education; Varies with previous coursework or nursing license; MSN program = 2 yrs

30 OCTOBER 2020

ARKANSAS TIMES

Special Advertising Section


March 1- High school Academic; July 15- Others; Nursing Scholarship- Dec. 1

ASSET, ACT, SAT or ACCUPLACER, and KAPLAN Nurse Entrance Test

TC-PN and AAS-Generic RN May 1; AAS-LPN-to-RN July 15

Prerequisite courses and KAPLAN entrance testing must be completed prior to entry into a nursing program. www.uaccb.edu

April 15 and November 15

ACT or ACCUPLACER or LPN license

August 31st

www.arnec.org, www.uacch.edu

varies

ACT or SAT; TEAS

RN traditional track/PN program: July 1st & December 1st , RN Accelerated: December 1st

www.bhclr.edu

none

ACT

Oct. 15 for Jan. class; Apr. 15 for June class. $35 application fee.

www.jrmc.org/schoolofnursing

Priority April 15th

ACT, SAT, COMPASS, or ACCUPLACER and PAX-PN

PN-March 31st

Variety of clinical experiences. www.anc.edu

June 15th

ACCUPLACER and WONDERLIC

April 15 and November 15

Application packet and program requirements are online. www.asub.edu

varies

ACT, ACCUPLACER plus HESI A2

Oct. 15, March 15

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asumh.edu

varies

Accuplacer, ATI TEAS

August class (Newport/Jonesboro)-June 1, January class (Marked Tree)- Oct 15

Application packet and program requirements online. www.asun.edu

varies

TEAS

March 15th, October 1st

Clinical experience in hospitals of varying size, physicians’ offices and geriatric facilities. www.atu.edu/ozark

none

ASSET, NET

June 1 & November 1

Combines classroom instruction with clinical experience. Graduates eligible to take NCLEX.

varies

ACT or SAT; TEAS

Dec 1st & June 1st

www.bhclr.edu

April 15th

ACT or Accuplacer for BRTC Admission and NA Applicants; TEAS for PN Applicants, NACE for RN Applicants.

NA - Contact Nursing department, PN April 1 for following fall acceptance and October 31 for following spring acceptance, August 31 annually for following Spring RN acceptance.

BRTC: A college of vision. BRTC has a 95% plus boards pass rate. www.blackrivertech.org

Spring-November;Summer-May

HESI Entrance Exam

2nd Friday in Oct. for Jan. admittance; 2nd Friday in March for May admittance to PN program

www.coto.edu

April 1st

ACCUPLACER or ACT; TEAS for LPN; NACE for RN

LPN Day Program-De Queen: March 1st, LPN and RN Evening Program-Nashville: August 31st

Prerequisites required prior to admission. www.cccua.edu/MedEd

varies

ACCUPLACER

CRTI is currently in the process of merging with East Arkansas Community College. Call for more information.

www.crti.ar.tec.us

none

College Entry Exam, TEAS

First Monday in March

Do you want to make a difference? Then nursing is for you! www.np.edu

June 1/Fall, December 1/ Spring

NET, COMPASS

November 1st

Bilingual scholarships available- www.nwansged.org

April 1st

PAX Test

April 1/Fall entry, November 1/Spring entry

Providing life-changing experiences through education. www.ozarka.edu

none

Nelson-Denny Reading Test 9th grade level and 47 on ATI Critical Thinking Exam

June 1st for fall admission and Oct. 1st for spring admission

www.pccua.edu

varies

ACT or ACCUPLACER and Kaplan Admission Test

April 15th

Call the Allied Health Advisor to discuss eligibility requirements. www.uaptc. edu/programs_of_study/nursing/practical_nursing.asp. Allied Health Advisor: 501-812-2745. Allied Health Administrative Specialist: 501-812-2834. INTERNET HOME PAGE ADDRESS - www.uaptc.edu

Nov. 15 - Priority; Apr. 1 - Pending funds available; Foundation Scholarship Deadlines: Fall - Apr. 1 & Jul. 30; Spring - Dec. 1

RN: NACE; LPN: PSB and ACT or Accuplacer

LPN-March, RN-August

www.uarichmountain.edu

March 1st

ASSET. TEAS. Practical Nursing

March 31st

Two Applications required: admissions and nursing. www.sautech.edu

Priority April 1st

ACT, ASSET, or COMPASS

open

SouthArk: Where students come first. www.southark.edu

March 1st

ACT, Accuplacer, ASSET, COMPASS, or SAT - TABE and TEAS

Early October

Approved by Arkansas State Board of Nursing, Accredited by the Higher Learning commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools

April 1st

TEAS, NACE

PN deadlines are Oct. 1 & Mar. 1; RN dealine is Aug. 31

Enrollment in PN program on Morrilton campus limited to 24 in spring semester and summer. Enrollment in RN program limited to 48 for classes beginning each January. www.uaccm.edu

April 15 and November 15

ACT or ACCUPLACER

May 1st and November 1st

www.uacch.edu

Special Advertising Section

ARKANSASTIMES.COM

OCTOBER 2020 31


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Arkansas Times | Nurses Guide 2020  

Arkansas Times | Nurses Guide 2020