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ARKANSAS’S WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF POLITICS AND CULTURE ■ november 18, 2010

www.arktimes.com

Lawyers

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n A source says he’s been interviewed by FBI agents doing background checks on former state Rep. Chris Thyer of Jonesboro for possible nomination to be U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Arkansas. The Obama administration has been so slow to move on this appointment that the original front-runner, Michael Barnes of Little Rock, dropped out of consideration.

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n Sen. Steve Faris apparently will still be haunting the Senate chamber next year despite being term-limited. Sources say he’ll be hired as a temporary legislative staffer. Don’t be surprised if he winds up with a full-time Senate job. At least one key position could be opened if, as expected Senate staffer Bruce Campbell joins the staff of rising Lt. Gov. Mark Darr. It’s long rankled many Democrats that Campbell, a former member of the Huckabee administration, had a Senate job while being seen often in the company of Republican officials plotting this year’s sweep of open Senate seats.

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n Lottery officials took a beating last week in front of state auditors and legislators regarding the commission’s reporting of travel expenses, among other issues. Auditors took issue with a trip to New York taken by Vice President of Gaming Operations David Barden to attend a conference from March 22-25. The total cost of Barden’s trip was $1,280. All other employees returned to Arkansas after the conference ended, while Barden stayed in New York until March 27. The extra twonight stay was justified because Barden attended additional meetings and had to attend a conference in Washington on the 28th. Staying two extra nights eliminated a return trip to Little Rock, Lottery Director Ernie Passailaigue told reporters last week. Barden’s room was also $100 more expensive per night than those of other employees. According to the report, “The room is a Sheraton Club Suite which is eligible for complimentary access to the Sheraton Lounge on the 44th floor; this access provides complimentary breakfast, evening hors d’oeuvres and adult beverages each day.” According to a lottery response included in the working papers to justify the extra expense, “The other ASL employees received the discounted rate of $189 a night plus taxes ($220/night). After the block of rooms were sold out, the hotel’s regular room rates applied.” The report indicates the lottery spent $57,741 on travel from August 2009 through October 2010, with Passailaigue spending 27 days on the road, or 15 percent of the time; and Barden traveling 38 days or, on average, one day out of every five.

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Smart talk

Contents

brian chilson

Name that tune — and gal

NO VIC SNYDER: Joyce Elliott couldn’t muster support in Pulaski that other Democrats found.

Can the 2nd District be saved?

n Arkies on Capitol Hill were intrigued last week when Mike Allen’s daily e-mail for Politico contained an item saying rising Republican House Speaker John Boehner had been spotted at La Lomita, a Capitol Hill Mexican eatery, “singing to an Arkansas Razorback birthday girl. No calling of the hogs.” Name that gal, and we’ll provide you a Mexican dinner in Little Rock. Name the tune and we’ll throw in a margarita.

Little Rock Promise?

n Republican Tim Griffin’s 58-38 victory over Democrat Joyce Elliott in the race for 2nd District Congress wasn’t a surprise, given advance polling. But the margin of victory for a far-right Republican was somewhat surprising given the district’s representation for 14 years by U.S. Rep. Vic Snyder, a liberal Democrat. The problem may be less a profound change in district voting patterns than the weakness of the Democratic candidate (and arguments are likely to persist whether it was her race [black], gender, issues or political mechanics that were to blame). Proof: Three Democratic candidates who lost statewide races by narrow margins all carried the eight-county 2nd District. Shane Broadway beat Mark Darr 56 to 44 percent in the race for lieutenant governor in Conway, Faulkner, Perry, Van Buren, Saline, White, Yell and Pulaski Counties. Pat O’Brien led GOP secretary of state winner Mark Martin 55-45 and L.J. Bryant even eked out a 51-49 win over Republican John Thurston in the land commissioner race. All carried Conway and Pulaski counties, the latter by margins ranging from 15,800 for Bryant to almost 30,000 for O’Brien. Broadway also carried his home Saline County. O’Brien carried Van Buren and Yell, too. Elliott was beaten badly everywhere, except for a margin of a few hundred votes in Pulaski.

n The El Dorado Promise scholarship program — which provides to El Dorado high school graduates a scholarship with a value equivalent to tuition at an Arkansas public university — is being replicated around the country. News came last week that New Haven, Ct., had adopted a “Promise” program, with scholarships for Connecticut public colleges and universities and a $2,5000 annual payment to private colleges. Yale University is paying most of the cost. It’s a powerful lure to get people to reconsider living in sometimes declining communities like New Haven. Anyone like to step up for Little Rock?

8 Self-dealing

at the airport

For its first ever “sponsorship” of advertising at a football field, the Little Rock National Airport sent $40,000 — up front — to Little Rock Christian Academy, the private church school attended by a child of Airport Director Ron Mathieu. — By Leslie Newell Peacock

11 Down by law

A legal career is no longer looking as promising as it once did, current and recent law students have been learning. — By Doug Smith

16 Tip of the iceberg

Airport Director Ron Mathieu’s expenditure on his son’s private church school isn’t the only expenditure worth more inspection at Little Rock National Airport. — By Max Brantley

Departments

Mama Grizzly cometh n Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin will sign copies of her book, “America by Heart,” at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 30 at the Sam’s Club on Bowman Road. Her publisher said a national book tour was aimed at heartland America more than major coastal cities, presumably because of the expected popularity of her message. Maybe so. But after we posted the news on the Arkansas Times Facebook page it drew 28 quick comments – all negative. Typical comment: “Please tell me it’s Tina Fey.”

3 The Insider 4 Smart Talk 5 The Observer 6 Letters 7 Orval 8-14 News 16 Opinion 19 Arts & Entertainment 55 Dining 61 Crossword/ Tom Tomorrow NOTE: Bob Lancaster is off this week.

Words VOLUME 37, NUMBER 11

n Let your conscious be your guide: “Layaway is back in a big way; Revival helping cost-conscience avoid credit cards” n “A pit bulldog Saturday attacked a mother and her two sons, sending all three to an area hospital with injuries. Jane Doe, 30, and her son, John, 9, were being treated for cuts on their heads, arms and hands at Northwest Medical CenterSpringdale. … Jane Doe, whose injuries included two cuts on her right eyelid and muscle damage in her right arm, said Justin was playing outside when he was attacked. She ran outside to help.” Did the dog have a knife? I don’t know that I’ve ever seen bites referred to as cuts. Cut as a verb means “to penetrate 4 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

Doug smith doug@arktimes.com

with or as if with a sharp-edged instrument or object.” As a noun, cut is “the result of cutting, as an incision, wound, passage, or channel.” Injuries can be applied to both cuts and bites, I suppose, and wounds certainly can. But why use a vaguer term when there’s one that fits precisely? n “Of the 80 people who turned up, a scattered few phased out near — but not too near — the stage with the rest of the

crowd either wide-eyed or nodding off at the tables.” Phased out in this sense is not in my dictionary. The writer tells me it’s similar to spaced out: “You know, eyes glazed over.” Spaced-out is in the dictionary. It dates back to the late 1960s and it means “dazed or stupefied because of the influence of narcotic drugs,” and “dreamily or eerily out of touch with reality or seemingly so.” n He means a lot at our football team: “I’m just very proud of the way he played. He’s a really, really talented, extremely gifted player who means a lot of our football team.” To is what’s needed here, but lately people seem to believe that one preposition is as good as another.

ARKANSAS TIMES (ISSN 0164-6273) is published each week by Arkansas Times Limited Partnership, 201 East Markham Street, 200 Heritage Center West, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, Arkansas, 72203, phone (501) 375-2985. Periodical postage paid at Little Rock, Arkansas, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to ARKANSAS TIMES, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR, 72203. Subscription prices are $42 for one year, $78 for two years. Subscriptions outside Arkansas are $49 for one year, $88 for two years. Foreign (including Canadian) subscriptions are $168 a year. For subscriber service call (501) 375-2985. Current single-copy price is 75¢, free in Pulaski County. Single issues are available by mail at $2.50 each, postage paid. Payment must accompany all single-copy orders. Reproduction or use in whole or in part of the contents without the written consent of the publishers is prohibited. Manuscripts and artwork will not be returned or acknowledged unless sufficient return postage and a self-addressed stamped envelope are included. All materials are handled with due care; however, the publisher assumes no responsibility for care and safe return of unsolicited materials. All letters sent to ARKANSAS TIMES will be treated as intended for publication and are subject to ARKANSAS TIMES’ unrestricted right to edit or to comment editorially.

©2010 ARKANSAS TIMES LIMITED PARTNERSHIP

FOR INFORMATION OR SUBSCRIPTIONS CALL 501-375-2985


The Observer’s old friend, birding partner, radio reporter and freelance writer Nancy King died recently, and one of the remembrances of her that came to light was the article she wrote for the Quapaw Quarter Chronicle in 1993 about the faux Socks. Christa Belle Fennell, who lived just a few doors down from the Governor’s Mansion, found herself the subject of much misguided press attention after Bill Clinton was elected president. Nancy reported that Christa Belle’s owner Sam (then 15) rescued his black and white cat from a circle of “paparazzi,” and when the press asked where he was taking Socks he replied, “Who’s Socks?” Nancy called the White House asking if Socks had a press kit and reported that a spokesman in the “deadly dull and serious 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.” said “with out a trace of humor” that there was no such thing. He could send a glossy 8 x 10, and did. Nancy took that photograph and compared it to other portraits of Socks in national magazines — Time, Newsweek, Life and People — and found they were all of the real thing. “The nation’s leading periodicals, it seems, employ photographers not easily fooled by any pretty feline face.” Fortunately for Christa Belle, she was no longer hounded after Socks left for D.C. As Nancy wrote, “ ‘Her family is from Gilbert, an old Arkansas family,’ Tom Fennell says, shaking his head. ‘She just wants to avoid all this sensational publicity.’ ”

The Fennells have their QQC article tucked into a book called “Socks Goes to Washington.” It’s a picture book, with entries like “My cat bowl once belonged to Calvin Coolidge” accompanied by a cartoon of Socks chowing down. It has this entry too: “Every now and then, when you’re wondering how to pay off a four-trillion-dollar national debt plus an extra sixty billion Bush claims he ‘forgot’ to mention and you’re worried about a sluggish economy and rising unemployment and a crumbling infrastructure and global warming and carjacking and the banks are going under and the schools are getting worse and

AIDs is out of control and you’re turning back boatloads of Haitians and you still haven’t put together a decent health plan and Gore is on your case to save some little spotted owl up in Oregon and you’ll probably have to raise taxes on the middle class even though you swore you’d cut them and maybe tax gasoline too which is going to send your approval rating into single digits and every day something weird happens in Bosnia and Somalia and Iraq and the C.I.A. confirmed that Pakistan has seven nuclear bombs and they’re not sure but Iran may even have one or two, it’s quite soothing to just sit and pet a cat.” Maybe Obama needs a Socks.

Always bookish,The Observer has been even more immersed in printed material than usual. He recently reported on a visit to the grand old used-book store on Dickson Street in Fayetteville. More recently, he discovered It’s A Mystery Bookstore in Berryville. “Of all places,” one is tempted to say, but that would be patronizing. Readers live in small towns too. Still, The Observer was pleasantly surprised to find a substantial used-book store on the Berryville town square. The store buys, sells and trades books, specializing in used paperback mysteries, though other sorts of books are available too, including Westerns. As a boy, The Observer read both the Westerns and the mysteries that his father brought home. In It’s A Mystery, he found books in both genres whose covers and titles he remembered from long ago. Zane Grey and Erle Stanley Gardner still live in Berryville. We bought a couple of books, of course, though the browsing was what we liked best, in a store where we liked everything — the dog, the friendly lady behind the counter, the bookmark she gave us that was recycled from advertising for Milk-Bone dog food. There’s a bit of lacy red ribbon attached; The Observer is choosing to think of it as a garter from a gold-hearted dance hall girl in one of those Westerns. Perry Mason may be frozen in time, but It’s A Mystery is not. Check out the website, www.itsmystery.biz.

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Letters arktimes@arktimes.com

Name change For some time now, I have been concerned by our new senator-elect, John Boozman, and his apparent confusion about the pronunciation of his name. I know of no word in the English language containing two contiguous letters O which are pronounced as if there was only one such O. Yet, that is exactly the pronunciation used by Mr. Boozman. If he’s unhappy about his name, why doesn’t he just change it? To Bozeman — or Smith or Jones? Or he could change his given name to match it — say “Bob,” but spelled with two Os? Ronald A. May Little Rock

Grievous wound A dark and sinister veil of fear has been drawn over the face of our land. What a grievous wound to bear as we bid farewell to Vic Snyder (D-Integrity), and feel the darkness and deceit of Tim Griffin (RMendacity). Buddy Slate Little Rock

Wall Street fought financial regulation and was supported by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The chamber fought hard against health care reform also, not caring about out of control health costs or preexisting conditions. Candidate Tim Griffin was glad to have the support of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Steve Wheeler North Little Rock

As a nurse, I think you should check Bob Lancaster into the nearest mental hospital for evaluation. His rambling Nov. 4 reminds me of some of the patients on the psych unit. I think something blew in his brain after the election. I couldn’t follow anything he said in his article. Didn’t you even read it before you printed it? Deborah Bowman North Little Rock

up enormous deficits; the Clinton administration paid the debt in the amount of $600 billion. The George W. Bush administration ran up deficits to unprecedented levels, deregulated financial services and a number of other vital services, and handed out tax cuts, paid for by borrowing, to the wealthiest people in our country. He also presided over the disastrous invasion and occupation of two countries. Every president (and congress) in history, prior to President Obama, has essentially turned a cold shoulder to the fact that Americans die every day because they have no health insurance. The current political atmosphere looks and sounds like the Jerry Springer Show — an emotional, irrational approach to conflict resolution that is sickly entertaining but will never solve anything. Ora Barnes Stevens Little Rock

Politics

Confronting hatred

First, I make no apologies for being a true liberal progressive. As such, there are a number of President Obama’s domestic and foreign policy positions that I do not fully embrace, but my position is based on facts, not emotions. I find the anti-Obama rhetoric related to the economy, health care and a wide range of other issues to be simply emotional. The facts are very clear. The facts are that Ronald Reagan ran

Recently, a Ugandan magazine released the names and address of 100 gay and lesbian residents, situated next to a bolded message “Hang Them.” People have been attacked, with several fired from their jobs, and many more now in hiding for fear of losing their lives. With the most recent slew of publicized deaths resulting from gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender bullying, the very real

Something blew

effects of hatred and prejudice have been reintroduced into the American dialog. But too many people have looked to this atrocity — the preventable deaths of our fellow humans — and responded, “But I would never hurt anyone.” To these folks, I ask, “Is prejudice and hatred really any different when the results are the same?” Homophobia is homophobia, even when dealt with a healthy dose of Christian love. Gay and lesbian citizens of Arkansas—children even—have died because of homophobia. Homosexual citizens of Arkansas are still fired from their jobs because they lack basic worker protections from homophobia. And don’t kid yourself into thinking homosexual citizens of Arkansas aren’t in hiding—they just haven’t told you yet. Uganda and Arkansas don’t seem to be that different after all. When staring hatred in the face, I challenge everyone in this state to act with true compassion and love, not engage in pitiful and meaningless self-gratification. Cody Hooks Little Rock Submit letters to The Editor, Arkansas Times, P.O. Box 34010, Little Rock, AR 72203. We also accept letters via e-mail. The address is maxbrantley@arktimes. com. We also accept faxes at 375-3623. Please include a hometown and telephone number.

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Nov. 10-16, 2010 It was a good week for …

MIKE HUCKABEE. He’s obliquely alerting the faithful to gear up for a 2012 presidential run. Why not? His numbers look as good or better than any other Republican contender and President Obama’s political trajectory continues to run in the wrong direction. The LITTLE ROCK POLICE. Missing pets are not a high priority for police in a city with a stout homicide rate. But the cops managed to get cat lovers in the Stifft Station in an uproar for a tepid response to a mentally disturbed man’s suspicious encounter with neighborhood cats. (He seemed to have been trying to carry one off in a small cooler.) Is he a felinicidal maniac responsible for multiple missing neighborhood cats? Or just misunderstood? Who knows? Before it was over the police chief, a city director and the prosecutor’s office were in talks with unhappy residents. DR. CHARLES WELCH. The president of Henderson State University was a last-minute applicant for the job of Arkansas State University president and — surprise! — he got the job over two out-of-state applicants and received high praise from ASU Board members who’ve known Welch for many years. If you get our drift. STATE EMPLOYEES. Gov. Mike Beebe said the budget – if creeks don’t rise, etc. – might provide a 1.8 percent state employee pay raise. That’s not a lot. But it’s better than zero, last year’s raise (except for special exceptions like coaches and such.) It was a bad week for …

ARKANSAS. Sen.-elect John Boozman fell in lockstep with his party leaders (surprise) to swear off seeking special spending for Arkansas projects. The benefits to Arkansas in highway, park, research and other “earmark” projects over the years has been significant. No more, if Boozman has anything to do with it. LITTLE ROCK NATIONAL AIRPORT. See our story, which went on-line last week, about Airport Director Ron Mathieu’s spending $40,000 on the football field at his kid’s private church school. See their uncommunicative media manager. See their lavish expense accounts. See a governing commission slow to react. It sounds like Game and Fish Commission Story II, though Mathieu finally apologized Tuesday. 8 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

The Arkansas Reporter

Phone: 501-375-2985­ Fax: 501-375-3623 Arkansas Times Online home page: http://www.arktimes.com E-mail: arktimes@arktimes.com ■

■­

Mathieu survives $40,000 ad buy Commission: ‘Error in judgment,’ but no punishment. By Leslie Newell Peacock

n Little Rock Airport Executive Director Ron Mathieu did not lose his job this week — wasn’t even close to losing it, Airport Commission Chairman Bob East told reporters — after the Arkansas Times disclosed in a story published online last week that Mathieu had channeled $40,000 in airport funds to his son’s private church school, Little Rock Christian Academy, to help buy turf for the football field. Mathieu and commissioners contacted last Friday defended the transaction as payment for an advertisement. However, the news brought a hail of criticism. Tuesday morning, the Airport Commission called an executive session at its regular meeting to discuss Mathieu’s employment. Mathieu, who last Friday evening issued a statement accusing the Times of publishing “innuendo and untruths” in its story, read a statement of apology at the opening of the commission meeting. He said after several days thought, he decided he made errors in judgment. “I was focused on the process and missed the greater issue,” he said, of not consulting the commission for advice on the expenditure. Mathieu, who’s paid $181,000 a year, and his media relations manager, Tiajuana Williams, who makes $96,000 a year, refused to speak to the Times about the story last week or answer written questions. They referred questions that concerned documents to the airport’s counsel, Carolyn Witherspoon, whose firm is on a $10,725 monthly retainer. Mathieu said Tuesday he wanted to make six apologies: To the commission as a whole for “failing to make sure his actions” didn’t create controversy; to Commissioner Tom Schueck for his misleading response to Schueck’s question about the expenditure at a June meeting; to his staff, saying, “You have been damaged”; to the public for “not doing a better job”; to the “editor and staff of the Arkansas Times for not granting a personal interview” when the paper requested one last Friday; and to his family. “There is no excuse for my mistakes and I accept the judgment of the commission.” When it became clear no answers were forthcoming from the airport to numerous questions, the Times published its story on-line Friday afternoon. Mathieu then released a statement to media following the story — after Times’ reporters had left for the day — saying he was “saddened” by the decision of the Times to publish the

brian chilson

The WEEK THAT was

APOLOGY ACCEPTED: Airport Commission Chairman Bob East said Airport Director Ron Mathieu’s apology was accepted for guiding a $40,000 airport payment to help install a football field at his son’s private church school. story. He said that his staff had handled the details of the deal with Little Rock Christian to avoid a conflict of interest. It was the airport’s first and only ad on a football field. Mathieu currently has authority to spend up to $50,000 unsupervised. It appears the airport officials believe he may delegate that authority to others, here Deputy Director Bryan Malinowski, who signed the contract with Little Rock Christian. East said Tuesday that the Airport Commission will try to find a way to get the $40,000 back from the school, which hasn’t been commenting. He also said the Commission will review the amount of money that the director can spend on his own authority, now $50,000, and asked Commissioner Schueck to review how the airport spends funds on travel and other expenses, “to look into everything we’re doing,” and report back in December. He said the commission believed Mathieu had made a “serious error of judgment,” but otherwise would take no personnel action. He said “everybody makes mistakes” and the apology was accepted. The story that originally appeared online reported that Mathieu avoided mention of the specific expense when asked directly about it at a June Commission meeting. He intimated an increase in spending was for a variety of new ad efforts, when it was solely for the football field sponsorship. (See sidebar for full transcript.) For its $40,000, the airport got a 7-by10-foot painted logo on the field that features the airport’s web address, www.flylit.com. The invoice for the check made out to Little Rock Christian Academy on May 15 notes that it is for a “turf sponsorship agreement.” The airport issued the check a month after LRCA development direc-

tor Jason Carson sent Mathieu an e-mail with the subject line “important reminder regarding your LRCA turf pledge ...” Addressed to “Friends of Warrior Athletics,” Carson’s e-mail said, “I just wanted to remind you about your donation to the turf project. As of today, only about 40% of the pledges have been realized. We will need all pledges turned into cash donations before this project can be given the green light. ... Our deadline is fast approaching so please send it in as soon as possible and remember this is a tax-deductible donation.” Mathieu responded to Carson’s e-mail saying he thought the “airport advertising pledge” should have been sent out earlier. When a commissioner asked at a June commission meeting why May’s marketing budget had gone from $6,000 last year to $47,000 this year, Airport Finance Director Carol Snay replied that it was because the airport had a $40,000 advertising expense. Commissioner Schueck asked for more information, and Mathieu jumped in, explaining that the expense was to push traffic the website; he cited specifically television and radio ads and a banner at the Race for the Cure. He did not mention the turf advertising at Little Rock Christian. Mathieu finally granted the Times an interview Tuesday afternoon, following the commission meeting and a damp groundbreaking ceremony for an airport expansion. At that groundbreaking, Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Jay Chesshir, another Little Rock Christian Academy parent, prayed for “special blessings” and guidance for the commission and airport leaders. Mathieu’s only comment to the Times last week, a prepared statement distributed by Williams, came only after the Times Continued on page 9


MATHIEU

Continued from page 8 published its story. She provided a copy of a prepared statement by Mathieu several hours after his 5:30 p.m. news conference in which he accused the Times of printing “innuendos and untruths,” though he cited no factual errors. He said that it would have been unfair for him to have to pass up the opportunity simply because he had a personal relationship to the school. He called it a “clean business transition [sic].” Commissioners had been warned by Mathieu’s staff before the Times called Friday that the newspaper had been researching airport records. When reached Friday none was ready to criticize the expense. Commissioner Jesse Mason insisted that the money was not for providing turf for the field but to advertise the airport (that later proved to be a talking point provided commissioners by Williams). Mason described the advertising as a 10-year contract, and a bargain at $4,000 a year, though it was all paid up front, unusual in the advertising business. The payment amounted to about 15 percent of the airport’s $270,000 annual marketing budget. Schueck said he didn’t remember his

questions at the meeting, and expressed confidence in Mathieu. “Our director is a pretty sharp guy; I’m sure he operated within the system.” He did seem surprised at the way the turf sign was paid for, exclaiming “$40,000 at once?” Commissioner Jimmy Moses said he couldn’t comment because Airport Commission chairman Bob East had said all questions should come to him. East also declined comment pending Tuesday’s commission meeting. Commissioner Kay Arnold, in response to an e-mail question from the Times, relayed the talking points Williams had sent to her. Williams told Arnold: “We felt this to be ‘kosher’ as the value is exceptional for the term of this advertising flight. For less than $4,000 a year we have exposure to people who are considered loyal to products and services provided by companies that partner with them through advertising sponsorships. Our targets include those with discretionary incomes who travel frequently for business and leisure. This advertising opportunity fit well for our goals. “Over 10 years (possibly 12) we will reach our audience repetitively for a very reasonable annual advertising cost and in a way that doesn’t get caught in too much clutter.”

The transcript Football expense avoided by Mathieu. n What follows is a discussion by Little Rock Airport Commissioner Thomas Schueck, Airport Finance Director Carol Snay, Airport Executive Eirector Ronald Mathieu and Airport Commission Chairman Bob East at the June 15 meeting of the Airport Commission on the airport advertising expense, which jumped $40,000 in May. Schueck: Now, down underneath administrative expenses we’ve got marketing and air service development we go from $6,000 last year to $47,000 this year? That’s a big increase. Snay: Yeah, we had a $40,000 advertising that we had this year that we didn’t have last year. Schueck: What did we do there, you know? Mathieu: This … Sir, as you know, we’re pushing our new website, we’re pushing the development of the terminal, we’re pushing new brand on website so there are a number of things that we did not do last year in terms of advertising because we were developing … that as a result of the retreat with the commission. We wanted to go out there now and really start pushing the airport brand. Uh, I’ve done a number of television and radio interviews as you know and that’s in my executive director report as well. So we’re just really pushing our website now and driving people to the website because the more people go to the website and book their flights the more revenue we

end up making, so that whole advertising portion that was dormant last year we’re now starting to ramp up. Schueck: Well, I hate to tell you this, but I haven’t seen any advertisements on the airport. Course, I use Tivo a lot. Mathieu: Most of it is not TV. East: This is part of what we talked about at the beginning of the year, spending more money on our website and getting the airport out in the public as an economic development tool. So we’re just starting and I hope we spend more money than we’re doing. Schueck: “Well, you should be visible somewhere and I haven’t seen it.” Mathieu: Well if you remember Race for the Cure we had banners up there and there were other public events that we’ve had and we’ve been advertising. So, and we’ve we cut back in some areas as well. We’re trying to make sure we have some impact but I think you’re going to see more things happen as we go forward East: And we’re not doing doing newspaper ads and things like we used to do, they’re kind of throwaway in our opinion, so we’re trying to do more focused things. Schueck: The point that I was trying to make was I hadn’t seen anything myself. East: That might not be the best test of whether it’s good or not. Schueck: Well it’s the only test I’ve got. … OK, let’s move on.

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brian chilson

CEJA (right): Even getting an interview is hard.

Over-lawyered? The job market for lawyers is tight.

B y D o u g Smit h

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ome people will always believe there are too many lawyers. At the moment, the market seems to agree. Recent law school graduates are having trouble finding work, and even some established practitioners have felt a pinch as the demand for legal services declined during the recession. There are those who say the problem is short-term, that the outlook for lawyers will improve when the general economy improves. Others believe fundamental change has occurred, that the demand for lawyers will continue to fall, that too many loans are being made to too many students attending too many law schools, that the legal profession is over-populated already. Those who believe this tend to believe it strongly, with exclamation points and capital letters, like the anonymous ranter on Yahoo Answers, apparently a lawyer him- or herself, probably in a large city: “We simply already have too many Legal Professionals. AND the legal profession is dramatically changing. It is in absolute CRISIS!!! Job searching in this vocational field has changed >>DRAMATI-

Some say it’ll get worse.

Law school graduates in Arkansas aren’t going to such extremes — yet — but they are being roughed up by a rocky job market. Keith Pike, a 2010 graduate of the UALR Law School, eventually found work, but it wasn’t easy. “I’d been clerking for one of the big firms and kind of led to believe I’d have a job there after graduation. Then the economy crashed and all those jobs at the big law firms dried up.” Business clients became less active; they didn’t need or couldn’t afford legal services as much as previously. “I sent a ton of resumes to different law firms. They all said, ‘We’re not hiring now.’ I applied to work for judges, but there are 10 times as many people applying for those jobs as normal, including a lot from out of state. I graduated in the top 20 of my law school class and I have a master’s degree in business from UCA. I was one of those people who should have no trouble finding a job in a normal economy. I can’t imagine what the people in the bottom half of the class are doing.” He resolved to open his own law firm, and was looking for office space when he exchanged e-mails with a general-practice firm in downtown Little Rock. “They hadn’t been hiring, but after talking with them, they said ‘You’re too good to pass up.’ ” Pike’s loan payments are troublesome. “My wife is also an attorney. We have good salaries for Arkansas. You’d think we’d have a house in the Heights, but we’re living in a condo.” He’s still miffed at the Bush administration. “The interest rate [on student loans] was around 2.7 percent when I started my schooling. One of the last things the Republicans did was set student interest rates at 6.8 percent and prevent consolidation of loans. Now all my loans are at 6.8 percent. That’s very high for this kind of economy. I’m not sure why the Republicans did it. I think a bunch of banks probably lobbied Congress and said ‘We’re not making money, why don’t you help us?’ ” The loans are set for 30 years; Pike hopes that as his and his wife’s legal careers progress, they’ll be able to pay off the loans early. On the other hand, “If the economy takes another downturn, both of us could be laid off. I feel sorry for the people who went to private law schools. Their loans are bigger.” A salary of $65,000 has been referred to in reports on the lawyers’ job market as a “break-even” figure, meaning that’s what a person needs in order to pay off his loans and still maintain a standard of livContinued on page 12

“I think the long-term problem for Arkansas is that the cost of getting a degree has risen to such a point, it’s outgrown what the market pays an attorney.” CALLY<< in the last five years. And, every year, more and more people graduate from law school, but there are fewer and fewer jobs. Even the largest and most reputable law firms are experiencing unprecedented cutbacks.” Slate, an on-line magazine, reported last month on a law-school grad who named his school in his bankruptcy filing, claiming that the school should have known he wouldn’t be able to repay the student loans he’d received. Slate also remarked on a Boston College law student who wrote an open letter to his dean, begging for his tuition back in exchange for dropping out without a degree. “This will benefit both of us,” he wrote. “On the one hand, I will be free to return to the teaching career I left to come here. I’ll be able to provide for my family without the crushing weight of my law school loans. On the other hand, this will help BC Law to go up in the rankings, since you will not have to report my unemployment at graduation to US News.”

www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 11


she have difficulty finding a job? “That would be an understatement.” Like Ceja, Bell and a classmate were planning to work as volunteers, for experience, but one of her offers to work for nothing produced an actual paying job, though she still hopes to find something “more permanent.” “I looked at leaving town, but I stayed because my family is rooted here.” She too has student loans to pay off, and “That could definitely be a problem,” but, like Ceja, she has hopes of getting her payments reduced through a “hardship” provision. In any event, “I’ve worked too hard to give up on being a lawyer.” Not everybody has trouble. Tyler Broyles accepted a job offer that was made even before he graduated among the top students in his class at UALR Law. He’s working at a middle-sized (12 lawyers) Little Rock firm, representing defendants in civil cases. Repayment of his student loan begins next month, and he’s confident he can handle it. “I’ve been fortunate,” he says. “I have a friend who graduated at Fayetteville who opened her own practice. She said she couldn’t find anything.” In a recent article in the American Bar Association Journal, two law professors predicted that the number of law schools will shrink. They said the “super elite” schools will continue as they are, and provide most of the lawyers to fill the high-paying jobs at big law firms that all law students envision themselves getting. Otherwise, the professors said, the schools that survive will be those with good placement records, or that are in a region little served by other institutions, or that have lower tuition because they’re state-subsidized. The third category fits Arkansas’s two law schools, and the deans at both schools emphasize that because of their lower tuition, their graduates carry lighter debt loads. Dean Cynthia Nance at UAF and Dean John DiPippa at UALR sound alike on other things too. Such as, the advisability of law grads going to smaller towns to practice. “We have a lot of senior alumni who’d love to turn their practice over to young people, in West Memphis and El Dorado and other places,” Nance said. “I’m trying to tell our students there’s really an opportunity there. They like Fayetteville and Little Rock for the nightlife. I tell them that won’t be so important when they’re married with a couple of kids. If it’s a buyer’s market, you’d better go where there are more opportunities.” Continued on page 14 bRIAN chIlSoN

PIKE: What are the people at the bottom of the class doing?

Over-lawyered Continued from page 11 501-376-1195  1023 West Markham  Downtown Little Rock www.doeseatplace.net

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ing that makes going to law school worthwhile. Pike didn’t quarrel with that figure. “You can make less than that and get by, but if you’re going to make less than that maybe it’s not worth getting a law degree. The courts have made it nearly impossible to get student loans forgiven by bankruptcy. I think the long-term problem for Arkansas is that the cost of getting a degree has risen to such a point, it’s outgrown what the market pays an attorney. Or it’s quickly approaching that figure.” Sergio Ceja says that finding a job after graduating from UALR Law has been “really difficult. Most places you can’t even get an interview.” He went to Jacksonville to help one of his classmates start a law firm, now called Vaughan and Friedman. He didn’t anticipate working there fulltime — he thought he’d work awhile for free, just to get the experience — but now he anticipates a longer, more substantial relationship. He’s not making any money to speak of, but he says that in Jacksonville more than Little Rock, “There’s an opportunity to bring in business.” He’s supposed to begin repaying his student loans next month. He hopes to negotiate a smaller payment than was originally scheduled, but that hasn’t been resolved yet. Ceja thought about going to Texas, but decided against it. Of Latino descent himself, he notes that there’s a growing Latino population in Central Arkansas, and not a lot of Latino lawyers. Joycelyn Bell graduated from the UALR Law School in December 2009 and passed the bar exam in February 2010. Did


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f the pessimists are correct, if the demand for lawyers is in longterm decline, Arkansas is apt to see a revival of a dispute believed settled a couple of decades ago. In the very old days, a new lawyer could get a law license by apprenticing under an established practitioner. The first formal program of legal education in Arkansas began at Little Rock in 1868, according to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas History, and a small, unaccredited, sometime public, sometime private law school operated in Little Rock for many years. Efforts to create a law school at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville started in 1890, and what might be called the modern era of legal education in Arkansas began with the opening of the University of Arkansas School of Law in 1924. The Fayetteville institution would have a near-monopoly on legal education in Arkansas for half a century; its more distinguished and demanding professors would become the stuff of legend among Arkansas lawyers. In 1969, the state legislature authorized the merger of Little Rock University, a private school, into the University of Arkansas system. Pulaski County, then as now, was the most populous area of the state, the governmental and financial center, and home to about half of Arkansas’s lawyers. Many of them, along with lay boosters and, perhaps most importantly, influential legislators, thought Central Arkansas should have its own law school, the area being more accessible to most of the state’s aspiring lawyers than Northwest Arkansas, and more able to provide employment for law students. Northwest Arkansas interests weren’t keen on the idea, but this was before the big boom in that area, and its leg-

islative delegation was comparatively weak. The University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law School was established in 1975. Fayettevillians weren’t the only ones unimpressed with the new arrangement. Conservative types believed that a small, poor state didn’t need and couldn’t afford two state-supported law schools. If the legislature was determined to have a law school at Little Rock, they said, then the one at Fayetteville should be closed. In some circles, Two Law Schools became a symbol of unnecessary government spending, the way Amtrak became a symbol on the national level. But the idea of eliminating a law school, with all the ill will that would bring from one part of the state or another, never gained any considerable support among the people who could do something about it — that is, legislators and governors. A committee of the Arkansas Bar Association studied the matter and concluded that whether or not Arkansas needed two law schools, doing away with either would be so divisive that the cost to the state would far exceed any savings. Most of the state came to share that opinion over time, though considerable competitiveness developed between the two schools. Cynthia Nance, dean of the Fayetteville law school, says that when she first came to the school as a professor in 1994, there was still talk going around that Arkansas should get rid of one of its law schools. She’s heard no such talk lately, she said, and is glad of it. “I think Governor Beebe is right,” she said. “We’ve already been there and hashed that out.” She also said, “There’s a better working relationship between the two schools now.”

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ANDERSON: Three tough years.

Over-lawyered Continued from page 12

DiPippa said: “The recession caused not just a restructuring but a destructuring of the profession at certain levels. The firms that did high-stakes financial things, they’re devastated. I don’t think those jobs are coming back. We’re turning out more graduates for jobs with big law firms than we need. But most of the legal profession has not been fundamentally changed. Personal injury, defense, wills, insurance — those things will still be around. Travel to the small towns across Arkansas and you’ll find that people do still need people-to-people law.” “A lot of graduates are leaving expensive law schools with very high debt loads,” DiPippa said. “They figured they’d get six-figure jobs when they got out, but that’s where the real crisis hit. They’re not going to be able to recoup.” Philip S. Anderson of Little Rock, a partner in a law firm that employs nearly 30 lawyers, and a former president of the American Bar Association, said: “The market may be coming back now — I think it is — but the last three years have been very tough years. Our clients have been less prone to pursue projects that would require the work of lawyers because the clients’ own businesses have been hit by the recession. Law firms in Little Rock have not been hiring new graduates at the rate they did before the recession hit. Hiring hasn’t come to a stop, but it has most assuredly slowed down. I have counseled promising new graduates to seek jobs in government to ride out the decline in hiring by the private law firms. … Are we overpopulated with lawyers? I can’t say. The market will decide that.” Harry Hamlin is managing director of the Mitchell Williams law firm, one of Arkansas’s largest, with about 80 lawyers in five offices, the biggest of which is in Little Rock. He said the firm had hired three or four law students in August to go to work next August, after graduation. “Year before last we didn’t hire anybody.” The Mitchell

14 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

firm is so big, and has so many different specialties, that it may not feel the recession as much as smaller firms, Hamlin said. When the housing market tanked, the firm’s lending practice went down, but the foreclosure practice went up. And, “Our business with larger corporate clients has picked up a little bit. They’re looking for cheaper law firms than are available in the big cities.” It’s widely believed that websites offering forms for wills and other basic legal documents are hurting lawyers, that people are now doing things on-line that they used to go to lawyers for. At least one of these companies, legalzoom.com, is being sued, accused of the unauthorized practice of law. But most of the lawyers and educators interviewed for this article weren’t ready to concede that the profession has been seriously harmed by the electronic offerings. Some noted that legal forms have long been available from libraries and other sources. They all noted the dangers involved in trying to be your own lawyer, and they said there’ll always be litigation and other services that only a lawyer can perform adequately. (All true, probably, but the Internet seems to embolden people to do a lot of things they wouldn’t have done with pencil and paper. And to lead people to expect something for nothing.) William D. Haught, who specializes in wills, says he can’t tell that his practice has been hurt by electronic competition, “but it’s a trend that will probably continue.” He’s aware that the job market for lawyers has tightened up, but his firm, small and intending to stay that way, does little hiring even in the best of times. Hamlin said he had a good friend who was an electrician. “He wanted to form a corporation. He said he could just go to the secretary of state’s website and do it himself. I told him, ‘I can rewire an outlet too, but do you think I should be doing that?’ There are a lot of things you can do on-line, and a lot of that stuff works fine. But you don’t know all the ramifications. Sometimes we get business out of people

BELL: Looked at leaving town.

brian chilson

brian chilson

W

hat is the job market like for graduates of Arkansas law schools? “Tough,” says Susan Schell, director of career services at the University of Arkansas Law School in Fayetteville. “People are finding jobs, but not at great salaries. It’s not as bad this year as it was last year, but it has definitely gotten worse than it was two or three years ago.” The Fayetteville law school typically graduates between 125 and 130 students a year. A survey of the class of 2009 that was done last February showed 94 — about 75 percent — either working as lawyers or seeking advanced degrees of some sort. (Some others had jobs, but not as lawyers.) Starting salaries ranged from $30,000 to $70,000, Schell said. The numbers were slightly better at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law School. According to Dianna Kinsey, assistant dean for career services, 85 percent of the 127 members of the class of 2009 found work as lawyers or chose to pursue advanced degrees. In 2008, the figure was 95 percent; in 2007, it was 98 percent. As the economy worsened, “We saw more of our legal employers being more hesitant to take on new employees,” Kinsey said. Salaries declined too, she said. The mean salary of $58,000 in 2008 dropped to $54,600 in 2009. It may be worth noting that some question the accuracy of law school statistics on salaries. The law schools get their information from their graduates, and skeptics say those who make very little tend not to reveal it, thus skewing the averages upward.

trying to do things for themselves.” John Wesley Hall is a criminal defense lawyer. Even though criminals are plentiful, and expected to remain so, he’s felt the economic slump. “Most people in our line of work say we’re recession-proof,” Hall said, “but getting paid is always the issue. You know you’re in a recession when even the drug dealers don’t have any money.” Eighty percent of criminal cases are handled by public defenders, and that number is increasing, Hall said. (One branch of criminal defense is prospering, though, Hall said, and that is defense of whitecollar crime. “I’ve got a friend who’s been hired in the BP [British Petroleum] case. He’ll make more money in the next five years than I’ll make the rest of my life. It’s not just the corporation that’s in trouble, there’ll probably be employees indicted. There could be negligent homicide cases. Criminal-defense lawyers are falling all over themselves to get in on that case and get their friends in.”) Possibly because criminal defense lawyers know about facing up to unpleasant facts, Hall doesn’t hesitate to say that “I think society as a whole is over-lawyered.

That’s why they’re turning on each other with malpractice suits. When I started practicing in 1973, there were 250,000 lawyers in this country. Now, there are 1.1 million.” The US population has grown in the same period, of course — from a little over 200 million to a little over 300 million — but at nowhere near the rate at which the lawyer population has grown. Jim Julian of Little Rock, president of the Arkansas Bar Association, says that the legal profession has seen ebbs and flows over the years. “This economic downturn seems to have had a more significant impact than I’ve seen in the past. Whether it’ll be long-term or not, I don’t know.” A cold-eyed British law professor wrote a couple of years back: “The law is not there to provide a livelihood for lawyers any more than ill health exists to offer a living for doctors. Successful legal business may be a byproduct of law in society, but it is not the purpose of law. And, just as numerous other industries and sectors are having to adapt to broader change, so too should lawyers.” Everybody in the newspaper business knows the feeling.


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Editorial n If Ron Mathieu wanted to give $40,000 to a private Christian school his son attends, he should have taken it from his own pocket. This is not a close call, though some airport commissioners will try to make it so, hoping to protect their own reputations. They’ll be safer in the long run if they dump Mathieu now. Unethical and unrepentant until a public outcry forced a belated apology Tuesday, he’s apt to try something like this again, and next time, it could be even worse, the danger to the commissioners who employ him even greater. The executive director of Little Rock National Airport was caught with his hand in the public till by the Arkansas Times’ Leslie Peacock, who, despite their resistance, squeezed incriminating admissions from the furtive Mathieu and his slippery subordinate, Tiajuana Williams. (Williams, the airport’s media manager, is supposedly on the payroll to provide public information, not conceal it. Apparently she didn’t get the memo.) When an airport commissioner asked at a June meeting about a mysterious $40,000 increase in the Airport’s marketing expenditures, Mathieu said the Airport was promoting its website. He referred vaguely to television and radio ads. But Peacock learned that Mathieu had given the $40,000 to Little Rock Christian Academy to help buy new turf for the school’s football field. He did so after receiving an e-mail from the school’s development director with a subject line of “Important reminder regarding your LRCA turf pledge.” Addressed to “Friends of Warrior Athletics,” the director’s e-mail said, “I just wanted to remind you about your donation to the turf project. As of today, only about 40 percent of the pledges have been realized. We will need all pledges turned into cash donations before this project can be given the green light … Our deadline is fast approaching so please send it in as soon as possible and remember this is a tax-deductible donation.” In return for the donation, a 7-feet-by-10-feet logo containing the Airport’s website address was placed on the sideline of the football field. Benchwarmers planning trips will find it handy. Mathieu and Williams share an imperfect understanding of public employment. Mathieu says it would be discriminatory to deny him the right to hand over public money to a church school that competes with public schools, and with which he has a close connection, or to require him to tell the whole truth to taxpayers. Williams apparently believes she’s exempt from the Freedom of Information Act, and tries to hide even her own salary. The Airport Commission should replace both. Honesty and competence are not unreasonable requirements.

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FOR SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE CALL: (501) 375-2985

16 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

brian chilson

Fire Ron Mathieu

UNDER SIEGE: Ron Mathieu digs in.

Airport scandal n You think somebody using a state pickup to commute to work is a scandal? You think the Game and Fish commissioners have been arrogant and insensitive to how highhanded they appear? Get a load of the Little Rock National Airport. Leslie Newell Peacock is working on a mountain of information about airport operations, but the tip of the iceberg would cripple the Titanic. It certainly ripped a hole in airport executive director Ron Mathieu. It’s simple. We published the story on-line last Friday. Mathieu’s kid is a student at Little Rock Christian Academy. The school needed money for a new football field surface. Mathieu came through on a pledge appeal. He arranged for the city’s public airport to kick in $40,000 (a minion, with Mathieu’s delegated power, formally kicked in the cash.) Nominally, it was an advertising deal, paid upfront for a 7-by-10 logo on the sideline down near the goal line that will be in place 12 years or so. It gets worse. A sharp-eyed airport commissioner noticed at a June meeting that the airport advertising budget had jumped in May from $6,000 in 2009 to $47,000 in 2010. When he was asked about the big change, Mathieu jumped into the discussion, cutting off a financial official who had mentioned $40,000 in new advertising. Mathieu said the airport had undertaken new initiatives to “drive traffic” to the airport website and push the “airport brand.” One commissioner mentioned he’d seen no signs of the new advertising. No wonder. NEVER during his filibuster did Mathieu mention the Little Rock Christian $40,000 payment that caused the spending jump. Mathieu refused to be interviewed by our reporter about this. He’d only accept written questions. And then he didn’t respond to those. His paid flack, Tiajuana Williams, said I was “threatening” her and reported me to her legal counsel for vowing not to stop investigating. She also stopped responding directly to questions, with the notable exception of an

Max brantley max@arktimes.com

after-hours statement Friday in which Mathieu accused the Times of “innuendo and untruths.” Initial response from airport commissioners was similarly unimpressive. If policy was followed – and policy allows Mathieu unsupervised discretion to spend up to $50,000 on anything – then it appeared to be OK, several said. None questioned the wisdom of an obscure private school football field ad for website promotion. Enter the Arkansas Times blog. Readers’ reaction was fast and furious. It had an impact, I believe. Our story would not be stonewalled as the good suit club that runs Little Rock government typically does with things like taxpayer subsidies of the Little Rock Regional Chamber of Commerce. By Monday, airport worms were turning. Mathieu still wouldn’t talk to us. But he told the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette that he might have erred. Commissioners began announcing misgivings, too. Tuesday, Mathieu apologized at a public meeting to all and sundry for misjudgments, including the Arkansas Times. The Airport Commission pronounced a “serious error in judgment” and announced an in-house, rather than independent, review of all expenditures. There is much in Mathieu’s free-spending ways to review, including first-class junkets to airport conferences in Hawaii and Europe for himself and, sometimes, airport commissioners. He misspent public money to help a personal interest, his son’s school. When questioned by a commissioner, he didn’t tell the truth. He later lied about our reporting. His hired hand, paid $96,000 annually in public dollars to provide information, tried to stymie accountability. For this, a slap on the wrist?


brian chilson

Budget balancing n Let’s pretend that the public is genuinely outraged at the big federal budget deficits — $1.4 trillion for fiscal 2009 and $1.3 trillion for the year just ended — and that the new tea-party Congress is hell-bent on fixing them. Neither is true, but if they were, how hard would it be to get the budget in balance? Not as hard as you imagine, given a small quotient of political courage, and not nearly as hard as the president’s deficit-reduction commission makes it out to be. First, you would excise the past 10 years from history and then — well, you actually would pretty much have it done. Oh well, we can’t reverse history, but the mental exercise helps us see the path to glory. At this time 10 years ago we had enjoyed a budget surplus of $236 billion for fiscal 2000, the third budget surplus in a row and the first time since the late 1920s that we had consecutive surpluses. In the new fiscal year, which President Clinton was handing off to George W. Bush in two months, the nation would experience its last surplus, $128 billion, down a little from 2000 because the country would slip into a mild mid-year recession as Bush put his economic plan into action. Still, government and private economists were forecasting huge surpluses far into the future. Clinton was paying down the national

Ernest Dumas debt and talking about using the surpluses to lengthen the solvency of Social Security, which was forecast to exhaust its stillgrowing reserves by around the middle of the new century. The U. S. economy had withstood fiscal crises around the globe the previous eight years and created a record 22 million jobs. That seems so implausible now, but that was the enviable situation we were in. What happened? Start with Bush’s big 2001 tax cuts, which went mainly to people with high incomes, and the succeeding smaller tax revisions through 2004. The tax cuts were supposed to stimulate so much growth that tax receipts would remain steady and, in fact, grow. That did not happen. The government’s income fell sharply and did not again reach the level of 2000 for five years. Job growth was the most anemic for any fiveyear period since the Great Depression. By the fall of 2007, the last year before the great recession, the trifling growth had brought the government back to the point that it was running a general-revenue deficit of only $430 billion (it had been $568

Ethics and other trivial pursuits n Robert Moore, the speaker-designate of the state House of Representatives and a good ol’ boy Democrat from Arkansas City, got quoted as telling a reporter last week that he was concerned about substantive issues instead of ethics reform. So let me get this written before we go further: He instantly took it back when I got him on the phone. He said that, yes, those were his words, but they were poor choices and that he tried to advance a more fully contextualized point, but blundered. Moore essentially explained — and not to make excuses — that we have a citizens’ legislature in a term-limited era and that the guy who looks up one day to see himself speaker-designate of an upturned legislative culture may not be altogether well-equipped for getting confronted on an impromptu basis in the Capitol corridors by reporters with pens, notepads and recorders. So what is his real view of ethics reform? It is that he personally eschews getting entertained by lobbyists and that he is aware of abuses that infest our legislative culture. But it also is that he tends to be a plodder

John Brummett jbrummett@arkansasnews.com

and is not ready to jump out in front of a Republican-generated ethics reform parade until he has gathered his facts and assimilated his thoughts. Indeed, ethics reform was not visible among the “substantive” issues that got discussed by interim legislative committees over the last two years. In fact, it only burst to the top of the media agenda a week or so ago with a column in this space about how these newly muscular Republican minorities ought to make ethics reform and good government their priorities. Republicans were receptive; a couple were already at work. All Moore was saying was that he would not be baited into some kind of grandstand play. Fine. Not getting baited, assimilating one’s thoughts — I’m for those.

billion by Bush’s third year, 2004). So that is where we start in computing the current deficit: $430 billion, conservatively, from the tax cuts. Bush started two wars and, believing both would be short, he financed them with borrowing. Military spending rocketed from $281 billion in 2000 to $594 billion in 2008. Add another $300 billion to the annual deficit. The Republican Congress and the president in 2003 adopted the Democrats’ idea of insuring us old folks’ prescription drugs and threw in their own idea of subsidizing elderly Medicare recipients if they would purchase coverage with private insurance companies. Health and Human Services spending surged from $505 billion in 2003 to $700 billion in 2008. The new health-insurance law will recover some of that starting in 2014 but uses it to pay for expanded drug coverage and other Medicare improvements rather than lowering the deficit. Then came the recession in December 2007 and the financial collapse in 2008. The government’s income fell by $400 billion in 2009 while the costs of recession—extended unemployment relief, safety net programs like food stamps, the bank and auto bailouts and President Obama’s spending to jump-start private consumption and preserve jobs—provided the final surge to the $1.3 trillion deficit for 2010. So how do we get back? A return to the modest economy of three years ago will pick up that $400 billion of

lost revenue from 2007, leaving us with a deficit $900 billion or so. Nothing that the Congress is apt to do now will put any verve in the economy, certainly not more tax cuts as recent experience has shown. It will have to do it on its own, as it always has. What about letting all the Bush tax cuts expire, not just the top marginal rate for the very rich, the estate tax and capital gains, as Ronald Reagan’s budget czar, David Stockman, has suggested? Wait maybe another year, for the economy to stengthen. Letting the rich’s extra tax cuts expire would go a long way toward the goal. Everyone else’s tax cuts were small, but 130 million tax filers paying a little more, as we were doing in 2000, can mean a lot of money and a lot of deficit reduction. That won’t happen because the public has been led to believe that their taxes have gone up and up and up, when the opposite is true, at least with federal income taxes. But, remember, this is just an academic exercise. That leaves the wars and military bloat. President Obama could remedy that and he or his successor eventually will, but only after the folly of the wars has finally been proven beyond a shadow of a doubt. That leaves the Medicare and Social Security deficits, the latter of which looms in another 25 years or so. Social Security should be fixed, and easily can be with some of the adjustments that the chairs of the deficit commission propose, but it should be done to fix Social Security and not to repair the rest of a broken fiscal system.

But there is indeed a cultural disease to be addressed and Moore had best get a sound diagnosis. For one thing, he must not be soured on the issue by fellow Democratic House members who will do what ethics reform resisters always do: attack proponents as hypocrites. We already hear grumbling from legislative Democrats that some of these Republicans are the worst offenders of expense-padding and lobbyist-dependence. No doubt that is so. But the purpose of ethics reform is institutional, not individual. We do not decline to impose speed limits because some people applaud the ticketing of others even as they speed themselves. We impose speed limits for the greater good. We do not decline to impose a civil rights law because some people who preach for it actually are racist. We impose the law for greater justice. If there is a telling failing in Moore’s misstatement, it is this: As a political veteran with a rich personal and family background in state and local government, he reacted instinctively in a defensive way to ethics reform. Some of these insurgent Republicans will say that Moore “just doesn’t get it.” Perhaps he doesn’t. Perhaps he is influenced by people around him who tell him they never hear anything about ethics reform from the people and that, therefore, the people

do not care. But a smart politician can see that the public is distressed about government generally, finding it insulated, unresponsive, arrogant and perhaps corrupt. People are angered by the abuse of state-owned vehicles, for example. While legislative ethics reform would not address that issue directly, it would respond effectively to it in broader terms of public accountability. Look for scant leadership on ethics from Gov. Mike Beebe. He is a product of the legislator-lobbyist culture. That is a culture in which a phone company executive could get telecommunications deregulation enacted in his company’s image by handing off his company’s selfprepared bill to a clique of influential state senators led by Beebe, and see it passed perfunctorily. But Beebe does have a sense of when to embrace legislative initiatives. That cigarette tax for a trauma system? That was House Speaker Robbie Wills’ baby. Beebe was smart enough to agree to it. We will know that ethics reform is on the right track if and when Beebe co-opts it. John Brummett is a columnist and reporter for Stephens Media’s Arkansas News Bureau. You can read additional Brummett columns in The Times of North Little Rock. www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 17


arts entertainment Page 20

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to-do list

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calendar

22

Movies

30

Dining

55

brian chilson

This week in

Reverend Horton Heat plays Juanita’s

Brad Paisley to Verizon

NOTES ON NOTES: Chris McKay, Bonnie Montgomery and Dr. Robert Boury review an excerpt from “Billy Blythe.”

‘Billy’ bows

Bonnie Montgomery and Britt Barber’s nationally anticipated folk opera “Billy Blythe” debuts scenes on Friday. By John Tarpley

O

n Monday morning, a roomful of performers are miles away from their jobs at out-of-state colleges, leafing through notes and sheet music, stretching and doing vocal warm-ups in a chilly Quapaw Quarter studio when Bonnie Montgomery, the woman of the week, looks up from her keyboard. 19 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

“Alright, let’s take it from 83, okay?” She rolls a few introductory measures out of the keys before Evan Jones and Chris McKay, both opera instructors, dive into their scene from “Billy Blythe,” Montgomery’s much-anticipated “American folk opera” about President Clinton’s childhood which, this Friday, will announce the operatic debut from the lo-

cal composer. It’s been a long string of “unlikelies,” if not “unprecedenteds,” for the White County native, 31, and her Bill-centric composition. What began with reading “My Life” in 2006 turned into a vivid vision of an adolescent Clinton with mother Virginia Kelley on an operatic stage, which then led to the beginning of an intensive, four-year-long songwriting session by Montgomery and fellow Ouachita Baptist University graduate Britt Barber, the project’s librettist. Before releasing so much as a note of the piece, “Blythe” began to draw unforeseeable national attention from opera magazines and political newspapers, even popping up as a joke in a “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” monologue. But for now, while opera enthusiasts wait in the wings, the cast and crew seem unshaken by the national eye focused on

their homegrown production. They admit that the buzz surrounding “Blythe” is unusually huge for a workshop production, but with four scenes to perfect in five short days, their watchword is “work,” not “worry.” This morning’s song, which sees a young Clinton debating whether or not to take a swing at his abusive stepfather before finally confronting him, ends with director Jeremy Franklin springing upright from his crouch on the floor. “That was great, guys. Now this time, Big Roger, turn to Billy the second he says ‘fight’ and you laugh at him.” Montgomery lights up, agreeing with the cue. “See, it’s so nice to have the composer in the room,” Franklin quips. “It’s like, you can’t say, ‘Hey, Verdi, if we can add three measures here, we could really Continued on page 33


■ to-dolist By Lindsey millar & john tarpley

THU R SD AY 11/ 18

JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER

7:30 p.m., Staples Auditorium, Hendrix College. Free.

n The Crain-Maling Center of Jewish Culture, an organization that aims to “enhance knowledge about Jewish culture and raise awareness of Jewish life” at Hendrix, went a long way towards furthering its mission by bringing Jonathan Safran Foer to campus. A writer who’s rarely mentioned without the word “wunderkind” trailing near behind, Foer is perhaps most famous for his widely praised debut novel, “Everything Is Illuminated.” Published when he was 25, the book follows the travels of a young American Jew who travels to Ukraine to find the woman who saved his grandfather from the Nazis; the Jewish newspaper The Forward called it “the first great American Jewish novel of the twenty-first century.” Foer has followed up with another acclaimed novel, “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” and, most recently, a non-fiction account of his vegetarianism, “Eating Animals.” He’s currently at work on a new edition of the “Haggadah,” the Jewish text that tells the story of the Jewish liberation from slavery in Egypt. So he’s certainly got the bona fides to rep for the Crain-Maling Center and to deliver a lecture called “Why Jews Laugh at Things That Aren’t Funny.” A reception follows the talk in Mills Library. LM.

LIT STAR: Foer speaks at Hendrix. 20 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

ON THE RISE: Fresh off a big CMA win, Paisley performs at Verizon.

F RID AY 11/19

BRAD PAISLEY, DARIUS RUCKER

opening slot. Double date and save some dough: four pack tickets are available for $79.00 and $199.00. LM.

7:30 p.m., Verizon Arena. $25-$59.75.

n Brad Paisley had a good week last week. He co-hosted the CMA Awards, where he debuted a new, sure-to-be-anthem, “This Is Country” (“It ain’t hip to sing about tractors, trucks, little towns, and mama, yeah that might be true / But this is country music and we do”). And after being nominated five times prior, Paisley finally took home the ceremony’s coveted entertainer of the year award. In fact, it’s been a pretty good recent career for Paisley. In less than five months, he’s played for more than 750,000 fans on his H20 tour. In a little more than 10 years, he’s sold 10 million and landed 25 singles on the Billboard country charts, including 10 straight number ones. In 2008, former Hootie and the Blowfish front man Darius Rucker became the first African-American singer to top the country charts since Charley Pride in 1983. He’s done it three more times since, most recently with “Come Back Song,” the first single off his recently released sophomore album. Poyen, Arkansas native Justin Moore has plenty to draw from in his anthems about country livin’: his grandma’s name was Faynette, he grew up on 100 acres, he was on a deer stand before he was one. He’s sure to get a rousing welcome from the hometown crowd in the

Al Green and Prince. He’ll be supported by his crack backing unit, The Mercers. The $50 VIP tickets get you reserved seating, a drink voucher, an event poster and access to a VIP after party. Get tickets a wildwoodpark.org. LM.

S AT U R D AY 1 1 /2 0

RIVER MARKET ON ICE GRAND OPENING 9:30 a.m., River Market Pavilions. $8 for skaters.

HULLA-BELEW: Local crooner Cody Belew raises money for Big Brothers/Big Sisters at Wildwood.

CODY BELEW

8 p.m., Wildwood Park for the Arts. $25-$50.

n This one’s easy to wrap your head around: Do you support the mission of Big Brothers/Big Sisters? Enjoy funk and soul? Well then, this benefit concert’s for you. Cody Belew, the blue-eyed soul shouter known for his spot-on renditions of ’60s and ’70s hits, is bringing his full arsenal to Wildwood, including songs from the likes of Aretha Franklin, Sam Cooke, Annie Lenox, Chaka Khan, Percy Sledge, James Brown, Fleetwood Mac, Stevie Wonder, Donny Hathaway, Patti LaBelle,

n Consider it an antidote to the crass commercialism of the holidays, a celebration, instead, of thrill of the season — the bundling up, the winter sports, the family togetherness — or at least what we’ve come to recognize as the thrill of the season from commercials. Sure it’s manufactured, but given a choice between fake winter wonderland and no winter wonderland, what’re you going to choose? I’m thinking it’s genius, particularly if we have another stretch of 70 degree temps and they can keep the ice from melting. The gist: From November 20 until January 9, the River Market Pavilions transform into ice skating rinks open to the public. The hours are 4 p.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. Saturday and noon until 8 p.m. on Sunday until December 17. After that they stretch from 10 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday


■ inbrief

THURSDAY 11/18

ONE OF PHILLY’S FINEST: Kurt Vile comes to White Water Tavern.

KURT VILE AND THE VIOLATORS 10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $5.

REVED UP PSYCHOBILLY: With Reverend Horton Heat at Juanita’s. (and stay the same on Sunday). It’s $8 per person, including skate rental. Kids under four skate free with a paid adult admission. The Diamond Edge Skating Club and Radio Disney’s Rockin’ Road Show celebrates the opening on Saturday. See holidaysinlittlerock.com for more info and special dates. LM.

BEETHOVEN AND BLUE JEANS

8 p.m., Robinson Center Music Hall. $14-$48.

n In what’s become something of a trend throughout the symphonic music world, the Arkansas Symphony Orchestra encourages concertgoers to don blue jeans — or simply casual dress — at its typically buttoned-down “Masterworks” series. On the bill: Beethoven’s spirited Seventh Symphony, which Richard Wagner described, in 1849, as “the apotheosis of the dance herself”; Manuel Ponce’s Guitar Concert, which includes references to Mexican folk music and will feature multi-Grammy Award-winning soloist Sharon Isbin and Stravinsky’s Suite No. 2, which includes a conclusion inspired by a performance Stravinsky watched in a “semi-respectable night club.” The ASO reprises the performance on Sunday at 3 p.m.; same place and price, though students, grades K-12, can go for free if ac-

companied by a paid adult as part of the Entergy ticket program on Sunday. LM.

REVEREND HORTON HEAT

8 p.m., Juantia’s. $25-$30.

n Who knew psychobilly would have such an enduring appeal? Born by The Cramps in the ’80s out of an unholy alliance of ’50s kitsch, a love of rockabilly and a punk rock sensibility, the genre’s survived on a largely unchanged formula for more than 30 years, with psychobilly bands enjoying success all across the world. Even here in Little Rock, we’ve had Josh the Devil and the Sinners and Ace Spade and the Whores of Babylon singing songs about hotrods and devils and meth for years. But, of course, no one’s done more to carry the psychobilly flag than The Reverend Horton Heat, the Dallas-based trio whose “Psychobilly Freakout” helped introduce audiences to the genre in 1990. In the 20 years that’ve followed, over the course of 10 studio albums, Heath and his mates have barnstormed across the country, plying retro sounds (the Rev’s trademark “hurricane” lick allows him to simultaneously play lead and rhythm guitar) and gonzo lyrics to the faithful. Kansas’ Split Lip Rayfield punks-up bluegrass in the opening slot. LM.

n Philly’s new favorite indie rock son has certainly earned his spot in the upper echelons of lo-fi indie rock royalty. He’s nothing if not tenacious. Writing and recording music since junior high, Kurt Vile released a flood of homemade CD-Rs during his 20s before finally picking up traction in the blogosphere and finding himself in the middle of rock royalty after being signed to Matador Records. His sound oscillates back and forth from delicate, fingerpicked acoustic dirges, all dunked in reverb, to stomping New York City rockers ala Richard Hell. What’s admirable about the songwriter is the way he’s managed to stay relevant for so long in the fickle-bynature indie rock spotlight. Though one to usually tour solo, Vile visits Little Rock with The Violators, the Crazy Horse to his Gen-iTunes’ Neil Young. A list of openers fill out the bill with dark, blown-out ’70s stoner metal from fellow Philadelphians Purling Hiss, art-garage from Fayetteville with Niall, shoegaze-pop courtesy of one of my favorite local acts, Pink Drapes, and catchy, clever anti-folk from house show all-stars No Hickeys. JT.

M ONDAY 11/22

KEN STRINGFELLOW 10 p.m., White Water Tavern. $7.

n It’s not every week that one of the crowned kings of college rock royalty decides to spend one of their off-dates in Little Rock. It’s even rarer that they decide to use it to play a solo show. But this Monday, White Water Tavern hosts the cult songwriter behind power-pop heroes The Posies. Alone, that contribution to music warrants a big-ass gold star, but add in the six years he spent in R.E.M., the great American band, and the 17 years he’s spent with Jody Stephens and the late Alex Chilton as part of Big Star, the greatest American band, and you’ve got a sterling music icon. The man, in the middle of a tour with The Posies and Brendan Benson, trades in arena stages a tiny platform this Monday night. Expect a packed house of power-pop acolytes. Locals David Slade and Brian Frazier provide support with a couple solo sets. JT.

n Fresh from having Bruce Springsteen sit in for its sound check in New Jersey, Texas-based Americana outfit Reckless Kelly return to Revolution with tour mates The Happen-Ins, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 d.o.s. The Elise Davis Band deliver roots-y femme-pop while Adam Faucett and the Tall Grass bring soulful Southern Gothic sounds to White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. At Cajun’s Wharf, Little Rock party act Mr. Happy takes the stage at 9 p.m. after acoustic duo Rob and Tyndall perform for the happy hour crowd at 5:30 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. Tommy Roeck and Jay Clinton play classic rock and blues, unplugged, at Town Pump, 10 p.m., $3. The Secret Handshake does electro-soul at The Village, supported by the pop-punk outfit A Cursive Memory and anthemic indie act The Narrative, 7 p.m., $11 adv., $14 d.o.s.

FRIDAY 11/19

n Cool Shoes returns with Sleek, Jahvis and Cameron Holifield in the DJ booth, 9:30 p.m., $5. Fayetteville singer/ songwriter/rocker Benjamin del Shreve takes to Sticky Fingerz with Conway outfit Benjamin’s Army (no relation, guys), 9 p.m., $5. No stranger to Little Rock but always a good time, the mobile hootenanny of Big Smith, returns for a night at Revolution with Fayetteville country-rockers Charliehorse, 9 p.m., $6. Another one of our favorite folk acts, Tyrannosaurus Chicken, brings its twisted, two-piece noise to Midtown Billiards, 12:30 a.m., $8 non-members. Provo, Utah’s Neon Trees do dancepunk at The Village, with Denmark rockers New Politics, $13 adv., $15 d.o.s. Juanita’s hosts Mississippi indie rockers Colour Revolt along with cantina regular Badhand, 9 p.m., $10.

SATURDAY 11/20

n Downtown Music Hall hosts a Cystic Fibrosis Benefit with a full night full of local punk and metal from Jungle Juice, Forever Eternal, Dead Beat, Something to Stand For and more, 6 p.m., $10. Local Steve Bates and his acoustic guitar provide the tunes at Cregeen’s Irish Pub, 8:30 p.m., free. ACAC welcomes two ex-Soophie Nuns back to town with their new band, HumanBeast, as well as local singer/songwriter Matt Anders and a noise set from Falling Up, 9 p.m., $5. Rockers Kickback lay into Fox and Hound, 10 p.m., $5. This week at Discovery, Kramer mans the lobby, Justin Sane deejays the techno room and g-force handles the hiphop room, 10 p.m., $10. www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 21


www.arktimes.com

afterdark

All events are in the Greater Little Rock area unless otherwise noted. To place an event in the Arkansas Times calendar, please e-mail the listing and all pertinent information, including date, time, location, price and contact information, to calendar@arktimes.com.

Books

Music

coMedy

Kristin Key. The Loony Bin, 8 p.m.; Nov. 19, 8 and 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 20, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $6-$9. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. www. loonybincomedy.com.

dance

UALR Dance Harvest. UALR, 8:30 p.m., $7. 2801 S University Ave. 501-569-8977.

events

Antique/Boutique Walk. Shopping and live entertainment. Downtown Hot Springs, third Thursday of every month, 4 p.m., free. 100 Central Ave., Hot Springs. “Dancing Into Dreamland” Dance Gala. A competitive celebration of dance featuring vacation prizes and a celebrity panel of judges, including Broadway veteran Lawrence Hamilton. 22 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

Lectures

Phaedra Siebert. The Arkansas Arts Center’s Curator of Drawings discusses the history and traditions of Mexican murals. For more information, visit arkansasmexico2010.com. Arkansas Arts Center, 6 p.m., $5. MacArthur Park. 501-3724000. www.arkarts.com. The West Memphis Three Panel Discussion. Activists Felecia Epps, Mara Leveritt, Carlton “Sonny” Rhodes and Dr. David Jauss discuss the West Memphis Three case in the Dickinson Hall Auditorium. UALR, 7 p.m. 2801 S University Ave. 501-569-8977. Jonathan Safran Foer. The author of “Everything Is Illuminated” and “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” speaks in Hendrix College’s Staples Auditorium. Hendrix College, 7:30 p.m. 1600 Washington Ave., Conway. www.hendrix. edu.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18 Cloud 9, Penny Sparrows. Vino’s, 7 p.m., $5. 923 W. Seventh St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Calmus. St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 7:30 p.m., $10-$25. 1000 N. Mississippi Ave. Charming Gardeners, Rena Wren. Maxine’s, 9 p.m., $5. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. “V.I.P. Thursdays” with DJ Silky Slim. Sway, 8 p.m., $3. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Elise Davis Band, Adam Faucett. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-3758400. www.myspace.com/whitewatertavern. J-One Presents: “In Too Deep.” Deep Ultra Lounge, 9 p.m. 322 President Clinton Ave. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Mr. Happy (headliner), Rob and Tyndall (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-3755351. www.cajunswharf.com. “Posh.” Clear Channel Metroplex, 9 p.m., $5 early admission. 10800 Colonel Glenn Rd. Reckless Kelly. Revolution, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 d.o.s. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. revroom.com. The Secret Handshake, A Cursive Memory, The Narrative, Speak. Downtown Music Hall, 7 p.m., $11 adv., $14 d.o.s. 215 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows.homestead. com. Ted Ludwig Trio. The Afterthought, 8:30 p.m., $5. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 W. President Clinton Ave. 501-3747474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Tommy Roeck. Town Pump, 10 p.m., $3. 1321 Rebsamen Park Road. 501-663-9802. University Chorus: “Motet Mania.” University of Central Arkansas, Snow Fine Arts Center Recital Hall, 7:30 p.m. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway.

For more information, call 993-7502 or visit dreamlandballroom.com. Governor’s Mansion, 6 p.m., $75. 1800 Center St. Quapaw Quarter Association Annual Membership Meeting. The annual neighborhood reception and business meeting features guest speaker Daniel Carey and the presentation of the Greater Little Rock Preservation Awards. For more information, visit quapaw.com. Curran Hall, 5:30 p.m. 615 E. Capitol. 501-370-3290. Wine Tasting with Bruce Cochran and James Cripps. The Afterthought, 5:30 p.m., $10. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www. afterthoughtbar.com.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 19 Music

LITERARY FOLK FOR LITERARY FOLKS: Kate Campbell, the Americana singer/ songwriter whose quirky, complex lyrics draw comparisons to the works of Flannery O’Connor and Eudora Welty, lands in town this Saturday, Nov. 20, for a performance at the North Little Rock Presbyterian Church, 7 p.m., $20. Call 374-7677.

Benjamin Del Shreve, Benjamin’s Army. Sticky Fingerz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www. stickyfingerz.com. Big John Miller Band. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Big Smith, Charliehorse. Revolution, 9 p.m., $6. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom.com. “Billy Blythe” Afterparty with Turnrow, Justin McGoldrick. White Water Tavern, 10:30 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.myspace. com/whitewatertavern. Brad Paisley, Darius Rucker, Justin Moore. Verizon Arena, 7:30 p.m., $25-$60. 1 Alltel Arena Way, NLR. Cody Belew. A night of classic soul and R&B to benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arkansas. For tickets or more information, call 821-7275 or visit wildwoodpark.org. Wildwood Park for the Performing Arts, 8 p.m., $25 general admission, $50 V.I.P. 20919 Denny Rd. Colour Revolt, Badhand. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $10. 1300 S. Main St. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Cool Shoes with DJs Sleek, Jahvis, Cameron Holifield. Downtown Music Hall, 9:30 p.m., $5. 215 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows.homestead.com. Dirtfoot. Maxine’s, 9 p.m., $8. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. DJ Ja’Lee. Sway, 5 p.m., $5. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, Nov. 19-20, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-3242999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. The Gettys. Fox And Hound, 10 p.m., $5. 2800 Lakewood Village, NLR. 501-753-8300. Grayson Shelton. Cregeen’s Irish Pub, 9 p.m. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-376-7468. www. cregeens.com. Jay Jackson. Capi’s, 8:30 p.m., free. 11525 Cantrell Suite 917. 501-225-9600. www.capisrestaurant.com. Jeff Coleman. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-7468. www. beerknurd.com/stores/littlerock. Jill Stringham Band. Vino’s, 8 p.m., $7. 923 W. Seventh St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub. com. Marilyn Keiser, organist. Christ Episcopal Church, 6:15 p.m., $10. 509 Scott St. 501-3752342.


UpcOMiNg EVENTS Concert tickets through Ticketmaster by phone at 975-7575 or online at www.ticketmaster.com unless otherwise noted. Dec. 3: Old 97s. 9 p.m., $16 adv., $18 d.o.s. Revolution, 300 President Clinton Ave. 823-0090, rumbarevolution.com. Dec. 7: Michael Buble. 8 p.m., $51.50$91.50. Verizon Arena. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com. Dec. 7: Sweet Eagle CD release show. White Water Tavern, 2500 W. 7th. 375-8400, myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Dec. 9: T-Model Ford. White Water Tavern, 2500 W. 7th. 375-8400, myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Dec. 18: Trans-Siberian Orchestra. 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., $27-$63. Verizon Arena. 800-7453000, ticketmaster.com. Dec. 22: Lucero, Cory Branan. 9 p.m., $16. Revolution, 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090, revroom.com. Dec. 23: The Big Cats. White Water Tavern, 2500 W. 7th. 375-8400, myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Dec. 31: Hayes Carli. 9:30 p.m., $18. Revolution, 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090, revroom.com. Neon Trees, New Politics. The Village, 7:30 p.m., $13 adv., $15 d.o.s. 3915 S. University Ave. 501-570-0300. www.thevillagelive.com. Rockshow. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, Nov. 19-20, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501-224-7665. www.westendsmokehouse.net. Crisis (headliner), Slimpickins (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m. 111 W. President Clinton Ave. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Tyrannosaurus Chicken. Midtown Billiards, Nov. 20, 12:30 a.m., $8 non-members. 1316 Main St. 501-372-9990‚Äé. midtownar.com. UALR Women’s Basketball vs Louisiana Tech. UALR - Jack Stephens Center, 7 p.m. 2801 S. University Ave.

Comedy

Kristin Key. The Loony Bin, Nov. 19, 8 and 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 20, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $6-$9. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. www.loonybincomedy. com.

events

Haunted Evening Tour. A two-hour tour of locations said to be the city’s most haunted and a visit with paranormal investigators. Visit hauntedtoursoflittlerock.com for more information. MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, through Dec. 3: 7 p.m., $25. 503 E. 9th St. 376-4602. www. arkmilitaryheritage.com. LGBTQ/SGL Youth and Young Adult Group. Diverse Youth for Social Change is a group for LGBTQ/SGL and Straight Ally Youth and Young Adults age 14 to 23. For more information, call 244-9690 or search “DYSC” on Facebook. 800 Scott St., 6:30 p.m. 800 Scott St. “A Royal Night Out.” A royal court-themed night with dinner, photos, entertainment by I Can Dancers and ACTS Jr. theater teams and live and silent auctions. For tickets or more information, call 733-1627. New Life Church, 6:30 p.m. 8000 Crystal Hill Road, NLR. “Toast of the Tour” Gala. A kick-off party for the North Little Rock Junior League’s annual Tour of Homes. For more information, visit jlnlr.org. E.O. Manees House, 6 p.m. 216 W. Fourth St, NLR.

LeCtures

Marine Captain Thomas Daly. Captain Daly discusses the battles, troop surge and awakening of Sunni tribes that changed the tide of the Iraq War in Anbar province. To reserve seats, call 683-5239 or e-mail publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys. edu. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu.

Poetry

“Rebirth of Cool” with poet Sunni Patterson,

Ko’ Hesive. Mediums Art Lounge, 7 p.m., $10. 521 Center St.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20 musiC

Afterglow. Flying Saucer, 9 p.m. 323 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-7468. www.beerknurd.com/ stores/littlerock. As We March Towards the Sea, Hosannas, Seamonster, Captain #1. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., $7. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub. com. Bulla. Vino’s, 9 p.m., $7. 923 W. Seventh St. 501-375-8466. www.vinosbrewpub.com. Cystic Fibrosis benefit with Jungle Juice, Take it Back, Something to Stand For, Run with the Hunted, Forever Eternal, Motives, Dead Beat, Second-Rate. Downtown Music Hall, 6 p.m., $10. 215 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows.homestead.com. DJ Ja’Lee. Sway, 5 p.m., $5. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. DJ King Julian. Union, 10 p.m., $5. 3421 Old Cantrell Road. 501-661-8311. Ed Burks. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www. sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. “Encore”: Supreme Clientele Edition with DJ Greyhound. Samurai Japanese Steakhouse, 10 p.m. 2604 S. Shackleford Rd . Human Beast, Matt Anders, Falling Up. ACAC, 9 p.m., $5. 608 Main St. 501-244-2974. Penguin Dilemma (headliners), Jim Mills (happy hour). Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 and 9 p.m., $5 after 8:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-3755351. www.cajunswharf.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Kate Campbell. First Presbyterian Church of North Little Rock, 7 p.m., $20. 201 West 4th St., NLR. 501-374-7677. Katmandu. The Afterthought, 9 p.m., $7. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Kickback. Markham Street Grill And Pub, 10 p.m. 11321 W. Markham St. 501-224-2010. www. markhamst.com. Kramer (lobby); Justin Sane (techno); g-force (hip-hop room); Aspen Tyler, Leah Alize, Dominique Sanchez (theater). Discovery Nightclub, 10 p.m., $10. 1021 Jessie Road. 501-664-4784. www.latenightdisco.com. Kurt Vile & the Violators, Purling Hiss, Pink Drapes, No Hickies, Nial. White Water Tavern, 9 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www. myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Raising Grey. Fox And Hound, 10 p.m., $5. 2800 Lakewood Village, NLR. 501-753-8300. Randall Shreve, Catskill Kids. Sticky Fingerz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9:30 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz. com. The Reverend Horton Heat, Split Lip Rayfield. Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $25. 1300 S. Main St. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Rockshow. West End Smokehouse and Tavern, 10 p.m., $5. 215 N. Shackleford. 501-224-7665. www.westendsmokehouse.net. Ryan Couron. Denton’s Trotline, 9 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. “Sound Check” with Bijoux, Onyx. Mediums Art Lounge, 8 p.m. 521 Center St. Steve Bates. Cregeen’s Irish Pub, Nov. 20, 9 p.m.; Nov. 26, 9 p.m.; Nov. 27, 9 p.m. 301 Main St., NLR. 501-376-7468. www.cregeens.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 9 p.m. 111 W. President Clinton Ave. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG. Ten Cent Hat. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 9 p.m., $5. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub. com. Tragikly White. Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $5. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. revroom. com.

Comedy

Kerry White, Jason Thompson. Knight Play Comedy Club, 9 p.m., $10. 8500 Castle Valley Rd., Mabelvale.

Kristin Key. The Loony Bin, 7, 9 and 11 p.m., $6-$9. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. www. loonybincomedy.com.

events

“ARTament Bash.” A day-long sale of original artwork by Arkansas Arts Center Museum School teachers and students. For more information, call 372-4000 or visit arkarts.com. Clear Channel Metroplex, 9 a.m. p.m., free. 10800 Colonel Glenn Road. Civil War Living History. Explore Arkansas and its involvement in the Civil War during 1862, reenacted with soldiers, politicians and citizens. For more information, call 324-9685. Old State House Museum, 10 a.m. p.m., free. 500 Clinton Ave. 501-324-9685. www.oldstatehouse.com. Diabetes Health Fair & Wellness Expo. A day of tests and information, featuring free triage, blood pressure, glucose, hemoglobin A1C, cholesterol, podiatry, BMI and dental screenings as well as vision and glaucoma examinations. Pine Bluff Convention Center, 10 a.m. p.m., free. 500 E. 8th Ave., Pine Bluff. Falun Gong meditation. Allsopp Park, 9 a.m., free. Cantrell & Cedar Hill Roads. Holiday Trunk Show 2010. Hosted by Korto Momolu, this year’s fashion showcase features collections from an array of designers as well as music from Tawanna Campbell and J. White. For more information, call 658-5574. Statehouse Convention Center, 3:30 p.m., $20 general, $35 V.I.P. 7 Statehouse Plaza. “River Market on Ice” 2010. The River Market Pavillions turn into an outdoor ice skating rink for the holidays. For hours and more information, visit holidaysinlittlerock.com. River Market Pavilions, Nov. 20-Jan. 9, $8. 400 President Clinton Ave. 375-2552. www.rivermarket.info.

FiLm

Brock Thompson. The author and Conway native discusses his new book, “The Un-Natural State: Arkansas and the Queer South.” Faulkner County Library, 2 p.m. 1900 Tyler St., Conway. 501-327-7482. www.fcl.org.

Live Music THuRsDay, NovemBeR 18 eLise Davis BaND aDam FauceTT FRiDay, NovemBeR 19 a speciaL LaTe NigHT peRFoRmaNce oF THe BiLLy BLyTHe opeRa wiTH TuRNRow saTuRDay, NovemBeR 20 KuRT viLe & THe vioLaToRs (pHiLaDeLpHia, pa) Purling Hiss • Pink DraPes • no Hickies • nial moNDay, NovemBeR 22 KeN sTRiNgFeLLow FRom THe posies, Big sTaR, & R.e.m. DaviD slaDe • Bryan Frazier

myspace.com/whitewatertavern Little Rock’s Down-Home Neighborhood Bar

7th & Thayer • Little Rock • (501) 375-8400

support your community Small Town

sPorts

Children’s House Fundraiser. The Children’s House Montessori School hosts a silent auction, open to the public, with food, drinks and live entertainment. Children’s House Montessori School, 6 p.m., free. 4023 Lee Ave.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21 musiC

“Climax” with Cruise Control, Mike Blaze, DJ Swagger. Ernie Biggs, 9 p.m. 307 Clinton Ave. 501-372-4782. littlerock.erniebiggs.com. Damn Bullets, Mockingbird Hillbilly Band. Arkansas Flag and Banner, 9 p.m., $7. 9th and State St., downtown. 501-375-7633. www. flagandbanner.com. Forever the Sickest Kids, I See Stars, Runner Runner. Juanita’s, 6 p.m., $13 advf., $15 d.o.s. 1300 S. Main St. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. The Punch Brothers featuring Chris Thile. George’s Majestic Lounge, 8:30 p.m., $20. 519 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-442-4226. Sunday Jazz Brunch with Ted Ludwig and Joe Cripps. Vieux Carre, 11 a.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.vieuxcarrecafe.com.

s cajun’ wharf presents

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26

Big John Miller Band SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27

Razorback Post-Game Party

events

The Big Dam Bridge “Full Moon Walk.” Big Dam Bridge - Murray Park, 6 p.m., free. 7600 Rebsamen Park Rd. www.bigdambridge.com. Fashionetta 2010. The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority hosts an afternoon of fashion followed by the Miss Fashionetta Pageant. Park Plaza, 3 p.m., $25. 6000 W. Markham St. 501-664-4956. “River Market on Ice” 2010. See Nov. 20.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 22 musiC

Keelhaul. Downtown Music Hall, 8 p.m., $7.

Continued on page 24

live music every night Big Swingin’ Deck Parties on Thursdays

cajunswharf.com

mon-sat from 4:30 p.m.

2400 cantrell road • on the arkansas river

375-5351

www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 23


calendar

Continued from page 23 215 W. Capitol. 501-376-1819. downtownshows. homestead.com. Ken Stringfellow, David Slade, Brian Frazier. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Mark and Matt Jacob. The brothers discuss their new book “What the Great Ate,” which chronicles the culinary likes, dislikes, habits and attitudes of historical figures. To reserve seats, call 683-5239 or e-mail publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m., free. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool.uasys.edu. Monday Night Jazz with the Alan Stoneguard Trio. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., $8. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.after-

thoughtbar.com. Traditional Irish Music Session. Khalil’s Pub, Fourth and second Monday of every month, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www. khalilspub.com.

EvEnts

“River Market on Ice” 2010. See Nov. 20.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23 Music

David’s Pegasus, Cold Mold. White Water Tavern, 10 p.m. 2500 W. 7th. 501-375-8400. www.myspace.com/whitewatertavern. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Joe Firstman, Trey Lockerbie, Marianne Keith. Juanita’s, 6:30 p.m., free. 1300 S. Main

St. 501-372-1228. www.juanitas.com. Karaoke Night. Cornerstone Pub & Grill, 8 p.m. 314 Main St., NLR. 501-374-1782. cstonepub. com. Karaoke Tuesday. Prost, 8 p.m., free. 120 Ottenheimer. 501-244-9550. Karaoke with Big John Miller. Denton’s Trotline, 8 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. “Nocturnal.” Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $3 general, $5 under 21. 1300 S. Main St. 501-372-1228. www. juanitas.com. Ray Tarantino. Maxine’s, 8 p.m., free. 700 Central Ave., Hot Springs. maxinespub.com. Tequila Tuesdays with DJ Hy-C. Bill St. Grill and Pub, 8:30 p.m. 614 President Clinton Ave. 501-353-1724. Tuesday Jam Session with Carl Mouton. The Afterthought, 8 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar. com.

New student registration for spring 2011 • Nov. 9 - Dec. 10

“Pulaski Tech was the perfect launching pad for me. I received the education I needed to polish my skills to better compete in my professional endeavors. It is an honor to represent Pulaski Tech as the 2010 Alumnus of the Year.”

DancE “Latin Night.” Revolution, 7 p.m., $5 regular, $7 under 21. 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-8230090. www.revroom.com.

EvEnts “River Market on Ice” 2010. See Nov. 20. Science Cafe: “Lung Cancer in the 21st Century.” The Afterthought, 7 p.m., free. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com.

LEcturEs Hillel Levine. The president of the International Center for Conciliation and Boston University professor discusses his role in facilitating a Israeli/ Palestinian workshop in the 1970s, the first of its kind. To reserve seats, call 683-5239 or e-mail publicprograms@clintonschool.uasys.edu. Clinton School of Public Service, 12 p.m. 1200 President Clinton Ave. 501-683-5239. www.clintonschool. uasys.edu.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 24 Music Acoustic Open Mic with Kat Hood. The Afterthought, 8 p.m. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1196. www.afterthoughtbar.com. Alex Ortiz. The Loony Bin, Nov. 24, 8 p.m.; Nov. 26, 8 and 10:30 p.m.; Nov. 27, 7, 9 and 11 p.m. 10301 N. Rodney Parham Road. www.loonybincomedy.com. Bolly Open Mic Hype Night with Osyrus Bolly and DJ Messiah. All American Wings, 9 p.m. 215 W. Capitol Ave. 501-376-4000. allamericanwings.com/. Brian & Nick. Cajun’s Wharf, 5:30 p.m. 2400 Cantrell Road. 501-375-5351. www.cajunswharf. com. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Karaoke at Khalil’s. Khalil’s Pub, 7 p.m. 110 S. Shackleford Road. 501-224-0224. www.khalilspub.com. Karaoke with Big John Miller. Denton’s Trotline, 8 p.m. 2150 Congo Road, Benton. 501-315-1717. Lucious Spiller Band. Sticky Fingerz Rock ‘n’ Roll Chicken Shack, 9:30 p.m., $5. 107 Commerce St. 501-372-7707. www.stickyfingerz.com. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 W. President Clinton Ave. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

DancE M o s c o w B a l l e t ’s “ G r e a t R u s s i a n Nutcracker.” Robinson Center Music Hall, 7:30 p.m., $34.60-$369.10. Markham and Broadway. www.littlerockmeetings.com/conv-centers/ robinson.

EvEnts

Geovanni Leiva Programmer • Tromik Technology Owner • Leiva’s Coffee 2010 Pulaski Technical College Alumnus of the Year

3000 West Scenic Drive North Little Rock, AR 72118 (501) 812-2200 www.pulaskitech.edu

“River Market on Ice” 2010. See Nov. 20.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 25 Music “V.I.P. Thursdays” with DJ Silky Slim. Sway, 8 p.m., $3. 412 Louisiana. 501-907-2582. J-One Presents: “In Too Deep.” Deep Ultra Lounge, 9 p.m. 322 President Clinton Ave. Jim Dickerson. Sonny Williams’ Steak Room, 7 p.m. 500 President Clinton Ave. 501-324-2999. www.sonnywilliamssteakroom.com. Katmandu. Capi’s, 8:30 p.m., free. 11525 Cantrell Suite 917. 501-225-9600. www.capisrestaurant.com. “Posh.” Clear Channel Metroplex, 9 p.m., $5 early admission. 10800 Colonel Glenn Rd. Ted Ludwig Trio. Capital Bar and Grill, 5 p.m., free. 111 W. President Clinton Ave. 501-374-7474. www.capitalhotel.com/CBG.

EvEnts “River Market on Ice” 2010. See Nov. 20.

Continued on page 25 24 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES


calendar

A&E NE ws

Continued from page 24

New on Rock Candy n After nearly 10 years as Juanita’s talent buyer, Erin Hurley said last week that he’s taking an indefinite leave of absence, explaining the move in an email, “I need to get away from this business for a while.” Hurley said he’ll remain bar manager. Juanita’s GM James Synder, local promoter Mike Zimmerebner (better known as Mike Z) and local talent buyer and owner of The Village Blake Sandifer will assume the shared role of replacing Hurley, Snyder said. These changes come to Juanita’s a little more than two months after new ownership took control. We posed three questions to Snyder: Does this mark a shift in Juanita’s booking focus? Do he and his partners plan on hosting concerts more frequently? And does Juanita’s consider it a conflict that Sandifer also continues to book The Village and recently began booking Downtown Music (the concerts he’s booked for each of the three venues are now listed at arkansaslivemusic.com). Snyder’s responded via email: “1) Yes, you’ll see a marked difference in the booking at Juanita’s. More mainstream Top 40/Country/Rock artists, less underground, hip-hop, and hardcore metal. 2) We do not plan to book the room five nights a week for the sake of having five shows a week. If there is a show at Juanita’s, we want to be confident it will be a quality show people will enjoy. In the past, we’ve been guilty of filling dates because they were empty and we want to focus on quality not quantity. 3) We are concerned about the potential for a conflict of interest with Blake’s booking three venues. Our hope is by focusing on mainstream artists, he will be able to point Metal shows to Downtown and HipHop to the Village. We feel he’s going to do a great job for us, and that he’ll point the right shows in the right direction. This isn’t much different than a couple of years ago when Erin was booking Vino’s,

THIS WEEK IN THEATER

DAVID LYNCH NIGHT: Saturday at the Faulkner County Library. Juanita’s, and The Village. A balancing act to be sure, but with the right mindset, I think he’ll be fine.” n Heads up, film nerds: the Faulkner County Film Society is doing some pretty cool stuff. Once a month, the club turns the Faulkner County Library in Conway into a repertory theater. They’ve spotlighted directors Wim Wenders (“Paris, Texas”) and Jane Campion (“The Piano”) with double feature nights and this month, on Saturday, Nov. 20, it’s David Lynch night with “The Elephant Man” at 7 p.m. and “Dune” at 8:30 p.m. n Local promoter, DJ and owner of GreenGrass Rock ’n’ Roll Bodega Mike Brown is launching “Sin Sundays,” a new weekly party at Ernie Biggs on Sunday nights aimed at people who work in the service industry. The set-up features a diverse mix of local bands performing downstairs and DJs spinning upstairs, Brown said. Admission is $2 as are well drinks and domestic beers. “Sin Sundays” launches on Sunday, November 28 with Father Maple, Cody Belew and The Breakthrough downstairs and UK breakbeat standout DJ Deekline

WEBSTER UNIVERSITY’S Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)

upstairs. Brown’s framing the kick-off as an after-party for the “Pretty Things Burlesque and Side Show” across the street at Revolution. A $10 cover charge gets you in both events. Brown’s new social networking site RSVPsociety.com will offer special deals.

JOINING THE WOLF PACK: Bill Clinton shot a scene for “The Hangover 2” in Bangkok. n Bill Clinton is slated to appear in “The Hangover 2” as himself. His scene was shot in Bangkok, where the film’s set. n Watch, on Rock Candy, Arkansas native and actor Clark Duke and his “Clark and Michael” collaborator Michael Cera deliver the nerdiest rendition ever of one of Too $hort’s songs from footage taken at a recent Too $hort concert in LA.

“A...My Name is Alice.” An all-woman musical about the ins and outs of womanhood. In McCastlain Hall. For tickets or more information, call conwayarts.org. University of Central Arkansas, through Nov. 20, 2:30 p.m., $5 adv., $10 d.o.s. 201 Donaghey Ave., Conway. www.uca.edu. “Boeing Boeing.” Bernard, a successful architect living in Paris, thinks he can easily cope with his three air hostesses, who all happen to be his fiancee, in this comic farce. For reservations, call 562-3131 or visit murrysdinnerplayhouse. com. Murry’s Dinner Playhouse, through Dec. 8: Tue.-Sat., 6 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.; Wed., 11 a.m., $22-$30. 6323 Col. Glenn Road. murrysdinnerplayhouse.com. “Dog Sees God: Confessions of a Teenage Blockhead.” When C.B.’s beloved beagle dies of rabies, he turns to Beethoven, a piano-loving outcast who proves more reliable than his other sex and drugs-loving friends in this parody of (and tribute to) “Peanuts.” The Weekend Theater, through Nov. 20, $10-$14. 1001 W. 7th St. 501-3743761. www.weekendtheater.org. “Don Giovanni.” Ouachita Baptist University’s Opera Theatre performs Mozart’s classic comedy opera about the young, arrogant libertine. For tickets or more information, visit obu.edu/finearts. Ouachita Baptist University - Jones Performing Arts Center, Nov. 18-20, 7:30 p.m.; Sun., Nov. 21, 2:30 p.m., $10. 410 Ouachita St., Arkadelphia. “Lysistrata.” Aristophanes’ Greek classic of one woman’s efforts to end the Peloponnesian War will be peformed in the RJ Wills Lecture Hall. For more information, visit pulaskitech.edu. Pulaski Technical College, through Nov. 19, 7 p.m. W. Scenic Dr, NLR. “Spamalot.” Monty Python’s classic search for the Holy Grail comes to stage in this musical adaptation. For tickets or more information, call 443-5600 or visit waltonartscenter.org. Walton Arts Center, Fri., Nov. 19, 8 p.m.; Sat., Nov. 20, 2 and 8 p.m., $59-$79. 495 W. Dickson St., Fayetteville. 479-443-5600.

GALLERIES, MUSEUMS Openings and events

ArkANSAS ArTS CeNTer, MacArthur Park: “Mexican Mural Tradition,” lecture by Phaedra Siebert on the role of murals in the national cultural renewal of Mexico, 6 p.m. Nov. 16, $5. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat.; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., 501-3724000. CLeAr ChANNeL MeTropLex, 10800 Col. Glenn Road: Museum School Show and Sale and ARTament Bash. Arkansas Arts Center combines its annual holiday events, offering pottery, photography, jewelry, glass, paintings, woodwork, drawings and pastels by Arkansas Arts Center Museum School faculty and students, and handcrafted glass tree ornaments and children’s gifts

Continued on page 27

THE COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

Little Rock Metropolitan Campus 200 West Capitol Ave. • Little Rock, AR 72201 • 501.375.1511

webster.edu/littlerock www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 25


A certain type of bastard Antique to Contemporary in Store Great Selection of Larger Rugs

8116 Cantrell Rd (Accross from Pavilion in the park)

501.225.8999

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26 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

n I quit writing today. Had enough. Got pissed off. Threw my pen in the air. Left my chair. It wasn’t worth the heartache anymore. I had been reading James Agee again. I had re-watched “The Verdict.” I had listened to a new Jeffrey Foucault song. what you saw in the gallery and you In the 1940s, Abraham Maslow poslook at what you’ve done and it’s terited a theory known as the “Four Stages rible. I mean, it is an absolute waste of of Competence.” It describes the process materials, and time, and, most of all, deby which we learn, moving from “unsire. Why did you even try? conscious incompetence” to “conscious But then there’s a slightly smaller incompetence” to “conscious compepercentage of another type of bastard. tence” to “unconscious competence.” This is the one who’s a glutton for more Sound like a load of crap? Yeah, it grief, the one that sees a body trapped did to me too. But then I started thinkwithin the stone. This is the person ing about how I feel when I experience who is willing to suffer something bebeautiful things. We learn everything ing impossible, to fight through it being we learn by watching and then doing, hard, to prod it toward being easy, and right? At least that’s the way Aristotle to finally witness it become perfect, or saw it, and it holds true whether we’re elegant or just plain right. two or 62. And when we see beauty in And perhaps the thing that’s most the real world, we want astonishing is how many to copy it by reproducing of those bastards there I mean, good it, whether on a piano, in are. I mean, when you a painting, or, yes, as a consider how hard it is to God, just around little person. become proficient at, say, me every week, But what I’m more inplaying a guitar, isn’t it you are a terested in today is what mind-boggling the sheer makes people artists, and number of people withtalented Little that’s not the ability to be in a five-mile radius of Rock, you are a inspired, and it’s not the you right now who can talented state, capacity to turn that indo it really, really well? spiration into something Isn’t it a testament to and you are the beautiful, although those the bewildering human type of talented are clearly parts. No, spirit just how talented bastards who what makes the artist is so many around us are? a moment between inspiThat they fought through can make me ration and reproduction, the agony of creating feel horrible and that’s an inborn frussomething awful, to then wherever I go. tration and overwhelmmake something tolering dissatisfaction when able, then pretty good, we really, really suck at then flawless. I mean, something. good God, just around me every week, If you possess this brand of weak, you are a talented Little Rock, you are groping little soul, you don’t have to a talented state, and you are the type of go far to feel incompetent. Talent, and talented bastards who can make me feel therefore, inadequacy, are everywhere, horrible wherever I go. friends. Go to a gallery and look at So, I’m giving up. The pain is in the some local artwork. Contemplate both trying. Life is stunningly short anyway form and content. Note the palette used. and I won’t have time to do it all, and Examine the brush strokes. Marvel at you shouldn’t attempt it either, young the mastery to bring all of those eleartist. ments together. Good riddance to the impossible and At this point, if you were smart, you’d the hard and the easy and the right. I’ll just go home. But no, not you. You’re just look at yours. Never mind the feelthat certain type of bastard, the one that ing of your hands moving from chord to stops by the store on the way back. You chord for the first time without thinking can’t leave well enough alone, so you about it. Never mind that the other side buy paints and easel, and you set them of this striving (and inadequacy and up in a well-lit room. Your heart leaps failure and fumbling) is culture itself. up, your vision becomes fixed, you The whole damn thing is enough to put brush to canvas, and — you slowly make me spit. The whole damn prowatch your hands turn to hooves. The cess is gorgeous enough to inspire me brush becomes granite. You remember again.

Graham Gordy


calendar

Continued from page 25 as part of ARTament Bash, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Nov. 20. 501-217-5113. Gallery 26, 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Holiday Art Show, paintings, sculpture, sketches, pottery, photographs, jewelry, ornaments, scarves, mixed media by more than 70 Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 501-664-8996. Ketz Gallery, 705 Main St., NLR: John Kushmaul, one-man show of oils by the Little Rock painter of the local landscape, opens with reception with wine and beer 5-8 p.m. Nov. 19, third Friday argenta artwalk. M2Gallery, 11525 Cantrell Road (Pleasant Ridge Town Center): Charles Henry James retrospective, work by the Little Rock artist from the 1980s through the present, as well as work by Jason Twiggy Lott, William Goodman, Char Demoro, Cathy Burns, Bix Smith, Kathy Lindsey, Lauren Embree and Dawanna Young. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Thu., 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 501-225-6257 (M2LR). thea FouNdatioN, 401 Main St., NLR: Italian Sketchbooks of Ted Parkhurst, third Friday Argenta Artwalk opening 5-8 p.m. Nov. 19, third Friday argenta artwalk. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu., 501-379-9512.

Continuing exhibits at galleries

arGeNta StudioS, 401 Maple St., NLR: Open studios, studios of V.L. Cox and others. Call in advance. 501-786-1636. arKaNSaS artS CeNter, MacArthur Park: “A Century of Revolution: Mexican Art Since 1910,” work by Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Jose Guadelupe Posada, Manuel Manilla, Arnold Belkin, Pedro Coronel, Jose Luis Cuevas, Rocio Maldonado, Julian Galan and others from the collection of the University of Texas, Winthrop Rockefeller Gallery, through Nov. 21. “Bigger, Better, More: The Art of Viola Frey,” large-scale figurative ceramics by the late California artist. “Paul Signac Watercolors and Drawings,” watercolors by the French impressionist in the Signac Gallery. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat.; 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., 501-372-4000. arKaNSaS StudieS iNStitute, 401 President Clinton Ave.: “Raices,” new mixed media work by x3mex about Mexican independence, atrium gallery. “Making Pictures: Three for a Dime,” installation of photos made in the 1930s and ‘40s by the Massengill family, who traveled Arkansas in trailers and made cheap portraits, with text by Hendrix College art professor and photographer Maxine Payne. AIA exhibit, drawings by members of the Arkansas Chapter of the American Institute of Architecture. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., 501-320-5792. BoSwell-Mourot FiNe art, 5815 Kavanaugh Blvd.: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 501-944-7028. CaNtrell Gallery, 8206 Cantrell Road: “40th Anniversary Group Show,” work by 28 Arkansas artists, including Kae Barron, J.P. Bell, Jerry Burrow, Paul Caldwell, Lange Cheek, Daniel Coston, Bob Crane, Warren Criswell, Cici Davidson, Debie Deaton,John Deering, Katrina Dolislager, Ovita Goolsby, Doug Gorrell, Thom Hall, Kitty Harvill, Rhonda Hicks, Carole Katchen, Megan Lewis, Barry Lindley, Judd Mann, Sarah Merkle, Sarah Noebels, LeeNora Parlor, Randy Rhea, Julie Waschka and Virginia Williamson. 501-224-1335. CaNvaS CoMMuNity art Gallery, 1111 W. 7th St.: “Portraits of Hope,” photos of missing children and portraits of what they might look like today, through September. . ChroMa Gallery, 5707 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Contemporary art, work by Robert Reep and other Arkansas artists. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 10, a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 501-664-0880. GreG thoMpSoN FiNe art, 429 Main St., NLR: “Barry Thomas: Arkansas Landscapes,” paintings by Little Rock impressionist. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Sat., 501-664-2787. the heiGhtS Gallery, 5801 Kavanaugh Blvd.: “Do You Believe ...?,” seasonally themed works by Deborah Allen, Elizabeth Bogard, Thad Flenniken, Rene Hein, Jim Johnson, Betty Jones, William McClanahan, Beverly McLarty Burrows and others. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 501-664-2772.

laMaN liBrary, 2801 Orange St., NLR: Quilts and their Stories, Arkansas Quilters Guild exhibit. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.–Thu., 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 501-758-1720. red door Gallery, 3715 JFK, NLR: Work by Twin, Robin Steves, Brady Taylor, Georges Artaud, Lola, Jim Johnson, Amy Hill-Imler, James Hayes and Theresa Cates. 501-753-5227. SaGe houSe Gallery, 24627 Hwy. 365 N: “Farm-to-Table,” paintings of the Argenta Farmer’s Market by Pat White, Shirley Brainard, Tom Herrin, Bill Lewis David Cook; Janice and Marvin Crummer, and Suzanne Waggoner. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 501-851-4608. ShowrooM, 2313 Cantrell Road: Sandy Hubler, hubler’s gallery features her work and work by other area artists. 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 501-372-7373. StephaNo’S FiNe art Gallery, 5501 Kavanaugh Blvd.: Contemporary art, bronzes by Tony Dow, paintings by new gallery artist Jared Vaughn, work in all media by other artists including pop artist Stephano. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Tue.-Thu.; 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Fri.-Sat., 501-563-4218. thea FouNdatioN, 401 Main St., NLR: TheArtists Studio, studio/gallery space with artists Ted Parkhurst, Catherine Burton, Morgan Coven, Robin Steves on the second floor of the Thea Foundation. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Thu., 501-3799512. uNiverSity oF arKaNSaS at little roCK, 2801 S. University: Portraits of Women from the UALR Permanent Collection, portrait exhibit in Gallery II complements “Nosotras: Portraits of Latinas” in Gallery I and includes work by Kathy Strause, Amber Uptigrove, Louis Freund, John Banasiak and Shahzia Sikander. 501-5698977. n van Buren CeNter For artS aNd eduCatioN, 104 N. 13th St.: Cindy Wiseman, paintings. . n hot Springs aMeriCaN art Gallery, 724 Central Ave.: Jimmy Leach, Jamie Carter, Govinder, Marlene Gremillion, Margaret Kipp, work by Hot Springs artists. 501-624-0550. Blue MooN Gallery, 718 Central Ave.: “Holiday Gifts of ART,” variety of media to choose from, all under $300. Artists represented include: Kay Aclin, Diana Ashley, Megan Chapman, Kelly Edwards, Suzi Dennis, Cassie Edmonds, Thad Flenniken, Caren Garner, Randall Good, Marc Hatfield, Janice Higdon, James Hoff, Steve Lawnick, Nancy Nolan, David Rackley, Tom Richard, Ann Shedelbower, Jeanne Teague, Bart Soutendijk and Wayne Summerhill. 501-318-2787. Gallery 726, 726 Central ave., hot Springs: Shirley Anderson, Barbara Seibel, Caryl Joy Young, Jim Oberst, Mary Anne Stafford, Pati Trippel, Janis Gill Ward, Gary Weeter, Marlene Gremillion, Michael Riley, Charles Riley, Ken Vonk, Janet Donangelo. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tue.-Sat., 501-624-7726. hot SpriNGS CoNveNtioN CeNter, 134 Convention Blvd.: “Hot Springs: A Journey Through History,” photographic history of the Spa City. Daily, 501-321-2027. MuSeuM oF CoNteMporary art, 425 Central Ave.: “Expressions of Love,” paintings by Los Angeles artist Hessam Abrishimi, through Nov. 30. Living in Three Centuries: The Face of Age, photographs by Mark Story, through Nov. 30. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon., Wed.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Sun. n Fayetteville area Fayetteville uNderGrouNd, 1 E. Center St.: Cheri Bohm, stained glass and wood. “Falling Into Sound,” new paintings by Megan Chapman. “Looking for the Broadcaster,” paintings by Duane Gardner. “Six Miles Down a Dirt Road,” paintings by Dana Idlet. Wed.-Fri. 12-7 p.m., Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 479-387-1534. uNiverSity oF arKaNSaS FiNe artS CeNter, 800 W. Dickson: “Dreaming in Synthesis: An Experimental Collaboration,” exhibit in the Fine Arts Center gallery by MFA students Bryan Alexis, Justin Bolle, Stephen Curtis, Samantha Dixon, Dilenia Garcia, Nichole Howard, John Kelley, Gongke Li, Mauricio Linares-Aguilar, John Orr, Kat Wilson, Glenna Worrell, Hisae Yale and Yan Zhao. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 2-5 p.m. Sun., 479-575-7987.

Continued on page 29

ONE NIGHT ONLY!

Nov. 27 • Robinson Center Music Hall • 8pm

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Groups of 10 or more receive a discount, call (501) 492-3314 CelebrityAttractions.com

The best gift you can give your child is your time. Are you doing your part? Department of Human Services Division of Child Care and Early Childhood Education This information is provided as a public service only and in no way implies any recommendation or endorsement by the Division, the Commission or any personnel of any facility listed. Visit our website at: www.arkansas.gov/childcare www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 27


BioNaNoTox iNTerNaTioNal: PreseNT, PuBlish, aNd iNTeracT The 5th BioNanoTox (Biology, Nanotechnology, and Toxicology) and Applications

Research Conference held at the Peabody, Little Rock on November 4-5th, 2010. Multidisciplinary BioNanoTox catalysts the education and technology transfer, encourages collaboration, generates advanced scientific approaches in order to improve our lives and protect our environment. This year conference theme was dedicated to “BioNanoTox and Toxicity: using Technology to Advanced Discovery”. International participation increased up to 25 countries. High school students and teachers, college students, faculty, and scientists have presented oral and poster presentations on fundamental and translational research. There were 31 presentations and 41 posters from disciplines ranging from biology to chemistry, toxicology, nanotechnology, computational sciences, mathematics, engineering, plant science, and biotechnology.

nov 19 In THE ARGEnTA DISTRICT 5-8pm THE THIRD fRIDAy of EACH monTH SPONSORED BY

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KETZ Gallery

705 Main in Historic Argenta, North Little Rock 501-529-6330 Join us for the Opening Reception. Enjoy a glass of wine or beer and light refreshments on up-cycled bottle trays by Valerie Goetz. Show continues to December 30.

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www.lamanlibrary.org 28 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

We want to give a special thanks to presenters; participants; FDA, ASTA, ABI, WRF sponsors; co-sponsors; Drs. Bush, Gealt, Pellicane, and McGehee; administrative staff; sessions’ chairs; supporters; faculty; and students that helped with the preparation, organization of the conference. We are grateful for their service to university, community, Arkansas, our country, and the BioNanoTox International. BioNanoTox was organized by Dr. Olga Tarasenko, University of Arkansas at Little Rock and Dr. Parimal Chowdhury, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. We are looking forward to your participation at the 6th BioNanoTox, November 11-12th, 2011.

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A boy named

Distractions, frustrations and real adversity By DeRek Jenkins

n As much as Hog fans like to complain about being overlooked by the national media, I’d wager the Auburn Tigers would love to send a share of that attention west. In a year when the SEC’s marquee programs have struggled, Auburn’s been the bright shining hope. But their bulb is flickering. “Drinking the Kool-Aid” never registered for me as an entirely appropriate use of historical tragedy until I watched the Auburn fans at Jordan-Hare stadium this week. The extent of their delusion is so alien and radical and befuddling that you can only look on helpless. It’s hard to blame them for being indignant, but at the same time it’s hard to understand their lack of concern. I imagine Arkansas fans might be tempted to treat a stud-ly transfer the same way if it meant a national championship, but that wouldn’t make their rhetoric any less hollow. And I’m not sure that we’d readily sabotage the next several years of Arkansas football to a confirmed one-and-done. The blanket denial, the circling of wagons, the appeal to “family,” all that talk about overcoming adversity — it just mischaracterizes the whole situation. Cecil Newton asked somebody for money, and that’s a problem for Auburn. It’s distracting. It’s frustrating. It’s probably unfair. But it’s not adversity. Adversity is what Dan Mullen and the Mississippi State Bulldogs have been facing. When Nick Bell was diagnosed with a rare form of skin cancer, his teammates likely lost some sleep. They may have been unable to keep their heads straight during practice. One of them found himself starting in Bell’s spot — his dream became a nightmare. When just over a month after his diagnosis, Nick Bell succumbed to the disease, who knows how his teammates took the loss? These are young men, elite athletes who may have been confronting mortality for the very first time. Some may have even sought counseling, if they were blessed enough to recognize the need. At the same time, they had to live through the longest bye-week ever, prepare for a game on the road against the defending national champions, and deflect countless tedious accusations from the Auburn faithful because several months ago they did the right thing and blew the whistle on some shady business.

That’s adversity, and it likely tanked MSU’s chances against a beatable Crimson Tide. Dan Mullen was already one of the best coaches in the league when he was hired a couple years back. If anybody can make something happen for the Bulldogs, it’s him. He’s good at playing to the strengths of his personnel, he’s a good motivator, and he’s a good recruiter. He’s already put together a very dangerous team. Given a better arm, Chris Relf would be a pretty good approximation of Cam Newton. Mullen’s spread option allows the 240-pound scrambler to make up for that limitation on the ground, and he shares the bulk of rushing yardage with the short and stocky Vick Ballard. The best news about that tandem is how often they fail to make it beyond the line of scrimmage, which they owe as much to slow development as lack of execution. When the running game is sputtering, Mullen may bring in 6’5” freshman Tyler Russell to try his luck downfield; he has a boatload of ability but gives the ball away too often. Relf gives them a better chance to win, especially against the Hogs. While the defense is very strong on the line of scrimmage, they’re not so much disruptive as disciplined, with 73 tackles for a loss in 10 games. Their secondary is aggressive but raw, giving up a lot of yardage and getting crossed up often, and they’re good for at least one or two 20-plus-yard passing plays per game. The defense as a whole can be so physical and reckless that fate plays a hand in their success. The Bulldogs lead the conference in turnover margin, which might be familiar to the Hogs, who benefited from the same good fortune last season. If the offense can keep the ball off the ground and stop leaving passes up for grabs, they should defuse a lot of MSU’s explosiveness. But don’t overlook the Cowbell Factor. Our offensive line gets jumpy in loud environments, and that constant ringing could steal some yardage and a few conversions from the Hogs. With a team like the Bulldogs, one distraction might be all it takes for them to ruin all that talk of a BCS bowl. Follow Derek Jenkins throughout the week and during games on Twitter @aboynamedsooie.

calendar

Continued from page 27 n Benton Dianne RoBeRts aRt stuDio anD GalleRy, 110 N. Market St.: Contemporary art, work by Dianne Roberts and other area artists. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Wed.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., 501-860-7467. n Bentonville CRystal BRiDGes at the Massey, 406 NW 2nd St.: “David Hockney: Six Fairy Tales,” the British artist’s interpretation of Grimm’s Rapunzel, Rumpeltstiltskin, and other stories in engraving form, from book featured in exhibition. 479-4185700. sugar Gallery, 114 Central Ave.: “Architecture by Way of Biology,” inventory, drawings and models by Kendall Buster, a professor of sculpture at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Va., who received a Bachelor of Science in medical technology before pursuing an education in art. n Jonesboro aRkansas state univeRsity, Jonesboro: “Este Caballo/Esta Familia,” exhibit of work by ASU printmakers Shelly Gipson and Kimberly Boyd Vickrey, Oct. 14-Nov. 19, reception 5-7 p.m. Oct. 14, Bradbury Gallery. n springdale aRts CenteR of the ozaRks, 215 S. Main St.: Pastel Panorama, annual show of work by members of the Ozark Pastel Society. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., 479-7515441. n Calico Rock CaliCo RoCk aRtists CoopeRative, Hwy. 5, Calico Rock: Paintings, photographs, jewelry, fiber art, wood, ceramics and other crafts.

Continuing exhibits at MuseuMs

CentRal hiGh sChool MuseuM visitoR CenteR, Daisy Bates and Park Sts.: Central High Museum Visitor Center, exhibits on the 1957 desegregation of Central and the civil rights movement. 501-374-1957, www.nps.gov/chsc. 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. daily., 501-374-1957. histoRiC aRkansas MuseuM, 200 E. Third St.: “Natural Wonders: Paintings and Drawings by Laura Terry,” paintings by U of A associate professor of architecture inspired by Southern landscape, through Dec. 5. “All in the Touch,” sculpture by Diana B. Ashley of Little Rock and multi-media work by Scinthya Edwards of Helena. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., 501-3249351. MaCaRthuR MuseuM of aRkansas MilitaRy histoRy, 503 E. 9th St.: “Warrior: Vietnam Portraits by Two Guys from Hall,” photos by Jim Guy Tucker and Bruce Wesson, through Nov. 30. “In Search of Pancho Villa,” artifacts from soldiers, medals and original sketches of the Mexican Punitive Expedition, the United States’ 1916 retaliatory action against the Mexican general who attacked a small border town in New Mexico, through Dec. 31. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun., 376-4602. MosaiC teMplaRs CultuRal CenteR, 501 W. 9th St.: “The Fine Art of Jazz,” photographs of Kansas City musicians by Dan White, through Jan. 7. Exhibits on African-Americans in Arkansas, including one on the Ninth Street business district, Dunbar High School, entrepreneurs, the Mosaic Templars business and more. Free, 501-683–3593, www.mosaictemplarscenter.com. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Tue.-Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sat., 1-4 p.m. Sun., 501-376-4602. olD state house MuseuM, 500 Clinton Ave.: “Badges, Bandits & Bars: Arkansas Law & Justice”, exhibit on the state’s history of crime and punishment. Free. “Arkansas/Arkansaw: A State and Its Reputation,” exhibit on the evolution of the state’s hillbilly image. Free, 324-9685, www. oldstatehouse.com. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Sat., 1-5 p.m. Sun., 501-324-9685. the Witt stephens JR. CentRal a R k a n s a s n at u R e C e n t e R , 602 President Clinton Ave.: Witt Stephens Jr. Central Arkansas Nature Center, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Tue.-Sat.; 1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sun., 501-907-0636.

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NOV. 19-21

movielistings All theater listings run Friday to Thursday unless otherwise noted.

Showtimes for Chenal 9 were unavailable at press time. Check www.arktimes.com for updates. Market Street Cinema showtimes at or after 9 p.m. are for Friday and Saturday only.

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Kids are BacK iN school! time to do somethiNg For yourselF!

JoiN W/ a FrieNd aNd get $25 oFF the JoiNiNg Fee 30 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

NEW MOVIES Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part I (PG-13) — With Voldemort in control over Hogwarts and the Ministry of Magic, Harry, Ron and Hermione have to race against time to overthrow the evil lord. Breckenridge: 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 3:25, 4:00, 4:30, 6:30, 7:10, 7:40, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50. Rave: 11:30, 12:00, 12:30, 1:00, 1:30, 3:00, 3:30, 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 7:00, 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, 9:15, 10:00, 10:30, 11:00, 11:30. Riverdale 10: 12:00, 3:20, 6:25, 9:30. The Next Three Days (PG-13) — A college professor at his wit’s end decides to break his wife out of prison, years after she was wrongfully accused of a grisly murder. With Russell Crowe and Elizabeth Banks. Breckenridge: 12:15, 4:10, 7:05, 10:10. Rave: 10:30, 1:25, 2:25, 4:25, 5:25, 7:45, 8:25, 10:25, 11:25. Stone (R) — Intentions blur when a convicted arsonist arranges for his wife to seduce the parole officer in charge of his case. With Robert DeNiro and Edward Norton. Market Street: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:00. RETURNING THIS WEEK Alpha and Omega (PG) — Two wolves try to find their way back home after being kidnapped from their pack. But things go awry when the two opposites attract. Voiced by Hayden Panettiere and Justin Long. Movies 10: 12:15, 1:20, 2:25, 3:30, 4:35, 5:40, 6:45, 7:50, 8:55, 10:00. Animalopolis (NR) — A half-hour film of goofy animals being goofy in enormous 3D. Aerospace IMAX: 11:00 Thu., 11:00 Fri. Conviction (R) — A working mother puts herself through law school in order to defend her brother, wrongly charged for murder. With Hillary Swank and Sam Rockwell. Market Street: 2:15, 4:15, 7:15, 9:15. Due Date (R) — A tightly-wound father-to-be is forced to carpool cross-country with a clueless slacker so he can make it to his child’s birth on time. With Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis. Breckenridge: 11:35, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:40. Rave: 11:35, 12:35, 2:05, 4:55, 5:35, 7:35, 10:10, 11:10. Riverdale 10: 11:25, 1:30, 3:35, 5:40, 7:45, 9:55. For Colored Girls (R) — Tyler Perry adapts Ntozake Shange’s award-winning play about women of color for the big screen. With Janet Jackson. Breckenridge:

11:40, 4:05, 7:00, 10:00. Rave: 10:35, 11:20, 1:45, 5:05, 8:15, 11:20. Riverdale 10: 11:05, 1:50, 4:35, 7:15, 10:00. Grown Ups (PG-13) — Five old basketball teammates act like kids again after their high school coach passes away. Movies 10: 1:10, 4:45, 7:30, 9:55. Hereafter (PG-13) — Matt Damon sees dead people. Riverdale 10: 11:10, 1:50, 4:25, 7:05, 10:00. Inception (PG-13) — Leo DiCaprio hijacks dreams. Movies 10: 7:00, 10:05. Inside Job (PG-13) — Matt Damon narrates this documentary which analyzes the roots and repercussions of the recent global financial crisis. Market Street: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15. Let Me In (R) — A middle school outcast is embraced by a new neighbor who, he soon finds, is a young vampire in Matt Reeves’ remake of the Swedish “Let the Right One In.” Movies 10: 1:00, 4:15, 7:05, 9:40. Lottery Ticket (PG-13) — A young man in the projects has to survive a three-day weekend after his neighbors find out he’s holding a lotto ticket worth millions. Movies 10: 12:10, 2:40, 5:00, 7:25, 9:45. Megamind (PG) — A blue, maniacal supervillain turns into a restless mess when his sworn superhero enemy is accidentally killed. Voiced by Will Ferrell, Tina Fey, Brad Pitt. Breckenridge: 12:10, 2:35, 5:00 (2D); 11:45, 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 9:40 (3D). Rave: 12:10, 2:45, 5:15 (2D); 10:30, 11:40, 12:55, 2:10, 3:20, 4:40, 7;10, 9:40 (3D). Riverdale 10: 11:10, 1:15, 3:20, 5:25, 7:30, 9:35. Morning Glory (PG-13) — An accomplished television journalist has to revive a struggling morning show in spite of its always-bickering divas. With Harrison Ford and Rachel McAdams. Breckenridge: 11:35, 2:15, 4:45, 7:30, 10:15. Rave: 10:40, 12:15, 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:35. Riverdale 10: 11:15, 1:55, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Never Let Me Go (R) — An adaptation of Kazuo Ishiguro’s dystopian love story. Market Street: 1:45, 4:00, 6:45, 9:00. Red (PG-13) — Three of the CIA’s top agents are jolted out of their peaceful retirements when they’re framed by the agency for murder. With Bruce Willis, Morgan Freeman and Helen Mirren. Breckenridge: 7:15, 9:55. Rave: 7:40, 10:20. Riverdale 10: 11:35, 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50. Resident Evil: Afterlife 3D (R) — In the newest installment of the video game-based franchise, zombie-killing, pistol-packing Alice (Milla Jovovich) returns to shepherd innocent Los Angelenos to safety. Movies 10: 12:20, 2:50, 5:30, 7:55, 10:20.

Saw 3D (R) — People tortured for the amusement of creepy mouthbreathers and sociopaths-in-training. More of the same abhorrent, sadistic stuff. Rave: 2:55, 5:30, 8:20, 10:45. Secretariat (PG) — The unlikely story of housewife Penny Chenery (Diane Lane), horse trainer Lucien Laurin (John Malkovich) and their legendary Triple Crown-winning racehorse. Breckenridge: 11:50, 4:15, 7:15, 10:05. Riverdale 10: 11:30, 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10:05. Skyline (PG-13) — When strange, extraterrestrial lights descend onto Los Angeles, its inhabitants can’t pull themselves away from its threatening glow. Breckenridge: 12:05, 2:20, 4:35, 7:35, 9:55. Rave: 11:05, 1:55, 3:05, 4:35, 7:05, 8:05, 10:05. Riverdale 10: 11:55, 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45. The Social Network (PG-13) — David Fincher and Aaron Sorkin’s instant-classic dives into the drama behind Facebook’s controversial rise from a Harvard dorm room experiment to a world-wide ubiquity. Riverdale 10: 11:40, 2:20, 4:55, 7:25, 10:05. The Switch (PG-13) — Seven years after she’s given birth, a woman (Jennifer Aniston) discovers her best friend switched her intended sperm sample with his own. Movies 10: 1:05, 3:25. Takers (PG-13) — Five meticulous bank robbers elude a hard-boiled detective so they can pull off one last heist. Movies 10: 12:00, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:15. Thrill Ride (NR) — This IMAX movie takes viewers on some of the fastest, scariest roller coaster rides on earth. Aerospace IMAX: 1:00 Thu., 1:00, 8:00 Fri., 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 8:00 Sat. Toy Story 3 (G) — Donated to a daycare center after their owner leaves for college, the beloved gang of toys rallies together for one last escape. Movies 10: 12:05, 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:10. Unstoppable (PG-13) — Denzel Washington has to stop an unmanned freight train full of explosives and poisonous gas from wiping out a city. Breckenridge: 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:45, 10:05. Rave: 11:45, 12:45, 2:15, 3:15, 4:45, 5:55, 7;45, 8:45, 10:15, 11:15. Waiting for Superman (PG) — Davis Guggenheim’s alarming look at the state of education in America. Market Street: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:15. Chenal 9 IMAX Theatre: 17825 Chenal Parkway, 821-2616, www.dtmovies.com. Cinemark Movies 10: 4188 E. McCain Blvd., 945-7400, www.cinemark.com. Cinematown Riverdale 10: Riverdale Shopping Center, 296-9955, www.riverdale10.com. IMAX Theater: Aerospace Education Center, 376-4629, www.aerospaced.org. Market Street Cinema: 1521 Merrill Drive, 312-8900, www.marketstreetcinema.net. Rave Colonel Glenn 18: 18 Colonel Glenn Plaza, 687-0499, www.ravemotionpictures.com. Regal Breckenridge Village 12: 1-430 and Rodney Parham, 224-0990, www.fandango.com.


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‘UNSTOPPABLE’: Chris Pine and Denzel Washington star.

■ moviereview Thrill ride Tony Scott and Denzel Washington reunite in ‘Unstoppable.’ ■ With Hollywood plumbing the depths of comic books, action figures, video games and even board games for source material, director Tony Scott manages to make a blockbuster action film out of an algebra problem. If Train A leaves the station in Brewster, Pa. going north at 40 miles per hour and Train B leaves the station heading south going 60 miles per hour, how long does it take Denzel Washington to stop them from colliding and incinerating a whole city? Ignoring “distance divided by rate equals time,” Scott spends nearly all of the film’s 100 minutes chasing the runaway train in “Unstoppable.” Washington plays Frank, a 28-year veteran engineer of the railroad on the verge of forced retirement, who is partnered with the young conductor, Will (Chris Pine from “Star Trek”), who is only four months out of training. At the train-yard, we learn the tough older working-class engineers don’t take kindly to the freshfaced rookie, who might soon be replacing them. As Frank and Will start their day checking cars and pulling pins on the track, another team of engineers isn’t getting off to a good start. Dewey, played by Ethan Suplee (“My Name is Earl,” “The Butterfly Effect”), neglects to tie the air brakes on his train and then abandons his conductor’s chair (despite his coworker’s protest) to switch lines, leaving the train in high gear. As it picks up speed, Dewey fumbles and fails to get back on the train. “Great going, Dewey! Go catch up with

your train,” his coworkers chastise him, until rail-yard manager Connie (Rosario Dawson) realizes the unmanned train is not a “coaster,” but instead, as Connie summarizes, “a missile the size of the Chrysler Building.” This is director Scott and Washington’s fifth teaming, and it largely follows the same formula of previous ventures. Washington plays the brave and goodat-what-he-does cop/boat captain/bodyguard/train conductor as well as usual, but fails to reveal any layers in his character. His chemistry with Pine works well, but it’s really the younger actor that creates a compelling and nuanced hero for us to root for. Maybe Denzel is training Pine to replace him as the new-generation action star. The story moves relentlessly along, crosscutting between the points of view of our two heroes, the rail-yard control room (which feels a lot like NASA), an expense-minded corporate executive, and news footage that fills in the story’s gaps and relays the unfolding drama to the families of those involved. The hyper-kinetic cinematography and MTV style editing, a trademark of Scott’s, work in the film’s favor, as do jolting sound effects and heart-pounding score. On paper it might sound like a typical high-concept chase film but the solid performances and effortless direction make it worthy entertainment for anyone looking for an adrenaline rush. — Levi Agee

AT:

COMING SOON! www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 31


JERSEY SORE: Not much premartial bliss in ‘My Big Friggin’ Wedding.’ themselves to the point of fault, mostly it’s just a high-decibel train wreck. Check it out, if only to see why you probably never, ever want to go to New Jersey.

READERS NIGHT OUT

NOVA: THE QUEST FOR SOLOMON’S MINES 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 23 PBS

Dedicated To All Fashionistas, Shop-O-Holics and Die Hard Foodies

www.arktimes.com

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BURN SURVIVORS AmericA’s FemAle F i re F i g h te r s mission is to raise and expend funds for the benefit of burn survivors across the United States. We are Raising Awareness and Educating about fire safety and treatment of burn injuries. We do this by producing the America’s Female Firefighters Calendar. The pages of the AFF calendar are graced with ladies from across the United States, and all of which serve their communities as paid fulltime firefighters. The women who are selected to be featured in the calendar exemplify good health, fitness and moral character, and are dedicated to their profession in the fire service. For our family of AFF ladies, it is not about being a “Calendar Girl”, but rather being able to “GIVE BACK” and makes a difference.

For more inFormation or to purchase a calendar please email missoctober2011@gmail.com please include your name, address and telephone number. 32 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

MY BIG FRIGGIN’ WEDDING Mondays at 8 p.m. VH1 n Forgive us while we wax nostalgic a bit for the good ol’ days, when VH1 actually fielded music videos, along with indepth looks at the lives of rock stars via “Behind the Music” and the delicious, delicious trivia-gasm that was “Pop Up Video,” which featured videos supplemented by bits of extraneous info that “blooped” onto the screen. Yes, it was a lovely time to be alive. These days, VH1 has morphed into a full-on, reality show wasteland, featuring guilty pleasure fare (heavy on the guilt) like “Celebrity Rehab” and “Bret Michaels: Life as I Know It.” Now VH1 is augmenting our reality-strewn TV world with even more realness, in the form of “My Big Friggin’ Wedding.” As with many reality shows these days, the formula on “MBFW” is to seek out the most emotionally unattractive people they can find, put them in a situation of high stress, and then film the results. This time, we’re talking mostly Jersey-bred Italian-Americans of the loud-and-drunken variety who are preparing to be joined in wedded bliss. Fold in a heaping helping of crazy family, a touch of bridezilla, a splash of wine and a spoonful of clueless, hair-productobsessed groom, and you’ve got a delicious baked ziti of failure. While some of the folks on the show are appealing just because they seem comfortable with

n Right now over in the Republican Empire, the GOP is tuning up for a push to deny funding to public broadcasting, including National Public Radio and PBS. If there is a better reason to keep that money flowing than the long-running PBS show “Nova,” we’d like to hear it. While The History Channel is fielding shows on hunting Sasquatch and whether the Nazis were working with Little Green Men, Nova is pumping out solid, factual, for-real history and science programming. To boot, it’s uniformly fascinating, featuring interviews and research from the best minds in a given field. This week, the show takes on one of the most enduring legends in history: the search for the famously rich mines of the Old Testament’s King Solomon. Real-life Indiana Jones-types have been scouring the Middle East and Africa for King Solomon’s secret stash for hundreds of years, but have yet to come upon any evidence to point to its whereabouts. What’s more, given that the historical record — that is, the record outside the Bible — is almost devoid of any mention of Solomon, archeologists and historians are beginning to wonder whether he ever existed in the first place. Some even say he was a figment of our collective human imagination, and no more real than King Arthur. Here, Nova follows archeologists into the field to search for clues, including a dig at a 3,000-year-old copper mine in Jordan that may hold clues to the whereabouts of the most storied treasure in history. Continued on page 33


televisionist Continued from page 32

CARRIE (1976) 11 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 20 IFC n It’s easy to forget how different the world was back in 1976 when the film version of “Carrie” was made. Though society in general is a lot more comfortable with women’s bodies these days, people back then just didn’t talk about such things as menstruation, much less make movies about it. Then along came Stephen King and his 1974 book about a tormented, religiously-isolated girl who develops the ability to move objects with her mind after having her first period. King has prided himself over the years in being a guy who is always ready to take a sharp stick and poke whatever it is that makes America uneasy, and his debut novel was no differ-

ent. The movie version, directed by Brian De Palma, totally gets that sense of unease, and still stands up as a classic of suspense -- if not “horror” in the current, jump-outand-get-ya sense. Sissy Spacek is excellent as Carrie White, an introverted teenage girl who is often picked-on and bullied at school and then terrorized at home by her religious kook of a mother, played by Piper Laurie. Both Spacek and Laurie were nominated for Academy Awards for their performances. Supporting actors include William Katt as the kind-hearted golden boy Tommy, Nancy Allen as Carrie’s chief tormentor Chris, and a very young John Travolta (fresh off his star-making turn on “Welcome Back Kotter”) as Chris’s boyfriend Billy. If you haven’t seen it in awhile, the scene at the end is still riveting, and worth re-watching just to see how much De Palma does with red lighting and camera angles. — David Koon

KUAR FM 89 Presents the sixth annual Jewish Guys’

Chanukah Special November 29 the Clinton Presidential Center

Music, stories and schtick featuring the two Jewish Guys, Phil Kaplan and Leslie Singer. Reception: 6:30 p.m.; show at 7 Admission: $4.99 (Such a deal!) Reservations required: www.kuar.org or (501) 569-8485

billy blythe Continued from page 19

With thanks to our Chanukah Special sponsors: The Clinton Presidential Center and The Clinton Museum Store.

BRiaN chilsON

make this acting thing work.’” The two baritones perform the scene a few more times, tweaking their vocals and stage blocking between each run while Montgomery shares a bench and trades notes with Dr. Robert Boury, the celebrated ragtime pianist, composer-in-residence at UALR and, as Montgomery puts it, her “mentor and psychiatrist” during the final changes to the “Blythe” score, made to highlight the state’s musical history. “I wanted to pay tribute to the indigenous Arkansas genres: blues, bluegrass, the ragtime of [late Arkansan] William Grant Still into the operatic structure,” says Montgomery. “It was important to incorporate the musical heritage of our state, to be able to hear light in the evening, the cicadas, the heat and the watermelon in this opera. “But specifically, we had to capture how wild Hot Springs was in the 1950s with all the drinking, partying and gambling right beside strict, Southern religion and racial segregation.” It may sound odd in theory, but it sounds great, catchy even, on stage as the music takes cues from both Italian and American masters, Montgomery citing Giuseppe Verdi beside Leonard Bernstein as influences and further drawing upon lesser known musical figures like Ned Rorem and Virgil Thomson, two geniuses of the American opera tradition. After a quick break, the collected cast and crew return to work, sprinting towards Friday’s opening curtain sans co-writer Britt Barber, who’s been the victim of cancelled flights for the last 24 hours. Take by take, they’re in a frantic focus, singing life into “Billy Blythe.” No doubt, the enthusiasm in the room is exciting enough for a bystander. But looking on as

MONTGOMERY: The local composer gives pointers. Montgomery — surely a little proud behind her second helping of Southern manners — watches her own labor of love finally take its first steps to future successes unknown, it’s hard not to be stirred. Even if it weren’t already a bit frigid in the studio, the whole scenario would be enough to raise a few goosebumps. “Billy Blythe” debuts as a workshop performance at 8 p.m., this Friday, Nov. 19, at the Women’s City Club before tipping its hat to Europe’s “pub opera” trend with an encore performance and after party at 10 p.m. at that old Clinton haunt, White Water Tavern. Tickets are $10 for the Women’s City Club performance and $7 for the after-party. Purchase advance tickets at billyblytheopera.com. As for a full debut of the opera, Montgomery says she’s received interest from several opera companies that want to debut “Billy Blythe,” but she’s still weighing her options. www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 33


ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

Best Lawyers in Arkansas 2011

Professionalism Civility Leadership Educating Arkansas’ Leaders Since 1924 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • november 18, 2010 35


The ARKANSAS TIMES is proud to publish the list of the BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS for 2011. The list is produced by the Best Lawyers in America®, which is the oldest lawyer-rating publication in the U.S., and the gold standard for accuracy and integrity. Listings are organized in alphabetical order, by specialty and broken down by cities.

The BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS 2011 ADMINISTRATIVE LAW Little Rock

FREDERICK K. CAMPBELL

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DOAK FOSTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

ALLAN W. HORNE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

T. ARK MONROE III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

P.O. Box 8064 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902-8064 479-783-1776

Little Rock

JOHN A. DAVIS III

ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

FRANK S. HAMLIN ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

SIDNEY H. MCCOLLUM ADR, Inc. 1501 North University Avenue, Suite 420 Little Rock, Arkansas 72207 501-376-2121

ANTITRUST LAW Little Rock

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER

PETER G. KUMPE

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

WILLIAM H. L. WOODYARD III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION Fort Smith

ROBERT E. HORNBERGER

ADR, Inc. 404 North Seventh Street

36 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

ROBERT SHULTS Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

JAMES M. SIMPSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

APPELLATE LAW Fayetteville

CONSTANCE G. CLARK

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

R. CHRISTOPHER LAWSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ROGER D. ROWE Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

ROBERT S. SHAFER Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Rogers

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

PATRICK J. GOSS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BANKING LAW Jonesboro

RALPH W. WADDELL

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

Little Rock

GARLAND W. BINNS, JR.

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

PATRICK A. BURROW

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

TROY A. PRICE

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings

RANDAL B. FRAZIER


Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Donald H. Henry Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Adoptions Make Great Families

Jeb H. Joyce Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

James C. Moser, Jr.

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Kimberly Wood Tucker Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

David B. Vandergriff Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

William A. Waddell, Jr.

Stephen A. Matthews

Ted N. Drake

Best Lawyers in Arkansas.

John Kooistra III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Michael J. Dennis

Congratulations to Jim, Mike, Steve, and Ted for being recognized among the

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One of Arkansas’ oldest law firms, Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake PLC provides a broad range of legal services through offices in Pine Bluff and Hot Springs.

315 East Eighth Avenue • Pine Bluff • 870-534-5532 508 Ouachita Avenue, Ste. A • Hot Springs • 501-609-0022

bridgesplc.com

Congratulations

Don JaCk Best Lawyer – Corporate Law and HeaLtHCare

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Bankruptcy and CreditorDebtor Rights Law Crossett

Thomas S. Streetman

Streetman & Meeks 302 Main Street P.O. Drawer A Crossett, Arkansas 71635 870-364-2213

Fayetteville

Jason N. Bramlett

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Jill R. Jacoway Jacoway Law Firm 223 Southeast Avenue P.O. Box 3456 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-521-2621

Little Rock

Charles W. Baker

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Charles T. Coleman Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

All of the attorneys and staff of Jack Nelson Jones Jiles & Gregory congratulate our senior partner, Don Jack, on this well deserved recognition.

James F. Dowden James F. Dowden 212 Center Street, 10th Floor Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-324-4700

Judy Simmons Henry Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Harry A. Light Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

501-375-1122 • One Cantrell Center • 2800 Cantrell Rd., Suite 500 • Little Rock 501-329-1133 • The Frauenthal Building • 904 Front Street • Conway 501-332-4910 • The Helberg Building • 106 West 2nd Street, Suite A • Malvern www.jacknelsonjones.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • november 18, 2010 37


LANCE R. MILLER

Congratulations to our partner

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

RICHARD L. RAMSAY Eichenbaum, Liles & Heister Union National Bank Building, Suite 1900 124 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3717 501-376-4531

STAN D. SMITH Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

GEOFFREY B. TREECE Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

North Little Rock

DAVID A. GRACE

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

Siloam Springs

JOHN TERRY LEE

John Terry Lee 106 South Broadway Street P.O. Box 1348 Siloam Springs, Arkansas 72761-1348 479-524-2337

Springdale

El Dorado

DENNIS L. SHACKLEFORD

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR. Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

• Bet-the-Company Litigation

• Personal Injury Litigation

Fayetteville

• Commercial Litigation

• Product Liability Litigation

• Medical Malpractice Law

• Professional Malpractice Law

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

SIDNEY P. DAVIS, JR.

Blair and Stroud

500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, AR 72503 Toll Free 1-800-343-4218 www.blastlaw.com 38 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

DAVID SOLOMON

David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, Arkansas 72342-3301 870-338-7427

Little Rock

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

ROBERT L. JONES III Conner & Winters 211 East Dickson Street Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 479-582-5711

CLIFFORD W. PLUNKETT Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

PETER G. KUMPE Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN G. LILE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

H. WILLIAM ALLEN

ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY

Allen Law Firm Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JESS L. ASKEW III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

E. B. CHILES IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

KEVIN A. CRASS

H. DAVID BLAIR

25 Years of Dedicated Advocacy

Helena

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

Members of the Firm: H. David Blair • Robert D. Stroud • Michelle C. Huff

Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

WILLIAM M. CLARK, JR.

Batesville

On being recognized as Best Lawyer in more categories than any other lawyer in Arkansas

C. WAYNE HARRIS

Cypert, Crouch, Clark & Harwell 111 Holcomb Street P.O. Box 1400 Springdale, Arkansas 72765-1400 479-751-5222

BETTHECOMPANY LITIGATION

H. David Blair

Fort Smith

RICHARD T. DONOVAN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

N. M. NORTON

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

STEVEN W. QUATTLEBAUM Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

GORDON S. RATHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ROGER D. ROWE Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

PATRICK J. GOSS

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN III

MICHAEL N. SHANNON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

STEVEN T. SHULTS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR.

JOHN E. TULL III

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

M. SAMUEL JONES III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JIM L. JULIAN Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR.

TERESA M. WINELAND Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Pine Bluff

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808


Congratulations to Abe Bogoslavsky on being selected by your peers as one of the Best Lawyers in Arkansas. Bogoslavsky Law Firm PLLC 111 Center Street, Suite 1200 Little Rock, AR 72201 (501) 244-0722 www.bogolaw.com

Congratulations to

John Coulter For Being Selected By His Peers As One Of The Best Lawyers In Arkansas In The Category Of Labor And Employment Law

James Carter Coulter

P.L.C.

Attorneys at Law

Employee Benefits/HIPAA/Employment Law/Training

501-372-1414 • www.jamescartercoulterlaw.com 500 Broadway • Suite 400 • Arvest Bank Building • Little Rock

Chisenhall, Nestrud, & Julian would like to congratulate Larry Chisenhall, Jim Julian, Chuck Nestrud & Denise Hoggard on being named among The Best Lawyers in Arkansas 2011.

Front Row, L to R: Chuck Nestrud, Jim Julian and Larry Chisenhall. Back Row, L to R: Heather Moody, Mark Hodge, Jason Earley and Denise Hoggard.

Regions Center – 400 West Capitol Avenue Suite 2840 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 (501) 372-5800 www.cnjlaw.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • november 18, 2010 39


P.O. Box 10205 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901-0205 479-782-1001

Civil Rights Law

Helena

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

David M. Fuqua

David Solomon 427 Cherry Street P.O. Box 490 Helena, Arkansas 72342-3301 870-338-7427

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

congratulates

David Fuqua

Named One of the Best Lawyers in Arkansas in the Category of Civil Rights Law Fuqua Campbell, P.A. is a litigation law firm whose members are dedicated to the highest standards of professionalism and commitment to excellence in the representation of our clients.

(501) 374-0200 425 West Capitol Ave., Suite 400, Little Rock

www.fc-lawyers.com

Fuqua Campbell 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 400 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-0200

all of the 2011 Best lawyers in arkansas

Commercial Litigation Batesville

H. David Blair

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

El Dorado

Brian H. Ratcliff

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Dennis L. Shackleford Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

Alfred F. Angulo, Jr.

Barrett & Deacon 100 West Center Street, Suite 200 P.O. Box 1506 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-582-5353

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Sidney P. Davis, Jr. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

John Elrod Conner & Winters 211 East Dickson Street Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 479-582-5711

John C. Everett Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Robert L. Jones III Conner & Winters 211 East Dickson Street Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 479-582-5711

Clifford W. Plunkett Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Hardin & Grace, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW 500 MAIN STREET NORTH LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS • (501) 378-7900 40 november 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

David Solomon

Little Rock

Constance G. Clark

Congratulations to

William M. Griffin III

Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Fort Smith

C. Wayne Harris

Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

Don A. Smith Smith Cohen Horan 1120 Garrison Avenue, Suite 200

H. William Allen

Allen Law Firm Centre Place, Ninth Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2416 501-374-7100

Philip S. Anderson Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jess L. Askew III Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Kristine G. Baker Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Christopher J. Heller

D. Michael Huckabay, Sr. Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

M. Samuel Jones III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Jim L. Julian Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Philip E. Kaplan Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

John K. Baker

Peter G. Kumpe

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

R. T. Beard III

Stephen R. Lancaster

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Jason J. Campbell

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

E. B. Chiles IV Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

John G. Lile

Bruce E. Munson Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Gary D. Corum

Elizabeth Robben Murray

Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

D. Nathan Coulter

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

Kevin A. Crass Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Richard T. Donovan Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Patrick J. Goss Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

N. M. Norton

David M. Powell Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Steven W. Quattlebaum Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Gordon S. Rather, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Roger D. Rowe Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565


BEVERLY A. ROWLETT Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

CHARLES L. SCHLUMBERGER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

MICHAEL N. SHANNON Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

STEVEN T. SHULTS Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

JOHN E. TULL III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

TERESA M. WINELAND Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Pine Bluff

STEPHEN A. MATTHEWS

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Rogers

L. KYLE HEFFLEY

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

JAMES G. LINGLE Lingle Law Firm 110 South Dixieland Road Rogers, Arkansas 72758 479-636-7899

MARSHALL S. NEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

COMMUNICATIONS LAW Little Rock

JESS L. ASKEW III

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

LAWRENCE CHISENHALL Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

CONSTRUCTION LAW Little Rock

JUNIUS BRACY CROSS, JR.

Junius Bracy Cross, Jr. 308 East Eighth Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-374-2512

ALLEN C. DOBSON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

JACK EAST III

Little Rock

Jack East III 2725 Cantrell Road, Suite 202 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-372-3278

CYRIL HOLLINGSWORTH Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

JEFFREY H. MOORE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DAVID M. POWELL Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN DEWEY WATSON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

North Little Rock

DAVID A. GRACE

Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-375-1122

D. NICOLE LOVELL

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

WALTER E. MAY

PAUL B. BENHAM III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

GARLAND W. BINNS, JR.

T. ARK MONROE III

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

C. DOUGLAS BUFORD, JR.

JOHN S. SELIG

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

WALTER M. EBEL III

ROBERT SHULTS

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Shults, Brown & Perkins 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1600 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3637 501-375-2301

PRICE C. GARDNER

Paragould

Hardin & Grace 500 Main Street, Suite A P.O. Box 5851 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-378-7900

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CORPORATE LAW

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Jonesboro

RALPH W. WADDELL

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

H. WATT GREGORY III

DONALD T. JACK, JR. Jack, Nelson & Jones 2800 Cantrell Road, Suite 500

P.O. Box 4700 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-4700 866-722-7694

JOHN C. EVERETT Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

WARNER H. TAYLOR Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-443-5222

Fort Smith

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR.

Christian & Byars 502 Garrison Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-9147

Jonesboro

BILL W. BRISTOW

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

RAY A. GOODWIN

Little Rock

Goodwin Moore 511 South Fourth Street P.O. Box 726 Paragould, Arkansas 72450 870-239-2225

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: NONWHITECOLLAR Fayetteville

TIMOTHY M. BUCKLEY

Buckley, McLemore & Hudson 123 North Block Avenue

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY

JOHN WESLEY HALL John Wesley Hall 1311 Broadway Little Rock, Arkansas 72202-4843 501-371-9131

RECOGNIZED AGAIN

DAVID H. WILLIAMS BEST LAWYERS IN AMERICA SINCE 2001

Every now and then even a good lawyer needs the name of another good lawyer. That’s why aorneys partner with us. When your clients need help with a personal injury case, adding us to your legal team is a strong idea. We bring more than 30 years of experience in such challenging legal areas as complex products cases, plane crashes, tractor trailer crashes and pharmaceucal cases. For more informaon on how we can help you obtain the best results for your client, contact us today.

THE LAW OFFICE OF DAVID H. WILLIAMS OFFERS OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WINNING ON BEHALF OF CLIENTS. PRESERVE THE AMERICAN JURY 212 Center Street Center Place Bldg • 2nd Floor Lile Rock, AR 72201 501-372-0038 toll free 877-492-3030 www.dhwilliamslawfirm.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 41


Watts, Donovan & Tilley, P.A.,

is honored that Jim Tilley, David Donovan, and Richard Watts have again been listed among the

Best Lawyers in Arkansas

J. BLAKE HENDRIX

JACK T. LASSITER

Blake Hendrix 813 West Third Street, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-0679

Lassiter & Couch 813 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-370-9300

RICHARD E. HOLIMAN

JEFF ROSENZWEIG

Holiman Law Firm 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1700 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-1170

Jeff Rosenzweig 300 Spring Building, Suite 310 Third and Spring Streets Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5247

JACK T. LASSITER Lassiter & Couch 813 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-370-9300

JEFF ROSENZWEIG Jeff Rosenzweig 300 Spring Building, Suite 310 Third and Spring Streets Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5247

North Little Rock

LEA ELLEN FOWLER

Lea Ellen Fowler, Attorney at Law 425 West Broadway, Suite A North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-375-9908

FLOYD M. THOMAS, JR.

Watts, Donovan & Tilley, P.A. ATTORNEYS AT LAW 200 RIVER MARKET AVENUE, SUITE 200 LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 72201-1769 (501) 372-1406 FAX: (501) 372-1209 • www.wdt-law.com

Securities Fraud Litigation, Environmental Litigation, Consumer Fraud Litigation, and Class and Complex Civil Litigation

Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

hank bates

DAN F. BUFFORD Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

WARNER H. TAYLOR

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Jonesboro

BILL W. BRISTOW

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

Little Rock

GARY D. CORUM

Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

TIMOTHY O. DUDLEY

42 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

EDUCATION LAW

JOHN C. EVERETT

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

11311 Arcade Drive, Suite 200 • Little Rock, AR 72212 Phone: (501) 312-8500 • Toll Free: (888) 551-9944 Fax: (501) 312-8505 www.carneywilliams.com

The Law Office of David H. Williams Center Place Building, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0038

Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

BOBBY R. MCDANIEL

CARNEY WILLIAMS BATES BOZEMAN & PULLIAM, PLLC

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Buckley, McLemore & Hudson 123 North Block Avenue P.O. Box 4700 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-4700 866-722-7694

Christian & Byars 502 Garrison Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-9147

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

JOHN WESLEY HALL John Wesley Hall 1311 Broadway Little Rock, Arkansas 72202-4843 501-371-9131

LAWRENCE CHISENHALL

Christian & Byars 502 Garrison Avenue Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-9147

JAMES EDWARD CHRISTIAN, JR.

CLAYTON R. BLACKSTOCK

EDDIE N. CHRISTIAN, SR.

Little Rock

Fort Smith

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

Taylor Law Partners 303 East Millsap Road P.O. Box 8310 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703 479-443-5222

ENERGY LAW Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Little Rock

Fort Smith

congratulations

CHRISTINA D. COMSTOCK

Everett & Wales 1944 East Joyce Boulevard P.O. Box 8370 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-8370 479-443-0292

Fayetteville

TIMOTHY M. BUCKLEY

CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Fayetteville

DAVID H. WILLIAMS

El Dorado

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

DUI/DWI DEFENSE

Little Rock

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITECOLLAR

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS LAW Little Rock

ABRAHAM BOGOSLAVSKY

Bogoslavsky Law Firm 111 Center Street, Suite 1200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-244-0722

BRYANT CRANFORD Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

DAVID M. GRAF Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

GREGORY B. GRAHAM Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

JOSEPH B. HURST, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ALEXANDRA A. IFRAH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

STEPHEN N. JOINER

N. M. NORTON Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

SCOTT C. TROTTER Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW Little Rock

MARK H. ALLISON

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

SHERRY P. BARTLEY Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

JOSEPH HENRY BATES III Carney Williams Bates Bozeman & Pulliam 11311 Arcade Drive, Suite 200 P.O. Box 25438 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212-5438 501-312-8500

RAY F. COX, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ALLAN GATES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

SAMUEL E. LEDBETTER McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-396-5400

RICHARD L. MAYS, SR. Mays, Byrd & Associates 415 Main Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-6303

KELLY M. MCQUEEN Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

A. WYCKLIFF NISBET, JR.

CHARLES R. NESTRUD

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840


400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas 71913 501-525-3130

JOHN PEISERICH

Little Rock

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

G. ALAN PERKINS Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

BRIAN ROSENTHAL Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

MARCELLA J. TAYLOR Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

WALTER G. WRIGHT, JR. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

North Little Rock

ANN P. FAITZ

Ann P. Faitz Attorney at Law 585 Silverwood North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-831-5637

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

North Little Rock

CARROL ANN HICKS

Hicks & Associates 5321 John F. Kenny Boulevard, Suite A North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-771-1817

STEPHEN C. ENGSTROM Wilson, Engstrom, Corum & Coulter 200 South Commerce, Suite 600 P.O. Box 71 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-375-6453

Paragould

HARRY TRUMAN MOORE

Goodwin Moore 511 South Fourth Street P.O. Box 726 Paragould, Arkansas 72450 870-239-2225

SAM HILBURN Hilburn, Calhoon, Harper, Pruniski & Calhoun U.S. Bank Building North, Suite 800 One Riverfront Place P.O. Box 5551 Little Rock, Arkansas 72119 501-372-0110

Rogers David R. Matthews Matthews, Campbell, Rhoads, McClure, Thompson & Fryauf 119 South Second Street Rogers, Arkansas 72756 479-636-0875

HENRY HODGES Hodges Law Firm 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1722 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3402 501-375-0400



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Little Rock

PHILIP S. ANDERSON

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

W. MICHAEL REIF





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FIRST AMENDMENT LAW

JUDSON C. KIDD

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor

  

Wagoner Law Firm 108 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-244-9293

Coplin & Heuer One Union Plaza, Suite 1650 124 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-707-0300

The Farrar Firm First National Bank Building, Third Floor 135 Section Line Road

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JACK WAGONER III

BARRY E. COPLIN

Hot Springs National Park

BRYAN J. REIS

GARY B. ROGERS

MARCIA BARNES

Dodds, Kidd & Ryan 313 West Second Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9901

FAMILY LAW

425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

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2011 BEST LAWYERS IN ARKANSAS

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G. Alan Perkins Environmental Law and Oil & Gas Law

John F. Peiserich Environmental Law

Kelly M. McQueen Environmental Law

James D. Rankin III Oil & Gas Law

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Our commitment to excellence has resulted in the firmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s statewide recognition as a leading environmental, utility regulatory and oil and gas law firm.

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P.O. Box 251618, Little Rock, AR 72225 r (501)603-9000 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES â&#x20AC;˘ NOVEMBER 18, 2010 43


JESS L. ASKEW III

WILLIAM A. WADDELL, JR.

LEE J. MULDROW

MICHAEL P. VANDERFORD

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

KRISTINE G. BAKER Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

JOHN L. BURNETT Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS LAW Little Rock

T. ARK MONROE III

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

HEALTH CARE LAW Fayetteville

BRYAN G. LOONEY

PHILIP E. KAPLAN

Kutak Rock 234 East Millsap Road, Suite 400 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-4099 479-973-4200

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

DEBBY THETFORD NYE Kutak Rock 234 East Millsap Road, Suite 400 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-4099 479-973-4200

JOHN T. LAVEY Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

Fort Smith

ELIZABETH ANDREOLI

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Hardin, Jesson & Terry Arvest Bank Building, Suite 500 5000 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 10127 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72917-0127 479-452-2200

JOHN E. TULL III

Little Rock

TROY A. PRICE

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

North Little Rock

MORGAN E. WELCH

CHARLES B. CLIETT, JR.

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

DAVID L. IVERS

Welch, Brewer and Hudson One Riverfront Place, Suite 413 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-978-3030

BRUCE B. TIDWELL

WILLIAM H. L. WOODYARD III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

IMMIGRATION LAW Little Rock

MELISSA MCJUNKINS DUKE

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

DONNA SMITH GALCHUS Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Lonoke

KATHY W. GOSS

Kathy Woodward Goss 604 South Center Street P.O. Box 448 Lonoke, Arkansas 72086-0448 501-676-6522

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW Little Rock

N. M. NORTON

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

INSURANCE LAW Little Rock

ALLAN W. HORNE

FRANCHISE LAW

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

DAVID M. POWELL

DONALD T. JACK, JR.

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jack, Nelson & Jones 2800 Cantrell Road, Suite 500 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 501-375-1122

ROGER D. ROWE

MICHAEL W. MITCHELL

JEFFREY THOMAS

Mitchell, Blackstock, Barnes, Ivers & Sneddon 1010 West Third Street P.O. Box 1510 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203-1510 501-378-7870

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Little Rock

Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

T. ARK MONROE III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW Little Rock

RAY F. COX, JR.

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

HAROLD J. EVANS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

HERMANN IVESTER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KATHRYN BENNETT PERKINS Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW Fort Smith

BENJAMIN H. SHIPLEY III

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 5401 Rogers Avenue, Suite 200 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72903 479-783-8200

Jonesboro

PAUL D. WADDELL

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

Little Rock

KRISTINE G. BAKER

Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

TIM BOE Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOHN L. BURNETT Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

RUSSELL A. GUNTER Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

MELVA HARMON Melva Harmon Stephens Building, Suite 1200 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1133

CHRISTOPHER J. HELLER

JOHN D. COULTER

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James, Carter & Coulter Arvest Bank Building, Suite 400 500 Broadway P.O. Box 907 Little Rock, Arkansas 72203 501-372-1414

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

DANIEL L. HERRINGTON

J. BRUCE CROSS

DENISE REID HOGGARD

Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

OSCAR E. DAVIS, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JOHN D. DAVIS Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

ALLEN C. DOBSON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

MELISSA MCJUNKINS DUKE Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

BYRON L. FREELAND Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

KATHLYN GRAVES Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800

PHILIP E. KAPLAN Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

JOHN T. LAVEY Lavey and Burnett 904 West Second Street P.O. Box 2657 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-2269

DAVID P. MARTIN Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JOANN C. MAXEY Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

MICHAEL S. MOORE Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

ANDERSON, MURPHY & HOPKINS, L.L.P.

Congratulates its partners on being named

Best Lawyers in America

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ELIZABETH ROBBEN MURRAY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JANET PULLIAM Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

CHARLES REYNOLDS Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

RICHARD A. RODERICK Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

SCOTTY M. SHIVELY Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

FREDERICK S. URSERY Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

BRIAN A. VANDIVER Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

CAROLYN B. WITHERSPOON Cross, Gunter, Witherspoon, & Galchus 500 President Clinton Avenue, Suite 200 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-371-9999

Mountainburg

MICHAEL R. JONES

Gilker and Jones 9222 North Highway 71 Mountainburg, Arkansas 72946 479-783-3109

Pine Bluff

SPENCER F. ROBINSON

Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons First National Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611-8509 870-535-9000

Rogers

LEIGH ANNE YEARGAN

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

LAND USE & ZONING LAW Little Rock

W. CHRISTOPHER BARRIER

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW Little Rock

DONALD H. BACON

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

EDWIN L. LOWTHER, JR. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

MASS TORT LITIGATION Little Rock

SHERRY P. BARTLEY

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES â&#x20AC;˘ NOVEMBER 18, 2010 45


Steven W. Quattlebaum Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Gordon S. Rather, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Walter B. Cox Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Avenue P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

Sidney P. Davis, Jr.

Media Law

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Little Rock

Jess L. Askew III

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

James R. Estes

John E. Tull III Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Medical Malpractice Law Batesville

H. David Blair

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Avenue P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

Kelly Carithers

Mariam T. Hopkins Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Paul D. Waddell

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

Little Rock

T. Michelle Ator

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Donald H. Bacon Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

D. Michael Huckabay, Sr.

M. Samuel Jones III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Bruce E. Munson Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Walker Dale Garrett

Timothy L. Boone

Laura Hensley Smith

Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Jonesboro

Ken Cook

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Bobby R. McDaniel

Fayetteville

Paul D. McNeill Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-0900

Mergers & Acquisitions Law

H. Watt Gregory III Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Fayetteville

James W. Smith

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Thomas C. Vaughan, Jr. Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

Little Rock

Paul B. Benham III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Mortgage Banking Foreclosure Law

C. Douglas Buford, Jr.

Little Rock

Robert M. Wilson, Jr.

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Wilson & Associates 1521 Merrill Drive, Suite D-220 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-219-9388

Kevin R. Burns

Jennifer Wilson-Harvey

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Wilson & Associates 1521 Merrill Drive, Suite A-150 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-223-0949

Walter M. Ebel III

Municipal Law

Springdale

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Roy, Lambert & Lovelace 2706 South Dividend Drive P.O. Drawer 7030 Springdale, Arkansas 72766-7030 479-756-8510

Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Robert J. Lambert

Little Rock

W. Christopher Barrier

Gregory B. Graham

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

C. Tad Bohannon Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300

No Turkeys Here.

This holiday season, McMath Woods is thankful that Sam Ledbetter and Bruce McMath are ranked among the best lawyers in Arkansas. If you’re hobbled, give us a gobble.

Personal injury, wrongful death and environmental litigation.

www.McMathLaw.com • 711 West 3rd Little Rock, AR 72201 • 501‑396‑5400

Criminal Defense Honored to be named as one of the Best Lawyers in America for the 5th year.

First Row (l to r): Second Row:

Neil Chamberlin, James Bruce McMath, Will Bond Carter Stein, Sam Ledbetter, Phillip H. McMath, Charles Harrison

Congratulations Tab Turner, selected as one of the Best Lawyers in Arkansas in areas of Personal Injury Litigation and Product Liability Litigation

J. Blake Hendrix attorney at law

813 West Third Street, Suite 200 • Little Rock • 501.376.0679 hendrixlaw@mac.com 46 november 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

Turner & Associates, P.A. (501) 791-2277 4705 Somers Ave # 100 North Little Rock


Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

M. Jane Dickey

Magnolia

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Hal Joseph Kemp Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-7243

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

J. Shepherd Russell III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

John William Spivey III Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Gordon M. Wilbourn Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Non-Profit/ Charities Law Little Rock

Sarah M. Cotton

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Byron M. Eiseman, Jr. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James E. Harris Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

W. Wilson Jones Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Carolyn J. Clegg

Keith & Clegg McAlester Building, Suite 205 124 South Jackson P.O. Drawer 1029 Magnolia, Arkansas 71754-1029 870-234-3550

Personal Injury Litigation Arkadelphia

Rodney P. Moore

Wright, Berry, Hughes & Moore 303 Professional Park Drive P.O. Drawer 947 Arkadelphia, Arkansas 71923 870-246-6796

Batesville

H. David Blair

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

Bryant

Ted Boswell

The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0798 501-847-3031

Clark S. Brewster The Boswell Law Firm 408 North Reynolds Road P.O. Box 798 Bryant, Arkansas 72089-0798 501-847-3031

El Dorado

Brian H. Ratcliff

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Dennis L. Shackleford Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Floyd M. Thomas, Jr. Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

K. Coleman Westbrook, Jr. Alfred F. Angulo, Jr. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Oil & Gas Law Fort Smith

Thomas A. Daily

Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Avenue P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-782-0361

Robert M. Honea Hardin, Jesson & Terry Arvest Bank Building, Suite 500 5000 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 10127 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72917-0127 479-452-2200

Little Rock

G. Alan Perkins

Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618 Little Rock, Arkansas 72225-1618 501-603-9000

James D. Rankin III Perkins & Trotter 101 Morgan Keegan Drive, Suite A P.O. Box 251618

Barrett & Deacon 100 West Center Street, Suite 200 P.O. Box 1506 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-582-5353

Kelly Carithers Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Walter B. Cox Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Avenue P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

Sidney P. Davis, Jr. Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

James R. Estes Cox, Cox & Estes Arvest Square, Suite 400 75 North East Avenue P.O. Box 878 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-251-7900

Walker Dale Garrett Bassett Law Firm 221 North College Avenue P.O. Box 3618 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-3618 479-521-9996

Robert L. Jones III Conner & Winters 211 East Dickson Street Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 479-582-5711

Don A. Taylor Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Forrest City

B. Michael Easley

Easley & Houseal 510 East Cross Street P.O. Box 1115 Forrest City, Arkansas 72335 870-633-1447

Fort Smith

Douglas O. Smith, Jr.

Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

Congrat ulat ions The BesT LawyeRs 2011 LisT

Rodney P. MooRe Personal Injury Litigation

G. Alan Wooten Warner, Smith & Harris 400 Rogers Avenue P.O. Box 1626 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72901 479-782-6041

Jonesboro

Bill W. Bristow

Bristow & Richardson 216 East Washington Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-3102 870-935-9000

303 Professional Park Drive • P.O. Box 947 • Arkadelphia, AR 71923 (870) 246-6796 • www.arklaw.com

Bobby R. McDaniel McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Paul D. McNeill Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-0900

John V. Phelps Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-0900

Phillip J. Wells McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

Little Rock

Donald H. Bacon

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Congratulations to our members named among the Best Lawyers in Arkansas: Allan W. Horne Administrative Law Insurance Law

W. Michael Reif Family Law

John B. Peace Tax Law • Trusts & Estates

Gary B. Rogers Family Law

Joseph H. Purvis Worker’s Compensation Law

Michael D. Barnes

Garland W. Binns, Jr. Banking Law Corporate Law Securities Law

Jim Beachboard Real Estate Law

Charles Reynolds Labor and Employment Law

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Cyril Hollingworth Construction Law

Michael O. Parker Tax Law • Trusts & Estates

Mark H. Allison Environmental Law

James C. Baker, Jr. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Sherry P. Bartley Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

R. T. Beard III Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800

(501) 375-9151 425 W. Capitol, Suite 3700 Little Rock, AR 72201 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • november 18, 2010 47


Congratulations

Judson Kidd

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Timothy L. Boone

Robert M. McHenry

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

McHenry & McHenry 8210 Henderson Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72210 501-372-3425

Dan F. Bufford Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

We congratulate our partner, Judson Kidd, on his dedicated service and on being named one of Arkansas’s Best Family Lawyers.

Michelle H. Cauley Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Robert M. Cearley, Jr. Cearley Law Firm Centre Place, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5600

Kevin A. Crass Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Dodds, Kidd and Ryan 501.375.9901 313 WEST SECOND ST. LITTLE ROCK, AR • 72201

DKRFirm.com

in arkansas.

Timothy O. Dudley Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

William M. Griffin III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Robert L. Henry III Barber, McCaskill, Jones & Hale Regions Center, Suite 2700 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3414 501-372-6175

Mariam T. Hopkins Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

D. Michael Huckabay, Sr.

Don Michael Huckabay, Jr.

Jim L. Julian

Rogers 600 S. 52nd St., Suite 200 (479) 695-2011

www.fridayfirm.com 48 november 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

John E. Moore Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Bruce E. Munson Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Randy P. Murphy

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Fayetteville 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 (479) 695-2011

Stuart P. Miller

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Little Rock 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 (501) 376-2011

McMath Woods 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-396-5400

David M. Donovan

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

46 Best Lawyers

James Bruce McMath

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 South Commerce Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Roger A. Glasgow

We are very proud of our

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Chisenhall, Nestrud & Julian Regions Bank Building, Suite 2840 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5800

David A. Littleton Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300

Lyn P. Pruitt Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Michael R. Rainwater Rainwater, Holt & Sexton 6315 Ranch Drive Little Rock, Arkansas 72223 800-434-4800

Gordon S. Rather, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Beverly A. Rowlett Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900 400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Jerry J. Sallings Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Michael N. Shannon Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

James M. Simpson Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Jeff Singleton Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Laura Hensley Smith Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James F. Swindoll Law Offices of James F. Swindoll 212 Center Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-1290

James W. Tilley Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 South Commerce Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Frederick S. Ursery Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Guy Alton Wade Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Richard N. Watts Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 South Commerce Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Bud B. Whetstone Whetstone, Spears & Odum 12921 Cantrell Road, Suite 204 Little Rock, Arkansas 72223-1799 501-376-3564

Teresa M. Wineland Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Mountain Home

Frank H. Bailey

Bailey & Oliver 506 Hospital Drive Mountain Home, Arkansas 72653 870-425-6041

Mountain View

Elton A. Rieves III

Elton A. Rieves III & Associates 213 East Washington, Suite Two P.O. Box 450 Mountain View, Arkansas 72560 870-269-5757

North Little Rock

Clyde Tab Turner

Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Avenue, Suite 100 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-791-2277

Pine Bluff

Stephen A. Matthews

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Product Liability Litigation Batesville

H. David Blair

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

Little Rock

Michael D. Barnes

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Robert M. Cearley, Jr. Cearley Law Firm Centre Place, Second Floor 212 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-5600

Edwin L. Lowther, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Bruce E. Munson Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore Regions Center, Suite 1900


400 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-6535

Scott D. Provencher Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Lyn P. Pruitt Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Gordon S. Rather, Jr. Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

Public Finance Law

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Little Rock

Robert B. Beach, Jr.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

James A. Buttry Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

M. Jane Dickey

Richard N. Watts

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Watts, Donovan & Tilley Arkansas Capital Commerce Center, Suite 200 200 South Commerce Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1769 501-372-1406

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

North Little Rock

Clyde Tab Turner

Turner & Associates 4705 Somers Avenue, Suite 100 North Little Rock, Arkansas 72116 501-791-2277

Professional Malpractice Law Batesville

H. David Blair

Blair & Stroud 500 East Main Street, Suite 201 P.O. Box 2135 Batesville, Arkansas 72501 870-793-8350

Little Rock

James E. Hathaway III

Thomas P. Leggett Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

J. Shepherd Russell III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Timothy O. Dudley

John William Spivey III

Timothy O. Dudley 114 South Pulaski Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-1924 501-372-0080

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

David A. Littleton

Gordon M. Wilbourn

Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

C. Tad Bohannon

Glenn E. Borkowski Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Randal B. Frazier Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

Price C. Gardner Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Timothy W. Grooms Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Harold W. Hamlin

Jeb H. Joyce Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

Hal Joseph Kemp Hal Joseph Kemp 111 Center Street, Suite 1300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-7243

James M. Saxton Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Project Finance Law

Railroad Law

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

Harold W. Hamlin

Scott H. Tucker

Jay T. Taylor

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Frederick S. Ursery

North Little Rock

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Real Estate Law

John William Spivey III

Stuart W. Hankins

Hankins Law Firm 800 West Fourth Street North Little Rock, Arkansas 72114 501-371-9226

Fort Smith

Securities Law

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Daily & Woods 58 South Sixth Avenue P.O. Box 1446 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902 479-782-0361

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

W. Jackson Williams

Little Rock

J. Shepherd Russell III

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Rogers

Thomas A. Daily

W. Christopher Barrier

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

John Alan Lewis

James P. Beachboard

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor

Little Rock: 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 • Little Rock, AR 72201 • (501) 376-2981 Northwest Arkansas Office: 5100 S. Thompson, Suite 201 • Springdale, AR • 72765 Texarkana Office: 210 N. Stateline Ave. • Suite 503 • Texarkana, AR • 71854

“Over 60 Years of Excellence in Serving our Clients”

David F. Menz Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

W. Jackson Williams

Little Rock

The attorneys and staff of Laser Law Firm, P.A. congratulate Frank B. Newell and Dan F. Bufford on being selected by The Best Lawyers in America Dan F. Bufford Frank B. Newell as 2011 Best Lawyers in Arkansas; they also wish to pay tribute to founder Sam Laser for being named among The Best Lawyers in America since its first publication in 1983.

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

David M. Powell

Little Rock

The Legacy Continues.

Little Rock

Congratulations Jack T. Lassiter Best Lawyers in America Recognized For 17 Years Criminal Defense White Collar & Non-white Collar

Paul B. Benham III

Garland W. Binns, Jr. Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

C. Douglas Buford, Jr. Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800

Lassiter & Couch

Attorneys At Law 813 West Third Street (501) 370-9300 ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • november 18, 2010 49


Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

PATRICK A. BURROW Quattlebaum, Grooms, Tull & Burrow 111 Center Street, Suite 1900 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4420 501-379-1700

WALTER M. EBEL III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

M. SEAN HATCH Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

JOHN S. SELIG

425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

STRUCTURED FINANCE LAW

Fayetteville

JAMES LEE MOORE III

Little Rock

J. SHEPHERD RUSSELL III

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JAMES W. SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

W. JACKSON WILLIAMS Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Jonesboro

ROBERT S. JONES

TAX LAW El Dorado

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard

Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Avenue, Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-443-2705

JOSEPH HICKEY

Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

TOM D. WOMACK Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-0900

Little Rock

SAMUEL R. BAXTER

Baxter & Jewell One Information Way, Suite 210 Little Rock, Arkansas 72202-2290 501-664-9555

J. LEE BROWN Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

BRYANT CRANFORD

GREGORY B. GRAHAM

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

WALTER M. EBEL III

W. WILSON JONES

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR.

CRAIG S. LAIR

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

C. BRANTLY BUCK

PRICE C. GARDNER

JOHN C. LESSEL

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000

John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-954-9000

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

STORYBOOK HOLIDAYS

JOHN B. PEACE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

DAVID A. SMITH Kutak Rock 124 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3706 501-975-3000

JOHN R. TISDALE Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

THOMAS C. VAUGHAN, JR. Lax, Vaughan, Fortson, McKenzie & Rowe Cantrell West Building, Suite 201 11300 Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-376-6565

CRAIG H. WESTBROOK Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Sunday, Nov. 28, 11 a.m. Enjoy the Tree-lighting Ceremony, Cookies and a Free Photo with Santa Claus

501-399-8059 HOLIDAY HOTLINE

Pine Bluff

TED N. DRAKE

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons First National Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611-8509 870-535-9000

TECHNOLOGY LAW Little Rock

RAY F. COX, JR.

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

J. CHARLES DOUGHERTY Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

50 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 â&#x20AC;˘ ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES


HAROLD J. EVANS

JAMES E. HARRIS

Williams & Anderson Stephens Building, 22nd Floor 111 Center Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-0800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

TRUSTS AND ESTATES El Dorado

JOSEPH HICKEY

Compton, Prewett, Thomas & Hickey 423 North Washington Avenue El Dorado, Arkansas 71730-5615 870-862-3478

Fayetteville

RICHARD F. HATFIELD Hatfield & Sayre 401 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 502 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3437 501-374-9010

WATER LAW

WILLIAM DIXON HAUGHT Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5257

WILLIAM JACKSON BUTT II

W. WILSON JONES Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JAMES LEE MOORE III

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

JAMES W. SMITH Friday, Eldredge & Clark 3425 North Futrall Drive, Suite 103 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72703-6252 479-695-2011

Jonesboro

ROBERT S. JONES

Barrett & Deacon Mercantile Center, Third Floor 300 South Church Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401-2911 870-931-1700

TOM D. WOMACK Womack, Landis, Phelps & McNeill 301 West Washington P.O. Box 3077 Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-0900

Little Rock

STEVE BAUMAN

CRAIG S. LAIR

JOHN C. LESSEL John C. Lessel 11601 Pleasant Ridge Road, Suite 301 Little Rock, Arkansas 72212 501-954-9000

MICHAEL O. PARKER Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

JOHN B. PEACE Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

GEORGE N. PLASTIRAS Plastiras Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-376-7410

WILLIAM THOMAS BAXTER

JOHN COGAN WADE

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Haught & Wade 111 Center Street, Suite 1320 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-5257

J. LEE BROWN

K. COLEMAN WESTBROOK, JR.

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

C. BRANTLY BUCK

DAN C. YOUNG

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

ALLISON J. CORNWELL

Pine Bluff

SARAH M. COTTON Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

JEFFREY H. DIXON Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

BYRON M. EISEMAN, JR. Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

Little Rock

BRIAN ROSENTHAL

Rose Law Firm 120 East Fourth Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2893 501-375-9131

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW El Dorado

TED N. DRAKE

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

ANTHONY A. HILLIARD Ramsay, Bridgforth, Robinson and Raley Simmons First National Building, 11th Floor 501 Main Street P.O. Box 8509 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611-8509 870-535-9000

JAMES C. MOSER, JR. Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Congratulations To Our Members Named As Best Lawyers In America

BRIAN H. RATCLIFF

Shackleford, Phillips & Ratcliff 100 East Church Street P.O. Box 1718 El Dorado, Arkansas 71731-1718 870-862-5523

Fayetteville

D. MICHAEL HUCKABAY, SR. "ET THE #OMPANY,ITIGATION #OMMERCIAL,ITIGATION -EDICAL-ALPRACTICE,AW 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION

CONSTANCE G. CLARK

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

THOMAS L. OVERBEY Overbey, Graham, Strigel & Wesbrook 10809 Executive Center Drive, Suite 310 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-6022 501-664-8105

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 425 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 1800 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3525 501-688-8800

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

CHRISTOPHER T. ROGERS

Mitchell, Williams, Selig, Gates & Woodyard 5414 Pinnacle Point Drive, Suite 500 Rogers, Arkansas 72758-8131 479-464-5650

Davis, Clark, Butt, Carithers & Taylor 19 East Mountain Street P.O. Box 1688 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702-1688 479-521-7600

Reece, Moore, Pendergraft 75 North East Avenue, Suite 500 P.O. Box 1788 Fayetteville, Arkansas 72702 479-443-2705

Rogers

Fort Smith

BRUCE MUNSON #OMMERCIAL,ITIGATION -EDICAL-ALPRACTICE,AW 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION 0RODUCT,IABILITY,ITIGATION

EDDIE H. WALKER, JR.

Walker, Shock & Harp 400 North Sixth Street P.O. Box 998 Fort Smith, Arkansas 72902-0998 479-783-7600

Jonesboro

BEVERLY A. ROWLETT "ET THE #OMPANY,ITIGATION #OMMERCIAL,ITIGATION 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION

PHILLIP J. WELLS

McDaniel & Wells 400 South Main Street Jonesboro, Arkansas 72401 870-932-5950

JOHN E. MOORE 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION

Little Rock

JOHN D. DAVIS

Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

TIMOTHY L. BOONE -EDICAL-ALPRACTICE,AW 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION

WILLIAM M. GRIFFIN III Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

BETTY J. HARDY

DON MICHAEL HUCKABAY, JR. 0ERSONAL)NJURY,ITIGATION

Friday, Eldredge & Clark 400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

MICHAEL R. MAYTON Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4823 501-376-0504

LEE J. MULDROW Wright, Lindsey & Jennings 200 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3699 501-371-0808

RANDY P. MURPHY Anderson, Murphy & Hopkins 400 West Capital Avenue, Suite 2470 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-372-1887

Huckabay, Munson, Rowlett & Moore, P.A. Attorneys at Law

FRANK B. NEWELL Laser Law Firm 101 South Spring Street, Suite 300 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-2488 501-376-2981

ERIC NEWKIRK Mayton, Newkirk & Jones The Lyon Building, Suite 200 401 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-4823 501-376-0504

Regions Center 7EST#APITOL 3UITEs,ITTLE2OCK !2   s&AX   www.hmrmlaw.com ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 51


JOSEPH H. PURVIS

8dc\gVi jaVi ^dch

Dover Dixon Horne Metropolitan Tower, 37th Floor 425 West Capitol Avenue Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-375-9151

MIKE RYBURN Ryburn Law Firm 10825 Financial Center Parkway, Suite 136 Little Rock, Arkansas 72211-3555 501-228-8100

GUY ALTON WADE Friday, Eldredge & Clark

400 West Capitol Avenue, Suite 2000 Little Rock, Arkansas 72201-3522 501-376-2011

PHILIP WILSON Philip M. Wilson 711 West Third Street Little Rock, Arkansas 72201 501-374-4000

CAROL WORLEY Worley Wood & Parrish One Financial Centre Parkway, Suite 411 650 South Shackleford Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72211 501-225-3535

Pine Bluff

MICHAEL J. DENNIS

Bridges, Young, Matthews & Drake 315 East Eighth Avenue P.O. Box 7808 Pine Bluff, Arkansas 71611 870-534-5532

Texarkana

GREGORY GILES

Moore & Giles 1206 State Line Avenue P.O. Box 2631 Texarkana, Arkansas 71854 870-774-5191

Lea Ellen Fowler

Voted Best in Criminal Defense

Non-white-collar

Lea Ellen Fowler Attorney at law 425 West Broadway, Suite A North Little Rock, AR

(501) 375-9908

CONTACT INFO: These lists are excerpted from The Best Lawyers in AmericaÂŽ 2011, which includes listings for more than 41,000 lawyers in 91 specialties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Best Lawyers in AmericaÂŽ is published by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, South Carolina and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 129 First Avenue, SW, Aiken, SC 29801; email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit www.bestlawyers.com. Online subscriptions to Best LawyersÂŽ databases are available at www.bestlawyers.com.

DISCLAIMER:

Arkansas Kids Count Coalitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 Pre-Legislative Conference Dec. 2 in Little Rock, 9 am - 2 pm r1SFWJFXPGMFHJTMBUJPOJNQBDUJOH"SLBOTBTGBNJMJFT r1BOFMTPOFEVDBUJPO IFBMUI FDPOPNJDJTTVFTBOEDIJMESFO r,FZOPUFCZ%S4IFSFDF8FTU 8JOUISPQ3PDLFGFMMFS'PVOEBUJPO r/FUXPSLJOHXJUIBEWPDBUFT XPOLTBOEMBXNBLFST $25 includes lunch; $15 for coalition members. Reserve your spot today: 501-371-9678, ext. 112 or visit www.aradvocates.org/pre-leg 4VQQPSUFECZ

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Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of July 1, 2010, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney.

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METHODOLOGY: This list is excerpted from the 2011 edition of The Best Lawyers in America, the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, Best Lawyers lists attorneys in 91 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey in which thousands of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2011 edition of Best Lawyers is based on more than 2.8 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile Best Lawyers remains unchanged since the first edition was compiled more than 25 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, Best Lawyers remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2011 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, lawyers who were nominated since the previous survey, and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among â&#x20AC;&#x153;the bestâ&#x20AC;?: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?â&#x20AC;? All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best LawyersÂŽ surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting, and to evaluate each nominee based only on his or her individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents, and the sophistication of the polling methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, Best Lawyers lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the best lawyers in the United States available anywhere. Best Lawyers lists are available at www.bestlawyers.com. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Lawyers,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Best Lawyers in Americaâ&#x20AC;? are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.


n Green Cuisine, the mobile food trailer we told you about back in August, is now open. Lori Moore, a former catering manager of Moe’s Southwest Grill, is serving lunch 11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Monday through Friday in a vacant lot on Sixth and Chester, adjacent to the lot that serves Vino’s. Moore’s all-vegetarian menu includes items like chipolte pineapple black bean quesadillas, grilled veggie quesadillas, a grilled veggie sandwich, a Philly cheese Portobello sub, angel hair pasta salad, quinoa salad and sweet potato slaw. Prices, Moore said, are in the $6 to $8 range. Look for specials on Facebook and Twitter (@grncuisine). Green Cuisine’s website is rollingtomato. com and the phone number is 454-7555. Moore said she encourages customers to call in orders in advance.

Restaurant capsules Every effort is made to keep this listing of some of the state’s more notable restaurants current, but we urge readers to call ahead to check on changes on days of operation, hours and special offerings. What follows, because of space limitations, is a partial listing of restaurants reviewed by our staff. Information herein reflects the opinions of the newspaper staff and its reviewers. The newspaper accepts no advertising or other considerations in exchange for reviews, which are conducted anonymously. We invite the opinions of readers who think we are in error. Restaurants are listed in alphabetical order by city; Little Rock-area restaurants are divided by food category. Other review symbols are: B Breakfast L Lunch D Dinner $ Inexpensive (under $8/person) $$ Moderate ($8-$20/person) $$$ Expensive (over $20/person) CC Accepts credit cards

Little Rock/ N. Little Rock American 65TH STREET DINER Blue collar, meat-and-two-veg lunch spot with cheap desserts and a breakfast buffet. But hurry -- breakfast closes down at 9 a.m. on the dot, and the restaurant doesn’t reopen until 10 a.m. for lunch. 3201 West 65th St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-562-7800. BL Mon.-Fri. ACADIA A jewel of a restaurant in Hillcrest. Wonderful soups and fish dishes. Extensive wine list. Affordable lunch menu. 3000 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, CC. $$-$$$. 501-603-9630. LD Mon.-Fri. D Sat. BIG ROCK BISTRO Students of the Arkansas Culinary School run this restaurant at Pulaski Tech under the direction of Chef Jason Knapp. Pizza, pasta, Asian-inspired dishes and diner food, all in one stop. 3000 W. Scenic Drive. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-812-2200. BL Mon.-Fri. BLACK ANGUS Charcoal-grilled burgers, hamburger steaks and steaks proper are the big draws at this local institution. 10907 N. Rodney Parham. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-228-7800. BLD Mon.-Sat. BOBBY’S CAFE Delicious, humungo burgers and tasty homemade deserts at this Levy diner. 12230 MacArthur Drive. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-851-7888. BL Tue.-Fri., D Thu.-Fr. BOSCOS This River Market does food well, too. Along with tried and true things like sandwiches, burgers, steaks and big salads, they have entrees like black bean and goat cheese tamales, open hearth pizza ovens and muffalettas. 500 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-9071881. LD daily.

Continued on page 56 55 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

■ dining Meals on wheels The Food Truck does mobile dining right. n We’ve been talking food trucks a lot lately on our food blog, Eat Arkansas, and in print with our recent taco truck cover story. But despite our deep love for the authentic workingman’s Mexican food that dominates the scene — not to mention the joy that comes from finding some out of the way truck plying catfish, jerk chicken or some other high calorie delight — for a while now, we’ve been clamoring for truck culture to evolve, to take a cue from scenes in places like New York, LA and New Orleans, where chefs, attracted to the flexibility, low overhead and slight rogue nature of the enterprise, have gone mobile in droves to produce our favorite kind of fare: cheap, gourmet street food. And now, praises be, thanks to The Food Truck, we’re on our way (and might be further down the path thanks to Green Cuisine; see What’s Cookin’). Because the people behind The Food Truck aren’t just doing approachable gourmet food, they’re doing it downtown and, like their counterparts in bigger cities, they’re moving around to different locations and keeping in touch with customers via the internet — with Facebook, Gowalla, Twitter and a nifty website (thefoodtruck-lr.com). The owners bring the right sorts of backgrounds. Chef Jeffrey Palsa spent time, back in the day, cooking at Allouette’s, Graffiti’s and 1620. More recently, he’s tenured in big name restaurants in D.C., Atlanta and Charleston, S.C. Naturally, he does most of the cookin’. Tyler Rogers is an upstart chef, who, in our experience, mostly mans the window, with a sunny charm. We’d be willing to bet a lot that he’s behind the Twitter feed (sample posts: “Come get some grub truckeys!!” and “The truck is closed!!! Thanks everyone for a kick ass day!!”). Tyler’s brother Jason Rogers works behind the scenes. He has a day job in advertising, which might have something to do with the outfit’s winning web strategy. “Really good sandwiches and salads” is how Jason Rogers described the menu to us in The Food Truck’s early days, and that turns out to be a fairly apt description. Nothing particularly bold — which is probably smart; Little Rock doesn’t always embrace boldness. Instead, the truck does the twists-on-standards thing every bistro and ladies lunch spot in town does, but better than or as well as all of them. The keys: a healthy understanding of the magic found at the intersection of a liberal amount of butter on sandwich bread and a griddle, an emphasis on quality ingredients (many of the condiments are truck-made) and a flair for that little touch that makes a meal. For the Reuben ($7.50), which not without merit the trucksters are promot-

brian chilson

what’scookin’

ON A ROLL: The Food Truck serves up sandwiches and salads. ing as the best in town, it’s the sweet onion relish mixed with the sauerkraut. It’s more difficult to single out that one element in the Portobello wrap ($7), a variation on the (usually boring) go-to vegetarian sandwich option in cafes everywhere. That the mushrooms are marinated in balsamic vinegar? The rosemary-seasoned sauteed spinach? The roasted red pepper? A drizzle of pesto? Whatever the case, it’s heavenly. Ditto for the Clarice ($8.50), a roasted lamb, red pepper and lettuce sandwich, topped with red onion marmalade and balsamic mayonnaise (the name, as movie junkies might’ve guess, is a “Silence of the Lambs” reference). More on the sandwich side of the menu: a delicious pesto chicken ($7.50), a ham and brie ($6.50), a roast beef ($6.75), two variation of tuna (one features a hardboiled egg in Sriracha; it goes for $7; the “classic” for $6.75), chicken salad ($6.50), turkey breast ($8) and a Greek burrito ($6.50). All sandwiches come with a handful of tasty hand-cut sweet potato chips. On the salad side of things, the truck offers four options: the Fin and Feather Plate ($8.50), which is two massive scoops of creamy tuna and chicken salad on top of a bed of greens; an Acapulco chicken Caesar ($7.50); a Greek salad, with a hearty helping of Kalmata olives and pepperoncini ($6.50; $8 with marinated chicken on top; $8.50 with roasted lamb) and a seven-layer salad ($6.75), described on the menu as “that one you love from all those potlucks!” — shredded iceberg, tomato, celery, English peas, green onions, mayonnaise, bacon and cheddar. We’ve yet to catch any of the entree specials — cowboy chili, turkey and dressing, grilled pork chops and candied yams — promising as they’ve sounded. The dessert special? That’s another story. At

least lately, the guys have been doing fried Honey Buns ($1), which involves nothing more than taking a Honey Bun out of its wrapper and pressing it on the griddle until the icing caramelizes. It’s irresistible. And will kill if the truck ever ventures into the late-night scene. The trio says it’s interested in that potential. Just like it’s interested in finding new places to park. More often than not the truck has been at the Bernice Garden on South Main Street. Several times, they’ve made arrangements to park somewhere only to be told something different once they arrive. Hopefully, more businesses and organizations will follow the lead of the Central Arkansas Library System, which allowed the truck to park in front of the Arkansas Studies Institute last Friday during Second Friday Art night. There’ve got to be dozens of businesses who’d love the exposure of having a buzz-y new “restaurant” out front for a couple of hours. Follow this model, enterprising chefs. One roving gourmet food truck is hardly enough.

The Food Truck Various locations, but often the Bernice Garden at 1401 South Main St. 501-291-2695 Quick bite

It’s hard to go wrong here, but we highly recommend the Rueben and the Portobello wrap. And the fried Honey Bun is worth the minutes it’s probably stealing from the end of your life.

Hours

Generally 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., but best check Twitter if you’re pushing up against closing.

Other info

Tax is included in prices, credit cards accepted for 35 cents extra, available for catering.


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Restaurant capsules Continued from page 55

BOUDREAUX’S GRILL & BAR A homey, seat-yourself Cajun joint in Maumelle that serves up all sorts of variations of shrimp and catfish. With particularly tasty red beans and rice, jambalaya and bread pudding. 9811 Maumelle Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-753-6860. L Fri.-Sat., D Mon.-Sat. BOULEVARD BREAD CO. Fresh bread, fresh pastries, wide selection of cheeses, meats, side dishes; all superb. Good coffee, too. 1920 N. Grant St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-663-5951. BLD Mon.-Sat. 400 President Clinton Ave. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-374-1232. BL Mon.-Sat. 401 W. Markham St. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-526-6661. BL Mon.-Fri. BUFFALO GRILL A great crispy-off-the-griddle cheeseburger and hand-cut fries star at this family-friendly stop. 400 N. Bowman Road. Beer, All CC. $$. 501-224-0012. LD daily. 1611 Rebsamen Park Rd. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-2969535. LD daily. BUTCHER SHOP The cook-your-own-steak option has been downplayed, and several menu additions complement the calling card: large, fabulous cuts of prime beef, cooked to perfection. 10825 Hermitage Road. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-312-2748. D daily. CAJUN’S WHARF The venerable seafood restaurant serves up great gumbo and oysters Bienville, and options such as fine steaks for the non-seafood eater. In the citified bar, you’ll find nightly entertainment, too. 2400 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-5351. D Mon.-Sat. CAPERS It’s never been better, with as good a wine list as any in the area, and a menu that covers a lot of ground -- seafood, steaks, pasta -- and does it all well. 4502 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-868-7600. LD Mon.-Sat. COAST CAFE A variety of salads, smoothies, sandwiches and pizzas, and there’s breakfast and coffee, too. 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-3710164. BL Mon.-Sat. COMMUNITY BAKERY This sunny downtown bakery is the place to linger over a latte, bagels and the New York Times. But a lunchtime dash for sandwiches is OK, too, though it’s often packed. 1200 S. Main St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-7105. BLD daily. 270 S. Shackleford. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-1656. BD Mon.-Sat. B Sun. COPPER GRILL Comfort food, burgers and more sophisticated fare at this River Market-area hotspot. 300 W. Third St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-3333. LD Mon.-Sat. CRUSH WINE BAR An unpretentious downtown bar/ lounge with an appealing and erudite wine list. With tasty tapas, but no menu for full meals. 318 Main St. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-374-9463. D Tue.-Sat. DAVE’S PLACE Downtown’s premier soup-and-sandwich stop at lunch, and a set dinner spot on Friday night to give a little creative outlet to chef supreme David Williams. Beef, chicken and fish are served with continental flair. 201 Center St. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-372-3283. L Mon.-Fri., D Fri. DAVID FAMILY KITCHEN Call it soul food or call it downhome country cooking. Just be sure to call us for breakfast or lunch when you go. Neckbones, ribs, sturdy cornbread, salmon croquettes, mustard greens and the like. Desserts are exceptionally good. 2301 Broadway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-371-0141. BL Sun.-Fri. DELICIOUS TEMPTATIONS Decadent breakfast and light lunch items that can be ordered in full or half orders to please any appetite or palate, with a great variety of salads and soups as well. Don’t miss the bourbon pecan pie -- it’s a winner. 11220 Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-225-6893. BL daily. DIZZY’S GYPSY BISTRO Interesting bistro fare, served in massive portions at this River Market favorite. 200 South Commerce St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-375-3500. LD Tue.-Sat. THE FADED ROSE The Cajun-inspired menu seldom disappoints. Steaks and soaked salads are legendary. Also at Bowman Curve. 1615 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-9734. LD daily. 400 N. Bowman Rd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-224-3377. LD daily. FATSAM’S LOUSIANA CAFE Heaping plates of Louisianainfluenced food in a corner of the River Market food hall. The lineup changes daily, but expect to find a steam table full of shrimp Creole, etouffee, jambalaya, red beans and rice and the like. 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-244-4720. LD Tue.-Sat. FERNEAU Great seafood, among other things, is served at the Ice House Revival in Hillcrest. With a late night menu Thu.-Sat. 2601 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$$-$$$$. 501-603-9208. D Tue.-Sat. FLYING SAUCER Beer, with dozens on tap, is the big draw at this popular River Market venue, but the food’s good, too. Sandwiches, including a great Reuben, salads, quesadillas and the bratwurst are dependable. 323 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-372-7468. LD daily. FRANKE’S CAFETERIA Plate lunch spot strong on salads and vegetables, and perfect fried chicken on Sundays. Arkansas’ oldest continually operating restaurant. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-2254487. LD daily. 400 W. Capitol Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-372-1919. L Mon.-Fri. GADWALL’S GRILL & PIZZA Once two separate restaurants, a fire forced the grill into the pizza joint. Now, under

■ update U.S. PIZZA We’ve eaten pizza for breakfast many times – cold pizza – but we’d never been to a pizza brunch until a recent visit to the U.S. Pizza outlet in Hillcrest. They serve up frittatas as well as pizzas – a frittata is an omelet under another name – and a ham and cheese frittata is what one of us had. She liked it. The other member of the reviewing team ordered the “Sunday Warrior” pizza, in part because he liked the name, and he too ate heartily. Unsurprising, perhaps, since the ingredients for the ham and cheese frittata — ham, cheese, eggs, peppers, onions – are pretty much the same as those of the Warrior, except that the Warrior comes on the familiar U.S. Pizza thin crust and it substitutes Canadian bacon for ham. Both dishes were served hot, incidentally. Brunch hours are 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The usual suspects in the way of fancy brunch drinks are available, and beer too of course – it is a pizza place. Available too, for the moment, is the patio, for those who like their brunch outdoors. 2710 Kavanaugh Blvd. CC $$ 663-2198 one roof, there’s mouth-watering burgers and specialty sandwiches, plus zesty pizzas with cracker-thin crust and plenty of toppings. 12 North Hills Shopping Center. NLR. 834-1840. LD. GRAMPA’S CATFISH HOUSE A longtime local favorite for fried fish, hush puppies and good sides. 9219 Stagecoach Road. 501-407-0000. LD. HONEYBAKED HAM CO. The trademark ham is available by the sandwich, as is great smoked turkey and lots of inexpensive side items and desserts. 9112 N. Rodney Parham Road. No alcohol, All CC. 501-227-5555. LD Mon.-Sat. HUNKA PIE Twenty to 25 different kinds of fresh baked pie daily. Plus, Krispy Kreme donuts in the morning, coffee, milk and cheesecake. 304 N. Main St. NLR. All CC. $-$$. 501-612-4754. BL Mon.-Sat. (closes at 6 p.m.). JUST LIKE MOM’S Daily specials include mom’s goulash, lemon pepper chicken over rice and garlic roast beef, with generous sides of pinto beans, cornbread, potatoes. 3140 E. Kiehl Ave. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-833-0402. BLD Mon.-Fri. B Sat. MARKHAM STREET GRILL AND PUB The menu has something for everyone. Try the burgers, which are juicy, big and fine. 11321 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-224-2010. LD Mon.-Sat. RED DOOR Fresh seafood, steaks, chops and sandwiches from restaurateur Mark Abernathy. Smart wine list. 3701 Old Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-666-8482. L Mon.-Fri. D daily. RIVERFRONT STEAKHOUSE Steaks delivered fresh from Chicago twice a week are salted, peppered, seared in an infra-red oven and then buttered for a meat-eater’s dream chowdown. There’s more to like also: crab cakes and shrimp bisque and chops and chicken and lobster tail. 2 Riverfront Place. NLR. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-375-7285. D Mon.-Sat. RUDY’S OYSTER BAR Good boiled shrimp and oysters on the half shell. Quesadillas and chili cheese dip are tasty and ultra-hearty. 2695 Pike Ave. NLR. Full bar. 501-7710808. LD Mon.-Sat. RUMBA Mexi-Cuban spot in the River Market area, this restaurant and bar has a broad menu that includes tacos and enchiladas, tapas, Cuban-style sandwiches. Specialty drinks are available also. 300 President Clinton Ave. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-823-0090 300 President Clinton Ave. 501-823-0090. SO RESTAURANT BAR Call it a French brasserie with a sleek, but not fussy American finish. The wine selection is broad and choice. Free valet parking. Use it and save yourself a headache. 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-1464. STARLITE DINER Breakfast and the ice cream-loaded shakes and desserts star here. 250 E. Military Road. NLR. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-353-0465. BLD. STICKY FINGERZ ROCK ‘N’ ROLL CHICKEN SHACK Fingers any way you can imagine, plus sandwiches and burgers, and a fun setting for music and happy hour gatherings. 107 Commerce St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-3727707. LD Mon-Sat. TOWN PUMP Soup specials daily for lunch and a dependable burger, plus basic beer food. 1321 Rebsamen Park Road. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-663-9802. L Mon.-Sat. D daily. TRIO’S Fresh, creative and satisfying lunches; even better at night, when the chefs take flight. Best array of fresh desserts in town. 8201 Cantrell Road. Full bar. $$-$$$. 501-221-3330. LD Mon.-Sat. VIEUX CARRE A pleasant spot in Hillcrest with specialty salads, steak and seafood. The soup of the day is a good bet. At lunch, the menu includes an all-vegetable sandwich and a half-pound cheeseburger. 2721 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-1196. LD Mon.-Fri., D Sat., BR Sun. WHOLE FOODS MARKET Good sandwiches, soups and hummus to go; an enormous number of hot and cold entrees from the deli; extensive juice bar. 10700 N. Rodney Parham Road. All CC. $-$$. 501-312-2326. BLD daily. WILLY D’S DUELING PIANO BAR Willy D’s serves up a decent dinner of pastas and salads as a lead-in to its nightly sing-along piano show. Go when you’re in a good mood. 322 President Clinton Ave. Full bar. $$. 501-244-9550. D Tue.-Sat. YOUR MAMA’S GOOD FOOD Offering simple and satisfying cafeteria food, with burgers and more hot off the grill, plate lunches and pies. 402 S. Louisiana St. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-372-1811. L Mon.-Fri.

AsiAn CHANG THAI AND ASIAN CUISINE One of the few Thai restaurants in Central Arkansas. Skip the pan-Asian buffet and order off the menu. Don’t miss the exotic mieng kham

appetizer; you won’t find anything that covers as many taste sensations in one bite. 9830 Highway 107. Sherwood. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-835-4488. LD Sun.-Fri., D Sat. CHINESE PAVILION HUNAN RESTAURANT A longtime favorite in Chinese restaurant polls, it’s one of the earliest Asian eateries on the north shore. 8000 Hwy. 107. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-835-8723. LD Tue.-Sun. FANTASTIC CHINA The food is delicious, the presentation beautiful, the menu distinctive, the service perfect, the decor bright. 1900 N. Grant St. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-663-8999. LD daily. GENGHIS GRILL This chain restaurant takes the Mongolian grill idea to its inevitable conclusion. It’s a restaurant where you choose all the ingredients that will be blended together and cooked on a massive round grill. 12318 Chenal Parkway. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-223-2695. LD daily. LILLY’S DIMSUM THEN SOME Innovative dishes inspired by Asian cuisine, utilizing local and fresh ingredients. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Rd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-7162700. LD daily. MT. FUJI JAPANESE RESTAURANT The dean of Little Rock sushi bars with a fabulous lunch special and great Monday night deals. 10301 Rodney Parham Rd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-227-6498. LD daily. SAIGON CUISINE Traditional Vietnamese with Thai and Chinese selections. Be sure to try to authentic pho soups and spring rolls. 6805 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. 501-663-4000. L Tue.-Fri., D Tue.-Sun. SAKURA Standard Japanese steakhouse and sushi fare — it’s hard to go wrong choosing from the extensive menu. Also in Bryant. 4011 E. Kiehl Ave. Sherwood. No alcohol, All CC. 501-834-3546. LD daily. SUSHI CAFE Impressive, upscale sushi menu with other delectable house specialties like tuna tataki, fried soft shell crab, Kobe beef and, believe it or not, the Tokyo cowboy burger. 5823 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-663-9888. L Mon.-Sat. D daily.

BArBecue CHATZ CAFE ‘Cue and catfish joint that does heavy catering business. Try the slow-smoked, meaty ribs. 8801 Colonel Glenn Road. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-5624949. LD Mon.-Sat. JO-JO’S BAR-B-Q The smoky aroma of Jo-Jo’s standard ‘cue has shifted from Levy to Sherwood. 3400 Burks. Sherwood. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. (501) 834-9696. D Mon.-Sun. WHITE PIG INN Go for the sliced rather than chopped meats at this working-class barbecue cafe. Side orders — from fries to potato salad to beans and slaw — are superb, as are the fried pies. 5231 E. Broadway. NLR. Beer. $. 501-9455551. LD Mon.-Fri., L Sat. WHOLE HOG CAFE The pulled pork shoulder is a classic, the back ribs are worthy of their many blue ribbons, and there’s a six-pack of sauces for all tastes. A real find is the beef brisket, cooked the way Texans like it. 12111 W. Markham. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-907-6124. LD Mon.-Sat. 1400 S.E. Walton Blvd. Bentonville; 516 Cantrell Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-664-5025. LD Mon.-Sat. 12111 W. Markham. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-907-6124. LD Mon.-Sat. 5107 Warden Road. NLR. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$. 501-753-9227. LD Mon.-Sat. 150 E. Oak St. Conway. All CC. $$. 501-513-0600. LD Mon.-Sat.

europeAn / ethnic AMRUTH AUTHENTIC INDIAN CUISINE Indian restaurant with numerous spicy, vegetarian dishes. 11121 N. Rodney Parham Road. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-2244567. LD daily. CAFE BOSSA NOVA A South American approach to sandwiches, salads and desserts, all quite good, as well as an array of refreshing South American teas and coffees. 701 Kavanaugh Blvd. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-614-6682. LD Tue.-Sat., BR Sun. DUGAN’S PUB The atmosphere is great, complete with plenty of bar seating and tables. There’s also a fireplace to warm you up on a cold day. The fried stuff is good. Try the mozzarella sticks. 403 E. 3rd Street. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-244-0542. HIBERNIA IRISH PUB This traditional Irish pub has its own traditional Irish cook from, where else, Ireland. Broad beverage menu, Irish and Southern food favorites and a crowd that likes to sing. 9700 N Rodney Parham Rd. Full bar, All CC. $$. (501) 246-4340. LAYLA’S Delicious Mediterranean fare -- gyros, falafel, shawarma, kabobs, hummus and babaganush -- that has a devoted following. All meat is slaughtered according to Islamic dietary law. 9501 N. Rodney Parham Road. No


alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-227-7272. LD daily (close 5 p.m. on Sun.). 612 Office Park Drive. Bryant. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-847-5455. LD Mon.-Sat. MASALA GRILL AND TEAHOUSE A delicious traditional Pakistani buffet, plus menu items like a chicken tikka wrap (marinated broiled chicken rolled in naan) and a chutney burger. 9108 Rodney Parham. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-414-0643. LD Tue.-Sat., L Sun. MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE Gyros, falafel and souvlaki plates, as well as hummus, tabouleh, eggplant dip and other dishes — wonderful food at wonderful prices. 400 President Clinton Ave. No alcohol, All CC. $. 501-372-1662. L daily. TAJ MAHAL The third Indian restaurant in a one-mile span of West Little Rock, Taj Mahal offers upscale versions of traditional dishes and an extensive menu. Dishes range on the spicy side. 1520 Market Street. Beer, All CC. $$$. (501) 881-4796. LD daily. YA YA’S EURO BISTRO The first eatery to open in the new Promenade at Chenal is a date-night affair, translating comfort food into beautiful cuisine. Best bet is lunch, where you can explore the menu through soup, salad or half a sandwich. 17711 Chenal Parkway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-821-1144. LD daily.

ItalIan BRAVO! CUCINA ITALIANA This upscale Italian chain offers delicious and sometimes inventive dishes. 17815 Chenal Pkwy. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-821-2485. LD daily. BR Sun. BRUNO’S LITTLE ITALY This more-than-half-centuryold establishment balances continuity with innovation in delicious traditional and original fare. The pizza remains outstanding. 315 N. Bowman Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-224-4700. D Mon.-Sat. GRAFFITI’S The casually chic and ever-popular Italianflavored bistro avoids the rut with daily specials and careful menu tinkering. 7811 Cantrell Road. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-224-9079. D Mon.-Sat. PIZZA CAFE Thin, crunchy pizza with just a dab of tomato sauce but plenty of chunks of stuff, topped with gooey cheese. Draft beer is appealing on the open-air deck — frosty and generous. 1517 Rebsamen Park Road. Beer, Wine. $-$$. 501-664-6133. LD daily. PIZZA D’ACTION Some of the best pizza in town, a marriage of thin, crispy crust with a hefty ingredient load. Also, good appetizers and salads, pasta, sandwiches and killer plate lunches. 2919 W. Markham St. Full bar, All CC. $-$$. 501-666-5403. LD Mon.-Sat. ROCKY’S PUB A little taste of Philly, right in North Little Rock, with authentic cheesesteak sandwiches, hoagies, salads and the like. But you’d be remiss not to try the Italian specialties whipped up at night, such as the proscuitto piselli verdi. 6909 JFK Blvd. NLR. Beer, Wine. 501-833-1077. LD Mon.-Sat. VINO’S Great rock ‘n’ roll club also is a fantastic pizzeria with huge calzones and always improving home-brewed beers. 923 W. Seventh St. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-375-8466. LD daily. ZAZA Here’s where you get wood-fired pizza with gorgeous blistered crusts and a light topping of choice and tempting ingredients, great gelato in a multitude of flavors, call-yourown ingredient salads and other treats. 5600 Kavanaugh Blvd. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-661-9292. LD daily. 1050 Ellis Ave. Conway. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-3369292. BLD daily.

MexIcan CANTINA LAREDO This is gourmet Mexican food, a step up from what you’d expect from a real cantina, from the modern minimal decor to the well-prepared entrees. We can vouch for the enchilada Veracruz and the carne asada y huevos, both with tasty sauces and high quality ingredients perfectly cooked. 207 N. University. Full bar, All CC. $$$. 501-280-0407. LD daily. JUANITA’S Menu includes a variety of combination entree choices -- enchiladas, tacos, flautas, shrimp burritos and such -- plus creative salads and other dishes. And of course the “Blue Mesa” cheese dip. 1300 S. Main St. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. 501-372-1228. L Mon.-Fri., D Thu.-Sat. SENOR TEQUILA Authentic dishes with great service and prices, and maybe the best margarita in town. Multiple locations: 4304 Camp Robinson Road, NLR, 791-3888; 9847 Maumelle Blvd., Maumelle. 10300 N. Rodney Parham Road. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-224-5505. LD daily. TACO MEXICO Tacos have to be ordered at least two at a time, but that’s not an impediment. These are some of the best and some of the cheapest tacos in Little Rock. 7101 Colonel Glenn Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-416-7002. LD Wed.-Sun. TACOS GUANAJUATO Pork, beef, adobado, chicharron and cabeza tacos and tortas at this mobile truck. 6920 Geyer Springs Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. LD Wed.-Mon. TAQUERIA THALIA Try this taco truck on the weekends, when the special could be anything from posole to menudo to shrimp cocktail. 4500 Baseline Road. No alcohol, No CC. $. 501-563-3679. LD Wed.-Mon.

Around ArkAnsAs conway THE BREWERY Coffeehouse serves soup, salads and sandwiches 2159B Prince St. Conway. No alcohol, All CC.

$-$$. 501-327-2678. BL Mon.-Sat. D Mon.-Fri. DOMOYAKI Hibachi grill and sushi bar near the interstate. Now serving bubble tea. 505 E. Dave Ward Drive. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-764-0074. L Mon.-Fri., D Mon.-Sat. EL CHARRITO Decent spread of Mexican items. 502 Oak St. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-450-6460. LD Mon.-Sun. THE FISH HOUSE The other entrees and the many side orders are decent, but this place is all about catfish. 116 S. Harkrider. Conway. 501-327-9901. LD Mon.-Sun. HART’S SEAFOOD Southern fried fish and seafood buffet over the weekend. 2125 Harkrider. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-329-8586. D Thu.-Sat., L Sun. JADE CHINA Traditional Chinese fare, some with a surprising application of ham. 559 Harkrider. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-329-5121. LD Mon.-Sat. SHORTY’S` Burgers, dogs and shake joint. 1101 Harkrider. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-329-9213. LD Mon.-Sat. STOBY’S Great homemade cheese dip and big, sloppy Stoby sandwiches with umpteen choices of meats, cheeses and breads. 805 Donaghey. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-327-5447. BLD Mon.-Sat. 405 W. Parkway. Russellville. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-968-3816. BLD Mon.-Sat. TIFFANY’S SOUL FOOD Opened in 2010, this eatery specializes in soul food classics like fried chicken, smothered pork chops and hot water corn bread. 1101 Mill Street. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $-$$. 501-327-7685. LD Mon.-Fri. TOKYO JAPANESE RESTAURANT Besides the hibachi offerings, Tokyo also has tempura, teriyaki and a great seaweed salad. Their combination platters are a great value; besides an entree, also comes with soup, salad, harumaki (spring rolls) and vegetable tempura. No sushi, though. 716 Oak St. Conway. No alcohol, All CC. $$. 501-327-6868. BL daily. U.S. PIZZA CO. CONWAY Part of the U.S. Pizza Co. chain 710 Front Street. Conway. Beer, Wine, All CC. $-$$. 501-450-9700. LD Mon.-Sun.

Hot SprIngS BELLE ARTI RISTORANTE Ambitious menu of lavish delights in a film-noir setting; excellent desserts. 719 Central Ave. Hot Springs. 501-624-7474. LD. CHEF PAUL’S Haute cuisine in a strip-mall setting. Top quality presentation and service. Freshest fish you’ll find in this area, great meats, exquisite desserts. 4330 Central Ave. Hot Springs. Beer, Wine, All CC. $$$-$$$$. 501-520-4187. L Mon.-Fri., D Mon.-Sat. DON JUAN’S Mex-style enchiladas, runny white cheese dip, great guacamole and great service in strip-mall locale. 1311 Albert Pike Road No. A. Hot Springs. 501-321-0766. LD. HAWGS PIZZA PUB Good pizza and other Italian food, a wide selection of appetizers, salads, burgers and sandwiches in an all-Razorback motif. 1442 Airport Road. Hot Springs. 501-767-4240. LD. MCCLARD’S Considered by many to be the best barbecue in Arkansas — ribs, pork, beef and great tamales, too. 505 Albert Pike. Hot Springs. 501-624-9586. LD. POMPEII CAFE Bubbling over with gourmet pizzas, steaks and pasta. 2012 Central Ave. Hot Springs. 501-318-3287. LD. PURITY BARBECUE Good smoked meats, very affordable, and don’t miss out on the crock of beans. 1000 Malvern Ave. Hot Springs. 501-623-4006. LD. RED OAK FILLIN STATION This unusual blend of convenience store and country restaurant serves up country favorites including a full breakfast, pigs-in-a-blanket, catfish and more. 2169 Carpenter Dam Road. Hot Springs. All CC. $-$$. (501) 262-0400. BLD daily. ROCKY’S CORNER Knock-out pizza at ahopping eatery across the street from Oaklawn Park. 2600 Central Ave. Hot Springs. 501-624-0199. LD.

Now Playing Boeing Boeing

Nov - December 31

The hilarious comedy! Season Tickets and Gift Certificates on Sale!

Colonel Glenn & University • murrysdinnerplayhouse.com • 562-3131

We’re Telling Tales! Come have a great dinner, cold drinks, and hear some incredible tales every Tuesday night. We record the Tales From The South radio show in front of a live audience, and it’s FREE to get in.

s Doors open at 5pm, live music start . at 6pm, and taping starts at 7pm Dinner from 5pm to 7pm.

’s See our schedule online for who your rve rese to sure be and ng, comi table. We are standing-room only almost every show. 411 Main St. • Argenta Arts District • Downtown North Little Rock

www.StarvingArtistCafe.net

eureka SprIngS THE CRYSTAL DINING ROOM Extraordinary fine dining experience that centers on coordinated service, gourmet food and a fabulous wine list. Favored by diners on special occasions. 75 Prospect Ave. Eureka Springs. Full bar, All CC. $$$-$$$$. 479-253-9766. D. KATHERINE’S CAFE AMORE Pizza and pasta with a gourmet twist will bring you back; the Slow Death by Chocolate Cake will make it a favorite. 2070 E. Van Buren. Eureka Springs. Full bar, All CC. $$. 501-479-253-7192. LOCAL FLAVOR CAFE This popular cafe along Eureka Springs’ Main Street features ecclectic and fresh entrees and sandwiches throughout the day, a flavorful breakfast selection and the best creme brulee in Arkansas. 71 South Main Street. Eureka Springs. Full bar, All CC. $$-$$$. (479) 253-9522. BL daily D Mon.-Sat. MUD STREET CAFE Voted many times as the best breakfast in the area, you’ll find lots of healthy and tasty items to choose from. The vegetable hashbrowns have more than a dozen different vegetables represented. The Mud Muffin’s a great balance between bean sprouts, eggs and black olives on a fresh English muffin, and you can’t beat the coffee. 22 G South Main Street. Eureka Springs. Wine, All CC. $$. (479) 253-6732. BL Thu.-Tue. Closed Wed. SPARKY’S ROADHOUSE CAFE Burgers are the specialty, but there are plenty of creative dishes, deli sandwiches and beer choices. 41 Van Buren (Highway 62). Eureka Springs. 479-253-6001. LD.

Private room available for holiday parties! Happy Hour 4-6 daily Big Whiskey’s Gift Cards Available! The perfect gift for any occasion! Mon-Fri 11am - close • Sat 11am-1am • Open Sundays 11am-10 pm

501-324-2449 • 225 E. Markham • River Market District

Late-Night Dining www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 57


Food for Thought

a paid advertisement

To place your restaurant in Food For Thought, call the advertising department at 501-375-2985

AMERICAN

SEAFOOD Cajun’s Wharf 2400 Cantrell Road 501-375-5351

Food and fun for everyone when you pair Cajun’s Wharf’s succulent seafood and steak with the ever-evolving live entertainment. Enjoy the fabulous fresh seafood or aged Angus beef while listening to the rolling Arkansas River on the famously fantastic deck! They also boast an award-winning wine list.

Black Angus

Homemade Comfort Food Daily Specials • Monday: Spicy Shrimp Stir-fry. Tuesday: Pot Roast. Wednesday: Meatloaf. Thursday: BBQ Plate or Shepherd’s Pie. Friday & Saturday: Fried Catfish.

Capers Restaurant

Indulge in the culinary creations and intimate environment that define Capers Restaurant. Food and wine enthusiasts agree Capers’ sophisticated approach to dining is key to it’s many accolades including receiving the Wine Spectator Award of Excellence for six years running.

Copper Grill & Grocery

An endless array of delicious dishes available in the Grill or grab your Gourmet-to-Go from the Grocery. Offering products by French Farm, Bella Cucina & Bittersweet Herb that promise to turn any recipe into a memorable masterpiece Copper Grill & Grocery is a wonderland for the gourmand.

SO

Contemporary metropolitan bistro meets Southern smalltown hospitality in a neighborhood bar.  SO offers the best in fresh seafood and hand-cut rustic meats, complimented by an extensive and diverse wine list, honored with Wine Spectator’s Award of Excellence. Whether casual dinners, special occasions, meetings with clients, or private parties, our service will impress.  Reservations six and more.  Private Lounge.

Butcher Shop

Tremendous steaks, excellent service, fair prices and a comfortable atmosphere make The Butcher Shop the prime choice for your evening out. In addition to tender and juicy steaks, The Butcher Shop offers fresh fish, pork chop, 24 hour slow roasted Prime Rib, char grilled marinated chicken and fresh pasta. Ideal for private parties, business meetings, and rehearsal dinners. Rooms accommodate up to 50-60 people.

Capi’s

Lunch offers creative and fresh entree-sized salads; a daily special and homemade soup; plus superb sandwiches sure to satisfy.   Serving continuously all-day, global appetizers, then Chef Capi’s fabulous After 5 Menu.  Advanced acoustics in place for focused business lunches.  Happy Hour all day Tue, late afternoon daily, and late night weekends.  Cozy patio atmosphere under the canopy.  www.capisrestaurant. com. Now serving new Saturday & Sunday brunch menu, and Sunday dinner.

Flying Saucer

“A great place to hangout, experience great beer and authentic German specialties”. The Flying Saucer definitely offers a unique range of domestic and international draft and bottled beers, carrying over 80 beers on draft and 120+ different bottled beers, many which are seasonal.  Accompanying their unique beer line-up is a menu packed with flare.  Bratwurst is the house specialty served with German coleslaw, or you can try Brat Con Queso or Beer Brat Nachos. Be sure to leave room for dessert: Young’s Double Chocolate Stout Ice Cream Float offers the best of both worlds.

Buffalo Grill

The crispy off the griddle cheeseburger and hand-cut fries star at this family friendly stop and will keep you coming back. The casual atmosphere will have everyone feeling right at home. The options are endless for whatever dining mood you are in. Grilled Tuna Steak sandwhich to a loaded foot long hotdog to the crispy chicken tender salad. Buffalo Grill does not disappoint. Fast and friendly staff. Very affordable prices!

Morningside Bagels

Morningside Bagels café is a full service bagel bakery. We serve breakfast, lox and deli sandwiches on a bagel. Our fresh cream cheese schmears and Guillermo’s coffee compliments our bagels. We serve espresso drinks hot and iced. Our soups and bagel chips have developed their own following. Come visit with Roxane and David Tackett and enjoy.

10907 N. Rodney Parham Mon-Sat 10:30am-9pm Breakfast 6-10:30am 501-228-7800

BISTRO Lulav

220 West 6th St. 501-374-5100 Breakfast Mon-Fri 6:30 am -10:30 am Lunch Mon-Fri 11am-2pm Dinner Tues-Sat 5-10pm V Lounge til 1am, Thurs-Sat

Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro 200 S. Commerce, Suite 150 (501) 375-3500 Tues-Thurs 11am-9pm Fri & Sat 11am-10pm

Fresh seafood specials every week. Prime aged beef and scrumptious dishes. Wine Spectator Award of Excellence, over 30 wines by the glass and largest vodka selection downtown. Regular and late night happy hour, Wednesday wine flights and Thursday is Ladies Night. Be sure to check out the Bistro Burger during lunch. Jump start your day with bistro breakfast from Lulav featuring scrumptious omlettes, pancakes and more. For the salad lover, Dizzy’s is an absolute paradise. Its list of eleven “Ridiculously Large Entrée Salads” runs the gamut of what you can do with greens and dressing. For example Zilpphia’s Persian Lime Salad, featuring grilled turkey breast, tomato, cucumber, onion, lime and buffalo mozzarella over romaine. For another: Mary Ann’s Dream, with grilled chicken breast, baby spinach, sun-dried tomatoes, cranberries, mandarin oranges, bourbon pecans and bleu cheese. Don’t that sound good?

chinese Fantastic China 1900 N Grant St Heights 501-663-8999

Sharing good things with good friends is the motto at Fantastic China. A Central Arkansas favorite offering the Freshest Chinese Food in town. It’s made to order with 100% Vegetable Oil. The presentation is beautiful, the menu distinctive, and the service perfect. Fantastic China is one of the heights most reliable and satisfying restaurants and a local favorite. Full bar.

mexican Casa Manana Taqueria

400 President Clinton Ave. 501-372-6637 6820 Cantrell Road • 501-280-9888 18321 Cantrell Road • 501-868-8822

Canon Grill

2811 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-664-2068

Voted Best Mexican 2007. Featuring authentic fare from the Puebla region of Mexico, the selections seem endless at your choice of 3 locations in the Little Rock area. You will find an array of dishes ranging from the salient Shrimp Veracruzana at La Palapa out west to great Guacamole in the River Market Taqueria. Or try tasty Tostadas that share the name of the original Cantrell location, Casa Manana.

Stop in for Our ALL DAY LONG HAPPY HOUR SATURDAYS! Order up some homemade salsa & cheesedip with your happy hour beverage and stay for dinner! Tasty Quesadilla’s and Mexican chicken Pizza. There are menu items to accommodate those not in the Mexican food mood too. And of course, The Margarita cannot be missed!

Mediterranean Layla’s

Enjoy regional specialties such as Lentil soup, a huge serving of yummy Hummus, Baba Ghannnouj or Tabbouleh. And don’t forget about the Gyros, they’re sure to be heroes in your book!

9501 N. Rodney Parham 501-227-7272

Brazilian Café Bossa Nova 2701 Kavanaugh Blvd 501-614-6682 Tues-Sat 11am-9pm Sunday Brunch 10:30-2pm

Try something different! Café Bossa Nova serves up cozy atmosphere and unique Brazilian dishes guaranteed to satisfy and served with that special Latin flare. Don’t deny yourself one of the delectable desserts prepared fresh daily or for an A+ apertif, drink in the authentic flavor of the country in the Caipirinha~a perfect blend of lime, sugar and Brazilian sugar cane rum. Dine with them tonight!

14502 Cantrell Road 501-868-7600

300 West 3rd Street 501-375-3333

Brunch Sunday 11 am to 4 pm Lunch Mon-Sat 11 am to 4 pm Dinner Mon-Sat 4 pm to close 3610 Kavanaugh Blvd. 501-663-1464

Shackleford & Hermitage Rd. (501) 312-2748

11525 Cantrell Rd, Suite 917 Pleasant Ridge Town Center 501.225.9600

323 President Clinton Ave 501-372-8032

400 N. Bowman Rd 501-224-0012 1611 Rebsamen Park Rd 501-296-9535 11am-9pm 11am-10pm Friday & Saturday

10848 Maumelle Blvd North Little Rock 501-753-6960 Mon-Fri: 6am-2pm Sat & Sun: 7am-2pm www.morningsidebagels.com

steak

brew pub Vino’s Pizza•Pub•Brewery 923 West 7th Street 501/375-VINO (8466)

Beer, pizza and more! Drop in to Vino’s, Little Rock’s Original Brewpub! and enjoy great New York-style pizza (whole or by-the-slice) washed down with your choice of award-winning ales or lagers brewed right on site. Or try a huge calzone, our new Muffaletta sandwich or just a salad and a slice with our homemade root beer. The deck’s always open, you don’t have to dress up and the kids are always welcome (or not). Vino’s is open 7 days, lunch and dinner. You can call ahead for carry-out and even take a gal. growler of beer to-go. And guess what?? The bathrooms have just been re-done!

asian panda Garden

2604 S. Shackleford Road, Suite G 501-224-8100.

Fresh, flavorful, all-you-can-eat sushi. With fresh and authentic Chinese dishes, nice decor, great dessert choices and excellent sushi, Panda Garden raises the bar.

58 november 18, 2010 • ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE ARKANSAS TIMES

Sonny Williams

If you have not been to Sonny Williams lately, get there immediately and check out the martini/wine bar. Now you can enjoy 35 wines by the glass, 335 selections of wine, 6 single barrel bourbons and all different kinds of Scotch from the many regions of Scotland. Of course, don’t miss out on the nightly entertainment by Jeff at the piano. Sonny’s is a River Market mainstay and perfect for intimate private parties; free valet parking! As always, Sonny Williams has the best steaks in town along with fresh seafood and game. No Skinny Steaks… Call ahead for reservations (501) 324-2999

Faded Rose

Featuring the Best Steaks in town with a New Orleans flair from a New Orleans native. Also featuring Seafood and Creole Specialties. As Rachel Ray says “This place is one of my best finds ever.” Back by popular demand…Soft Shell Crab and New Orleans Roast Beef Po-Boys.

500 President Clinton Avenue Suite 100 (In the River Market District) 501-324-2999 DINNER MON - SAT 5:00 - 11:00 pm PIANO BAR TUES - THU 7:00 - 11:00 pm FRI & SAT 7:00 - Late

400 N. Bowman 501-224-3377 1619 Rebsamen 501-663-9734 Open Sunday


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N o ve m b er 1 8 , 2 0 1 0

Conway dream home has plenty to offer for great living

Dream homes don’t come any better than this one at 165 Merlot in Conway. Built by Boone Custom Homes, this new construction beauty has three bedrooms, two bathrooms and approximately 1,754 square feet of space. A split floor plan means easy living and the stained and etched concrete flooring shows just how amazing this home is. This intricate flooring adds to the overall look of the home creating a beautiful show place. The chef in the family will love this great kitchen. It’s roomy and has lots of great features like the beautiful backsplash, granite countertops and a stainless refrigerator. Another exciting feature of the kitchen is the beautiful island piece. It adds to the room as a piece of furniture and can be adjusted to meet your needs since it’s not built in.

The kitchen has incredible amenities.

The hearthroom is the perfect gathering spot.

The hearth room is where family will want to gather. The gas-log fireplace makes a great focal point and helps to create a cozy, homey feeling. Stunning light fixtures let you know that this home was built with attention to detail. Other great features include a two-car garage with insulated garage door, floored attic and nice landscaping with sprinklers. All the bedrooms are on the same level with the master suite separate. There’s so much more to this home, you have to see it to believe it. It is offered for $199,500 and is listed with Linda Roster White Real Estate. To see additional photos, visit www.LRWHomes.com. Call Linda for a private tour or for more information at 501-730-1100.

The floor plan is spacious.

Stained and etched concrete is throughout. www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 59


REAL ESTATE by neighborhood TO ADVERTISE, CALL TIFFANY HOLLAND AT 375-2985 Downtown City Center

5125 GALLERIA COVE - CONWAY Stunning 3BR/2BA with open split plan, an abundance of built-ins and storage. Extraordinary lighting throughout, smooth top cooking surface, breakfast bar, walk-in pantry. FP, screened in porch and fenced yard. $209,000

5 STATEHOUSE PLAZA New construction building on the east end of the Doubletree Hotel. Floor-toceiling windows provide exceptional views of river, ballpark and area activities. Enjoy the fireworks and River Market activity from spacious 200+ SF terraces. Only 6 left! Call Susan Desselle with the Charlotte John Company at 772-7100 or visit www. SusanSellingLittleRock. com

Mid-Town Little Rock

312 DEL RIO - $189,900. 4BR/3BA, GREAT space buy! Perfect inlaw/teen quarters. Walk to Catholic or Hall High. Call Susan Desselle of the Charlotte John Company for a private tour. 501772-7100.

Call Tiffany at

1220 TRENTON - CONWAY Charming 3BR/2BA with all new carpet, paint, tile, appliances including refrigerator, light fixtures, countertops, door knobs and pulls. Must see! $123,000

MLS# 10262073 3535 HOMESTEAD - CONWAY Adorable 3BR/2BA split open plan with breakfast bar, side-by-side refrigerator, 2-inch faux wood blinds, laundry room and large deck with access thru kitchen and master. $103,900

MLS# 10272778

123 N. SUMMIT - Rare find close to ACH, UAMS, & Hillcrest. 2 BRs and a separate office, 2050 SF. Totally updated including cherry wood laminate flooring throughout, all new plumbing & electrical wiring, new kitchen counters, sink & dishwasher, new tank-less H2’ 0 heater, wired for computer network, audio/video and IR remote, a deck, fenced yard and oversized 2 car garage. A 21X17.6 ft sunroom w/vaulted ceiling, tile floor, water proof walls, lots of windows and sunken Jacuzzi hot tub. Located in Union Depot next to AR School for the Blind. Call Clyde Butler of CBRPM at 240-4300.

Hillcrest

375-2985

for pricing and availability.

39 INDIAN SPRINGS - GREENBRIER

MLS# 10257991

400 S. VALENTINE - $109,750. 2BR/1BA updated in 2008 with HVAC, roof, kitchen, bath, flooring, paint, lighting, etc. Large fenced yard w/great deck. Walking distance to UAMS & Hillcrest. Call JoJo Carter 773-9949 or www.pulaskiheightsrealty.com for more info.

Great rates for Realtors & FSBO!

MLS# 10268505 3BR/2BA new construction with gas fireplace, tile backsplash, smooth top cooking surface, microwave, pantry, jetted tub in master. Large deck with country view. $166,500

Capitol View/Stiffts Station

33 ACRES OF PASTURE LAND

\

With a 2005 built brick home with approx. 3000 SF of heated/cooled space. 4BR/3.5 BA, separate dining room, a sun room, 2-car garage, security gate and security system, new appliances, new interior paint, Call Rocky Herman at 240-9172 new carpet and flooring, a pond, small creek and so, so much more! All located in south Pulaski County. This is a great deal 228-0018 at only $320,000. MLS# 1260248

4101 C ST - $224,900. 3BR/2BA, 1836SF. Recently renovated! Enter MLS# 10255320 on www. PulaskiHeightsRealty.com for more photos. John Selva, Pulaski Heights Realty, 993-5442

Access Realty

Publisher’s Notice

501-730-1100 • 501-679-1103 www.LRWHomes.com

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 1-800-669-9077. The toll-free number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

4924 HILLCREST AVE - $459,900. 3BR/3BA plus 3-car garage. 2600 SF. Recently renovated home on large corner lot. Call John Selva at Pulaski Heights Realty at 501-993-5442.

Arkansas times presents PULASKI COUNTY Real Estate sales over $101,000 A. K. Norris, Tamara A. Norris to Brian T. Hyatt, 59 Fontenay Cir., $550,000. Julleah M. Wise to Joshua L. Wallace, Michelle L. Wallace, 5801 Stonewall Rd., $465,000. Aaron Tygart, Valerie Tygart to State Farm Bank FSB, L21R, Somersett Estates 2, $456,870. Kim M. France, Carolyn S. France to Sarah B Estes, Trenton L. Stewart, 601 N. Jackson St., $405,000. Troy E. Daniels, Barbara M. Daniels to Suzanne Catlett, Walter Catlett, 25 Woodstream Cove, $380,000. John P. Jones, Arlene Jones to Tony K. Harvey, Tollie L. Harvey, 301 Valley Club Cir., $371,000. Suzanne K. Catlett, Walter C. Catlett to Wesley Anderson, Suzanne Anderson, 1700 Wellington Woods Dr., $354,000. Ronald A. Logan, Carol E. Logan to Heather Schmiegelow, Brent Schmiegelow, 70 Pine Manor Dr., $350,000. Scott Rosenthal, Shelley Rosenthal to Darrin L. Curtis, Angela D. Curtis, L9, Maxine’s Replat Of Mills Mountain Estates, $348,000. Mar y M. Healey to F. H. Vandiver, Mary S. Vandiver, 2106 Windsor Ct., $337,000. Woodhaven Homes Inc to Dale A. Zimmerman, Dana S.

Zimmerman, 201 Marie Jeanne Dr., NLR, $299,000. Arkansas Riverview Development LLC to Henry Burch, Rosemary Burch, 5 Statehouse Plaza, $290,000. Hubert H. Henderson, Charlene W. Henderson to John R. Nolen, Joan P. Nolen, 2579 Shenandoah Valley Dr., $285,000. Lay Z Dog Ranch LLC to Grew LLC, 4001 Faulkner Rd., $278,000. Tamim Antakli, Racha Antakli to Paul Gregory Riser Revocable Trust, Allyson Heflin Riser Revocable Trust, L11 B113, Chenal Valley, $265,000. Ronald C. Beggs, Sharon A. Beggs to Michael W. Parker, 13806 Longtree Dr., $265,000. George M. Thomason, Debbie S. Thomason to Wells Fargo Bank NA, 5 Regal Cir., Maumelle, $254,567. Charles R. Hufford, II, Rusti R. Hufford to John R. Lee, Melissa M. Lee, 54 Berney Way Dr., $250,000. Charles R. Hufford, II, Rusti R. Hufford to John R. Lee, Melissa M. Lee, L30 B19, Chenal Valley, $250,000. Bruce A. Engel, Karen A. Engel to David L. Hastings, 2516 Whitewood Dr., Sherwood, $244,000. CD Homes LLC to James E.

60 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES

Childs, Latricia Childs, 32 Waters Edge Dr., $235,000. D A. Phillips Homes LLC to David G. Reynolds, Mindy L. Reynolds, 2324 Miramonte Dr., Sherwood, $225,000. National Bank Of Arkansas to Mehul S. Mehta, Kunal S. Mehta, 16 Congressional Dr., $215,000. Lee R. Powell, Caroline T. Powell to Chris W. Vincent, Courtney E. Vincent, 311 Schoolwood Ln., Cammack Village, $207,000. Lafayette Plaza LLC to Larry L. Stewart, Kathleen Weickhardt, 523 S. Louisiana St Apt 10 F, $205,000. Charles R. Dunlap, Andrea J. Dunlap to Mark Burdette, Kristen Burdette, 3022 Echo Valley Dr., $204,000. Kalvin L. Smith, April N. Smith, April Benson to Wells Fargo Bank NA, 31 Woodridge Dr., $203,759. Euro Homes Inc. to John F. Ingram, Christal N. Ingram, 9400 Harmony Dr., Sherwood, $199,000. Sanders Enterprises Inc to Calun T. Fulton, 147 Pleasantwood Dr., Maumelle, $197,000. Stephen Williamson to Ed Strackbein, Shirley Strackbein, 19233 Kanis Rd., $196,000. Victoriano Valdez, Wendi Grayson to Ellen Serven, 113 Taylor Park Loop, $194,000. Renaissance Homes Inc to

Kristopher Yarlett, Elizabeth Yarlett, 2209 Reveille Cir., Jacksonville, $190,000. Jeremy Lee, Chantrey Lee to Robert C. Hutts, Laura L. Hutts, 115 Nantucket Loop, Maumelle, $189,000. Mark W. Jenkins, Jr., Courtney Jenkins to Wilsia J. Scott, L14 B33, Overbrook, $185,000. Kanis Premium Properties LLC to Shirley Gooden, 12401 Kanis Rd., $185,000. Deltic Timber Corp. to Cindy A. Young, 16 Dressage Ln., $183,000. Debora K. Moschel, Peter W. Moschel to Andrew J. Matson, 515 E. Capitol Ave., Ste. 305, $180,000. Scott B Allen, Susan Y. Allen to James M. Brown, Jr., 1606 Biscayne Dr., $178,000. Chuc Bui, Hanh Nguyen to Junzuo Wang, Xiumei Xun, 12904 Cherry Laurel Dr., $177,333. Herman Jackson, Regina Jackson to Everhome Mortgage Company, 1416 Cornflower Ln., Sherwood, $176,069. Holly K. Price, Holly K. Hensley, Mark C. Price to Jerry W. Miller, Ladona K. Miller, 3072 Woodruff Creek Dr., Sherwood, $170,000. Georjena W. Selva, John Selva to Tanner Critz, Melanie Critz, 423 N. Van Buren St., $170,000. Elaine G. McCormack to Kristy

K. Evans, 2220 Gunpowder Rd., $168,000. Paosen Lin, Yu M. Lin to John J. Forbus, Amy M. Forbus, 101 Woodlore Cir., $167,000. Gary M. Lanier, Katherine K. Lanier to Christopher D. Shelton, 8100 Krone Ln., Roland, $165,000. Dolores Branan, Branan Family Trust, Kirk Patton, Peggy Patton to Jeffery S. Insley, 8411 Highway 70, NLR, $165,000. Rickey M. Evans, Sr., Johnnie N. Evans to Gwendolyn Green, 109 Laver Cir., $160,000. Dale A. Zimmerman, Dana S. Zimmerman to Kevin M. Gaskell, Lauren E. Gaskell, 14305 High Point Dr., $158,000. Shailesh R. Shah, Sonia Shah to Brian Andrews, Augusta Andrews, 5 Livree Ln., $155,000. The Women’s Project to Andrea L. Ingalsbe, Andy L. Ingalsbe, Judy L. Ingalsbe, Ls13-14 B13, Rapley Estates, $140,000. Charles R. Baker, Margaret B Baker to Gail McKissick, 312 Cambridge Place Dr., $139,000. Marilyn Hutchison to Thomas R . M o n e y p e n n y, Pe n n y D . Moneypenny, L11 B2, Timber Ridge, $132,000. Kevin Mosley to Daniel T. Hoggatt, Lisa J. Hoggatt, 122 Greentree Rd., Sherwood, $131,000.

Brad A. Brannon, Jill F. Brannon to Rebecca J. Bolan, Kathy J. Bolan, 6525 Corsica Dr., NLR, $130,000. L. V. Gilmartin, Susan Gilmartin to Blake Hudspeth, Danielle Hudspeth, 112 Prospect Trail, NLR, $130,000. Mary E. Linscott to Aurora Loan Services LLC, 5101 B. B. Cir., $129,244. Thomas W. Crumpton, Sr., Delphine Crumpton to Katena N. Withers, 1208 Pinnacle Dr., Jacksonville, $120,000. Neha Mehta, Matthew Sparks to Lewis & Brenda Carllee Revocable Trust, Lewis S. Carllee, Jr., Brenda K. Carllee, L7, Chimney Cove HPR, $114,000. Creshelle R. Nash to Sherry T. Walker, L5, Parkwood, $113,000. Creshelle R. Nash to Shandra L. Ray, L5, Parkwood, $113,000. Ivan Vazquez to Wells Fargo Bank NA, 2304 Emily St., Jacksonville, $107,270. Phillip Switzer, Alissa Switzer to Marshall Management Inc., L507R, Pleasant View Phase 8C, $105,000. Nuage Residential Contractors LLC to Howard S. Turner, Deborah F. Tyler, 15419 Highway 365, $105,000. Kristin E. Pece, Lawrence G. Heinrichs to Charlotte A. Williams, 10 Holly Hill Rd., $101,000.


Conway

712 N. WALNUT - $159,900. 2BR/1BA in the heart of Hillcrest. Just 1/2 block of Kavanaugh. Renovated kitchen w/ custom maple cabinets, tile floors, solid surface counters. Enter MLS 10257444 at www.PulaskiHeightsRealty.com

1110 TRILLIUM - $152,000. Newly refreshed 3BR/2BA split plan w/new countertops, kitchen faucet and paint throughout. Gas log FP, wood floors and fenced yard. Close to schools! MLS# 10266757 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-730-1100 or 501679-1103

14615 BROWN BEAR DR - $299,900. Great 4BR/2.5BA, approx. 3015 SF home in the new Don Roberts School District. Plenty of space for the entire family. Formal dining room, office, family room & eat-in kitchen all downstairs. All bedrooms have large walk-in closets and master bath & closet are huge. Side-loading garage & fully fenced yard. Call Bob Bushmiaer of Pulaski Heights Realty @ 501-352-0156 for more info or a private showing. 9 LISA COURT - $174,900. This 3BR/2BA approx. 1770 SF, 1-level home in Marlow Manor is super clean & movein ready! Updates include new HVAC, hardwoods & carpet in bedrooms. Large eat-in kitchen, open family room & fully fenced yard make this a perfect starter home or great for someone looking to downsize. Call Bob Busmiaer of Pulaski Heights Realty @ 501-352-0156 for more info or a private showing.

Chenal

15 BRONTE CT - $311,500. 5BR/3BA home with approx. 2,928 SF. MBR & a bedroom/office can be found on main level with the three additional bedrooms up. One bedroom is wired with surround sound and used as a bonus/media room. The backyard and deck are a great amenity with views of Pinnacle Mountain. Other amenities inclue sprinkler system, security system (with motion detectors), gas fireplace & a large jetted tub in master bath. For more info, contact James Harkins at 501-519-5601. Owner/Agent

Neighboring Communities 1480 W. LAWSON RD - $189,900. All brick on 3.5 acres in Alexander! 1850 SF, 3BR/2BA, hardwoods in great room and formal DR. Bryant schools. Clyde Butler, CBRPM, 501-240-4300. 21854 WILLIAM BRANDON DRIVE - $168,500. Enjoy country living on five level acres only 15 minutes from downtown Little Rock! Like-new home with 4BR/2BA, wood-burning fireplace, granite counters, stainless appliances & more! Call Clyde Butler of CBRPM at 501-240-4300. GREERS FERRY LAKE - Spectacular view! 5 acres. Utilities, covenants, seller financing. Owner/agent. 501-825-6200

31 BERNARD - $149,000. Sparkles and shines like new! 3BR/2BA, huge living room with cathedral ceiling, oversized breakfast area, wood-burning fireplace, large bedrooms, 2” blinds thru-out. Fenced yard. MLS# 10253781 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-7301100 or 501-679-1103 3535 HOMESTEAD - $103,900. Adorable 3BR/2BA split open plan with breakfast bar, side-by-side refrigerator, 2-inch faux wood blinds, laundry room and large deck with access thru kitchen and master. MLS# 10272778 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-7301100 or 501-679-1103 5125 GALLERIA COVE - $209,000. Stunning 3BR/2BA with open split plan, an abundance of built-ins and storage. Extraordinary lighting throughout, smooth top cooking surface, breakfast bar, walk-in pantry. FP, screened in porch and fenced yard. MLS# 10268505 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501730-1100 or 501-679-1103

Greenbrier 37 INDIAN SPRINGS - $152,000. New construction! Charming 3BR/2BA home w/gas fireplace, breakfast bar, tile backsplash, smooth top cooking surface. Jet tub, stained & scored concrete floors. Deck with view. MLS# 10253103 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501730-1100 or 501-679-1103

Edited by Will Shortz

9204 CYNTHIA - $122,500. 4BR/2BA, 1426 SF. Great two-story home centrally located. New paint, new lighting fixtures & other updates throughout. Large fenced backyard. John Selva, Pulaski Heights Realty, 993-5442

1220 TRENTON - $123,000. Charming 3BR/2BA with all new carpet, paint, tile, appliances including refrigerator, light fixtures, countertops, door knobs and pulls. Must see! MLS# 10262073 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-7301100 or 501-679-1103

Across 1 Rock blaster 4 Shredded sides 9 Blackballs 14 “Fantasy Island” prop 15 1944 murder mystery directed by Otto Preminger 16 Jazz pianist with 16 Grammys 17 Hagen of Broadway 18 Footnote abbr. 19 Flexible conjunction 20 “Wow!” 21 Butcher’s roast cut 23 Spill 25 More fervent 26 Border line? 28 Not a copy: Abbr. 29 Trendy 32 O’s overseas 35 Pax ___ (uneasy peace)

ANSWER

■ CROSSWORD

West Little Rock

No. 1021

Hillcrest

F E D S E P I C M A S O S T W H I T O O P S M T A B E T W S L E E L D W E L R O Z O W I E V E N I E D E N

38 Temporary lapse of memory 39 Neighborhood get-togethers 40 Metal casting housing automotive cylinders 41 It displays the connections between system components 42 Incessantly 43 Like many squares in a French crossword 45 Pout 47 Newbie rollerblader s sore spots 52 Filling holders 57 N.B.A. Hall-ofFamer Hayes 58 Certain 1920s faddist 60 Anise-flavored liqueur 61 Scheme 62 Bronx cheers 63 1963 role for Liz

64 E-mail folder 65 Stop on the Métro? 66 Cigarette that once advertised the “health benefits” of its Micronite filter

Down 1 Fraternity benefactors, for short 2 Rock music genre 3 Cabinetmaker s hardware 4 Neatnik s opposite 5 In the ___ the gods (left to fate) 6 What a hammer may hit 7 Author’s bane 8 Zen enlightenment 9 Close call 10 Pay tribute to 11 Language of Islamabad 12 Old Dodge 13 Reddish-brown gem TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE 22 What screaming may exacerbate A L F A S J A M B 24 Jelly thickener N I O B E O B O E 27 Start of some N D I X O N B A S H addresses A Y A D O C H A 29 It’ll grow on you E S T A R O A K E N 30 Fit for duty E N D A L L 31 Land under D R N O P A T I N A Down Under: Abbr. E E N T H E L I N E S V E H E X A T A K 32 Harbinger O D G E R T E T E 33 ___ mosso (less rapid, in music) T F R E E T H R O W 34 Hoagy E S O R E A D Carmichael s P R O D U C T I O N “___ Buttermilk A C T U P I C E E Sky” R E S E T S T O W 36 Soothsayer

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Puzzle by Dan Naddor

37 Subj. of a 39Down reminder 39 See 37-Down 43 Smash hit 44 Bit of comic strip text 46 Kind of board

48 The 2x2 black square near the middle of this puzzle’s grid, e.g., which is part of eight answers 49 Fertilized item 50 Shrivel from age 51 Condescending one

52 Third afterthought in a missive: Abbr. 53 Princess loved by Hercules 54 Dash 55 Small price to pay 56 Bone-dry 59 Queue after Q

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.

39 INDIAN SPRINGS - $166,500. 3BR/2BA new construction with gas fireplace, tile backsplash, smooth top cooking surface, microwave, pantry, jetted tub in master. Large deck with country view. MLS# 10257991 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-7301100 or 501-679-1103 53 WIN MEADOW - $239,900. A little bit of country with all the modern amenities! 4BR/3BA with large kitchen w/oak cabinetry, double pantry, cook’s dream island, breakfast nook with large windows. Across from 55-acre lake. MLS# 10257940 Linda Roster White Real Estate, 501-730-1100 or 501679-1103

Sherwood 400 MAXINE - $119,000. 3BR/2BA, 1452 SF all brick home on corner lot w/a fully fenced yard! Heated and cooled craft room/workshop, new roof in 2010. Clyde Butler, CBRPM, 2404300

REAL ESTATE by neighborhood

It's cheap, It's simple, It's effective.

Call 375-2985 for more information. www.arktimes.com www.arktimes.com •• NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 18, 18, 2010 2010 61 61


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December 2-4, 2010 Join us for the premier holiday extravaganza December 2-4 at the Statehouse Convention Center Ballroom.

Senior Day

Festival of Trees

Breakfast with Santa

Presented by Fox Ridge Luxury Senior Living Thursday, Dec. 2, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Saturday, Dec. 4 • 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Tux ‘n Trees Gala

Presented by Jolly Family Dentistry Thursday, Dec. 2 • 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

Presented by Rogers Photo Archive and Snell Prosthetic and Orthotic Laboratory Honoring Glazer’s Distributors Saturday, Dec. 4 • 6 p.m.

Festival of Fashion

Stroll Through the Forest

Sugar Plum Ball

Presented by Soirée Friday, Dec. 3 • 11 a.m. – Noon Doors open at 10 a.m.

Presented by the CARTI Auxiliary Dec. 2 – Dec. 4 at various times

Festival After Dark Featuring Dr. Zarr’s Amazing Funk Monster Band

Friday, Dec. 3 • 7 p.m.

For Tickets Visit carti.com or Call 501-660-7634 Presented by:

62 NOVEMBER 18, 2010 • ARKANSAS TIMES


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20 years public experience All major credit cards accepted Newest LocatioN DowNtowN LittLe rock river market

Your Best-Ever Christmas Party

Slim Christmas & Yuletide Carol

Live music for your hoLiday party!

501-282-3546

polkayoureyeout.com

SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR Unique Gifts For Your Family & Friends

Saturday, November 27, 2010 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Door Fee $5 Hilton Garden Inn 4100 Glover Lane (Off of East McCain) North Little Rock 501-955-2063 / 501-351-0962

www.sharlettepumphrey.com

The Arkansas Times is accepting resumes for a full-time graphic designer. Must be proficient with Macs and all Adobe software, deadlineoriented and highly organized, with at least four years experience in publication layout, ad design and web design/maintenance. BA or BFA in Design preferred. Salary is negotiable depending on skill and experience. Benefits include health, dental, and 401-K. Email resumes in PDF format to sheryl@arktimes.com. No phone calls please.

Union Bistro

NEIGHBORHOOd EATS ANd dRINKS Live Music Mon and Tues 10pm –Close Happy Hour Mon- Thurs 4 to 6 Daily Drink Specials Including $1.50 Drafts • Full Dinner Menu until 12:30am

NOW BOOKING CHRISTMAS PARTIES CAll ABOuT NEW YEAR’S EvE 3421 Old Cantrell Road Little Rock, Arkansas 72202 • (501) 353-0360 www.arktimes.com • NOVEMBER 18, 2010 63



Arkansas Times