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LL JORDAN MENDENHA JON KOOLEY ALEX ANDREWS


PHOTO: IAN MATTESON


10-11 - OPENING ACT 16 - BURRITOS & SNOW: ADAPTATION 18 - CALE’S CORNER: CULTURE SHOCK 20 - (SLC) HISTORY 101: EAST HIGH RAIL 22-25 - CHARACTERS: JON KOOLEY 28-30 - ORIGINS: COAL 32 - HI THERE: ERIK NIELSON 34 - HI THERE: DURELL WILLIAMS 36 - HI THERE: COLTON MORGAN

38- THE GRAPHIC STORY: SUPER TOP SECRET 40 - PRODUCT TOSS 42 - INCENTIVE: CHRIS BERESFORD 46-57 - JORDAN MENDENHALL 60-69 - SHOOTING GALLERY 72-74 - AFTERLIFE: ALEX ANDREWS 76 - TALKIN’ SHOP: BOARD OF PROVO 78 - MY RESORT: STEVIE BELL 80 - INSTAHAMS: ARTISTS


ZAK HALE IN ST. PAUL, MN PHOTOGRAPHED BY DEAN BLOTTO GRAY


OPENING ACT

harrison gordon in

salt lake city PHOTO BY SEAN K. SULLIVAN

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ot all methods are created equal. It is a grab that commands complete commitment to fully extend and achieve a timeless look of effortless style. Much like the classic grab, not every winter is created equal. Whether trying to film a part, get a cover shot or simply getting on the mountain as much as possible, each season is unique. Some seasons, the cosmos seem to align and more opportunities than can be seized are easily within reach. Other seasons feel like a gauntlet of seemingly endless opposition. Usually, however, the season turns out to be a balanced dose of each scenario, and with commitment and hard work, the successes eventually outweigh the shortcomings. Such has been the case this year with Arkade, and at the twilight of our print-season, we are proud to look back on what has been another great year for us. We are enormously thankful for everyone who makes it possible for us to exist. It may sound clichĂŠ, but we really could not do this without the support of so many quality people. - Mark Seguin


MASTHEAD EDITOR & DESIGN PAUL BUNDY paul@arkadesnowboarding.com

EDITOR & ADVERTISING CORY LLEWELYN cory@arkadesnowboarding.com

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS BOB PLUMB, SEAN K. SULLIVAN, TIM ZIMMERMAN, BEN BIRK, ANDREW MILLER, Justin L'Heureux, ROB MATHIS, STEVEN STONE, ANDY WRIGHT, E-STONE, BRYCE PACKHAM, AARON DODDS, COLE ATENCIO, RYAN BREGANTE, MarK WELSH, DEAN BLOTTO GRAY

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Daniel Cochrane, Mark Seguin, Josh Ruggles, Rob Mathis, CALE ZIMA

Contributing Artist: DUSTIN ORTIZ, Dave Doman

DISTRIBUTION Landon Llewelyn, Cooper Llewelyn, The Norm, Marcus Patterson, Cael Campbell, Laramie Patrick

ARKADE MAGAZINE 127 South 800 East STE #37 SLC, UT 84102 www.arkadesnowboarding.com info@arkadesnowboarding.com Facebook.com/arkadesnowboarding Twitter.com/arkadesnow Instagram @arkadesnowboarding

KYLE FISCHER IN SALT LAKE PHOTOGRAPHED BY ANDREW MILLER

COVER: JORDAN MENDENHALL PHOTO: BOB PLUMB


POWDER DAyS ARE WAy MORE FuN With FRiENDS.

R O M E S N O W B O A R D S . C O M


PHOTO: JOEL FRASER

SCOTT STEVENS ON HIS PRO MODEL

WE DEVOUR EVERYTHING


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his year I was lucky enough to be allowed to share with you what I believe to be a few of the greatest assets of snowboarding. I have touched on balance and community and for this final issue I wanted to conclude with what I feel is one of the most exciting aspects of snowboarding, especially the urban scene, and that is adaptation. Adaptation pertains to two aspects of snowboarding. The first being the natural progression of the sport whether you are talking about the size of rails, switch tricks, spin on/spin off, you get the picture. The current generation breaks new ground by building upon the past, and in doing so lays the foundation for those that will come after them. This aspect of adaptation is what keeps snowboarding from getting stale. An example would be if you were ask Durell Williams and Jordan Mendenhall about the East High rail they would both have different spots in mind. Durell, coming from the new crop of riders, would most likely tell you about the 30 plus stair set to the south of the tennis courts, or maybe even the fence jump to 12 stair. Jordan on the other hand would probably bring up the original East High rail, on the north side of the tennis courts, which was a Salt Lake staple in Mack Dawg and Kingpin films of the 2000’s. In those Mack Dawg/Kingpin days hitting the 30-stair rail wasn’t even conceivable yet today it is a go to spot. Yesterday’s cants are tomorrow’s musts, rails that were once video part enders are now viewed as warm up spots. A perfect example of the adaptation of the old by the new. The other aspect of adaptation in snowboarding is a bit grittier. I am talking about how we as snowboarders take what the environment gives us and use that to push the bound-

aries. There are forces at work out there that seek to curb our adaptation of this urban environment. They knob rails, put up chains, fences or what ever they can because they don’t understand the combination of the drive and the art of adaptation. Part of that art is the process of adapting to those knobbed rails and incorporating them into new tricks, which in turn makes them the new norm. A perfect example of this is the knobbed rails that are now in the terrain park at Loon, New Hampshire, yes that’s right they have knobbed rails inside their park. This is the part of snowboarding I love: the aspect of molding the city to your needs, taking what you are given and staying one step above the clueless public. As I ride around Salt Lake in the winter and I see wedges built on rails, on wall rides, or loading docks I wonder what the office people think when they come to work on Monday. I wonder what am I looking at right now that is inconceivable to me but will be standard fare for the next generation of snowboarders. I think about the film crews out there with clipboards and safety vests using their wits to outfox rent-a-cops and police force rookies with nothing better to do and it makes me smile. Snowboarding is always one step ahead of the game. They put down an obstacle to stop us and we just use in the next video part. To me this is the art in snowboarding, taking barriers and adapting them to become platforms of creativity. What an amazing thing it is to be able to see the world in such a manner. Thank you for reading, see you in the fall, and keep adapting to the obstacles and breaking those barriers. WORDS BY DANIEL COCHRANE RIDER IS STEVE LAUDER PHOTOGRAPHED BY RYAN BREGANTE


RIDE THE

BLACKLIST FEATURING

PHOTO // ALEX MERTZ


CALE’S CORNER

culture shock Over the years snowboarding has taken me on some wild adventures. I feel very fortunate that I

get to travel to all sorts of different countries and cities. While this is my favorite aspect of my job, it can also be a bit exhausting. Life on the road is full of both rad, and not so rad experiences. I have been to almost every state in the U.S. and I have been to several different countries in Europe. I enjoy seeing the different people around the world, and the way that they interact with each other and how they live and get through day-to-day life. Sometimes when I'm on these trips, and I get a free moment from snowboarding, I like to just sit in a busy area and people watch; it is quite entertaining and interesting. One of my favorite places I have been to is Switzerland. I have been to this country twice, once for a Absinthe video premiere and once for a month long snowboard trip. Last winter when we were there I had some very interesting experiences. First off, the people in Switzerland are either very nice or very mean. The mountain town that we were staying in had a very locals-only feel, so naturally we stuck out like sore thumbs. One night, Brandon Cocard and I decided that we were going to try a new spot for dinner that was kind of a pub, so we thought that it would be very fun but we were very wrong. We walked in and sat at the bar, the lady behind the bar asked what we wanted to drink, we replied asking politely for two beers, and she got right on it. After we received our drinks we asked if we could order some food and she told us no because they were done serving food for the night. This made us a bit sad but we understood. About five minutes later a family of five walked in and sat at a table right behind us. They were immediately handed food menus and water. This confused me and Brandon because we were just told that they were done serving food, we very quickly put it together that they refused food to us because we were not a local to the area. We were bummed but we decided not to make a big deal about it and we stuck to a beer dinner. On the flipside, the house we stayed on this trip was owned by one guy named Dae Dae, who lived there as well. He was the nicest and most accommodating guy I have ever met. He supplied us with beer, entertainment and home cooked meals. Some of the food he gave us was a bit strange though. Within the first ten minutes of being in this house, Cocard and I discovered this crazy shaft in the ceiling where there was an incredible amount of meat hanging and curing. This was obviously called the crazy meat shaft, ha ha! I had never seen anything like this in my life. I wondered when I was going to see him eat some of this crazy dried meat, and the very next morning at 5:30 am I woke up to him offering me some of this meat on a huge serving plate. I had no idea what kind of meet this was but I didn’t want to be rude, so I said thank you and took three strips. At the first little nibble, I quickly realized that it was the most disgusting thing I have ever tasted in my life. I wanted to try and sneakily throw it away, but he was watching me like a hawk. I shoved all 3 strips in my mouth and forced it down with a smile on my face. I later found out that it was horse meat!

All in all I am so very thankful that I get to travel to these amazing places and have the experiences that I do. If I could give one piece of advice to anyone it would be to travel as much as you can, it will change your life!

WORDS BY CALE ZIMA ILLUSTRATION BY DAVE DOMAN


(SLC) HISTORY 101

C

hristmas break 1997 was the first time I shot the infamous East High rail. This was my first year working for Forum and getting to shoot with the one and only Mack Dawg! To me as a photographer I got to pretend I was a skate photographer, and I loved every minute of it! If the rail still stood today, it would never get sessioned. It was definitely small for today's standards. That being said, this was the re birth of rail riding and it was exciting. Give or take a couple guys, that first session still has guys that are still putting it down year after year in video parts or have gone on to start amazing brands. The line up was JP Walker, Jeremy Jones, BJ Leines, Mikey Leblanc and Brian "Chico" Thien. It's a bit mind blowing that after 17 years over half that group are still charging. The run in for the rail was perfect as it was a parking lot for the High School, the downside was the uber short run out. That short run out led to many a close call with riders heading out into oncoming traffic. Photographically this rail held some great angles. This shot of BJ was one of my favorite shots, but many will remember an insane poster of Seth Huot shot by Andy Wright. This first day was no more than 50-50's and board slides, but over time heavy moves were thrown on this rail. Sadly the powers that be decided to take out the rail and put up a non snowboard friendly rail in it's place. Although it's long gone the East High rail will always be remembered as an important part of the SLC rail scene.

WORDS BY ROB MATHIS RIDER IS BJORN LEINES PHOTOGRAPHED BY ROB MATHIS


CHARACTERS

The career of a professional snowboarder is fleeting to put it lightly. If you need proof just go pop in a snow video from about eight years ago and see how many of those riders are still around today. Even if you are one of the lucky ones and manage to put together a decade long career “retirement” can still be a nerve-wracking process. Jon Kooley recently went through this transition from professional rider to working within the industry with L1 and L1TA Outerwear. We sat down with Jon to talk about the uncertainty, the risks, and the rewards of “retirement”.

Arkade: So tell us about the period in career leading up to retirement. What was your mindset as you approached the part of your career where you knew it was starting to wrap up and you had to think about “the next step”. Jon: I guess right from the start you know being a pro snowboarder isn’t something that’ll last forever. I always assumed it would end every year, and when it did I would just do what everyone does, go to school and get a job. Snowboarding for a living is such an amazing thing; you get to do what you love and most of the time you make really good money. The downside to that is most people don’t go to school or really plan for a career; snowboarding ends and they make do with what’s available. In some way it’s a bit of a disadvantage when you do realize it isn’t going to last much longer and you have nothing to really fall back on. For me my mind wandered all over the place, I don’t think I had a solid idea until it fell in my lap.

INTERVIEW BY DANIEL COCHRANE PHOTOGRAPHED BY STEVEN STONE


Arkade: Did you know you wanted to carry on in the business side of snowboarding or did that just present itself as an opportunity? Jon: A bit of both I think. I love snowboarding and I always wanted to be a part of it in some way. The opportunity presented itself and I had a choice to make. Milk a few more years, or take the leap into something totally new and hope for the best. I took the leap and couldn’t be happier. Arkade: So how did the L1 opportunity came about? Jon: It was just being in the right place at the right time I guess. Just one of those things that happen and sounds so amazing, you just know there is no way you could pass it up. Probably one of the scariest moments in my life is when I committed to giving up the only thing I’ve known for over a decade and just diving head first into something totally new. Arkade: So what is your official title at L1, and what are your official duties? Jon: My official title is Creative Director for L1. That means I design the L1 and L1TA outerwear as well as give the brand a direction from an image standpoint. I’ve also started designing our L1 Premium Goods line for spring 2015. That’s our new street wear line; the first showing in stores will be this coming fall. Arkade: So now that you have some time under your belt what are the highlights of your new profession, and conversely what have been some of the challenges? Jon: For me I think the highlights are working with amazingly talented people who have enough patience to work with me. Having a creative outlet, and a finished product at the end of the year. Not unlike a video part, with this job I have the same feeling that this was my season, this is what I did with my life in 2013 or whenever. I like that, makes me feel like I’m starting fresh every season. Last of all seeing someone wearing something that started, as a drawing on my computer is just amazing. The main challenge is I’m still learning how to do this. I have a lot of help and guidance form people who’ve been doing it for a long time. I feel like everyday I learn something new. I think the challenge is what makes it fun, what’s the point in doing something if you’re not going to consistently push yourself? Arkade: Lastly has a position within this side of snowboarding changed your perception of the industry? Jon: I’m not sure if it’s changed my perception in anyway. It has opened my eyes a bit to the amount of work and cooperation it takes to make it work. I’m pretty fortunate to get to work with people who seem to really care about and enjoy what they’re doing.


ORIGINS

WRITTEN BY JOSH RUGGLES

Salt Lake City is referred to by many as the Mecca of

snowboarding. What started as a small trickle of young bloods with a passion for the shred has become crowds of hopeful young shredders pouring in when the snow starts touching down. Whether it’s top tier pros, photographers or the business arm, there is no mistaking that this snowy Mecca has a knack for fueling the industry with the next generation. But even before the trickle started, some young kids moved to SLC and became the first of many. For the most part, the guys who are currently playing major roles in this industry were a handful of punks that couldn’t be stopped. Founder of Coal Headwear Brad Scheuffele was one of these punks, and if he weren’t, Coal would not exist. Being one of the most well known and respected brands in snowboarding, Coal has thrived with uncompromised style and quality. And it started with Scheuffele’s decision to not follow what everyone else was doing. “I was the kid that wanted to skate all day, and had to do something in the winter, which kind of led me to snowboarding. I just got consumed by it,” Scheuffele says.

In snowboarding’s infancy, Scheuffele, left his hometown in the Pacific Northwest after graduating high school, and among others became one of the first drops that led to the eventual flood of snowboarders in SLC. “We were the first wave of snowboarders out there, I mean skiers had done it over the years, but there weren’t any snowboarders,” he says. Being a part of one of the first snowboard communities, Scheuffele and his friends weren’t able to flip through magazines and absorb webisodes on the daily, so they just did what they thought was cool. Unknowingly laying the foundation for everyone who likes to get sideways, these first SLC punks made it possible for these words to make it to this page. But, just as the industry could not have done without this initial culture of unruly youth, Scheuffele accredits his success to livin SLC. “I spent my mid-twenties there. So Salt Lake is where I really formed my identity,” says Scheuffele. “I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t have that time in Salt Lake.” This is before the day when snowboard product could be bought by clicking a button for it to arrive the next day and ready to shred. Scheuffele and his friends were on the DIY

train when there was no such thing as Pinterest, Etsy or Martha Stewart. Ok, maybe not Martha Stewart. That ex-con is a pretty seasoned craft-maiden. Nonetheless, Scheuffele at the time was used to using a little more than stickers to spice up his board. “We would modify our bindings, boots and snowboards to make them work better,” he recalls. “Working at shops, we would tweak everything, and I think it sort of built up the do-it-yourself mentality.” Scheuffele quickly became integrated in the industry. Working at snowboard shops, and with the help of friends Andy Wright and Rob Mathis, he was getting exposure. And while Wright and Mathis became some of the most published photographers in snowboarding, Scheuffele made his way to the pro level. But that was only part of what he accomplished in the early years of snowboarding. “I was working at Salty Peaks, and built their first snow team. Then later it became the Milo team,” Scheuffele recalls. “I can remember selling JP Walker one of his first snowboards.” As it stands today, Scheuffele’s work is not in vain. Milosport board shop is a staple in the industry; partly because of the snowboard team is arguably the most talented and legendary shop team in the industry. Think: Los Angeles Laker’s without faking injuries, or the court battles. From MFM, Dan Brisse and Jeremy Jones, this is where the heavyweights paid their dues. Riding at the pro level, Scheuffele was continuously getting gear from his sponsors, and grew tired of stock beanies that had no forethought, and felt nothing more than bland accessories. With the do-it-yourself mentality of the early snowboard communities, he and some friends started making their own beanies to have something unique, Scheuffele explains: “I think a lot of how it all started was just the community. Looking back at the first communities of snowboard, you just had to do things for yourself.” This was the first step toward Coal. He later found himself sitting around a table with a handful of industry friends and peers. Among them were: Bob Gundram, Johan Malkoski, Bruce Bannister, and George Kleckner, who at the time were major players in the binding and boot game, and eventually founded C3 Worldwide


MARK WELSH PHOTO


distribution. They had all worked in the industry for years, and they all felt like there was something missing. “I think the true inspiration behind Coal was: we wanted something different that wasn’t being offered. And I think that’s a great way to start any business,” Scheuffele says. The combination of their talent and knowledge made the decision to go forward much easier, and essentially made it Coal possible, according to Scheuffele: “The one thing that I learned with my partners is that you have to have the right partners and people involved. With us, I feel like we have the right people in place, and it’s a team effort all around,” he explains.

ANDY WRIGHT PHOTO

When Coal started, there were no delusions of what they were after, their tagline from the beginning has been: “We make headwear more than an accessory.” CAPiTA Snowboard’s founder Blue Montgomery explains Coal’s simple recipe for success: “From the very beginning, Brad and his team at Coal had a clear goal, a clear mission—a clear vision.” With their collective experience, and everyone in tune to the same goal, they were positioning themselves to change the industry. From launch, Coal has continued to stay true to how it started, and what they are good at. “Focus on your strengths. Don’t try to be everything to everyone, then you’re just trying too hard,” mentions Scheuffele. “I think with Coal, it’s authentic, and I think people from different walks of life realize that.” The concept of not constraining themselves to being snowboard specific was part of the genius behind Coal. Quality headwear was meant for anyone, not just the ones who are hiking for first tracks. “We were able to find success without trying too hard because we were able to mainstream outside of just the skate shops and snowboard shops,” Scheuffele mentions. “To me, that was huge.” From boutiques in New York to local board shops around the country, Coal infiltrated several industries while still maintaining its core values, and superior quality by simply making products that were unlike anything else in the industry or outside of it. “Starting very early on, they set themselves a part on a product level,” says Montgomery. “From what they made and how they made it—they had an attention to detail that was unique in the headwear category and it didn’t take long for others to notice. The most obvious example was probably the innovation of new styles like the Frena that was copied by everyone under the sun.” Bearing resemblance to the styles from the first to mid-century, Scheuffele takes inspiration from everyday life. They don’t go chasing what others in the industry have done. Instead, they let concepts and development come naturally. Each piece they build has a life, a story all its own. “I think what makes Coal different and stand out more than other headwear companies is that they have better quality and more personality than other companies,” says Coal ambassador Cale Zima. “For example, there is a reason for every single headwear item they make. One year they made a trucker cap with a sailboat steering wheel on the front and they called it the Bluemont. This was named and designed after Blue, the owner of Capita, and his sailboat, which is his baby.” As the majority of their most successful pieces are based around Scheuffele’s friends, and peers, one of the most unique is the “Scotty” beanie—modeled after Scotty Whittlake himself, who would rock his beanies until they were packed out, and frayed almost beyond recognition. Re-creating a new beanie to look like Whittlake just peeled it off his dome took a little finesse, and some construction tools, Scheuffele explains: “We had to re-teach our manufacturer how to make a beanie. We initially asked them to use the highest thread count and the best materials—then we told them to take a wire brush and ruin it.” This is just one of the examples of the unique approach that has kept Coal on everyone’s head, and at the forefront of the industry.

Now in its 12th year as one of the most prominent headwear companies, Scheuffele and Coal are still doing things differently, but the same as they always have—staying true to themselves, and to the people that got them here. “I think the driving force behind Coal would boil down to the people who work at the company,” notes Zima. “Everyone that is involved with Coal has their own interests and own style. They take these passions and work them into the line of product, which is rad because it makes the company so versatile.” From armies of snowboarders, and skiers dawning Coal, to regular Joes needing to keep warm in the winter, the Seattle-based headwear company has made it into closets all over the world. But for Scheuffele, this is not his biggest accomplishment. “I would say, my biggest success is walking into work each day with five or six people that walk in there with me that are happy to be there,” Scheuffele says. “And to be able to pay them a living wage for a job they enjoy—that is success to me.”


Scott Stevens The Young in Black Fall / Winter 2013 collection Photography by Joel Fraser coalheadwear.com facebook.com/coalheadwear


HI THERE

PHOTOGRAPGH TAKEN BY RYAN BREGANTE

Name: Erik Nielsen Nickname: Eerie, D-Splif Age: 20 Home Mountain: Brighton Resort Years Snowboarding: 15 years Backing You: Milo, Stepchild, Airblaster, Vans Gloat: I’m proud of the jobs I have and the way I live. I can snowboard for free whenever I want to. Besides Snowboarding: I play a lot of golf in the summer and I want to take up fishing this year. I like to go boating with my family as well. Inspired by: Anybody who is genuinely happy; who loves exactly where they are in life and is satisfied. My dad is a big role model. Hardest “Easy” Trick: Backside nose press Short Term: Ultimate is to have a video part that I’m hyped on. Long Term: I would love to get paid to snowboard; to get paid for doing what I love to do. Three Favorite Video Parts: Aaron Bittner – Follow Me Around, Justin Bennee – Burning Bridges, Chris Grenier – Get Real

WORDS BY MARK SEGUIN

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hanks to looking up to his older brother, Erik was hooked on snowboarding before he even strapped in for the first time. It didn’t take long for his experience on a skateboard helped him start progressing on snow at light speed. Being a digger at Brighton is another one of many reasons why his riding is so dialed in. Erik has basically grown up riding Brighton and now he helps shape it. If you’ve hit a park feature at Brighton, chances are Erik Nielsen helped make that possible. He has organically made the transition from looking up to the local guys on the mountain, to being the one looked up to. That probably has to do with his genuine stoke for snowboarding, and life in general. That stoke seems to translate directly into his riding in the form of an effortless, smooth style. At the tender age of 20, He has already logged as many days on hill as some guys ten years his senior. His passion for snowboarding and drive for progression and having fun isn’t slowing down either. If you see him at Brighton, slap a high five and thank him for being part of what’s good about snowboarding.


HI THERE

PHOTOGRAPGH TAKEN BY COLE ATENCIO

Name: Durell Williams Nick Name: D, D-Train, The Darkness Age: 28 Home Mountain: Boreal Mountain Resort Years Snowboarding: 7 Sponsors: Capita, Union, Coal, Ashbury, Adidas, Howl, Milosport, Stance, Jax at the Tracks Gloat: Having the opportunity to film every day with my best friends and to be able to make the Under Dawgs movie last year. Also we've started filming our new movie called "Video Mixtape". Besides Snowboarding: I like to play the drums and guitar. Andrew Aldrige and I just started jamming, and have a little garage band we put together. I also love film and film making, music in general and skating. Inspired By: My mom and dad. They showed me that if you work hard at something you're passionate about, and always give 100% that anything is possible. The Under Dawgs, aka my best friends. Scott Stevens, Louif Paradis and Phil Jacques have amazing style and creativity. Hardest "Easy" Trick: Backflips Short Term: Film a full video part with the Under Dawgs this season. Do everything I can to make our next project as good, if not better than last years. Long Term: Pretty much just be happy with where I am in life, live without looking back and wishing there was things I would have done, and be thankful the friends and family that I have in my life. Three Favorite Movie Parts: Louif Paradis - These Days, Scott Stevens - Stack Footy, Bode Merrill – It Ain’t Easy

WORDS BY MARK SEGUIN

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urell is one of those guys that probably pisses you off. Not because he is a jerk or has a bad attitude; but because he is good at pretty much everything he tries. From ball-sports to Nirvana and Smashing Pumpkin covers, D-Train kills it. He definitely would have had success in whatever he decided to focus on, but he chose to dedicate himself to his true passion; snowboarding. Though he might be a little older than his peers, Durell is regularly turning heads in the industry, thanks most recently to his stellar part in D.A.E., The Under Dawgs first film. Not surprisingly, he is already back on the grind filming what is sure to be another hammer filled part.


HI THERE

COLTON MORGAN WORDS BY DANIEL COCHRANE PHOTOGRAPGH TAKEN BY BEN BIRK

You may say Colton (Colt) Morgan is a filmer by default but in doing so you would belittle the passion he has for what he does. Yes

Colt is rad in front of the camera, way rad in fact, but he also has a love for being behind it as well. Colt has worked over the past few years in various crews, Tahoe’s bHappy, Minnesota’s Working For The City, and most recently with UnderDawgs via Tahoe/SLC. He cut his chops at Mountain Creek in his home state of New Jersey but moved to Tahoe when he was 15 and fell in with the bHappy crew there. Then after quite a few seasons in Tahoe he did something unorthodox, he moved from Tahoe to Minnesota to be part of the burgeoning urban scene of the twin cities. Colt balanced time between Minnesota and the Working for the City crew and being out west, with a healthy dose of HCSC summers too. Eventually settling back west last season Colt hooked up with the remnants of the This Must Be The Place crew, added some of his Tahoe homies into the mix, and UnderDawgs (which was conceived but not yet realized) was officially born. Now filming their second feature Colt has moved to Salt Lake (which he probably never thought he’d do) and is enjoying our brand of urban winter.

Name: Colt Morgan Age: 21 Hometown: From New Jersey, developed in Tahoe, and currently living in Salt Lake City. Current project: Currently filming a video with the Under Dawgs. Video Mixtape. In the gear bag: HPX170 School or self taught: My mom taught me some basics when I was younger and from there I studied videos and was always interested in how videos were executed. So I taught myself. Favorite projects you've worked on: Made a video for our homie Drake last winter. Pretty much the best experience I've ever had. Just filming with my best friends for our best friend who passed. We're always thinking of you Drake, and most definitely boarding for you. Describe your process for making an edit: The process is constant brainstorming, and starts before the filming begins. The challenge is executing your vision while shooting, and then piecing your vision together on your computer in an appealing way. Favorite filmers/photographers/artists (in any industry): Justin Meyer, Benny Maglinao, Jason Hernandez and so many other people.


THE GRAPHIC STORY

SUPER TOP SECRET T

Super Top Secret has been creating graphics for Rossignol Snowboards for a few years now using their passion and gut instinct to keep the designs fresh and relevant each season. Without giving up their… ahem… top secrets, Jared provides some insight to the process behind their creations, “There is definitely a [design] process. It’s a never ending process of looking at style, music, sub-cultures, art, pop-culture and everything under the sun. Filing it away for future reference and eventually seeing what is resonating or what will resonate with where snowboarding is headed. After we collect, we assign to various channels and interpret what it all means. And at the end of the day there is a huge gut check that happens. Sometimes something just feels like the answer even despite what we see happening on the slopes.”

JUSTICE

TESLA

ROCKNROLLA

JIBSAW

The graphics that Super Top Secret design for Rossignol aren’t afraid to be noticed. They are definitely eye catchers on the mountain and are sure to turn heads. The team at STS hasn’t let up at all for the 2014/2015 season; once again crafting bold design and imagery for the new Rossignol collection. The symbiotic relationship that exists between Rossignol and STS, and the passion that both parties share, is another part of what allows the unique and creative design to shine through. “[We] just want to thank Rossi for believing in us. When we started it was literally just two designers cranking out anywhere from twenty to thirty boards for a single season. We now are completely embedded in their organization, and it’s sick to help progress their product and keep it relevant in the scene.”

WORDS BY MARK SEGUIN IMAGES PROVIDED BY ROSSIGNOL

hese days it seems like there is so much redundancy in design. Originality and fresh ideas are replaced with recycled thoughts, corner cutting design and uninspired perspectives. However, there are some people who still care enough about creating and not simply emulating. Super Top Secret is a group of these design conscious people who have been creating since 2009. Taking a team approach to design helps STS in successfully servicing its wide arching clientele. From billboards to snowboards, one piece of the puzzle that Jared Strain at STS credits their success to is knowledge of design… “Design principles are universal. It all comes back to concept. If you keep the art direction on point with the concept it will be a success. We've always said if you can design a snowboard you can design anything. Designing snowboards will be the hardest thing to do at any point for a designer. There are many unsaid rules inside of the industry that you need to adhere to. Not only that but the fact that they are being designed almost two years in advance of the decks hitting the shops means it needs to be relevant in the future.”


Rossignol’s Jibsaw MagTek is a core freestyle board that’s just as fun on any pow day. AmpTek Freestyle combines traditional camber for explosive pop and stability, with slight tip and tail rocker, keeping the Jibsaw playfully loose with effortless press-ability. Rossi’s exclusive Magne-Traction 7S features 50% smaller Mag bumps for smoother park performance and continuous edge hold. With Flatware tip and tail profiles, CBF² laminate, and a symmetrical freestyle flex, the Jibsaw is a true-twin designed for fullthrottle park and pipe performance or any backcountry booter. Sizes: 153, 155, 157, 159, 158w

CudA V1 Binding


VANS HI-STANDARD $180

ARBOR WESTMARK $400

HOLDEN CARAVAN JACKET $280 FLUX TT $170

STANCE SOCKS WOMEN’S CLARRISA $20

ASS INDUSTRIES FLUORINATED HAUL ASS WAX $15

SPY RAIDER $105

HOLDEN STANDARD SKINNY $190


INCENTIVE

BOARD: K2 Hit Machine 152

BINDINGS: K2 Formula HOODIE: Dang Shades SHADES: Cobra Dogs Co-Lab SHOVEL: Think Tank

PHOTOGRAPGH TAKEN BY BRYCE PACKHAM

BOOTS: 32 Change That Tape

AGE: 11 1/2 STANCE: Goofy 22" + 15 - 6 HEIGHT: 5'9� HOME MOUNTAIN: Blandford Ski Area, Brighton Resort, Park City FAVORITE UTAH SPOT: The Bone Zone. (RIP) Best way to get back on your board. FAVORITE SPOT TO EAT AFTER RIDING: Spedellis! Great wings and good pizza. FAVORITE VIDEO PART: Travis in LAME. Fun and insane tricks. WHO IS IN YOUR CREW: Tim Ronan, Scott Stevens, Austen Granger, Ted Borland, Jesse Burtner, Bode Merrill, Chris Grenier, Ross Phillips. Pretty much the same crew that we started with 10 plus years ago. SPONSORS: K2 Snowboards, Dang Shades, Magical Go Go, Pom Pom, Pow gloves, Airblaster (flow)


Shaun McKay P: Jesse “Wet Rat” Johnson


BRANDON

REIS sagaouterwear.com


R: BRANDON HAMMID L: MANCHESTER, NH P: TIM ZIMMERMAN


R: AUSTEN SWEETIN L: SALT LAKE CITY, UT P: E-STONE


R: FORREST SHEARER L: SNOWBIRD, UT P: ANDREW MILLER


R: DAN BRISSE L: BISMARK, ND P: AARON DODDS


R: FOREST BAILEY L: JACKSON, WY P: TIM ZIMMERMAN


P: SPENCER SHUBERT L: SLC, UT P: BOB PLUMB


AFTERLIFE

ALEX ANDREWS T

he first time I met Alex in person was last January at SIA. We were trying to find a shuttle from Denver International to our hotel. At some point, Alex saw us, or we saw Alex… I don’t really remember, but we ended up sharing a ride into town. If you’ve ever flown to Denver, you know it’s a long drive from the airport to downtown… and it’s not the most scenic drive either. I happened to mention something about the view, or lack thereof, and that sparked an interesting conversation, which led to Alex telling us about what the next few months had in store for him. He rattled off a list of at least a dozen trips, events and tradeshows which didn’t put him back home until the end of March. Notably absent from that list was time for filming parts. This is Alex’s new life… Different? Yes. Worse? Not even. These days, what is the first thing that goes through your mind when you wake up on a pow day? First thing that goes through my head is I need coffee ASAP! Then I usually bust a move with my friends up to Brighton nice and early, shred as many laps as the day can handle and end it with a brewski. How has that changed since you transitioned from pro rider to your current position? Well the coffee thing hasn't changed nor will it ever. Usually if it had snowed, I was out in the streets trying to get some video clips. That part was awesome, and it still is, but I would rather go shred the pow these days. Wait… what exactly is your current position? Are you still a team rider for Burton? It seems like I hear the term “ambassador” tossed around… what kind of job description comes with such a title? I'm not a team rider; and I don't love the word ambassador because, to me, it doesn’t sound very relatable and like you said, has a title... Basically, I work with grassroots shops around the country connecting with retailers and local snowboarders. In doing this, I'm able to help Burton get a feel for how the brand is doing at the ground level, which is where we want to continue our support for snowboarding; with local shops who have supported snowboarding through thick and thin. I'm able to get knowledge and feedback that I then relay to the right people who can make a difference with our products, the shops, and the scene. This way we can stay true to snowboarding and its roots. So what exactly went down when you transitioned from team rider your job today? It was pretty shocking when the news

started circulating that you had been cut by Burton, no one really knew what was going on and then all of the sudden you're hooked up in this new role for them. Was there ever a time when you weren't sure about your future with them? There was a time when I wasn't sure where my future was headed, but my ties with the brand weren't necessarily cut. Basically my contract was up, and Dave Downing, who is a legend within snowboarding and Burton, had talked to me about the possibility of this role, and how he thought I'd be a good fit for it. He had been doing it for a bit by himself, but he has a family and kids, and wanted to explore more shops and scenes. This is where I came into the idea. I had looked into a few other avenues, but soon realized what an awesome opportunity this was. Burton, and the people who make it up, are genuine and really love what they do. I couldn't ask to be a part of a cooler company. I really feel that I can be more influential in a position like this than I was as a professional snowboarder. It allows me to progress another side of snowboarding, but that doesn't mean that I'll stop progressing my snowboarding. What has been the toughest part about the transition? Learning how to stay organized, haha. Also I miss filming with my friends and going on trips with them. Conversely, what has been the easiest part about it? Just being hyped that I'm learning and gaining knowledge from Dave and all his experience in the industry. Does your job exist anywhere else in the industry? Do you think that’s a good thing or a bad thing? I don't know... I would think that it does, and I'd say it’s a good thing. That would mean that companies are taking more notice within the roots of snowboarding, and listening to what actual snowboarders want and need. What is the difference between traveling to film parts and traveling with what you’re doing now? It’s a lot different. I use to travel to find spots in cites. Now, I travel to ride local resorts, visit shops, and help with events. I like it a lot because when I was out filming, I didn't really ride any of the resorts nearby. It’s cool to ride with kids at their local mountains and get a feel for that area.

WORDS BY MARK SEGUIN PHOTOGRAPHED BY DEAN BLOTTO GRAY


As you’re out on the road, do you notice anything that the local snow scenes have universally in common? People love to ride, and it doesn't matter if it’s a two hundred foot hill, a backyard or the sickest mountain. I guess that’s how I am too. So that’s why I love what I do, I just want to strap in and shred. Warranted or not, at times Burton seems to draw almost as much criticism as praise. Do you think the work you’re doing now is helping to win over some of the critics? I was on the lift at Brighton the other day and asked a kid how he liked his Burton Board. He responded with "I love it, but I don't like Burton because it’s a huge corporation." I was intrigued by this because he was riding our product but had a misunderstanding of the brand and wasn't proud to be riding it. I'm not necessarily trying to win over anyone, but I want people to understand one thing: Burton is a rider-owned snowboard company. They make amazing products, and the people who work and ride for them are snowboarders; plain and simple. It doesn't matter which companies you want to support, but the ones that have stayed true to snowboarding and the progression of the sport should be respected. A lot of people look at what you’re doing as a dream job. Is there anyone you would to thank for making it possible for you to have this dream job? I'm so grateful for all of the opportunities that snowboarding has brought me. I can't thank enough people for having my back, but If it wasn't for my family I'd be nowhere. I'd also like to thank the Burton Reps here, Four Horsemen for flowing me when I was a young buck, Dave Downing and Jeremy Jones for taking me under their wings, everyone in-house at Burton snowboards, my friends (you know who you are) and ARKADE. Thanks for the interview and having my back all these years. People who support me are Burton Snowboards, Anon, Analog, Mica Movement, Drink Water, Brighton, and Powder Mountain. Thanks for taking the time to do this! See you soon up at Brighton.. Thank you guys and if you see me or any friends at Brighton, try to keep up, haha!


TALKIN’ SHOP

T

he City of Provo is an interesting place; interesting, however, not much different than other mid-size suburban cities. Depending on where you go in the city will shape your experience and impressions of the place. If you happen to wander down University Avenue, you’ll find some of the best things the city has to offer; including Board of Provo. As a young skater growing up in Provo, John Hales spent a lot of time in Bored of Provo. Unfortunately, however, that shop went out of business in the early nineties. Luckily for the community, John’s passion for skating and snowboarding never wavered. In 2004 John and his wife opened up Board of Provo, not only paying homage to the shop that he loved so much, but more importantly, providing the city of Provo a new place to shop, where their dollars will go right back into snowboarding. John’s passion doesn’t stop when he steps off his skateboard or out of his bindings. “Ten years of blood sweat and tears, we feel we have created something special that will be here for many years to come.” Obviously a business can’t be successful without people supporting it, and Board of Provo has embraced this oft forgotten principal, “Customers are the life blood of our business and we appreciate all the support we have had from all the great people that have frequented Board of Provo over the years we have been here.” John adds, “I love to interact with our customers it's a very rewarding part of my job. If I can get someone stoked on a new product or technology I get psyched on that.”

While living and breathing snow and skate everyday seems like a dream come true, it takes passion and dedication to keep that dream alive. John shares, “…over the last ten years, there have been some really cool milestones for me here at Board of Provo; as well as tons of challenges and uphill battles along the way. There are lots of variables and responsibilities that most people have no clue about as far as what it takes to own and operate a successful snow and skate shop.” Supporting local shops has always been vital to the snowboard industry, and it always will be. However easy it may be to jump online, click a few times and have your gear on its way, it is impossible to replicate the feeling of a local shop and the knowledge they provide. Board of Provo really shines in this area, in John’s words “We have an amazing two level, 7,000 square foot shop that we have filled with the best snow and skate gear available. Staffed with dedicated and passionate individuals whose main charge is to treat all people how they would like to be treated. We are all on the same page as far as the most current and up to date training on all products in the shop. We are indeed a full service pro shop. We also have a full service tune shop for all our customers repair needs. No out sourcing or long turnaround times like many of our competitors.”

WORDS BY MARK SEGUIN

PHOTO BY JOHN HALES


(MY RESORT) STEVIE BELL

PARK CITY MTN. RESORT

We all know of course that Park City Mountain Resort is home to Utah’s most professionally built and maintained terrain parks. It would come as no surprise then for you to read this edition of “My ________” featuring PCMR and fully expect to hear about park laps (look we even have a park photo). Well we threw you a curve ball this time around. Word on the street is that iRideParkCity team member Stevie Bell is just as likely to be found outside the terrain park as inside when he is riding at PCMR. Of course if you’ve seen Stevie’s video parts you know his skills go way beyond rails and wall rides to also include a love of pow and freeriding. We caught up with Stevie to get the lowdown on his favorite spots at one of Utah’s most underrated freeriding resorts, Park City Mountain Resort. So feast your eyes on the pics from Rob Mathis of Stevie doing his thing in the park, and read what he has to say about why he likes to get out of it as well.

We all know the PCMR parks are amazing. So what prompted you to get out and explore the mountain more? Stevie: PCMR is an amazing place. They obviously have the best park in the world, but sometimes it is nice to take top to bottom cruisers and just ride my snowboard. Especially if its a pow day when NO ONE should be in the park. Without giving out too many (or any) big secrets where can we find you on a pow day at PCMR? Stevie: I can't tell you the secret spots, but I will say somewhere between the top and the bottom hahaha! Have you found that people are surprised when they hear you enjoy the freeride at PCMR and not just the parks?

Stevie: Not sure of that one, but every day before I ride park I take a lap from top to bottom to warm the legs. Snowboarding is not all parks, and I actually like cruising the mountains with friends more. Have you been able to convert some park rats to explore the mountain a bit more to find the goods? Stevie: Only the homies! Other than that why bother? That is one less person tracking out our stash spots. Finally what is your favorite thing about PCMR freeriding? Stevie: A good crew is always important, and I love how wide all the runs are helps when there is everyone and their dog out for the holidays. There are lots of fun hits all the way down the mountain and its fast up-tempo riding.

WORDS BY DANIEL COCHRANE PHOTOS BY ROB MATHIS


INSTAHAMS

ARTISTS DUSTIN ORTIZ @DUSTINORTIZ 1. 2. 3. 4.

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The Last Waltz poster Bring Me Your Vultures Gordon Miles Besch 2.5 weeks Our new record...

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Thursday chop up. Soon. Shit got weird. Virgin Suicides posters...


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Arkade February 2014  

ISSUE #8.3 - Jordan Mendenhall, Jon Kooley, Alex Andrews, Durell Williams, Erik Nielsen, Colt Morgan, Cale Zima, Stevie Bell, Rob Mathis, Pa...

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