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OPENING 7

AC T

A R K A D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M


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Star t with the basic s and per fec t the fundamentals let ting the rest of the chips f a l l w h e r e t h e y m a y. I n t h i s , t h e f i n a l i s s u e o f t h e y e a r, y o u ’ l l r e a d q u i t e a f e w s t o r i e s t h a t have a unif ying thread, people who had the basic s of a plan to help lay the foundation for u n c h a r t e r e d t e r r i t o r y. T h e i r o n l y a p p a r e n t thought being the hoped-for result and not so m u c h t h e j o u r n e y t o a c h i e v e i t . S o m e t i m e s i t ’s b e t t e r t o ke e p i t l o o s e , t r u s t i n g i n y o u r a b i l i t y and passion for helping you navigate potential p i t f a l l s a s y o u m a ke y o u r w a y t o w a r d s y o u r ultimate goal. Whether that 's a career at a resor t, event planning, making ar t, or this ollie (t h e m o s t f u n d a m e n t a l t r i c k i n s k a t i n g) f r o m D e e Os trander as captured by Chris Swains ton you h a v e t o c r a w l b e f o r e y o u c a n w a l k . We l c o m e t o t h e e n d o f Vo l u m e 12 , w a l k t h i s w a y…

- Arkade

Location: Camera:

Dee Ostrander

Chris Swainston

Los Angeles, CA C a n o n E O S -1D X

ISSUE 3

Skater: Photog rapher:

VO L U M E 12


TA B L E O F

CONTENTS

7 - 8 :

9

9 - 10 :

Opening Act Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s

13 - 14 :

Cover Story

15 - 16 :

Characters: JP Goulet

17 - 18 :

Characters: Krush Kulesza

19 :

Graphic Story

21 :

P r o d u c t To s s

25 - 36 :

Tr a v e l : J a p a n

37 - 40 :

Artist Profile

41 - 4 6 :

Musician Profile

47 - 53 :

Photographer Profile

5 5 - 67 :

Tr a v e l : S l o v a k i a & B u d a p e s t

69 :

Sound Check

71 :

Instaham

73 :

End Credits

Photog rapher: Location: Camera:

Bob Plumb Mt. Baker

C a n o n E O S -1D M a r k I V

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COVER

STORY

Photo:

Niels Jensen

Wo r d s :

Jake Malenick

Wi t h

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a f a n t a s t i c l o c a l s k a t e r a s t h e s u b j e c t , b a c kd r o p p e d b y t h e red rocks of Moab and looming, snow-capped peak in the far b a c kg r o u n d , t h i s j u s t m i g h t b e t h e m o s t q u i n t e s s e n t i a l “ U t a h ” p h o t o e v e r t o g r a c e o u r c o v e r. A s p h o t o g r a p h e r N i e l s J e n s e n describes it, “It was too hard to pass up get ting a shot with such c o n t r a s t i n g s c e n e r y. N o t m a n y p l a c e s i n t h e w o r l d w h e r e t h e s e g e o g r a p h i c f e a t u r e s e x i s t i n o n e p l a c e .” Seeing as the s tor y behind a shot of this caliber deser ves to be told by someone who was present, Niels continues, “It was a s p u r o f t h e m o m e n t s k a t e t r i p f o r b e t t e r w e a t h e r i n J a n u a r y. We o r i g i n a l l y w e n t t h e r e t o s k a t e a n a r e a w i t h a ‘ b u m p t o g a p .' A s w e w e r e e x p l o r i n g t h e a r e a , S a m (H u b b l e) w a s a l r e a d y n a v i g a t i n g around dif ferent hills. I saw how much fun he was having cruising around an area you wouldn’t normally see skateboarding, and I knew I wanted to capture the pure joy of it, so I told him he should go a lit tle fur ther out so we could get the entire scene in o n e s h o t . E v e n t h o u g h i t s c a l l e d ‘s l i c k r o c k ,’ a n d i t p r o b a b l y f e e l s t h a t w a y f o r b i ke r s , t h e t e r r a i n i s f i l l e d w i t h a l l k i n d s o f c r a c k s , h o l e s a n d l o o s e r o c k s t o t h r o w o f f a s k a t e b o a r d e r e a s i l y. S a m t o o k o n e q u i c k l o o k a t a l i n e h e w a s g o i n g t o t a ke a n d c o m m i t t e d t o i t , r e g a r d l e s s o f s h i f t s i n t e r r a i n . Wa t c h i n g h i m s k a t e d o w n t h e r o c k f a c e w a s l i ke w a t c h i n g s o m e o n e b o m b a s ke t c h y h i l l i n S F, b u t i n s t e a d o f t a k i n g a s t r a i g h t l i n e , i t f e l t m o r e l i ke w a t c h i n g a s n o w b o a r d e r o r s u r f e r i n t h e w a y h e c h o s e h i s p a t h .” H e r e a t A r k a d e , w e s e e m t o h a v e a s o f t s p o t f o r p h o t o s l i ke t h i s with a peaceful, almos t serene side to it. It gives us a feeling of solitude while showing the independence of skating. Whether a p h o t o g r a p h e r i s p r e s e n t o r n o t , m o m e n t s l i ke t h e o n e b e f o r e you occur worldwide on a daily basis, subconsciously uniting the independent over a simple yet consuming passion. A s long as p u r i t y l i ke t h i s ke e p s g e t t i n g p r o d u c e d , y o u c a n b e d a m n s u r e we will continue praising it.

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Camera:

Southern Utah Nikon D4S

ISSUE 3

Location:

VO L U M E 12


CHAR AC TERS

JP GOULET Photo:

Paul Bundy

Wo r d s :

Daniel Cochrane

Powder Mountain Marketing Manager Jean-Pierre ‘JP’ Goulet’s goal was simple, even though the pathway to achieving it was utterly unknown. His goal is one in which most of us can relate. Simply, he wanted to work where he played, and a post-Olympic move to Utah in 2003 from his hometown of Gatineau, Quebec was his first step in making that dream a reality.

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Initially spending his days at neighboring Snowbasin Resort JP found himself drawn more and more to Powder Mountain as Snowbasin’s post-Olympic notoriety resulted in slopes a bit more crowded than he preferred. The final transition across Pineview Reservoir came after the 07/08 season during which JP spent many solo, untracked, deep days on the slopes of Powder Mountain. He knew he had found his new home and so he applied for a position on the Powder Mountain Park Crew led at that time by Dave Jessup. Over the next handful of seasons Dave, the original architect of Powder’s Terrain Park program, groomed JP as an eventual replacement. When the time came for Dave to move on to new opportunities JP was ready to step in. JP says that the next series of seasons at Powder were about two distinctly different, but equally important, aspects of resort management. The first being the day to day learning of the ins and out of routine on-mountain operations, and the second being the behind the scenes marketing work vis a vis establishing and maintaining of relationships within the industry. It was the Pow Mow vets that helped JP with the first endeavor. From chainsaw ops to welding, and on snow events they were there to help teach JP all they knew about daily on snow life. The other side of the equation came from former Marketing Director Patrick Lundin who took JP under his wing grooming him for the marketing aspect of the business, using JP’s extensive contact tree to help build the Powder Mountain brand. When Patrick left JP described his opportunity as an ability to “sneak in and take charge of a few things in the office.” Now, a decade later, JP sits as the Marketing Manager, working where he plays; goal accomplished. JP now spends his days in his mid-mountain office where he continually works to navigate the everchanging challenges of resort life in a volatile industry while still managing to squeeze in a lap or two every day. It’s no secret that the current state of affairs seems to be merge, merge, merge, but for JP and new owners, Summit Group, that isn’t part of the plan; “These massive corporations are buying up everything and making it accessible to everyone, which is great in its way. However, we feel like we need to differentiate ourselves completely from the big attractions. You can call us a boutique resort or whatever the kids are calling it these days, but honestly, we simply want to offer a great skiing and snowboarding experience at a decent price. Pow Mow is for people who want to enjoy their surroundings and not have to be worried about what’s going on around them. You take your time at Pow Mow. The road, the lifts, the cats, the buses, it's all about the adventure and finding your line.” One of the biggest moves they have made in the past few seasons, a move contrary to conventional resort wisdom, is to limit day passes and the amount of traffic on the mountain (recall JP’s disdain at the overcrowding of Snowbasin). JP explains, “Since our purchase in 2013, Powder Mountain has become a bit more popular and mainstream. That is why we decided to cap our day passes and season passes, giving purchasing priority to locals and keeping our prices reasonable. The maximum amount of people you can have on the hill is around 3,000 on about 7,900 acres. Do the math! People ask why we decided to do the complete opposite of what every other resort does and it is really to keep the vibe and skiing and snowboarding experience alive.” Oh, and for those of you who know “how” to ride Powder Mountain JP shares his go-to lap from his office at Timberline Lodge: Strap in, Ride Timberline Lift, Drop into Powder Country on "The Finger", Ride the bus to Sundown, Catch the Lightning Ridge Snowcat up, Slash the wind lips in Cache Bowl and ride right back to Timberline Parking Lot.

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CHAR AC TERS

KRUSH KU LESZA Photo:

Tim Zimmerman

Wo r d s :

Daniel Cochrane

K rush Kulesza, the founder of Snowboy Productions, is one of my favorite people in the industry. Like

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myself, he’s half “bitter old cynic” and half “still kid at heart”; who is out there to just trying to help keep the stoke alive, and (lovingly) talk shit doing it. Some days those percentages may edge more towards 51%/49% one-way or the other, but that’s just the nature of the beast. There are very few people who have had such an immediate and profound impact on snowboarding as Krush (a fact he will deny) and it all started, fittingly enough, with DIY and the attitude that he could do “it” better; the “it” being local contests in Spokane, Washington. For Krush, those local contests just weren’t cutting it, and his reaction was merely to start doing his own. Thus began the now two-decade-long run of organizing events, which have branched from his Washington roots to include stops all over the U.S., as well as events in Japan, Canada, and Europe. The first big turning point in the structure of events came with 2003’s Holy Oly Revival in which the signature Snowboy event model was born. Krush decided to do away with the standard contest design of heats, rules, and formats that permeated even small-time events. Instead, he settled on a new format, which he describes as having “a start, an end, and some rad shit in the middle...hope you enjoy it!" and it has become a Snowboy trademark. In short, the focus turned from “contests” to “events.” Without question, the (current) crown jewel of Snowboy productions is The Holy Bowly, the (more or less) annual gathering of creativity and flow. However, it is also the one Snowboy event that is least like the others. Its large-scale format garners not only attention from all media but also attendees from all over the globe. For all of the benefits of a significant event, there are some drawbacks as well. “With large-scale events, you tend to get a lot of cooks in the kitchen. To pull off massive events, you need lots of money and with that money comes lots of opinions of what you should do. Those opinions might be amazing, and they might suck. With the (smaller) events I do I get to have creative control, and usually, that's more important to me than chasing every last dollar. Chasing is exhausting,” says Krush. Reminiscing on the past two decades, Krush is happy but not complacent; “Our tagline has always been "Making shit radder today than it was yesterday" and I think we have stayed true to that. I'm proud of what we have done, but I know our best days are still ahead of us. One thing I hope is that we make people look at things differently, question the status quo and come up with new ways to do shit.” Most importantly he reiterates that all of Snowboy’s success comes from DIY ethic and staying true to doing what they want to do vs. chasing dollars and trends. “Instead of waiting around for the industry we go out and create what we think would be rad. I think our events start trends instead of following them, and sometimes you miss out on cashing in on a trend you might have helped create because you've already moved on to something else. You don't like the way something is? Fuck it, change it. It could take a long ass time, but with enough grit and passion you can do anything."

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GRAPHIC

STORY

Wo r d s :

Jake Malenick

P izza and beer. Beaches and sunburn. Obama and Biden. Sometimes two things go together so perfectly that you can feel their effects worldwide. Two of the most iconic to fall in this category are undoubtedly skateboarding and photography. Since the birth of skating, there have always been those of us, myself included, who weren’t gifted with the coordination and athleticism it takes to excel on four small wheels. However, we still possessed a love and appreciation for rolling sideways and found our own home in this group of misfits behind the lens. Without photographers and videographers surfing the sidewalks right alongside skating’s founders, this simple hobby may have never been captured and shared with the world, elevating its status from pastime to subculture, to a full-blown way of life.

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Those who grew up with the now almost forgotten medium of DVDs, and even farther forgotten VHS tapes, are wholly aware of Girl Skateboards’ prowess and dedication to filmmaking and skate imagery. For the past 20+ years, Girl has been shooting their videos at least partly on film, and have in their possession a full archive of exclusively film photos that document not only the companies storied past but skating’s history as well. They were the clear choice for collaboration with such a well known and respected brand as Kodak, and a product line built on a mutual love for the craft of an analog image was born.

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Rider: Powder Mountain Turn n’ Burn Derby Back-to-Back Photo: Ben Moisen

251 W 12th St, Ogden, UT 84404

Champion Cody Lee


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TOSS Atlas Skateboards “Pack” Deck / $40 - atlasskateboarding.com Atlas “Logo 5 Panel” Hat / $28 - atlasskateboarding.com Skullcandy “Crusher” wireless headphones / $199 - skullcandy.com Vans “Chima Pro 2” shoe / $70 - vans.com Agfa Vista film (Being discontinued) - find at your local camera shop Field Notes “Costal 3-Pack” / $12.95 - fieldnotesbrand.com

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Cassette Sunglasses "Madness" / $70 - thecasset tecompany.com

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Your favorite rider’s favorite resort.

Sage Kotsenburg | Photo by: Bob Plumb Follow us on Instagram: @brightonresort


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To kyo & Nise ko ARK ADE IN JAPAN -

Intro by Daniel Cochrane / Photos by Paul Bundy

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Japan is a country of stark contrast, and

nowhere is that more evident than in Tokyo. The world’s largest metropolitan area evokes thoughts of sprawling neon cityscapes, and bustling urban streets bathing in the light of enormous video screens as high-speed bullet trains and monorails careen through a city that pushes the boundaries of technological advancement. In many ways these images are true, but another realm exists within Tokyo. A realm firmly rooted in tradition. In the midst of Pachinko Parlors and Robot Café’s are markets and business that still favor tradition over technology. It is here in these markets and side streets that the future runs head long into the past, and Japan’s contrast is most exposed. In the fabled Tsukiji Fish Market cash auctions are still held before sunrise each morning, and deals are sealed with handshakes and nods. Precious cargo is carried immediately from the docks to waiting chefs across the city on a variety of handcarts and scooters. Here, just a few blocks away from one of the Camera: Fi lm:

most advanced banking sectors of the world; ledgers are still kept by hand. Receipts for cash transactions are tallied on calculators under the faint glow of low wattage bulbs. The old ways are still the preferred ways for many. Tradition trumps technology. It is true no matter where you go; Akihabara, Shibuya, Shinjuku are awash in neon and advertisements hundreds of feet in the air. Yet below stand solitary figures holding hand written signs hocking their wares. Their faces constantly reflecting the colors of the everchanging neon screens above them. It is here, in these instances, where you are able to ever so slightly pierce the veil of Japanese society, and witness this clash of dynamic cultures. Where the headlong rush of technology meets the steadfast ways of tradition. Where, in an area that contains over 30 million people, you can easily find yourself walking alone on an empty street. We traveled to Japan and our journey simultaneously placed us firmly into the future and past.

Nikon F10 0

A g f a V i s t a 2 0 0 / 4 0 0 & K o d a k Po r t a 16 0 / 4 0 0 / 8 0 0

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Only s topped snowing for a couple hours the 8 days we were there.

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Niseko cabin, s till snowing.

Grand Hirafu gondola.

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Husband and wife owned food truck with the bes t s teak sandwiches in town.

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Domi Churiki, Gentem Stick showroom.

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Tsukiji Fish Market accounting depar tment.

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Quiet yet busy Tok yo alley way.

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Sunday af ternoon at the fish market.

Tsukiji Fish Market approval.

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National Championship Sumo wres tling.

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Japanese traditions.

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Japanese Parks and Rec.

Out side view of the Tsukiji Market.

Invitation to come eat the bes t sushi in town.

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Color coordinated school uniforms.

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Quiet sunday mornings on the s treet s of Tok yo.

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ARTIST

PROFILE

Photos:

Bree & Nate Millard

Wo r d s :

Daniel Cochrane

BAN Supply Collaboration is the brainchild of local Brighton power couple Bree and Nate Millard with a noted emphasis on the “and.” Over the past few years, at a pace that was completely unexpected, the duo has made quite a name for themselves with their collaborative pieces of woodcut art and signage.

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Although BAN Supply is relatively new, artistic expression in general as an outlet for personal growth has always been in the mix for the both Bree and Nate through many of their other hobbies especially snowboarding, traveling, and mountain biking. They elaborate; “these “woodcut” pieces we create are the product of that desire to grow. Fiddling with mixed mediums has suddenly become so much more than fiddling. It’s this refined ’product’ that embellishes everything we have learned up to now. Whether it is Nate’s drafting, graphic design, drawing, photography background, or Bree’s art school, photography, carpentry, and construction background. A ‘product’ was created, and people liked it. We liked it. And it goes from there.” At the core, the most crucial element for Bree and Nate is the relationship between themselves and their clients. They shun the term “business” and instead look at each work as it’s own collaborative entity between themselves and those who are commissioning the pieces. They meet with clients face to face to bounce ideas off of each other and dial in the rough idea of the work. Then Bree and Nate retreat to the workshop where Nate works on the illustrations and composition and Bree takes over when it comes time to hand route the wood. They then decide a final color pallet and Bree adds the finishing touches. The highlight of the process is delivering the pieces to customers in person to experience that moment when they see the end product for the first time and, hopefully, collect a unique heirloom for generations to come. With so many clients there must be a few that stand out and when asked Bree and Nate had immediate answers. One of their most important clients was Uintah Beer Company, not just because the Millard’s are huge fans of beer in general, but because that particular job pushed the duo to a realization of what BANSupply could accomplish. The massive installation for Uintah was a huge confidence builder as far as the scope of work that they could handle, and a big step forward in their belief in themselves.. Other examples are more personal, including making the logo plate for longtime friend Chris Grenier’s 16/17 Salomonder Board and most recently the title plates for Arbor’s Cosa Nostra video. “When Arbor Snowboards approached us to do the titling for their ‘Cosa Nostra’ film, it was a no-brainer for both us. No monetary value could substitute featuring our work in a snowboard film, a sport that has shaped both of us individually and as a married couple. Penciling and routing in Bryan Iguchi, Marie-France Roy, Mark Carter and all the others was a very surreal moment. We were creating the opening for these riders parts that we had looked up to for years, and now this is a part of snowboard history that the snowboard community can look back on forever.” It’s been a fast and crazy ride for BAN Supply, but it has also been a labor of love. Labor that comes with a small price of course; “That saying “find what you love to do and you won’t work another day in your life” its kind like that, but we work our damn asses off. Success? Depends how you look at it. The more work we get the more we have to do. But its work we love. We are incredibly proud of what we have become and stand behind everything we do.”

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PROFILE

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MUSICIAN

PROFILE

Photos:

Paul Bundy

Wo r d s :

Jake Malenick

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club is the spitting image of pure rock n’ roll. Chain smoking

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cigarettes, all black attire, leather jackets, motorcycles, booze, and an attitude of genuine independence. They continue to successfully fight and claw their way through modern music, holding onto an era that’s devoid of shameless commercialism and the mind-numbing repetition of today’s pop. By some mysticism we mortals could never understand, BRMC has formed a sound all their own while fluctuating between the many genres that make up their home in rock n’ roll. From the comforting twang of small-town blues to the aggression of punk glory days to the feeling of a dark and endless ocean crashing at night to the brightest skyward-facing anthems, their songs continue to rumble with otherworldly magic, like the product of a leather-clad wizard practicing a strange form of rock alchemy. Since releasing their debut album in 2001 after concocting their name from the 1953 Marlon Brando film The Wild One, BRMC has had nothing short of a tumultuous career. From the death of bassist Robert Levon Been’s father, while on tour to the severe brain surgery drummer Leah Shapiro underwent before recording their most recent release, it seems as if the full force of life has tried to hold them up at almost every turn. Their storied history is one of a journey to hell and back, of perpetually healing wounds, and ultimately of light triumphing over dark. Thankfully their spirit survived, and our own Paul Bundy had the opportunity to man the camera one fateful night in February as Black Rebel’s motorcade rolled into Metro Music Hall with the surfy psych-garage sounds of Night Beats. The gritty, grainy film perfectly captures their aesthetic as they finally have the chance to tour behind their latest release, Wrong Creatures; an album three years in the making. As their tour rolls on, so does the story of this ride-or-die trio, carrying on the spirit Brando portrayed on the screen; shaking fists at the establishment every chance they get.

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MUSICIAN 43

PROFILE

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PROFILE

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PHOTOGRAPHER

PROFILE

TAY L O R A L L A N Wo r d s :

Daniel Cochrane

For Taylor Allan, the pathway to professional photography was never clear-cut. The

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24-year-old Provo native readily admits that it wasn't until entering college that photography became a profession he considered, and even then it wasn't his first choice.

Initially, Taylor entered school as a graphic design major. His only goal was trying to find something that could land him a job within the skateboard industry, and graphic design offered that opportunity. He quickly realized however that even though his skills were on par with his fellow students his dedication to the craft was no match for the passion the others possessed. As a plan b, he bought a camera and enrolled in a photography course. There was a moment of crisis when he didn't initially enjoy his intro class, but he decided to give it another semester and enrolled in a class based on documentary photography. This time the stars aligned. The course challenged his notion of what photography could be, and he began to take the craft more seriously. He applied for and was accepted to a BFA Photography program and graduated in 2016. In skating and snowboarding photography is usually classified in one of two genres; action and lifestyle. Action obviously involves the capturing of a trick where lifestyle typically focuses on the social aspect of the session. With the fresh point of view from his recent documentary class, Taylor began taking photos that were a hybrid of the two. Eventually even using this process as his thesis for his BFA degree. “Skateboarding is such a tight-knit community, and most (outsiders) don't get to see anything other than action shots. I wanted to try to document and communicate the lifestyle of skateboarding from an insider’s perspective so more and more my efforts were focused on that during a session”, he recounts. He also believes that the creative freedom the skate industry provides proved crucial for him to find his place in photography as he has moved into a professional career. "There are so many aspects that a photograph has to convey in skateboarding; the trick, run in, obstacle, scale, all need to be understood in a single image" he explains. Understanding and honing that concept has given Taylor his unique perspective on his photography outside of skateboarding. Now graduated he spends his time developing his craft, as well as trying to stay warm, dry, and motivated in Utah’s less than skate friendly winters. He continues to pursue his goal of landing a job as a staff photographer.

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SLOVAKIA & HUNGARY A Journey of Splitboarding & Exploration Intro & Photos by Amanda Hankison

"I'm going to Slovakia to splitboard the High Tatras with some locals in February if you want to join. Just throwing it out there! Flying to Vienna!”

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My heart rate spiked in excitement as I read Marissa’s text. We met a month and a half ago at the Dirksen Derby splitboard race and had exchanged phone numbers with the promise of riding together this winter. Now she was making good on that promise, and I hurried to Google the High Tatras. I was rewarded with photos of craggy peaks coming in under 9,000’ in elevation, a perfect destination for my first overseas snowboard trip. With a quick look at the map I spotted Budapest as the closest major city I was interested in visiting and booked my return flight from there. Upon arriving in Slovakia our crew consisted of Tomas, a shy and considerate skier who sets nearly vertical skin tracks and breaks trail in a manner that earns him the nickname Tomas the Tank Engine, Rasta, the man with the plan and only other split boarder we saw besides Marissa and me, and Filip, a happy go lucky family man with a hilariously adventurous spirit and reasonable grasp of the English language. We worked together as a team exploring the High Tatras - traversing the ridgelines, riding couloirs, watching the sunrise from summits, and using google translate to discuss avalanche hazards. Flip educated us on the difficult transition rural towns still deal with after communism fell and helped us navigate menus and train systems. Over the course of a few days, we racked up over 10,000’ of vertical and saw a lifetime’s more worth of lines waiting to be ridden. The splitboarding portion of the trip was over before I knew it and I was saying goodbye to our new friends and Marissa as we parted ways at a train station in Strba. She was heading to the Freeride World Tour stop in Jasna, and I had six trains to catch to get to Budapest. Conductors and passengers took great interest in my board bag that day, offering help and looks of confusion. While in Budapest I saw the city by foot, covering 22 miles in two days. The layers of history that permeate the city are massive, skylines boasting ancient castles and basilicas provided a backdrop to the tent villages of the homeless and long tourist lines. The beauty of the town was Soviet through and through - strong, relentless, and hopelessly romantic. Camera: Fi lm:

Olympus Stylus

Kodak Por ta 400

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The Parliament building was inaugurated in 1896 on Hungar y’s 1000th bir thday.

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View from the Halรกszbรกs t ya.

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En route to Popradské Pleso.

Workers walk by a mini ramp in Budapes t ’s Cit y Park.

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Time for crampons.

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SzĂŠchenyi Chain Bridge built in 1849.

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Intricate Budapes t rooflines.

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Hungarian Parliament ’s guards.

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Slovakian nordic ski track.

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SOUND

CHECK WITH D I A B O L I C A L R E C O R D S [ @ d i a b o l i c a l s l c] 2 3 8 S E D I S O N S T, S L C , U T 8 4111

/

801.792.9204

Brianna Kelly /

Anthroprophh

U.S. Girls

Gabriel Garzon-

Sympathy Pain

Omegaville

A Poem Unlimited

Montano

Split Cassette

Rocket Recordings

4AD Records

Jardin

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Whited Sepulchre Records

Whited Sepulchre does it again by bringing together Cincinnati's Brianna Kelly and Salt Lake City's Sympathy Pain for a stunningly beautiful split cassette walking the line between drone and shoegaze. Brianna Kelly starts it off slow and steady with four gorgeous tracks of droning guitars and whispered vocals in the spirit of Grouper. The tones are so natural to sink into that it is effortless to get lost in; the songs melt together perfectly. Skyler Hitchcox has been performing as Sympathy Pain in and around Salt Lake City for four years. An incredible experiment in expressing himself through beautiful, shimmering guitar and layers of fuzz has made SP a favorite in both the ambient and metal communities. Skyler enlisted childhood friend, and drummer of Cult Leader; Casey Hansen to join him and the project has now reached new heights. Their side of this split is two tracks covering 23 minutes of immense beauty that will haunt you and leave you wanting so much more. Split albums can sometimes feel forced as if just thrown together. That couldn’t be farther from the truth here as these two were masterfully put together for an album that will stick with you long after every listen. - Adam Tye

Stones Throw Records

The heavy psychedelic scene in the United Kingdom is the most exciting and most enthralling underground music scene in the world today. Rocket Recordings is at the head of that scene and have still yet to release even a sub-fantastic album in their 20-year history. We were lucky enough to be able to go to London for their 20th Anniversary weekend in early March where we got to see most of the active bands on their roster. Anthroprophh doesn’t do many live shows but came out to help celebrate the landmark. Paul Allen, the mastermind of Anthroprophh and former member of The Heads, along with his rhythm section Big Naturals delivered one of the greatest live performances I’ve ever been lucky enough to see. While talking to the label owners after the set, they kept emphasizing to “just wait for the record,” and just a few weeks later we finally have it. Omegaville is unrelenting. These are the sounds of a band fully realizing itself and knowing it has no bounds. The album starts with “2029,” and you would be forgiven for thinking your jumping in halfway through the track but fear not, that’s just the only way they know how to say hello. From there it continues without giving a breath until track 9, “Maschine,” a master class in the hypnotic repetitiveness that is the key to heavy psych music. The break in intensity is over the second the drums start on the next track, “Human Beast.” You can feel the drums in your chest, even if only listening on $10 earbuds. You need to hear this album, everybody does.

U.S. Girls latest release, “A Poem Unlimited,” is the most pop Meg Remy has gone. Each song has a danceable beat, and memorable lyrics as pop tunes do. However, the 70’s disco influence keeps the album interesting. It takes a few listens to get used to the full band who also wrote the album with Remy (Cosmic Range) and the melodic singing. The whole album is a bit unexpected and different from the electronic albums that came before which had a sense of isolation and distance. “Time” is where Cosmic Range rages; the drums and saxophone take the song to an explosive level giving space to their impactful writing and musicianship. The album is full of commentary that sticks with you alongside the catchy rhythm. Each song movingly narrates problems with politics, capitalism, and what women face. “Poem” states with defiance and honesty “No one needs to make a profit, no one needs to get paid.” “M.A.H.” questions the use of drones in war during the Obama administration. “Incidental Boogie,” tells a story of domestic violence. The energetic pop provides power and some humor making it easier to digest. While the protagonists of each story may not always recover in the end, we can dance knowing one day they will move with the striking beat in defiance. - Alana Boscan

- Adam Tye A R K A D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M

New York-based singersongwriter, seems to draw influences from Stevie Wonder making this album incredibly familiar, eclectic and just plain good. There is plenty of groove, soul, and R&B and at some moments sounds like what Maroon 5 should have made efforts to be more like. Known for being sampled for Drake’s “Jungle,” it is clear GarzonMontano wishes to stand on his own, while keeping to a less mainstream but melodic sound. “Fruitflies,” a song to listen to when you want some sadness with your rhythm, showcases GarzonMontano’s vocal range. Lyrics such as “We can’t find the way back home” provide the perfect ambiance for rainy days in spring or slow hot days in summer. “The Game” showcases his ability to layer sounds to dance to and is ideal for outdoor parties. “Sour Mango” is fun, upbeat and has repetition, making it great for running errands with some pep. The album is pure, sincere and engaging and exactly what you should be looking for with the change in weather. If you love Solange and have been needing an album to fill in your desire for rhythm and blues, this album is it. Several potential sleeper hits are to be found and should not be missed. - Alana Boscan


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F E AT U R I N G

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I N S TA H A M 71

ROW: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club JP Goulet Niels Jensen Tay l o r A l l a n

@bmrcofficial @jeanpierregoulet @nellis_j @taylorallanimages

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lib-tech.com

im P:T n

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USA • ZERO HAZARDOUS WASTE


END

CREDITS

Editor & Advertising Cory LLewelyn cor y@arkademagazine.com Editor & Photo Editor Paul Bundy paul@arkademagazine.com Editor & Online Editor Daniel Cochrane daniel@arkademagazine.com Layout & Design Editor Jake Malenick jake@arkademagazine.com

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Contributing Photographers Amanda Hankison, Tim Zimmerman, Niels Jensen, Weston Colton, Bree & Nate Millard, Ta y l o r A l l a n , B o b P l u m b , C h r i s S w a i n s t o n Contributing Writers Jake Malenick, Amanda Hankison, A d a m Ty e , A l a n a B o s c a n Distribution Cooper LLewelyn, The Norm, Laramie Patrick

Proudly printed in S a l t L a ke C i t y, UT

Arkade Magazine 127 S 8 0 0 E S T E # 37 S LC , U T 8 410 2

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Location: Camera:

Matt Fisher / BS 50-50 Weston Colton

Rail Gardens - SLC, UT

C a n o n EOS 1D X M a r k I I

74 ISSUE 3

Skater: Photog rapher:

VO L U M E 12


April 2018  

Issue #12.3 - Southern Utah, Tokyo, Niseko, JP Goulet, Krush Kulesza, Ban Supply Co, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Taylor Allan, Slovakia, Hu...

April 2018  

Issue #12.3 - Southern Utah, Tokyo, Niseko, JP Goulet, Krush Kulesza, Ban Supply Co, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Taylor Allan, Slovakia, Hu...

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