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Wednesday, November 7, 2018 – Tuesday, November 13, 2018 • VOLUME 112 • ISSUE 12

4 | Midterm election results 8 | UA alumna premieres film about sexual assault 10 | SlutWalk returns to UA

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DAILYWILDCAT.COM SERVING THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA & TUCSON COMMUNITIES SINCE 1899

PASSING THE BATON

Shirlee Bertolini, the University of Arizona’s first featured twirler and longtime coach of the Pride of Arizona Twirling Team, is retiring after 60 years with the program | B7 @DAILYWILDCAT


B2 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

IN THIS EDITION | VOLUME 112, ISSUE 12 News

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Arts & Life

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Police Beat: An oddly self-aware bike thief

News

Follow the cast of Inishmaan as they take the stage

4 Arts & Life

Arts & Life UA Twirler coach retires after 60 years

UA alumna premieres film about sexual assault

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Sports Important stats in Arizona football’s victory

News

8

The Slut Walk returns to UA

12 News 100 years of Campus Health

Editor-in-Chief Jasmine Demers editor@dailywildcat.com

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Opinions

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Topic of the week: Cutting out technology

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Sports

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Arizona soccer runs past the Sun Devils

THE DAILY WILDCAT

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News

Sports Will Arizona make it to the Pac-12 Championship?

Midterm election results are in

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On the Cover

Shirlee Bertolini performs during the halftime show Saturday, Oct. 27 (photo by Amy Bailey, The Daily Wildcat), Shirlee Bertolini poses for a photo in the UA Cactus Garden in 1954 (courtesy Shirlee Bertolini)


The Daily Wildcat • B3

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

police

ARTS & LIFE | COMMENTARY UA THEATER

beat The stage is set for Inishmaan

The rotating stage that once had to be imagined is now there and available for the crew to rotate when scene changes are necessary. The eroding shoreline that Hank Stratton, the director, and Joe Klug, an assistant professor aiding in design, envisioned is now a physically tangible area. The actors got in places for Act I, Scene 1, with Rowerdink’s voice coming through the speakers and Stratton standing on his toes at the edge of the set. Then, they began the play. “Wait, that doesn’t work,” Stratton said as he lifted off from his already perched position and walked on stage. “This is the part where they think I’ll finally leave them alone,” Stratton called to the crowd of donors. “In reality, it’s where I really start micromanaging.” The new set and the audience make no difference in the way the rehearsal is being run. Stratton’s creative process and witty on-thespot remarks have remained the same. As he stated, if anything, he has begun to hone in on the details. This is the time where the actors really familiarize themselves with the space they will be using . They no longer have taped lines on the floor, but actual walls and elevations they have to work around.

The cast and crew of The Cripple of Inishmaan rehearsed on the finished stage in the Tornabene Theater for the first time Thursday, Oct. 25 to get ready for opening night Wednesday, Nov. 7. For a little over a month, the University of Arizona cast had been rehearsing in room 0114 of the Drama Addition Building while a team of students built the set. The actors had been blocking around makeshift props and elevations taped onto the floor. That Thursday, they were finally able to see the tape lifted off and the set come to life on the stage. On the night of the first rehearsals, the cast was introduced to the set and taken around for a safety walkthrough. The stage manager, Cole Rowerdink, and the technical director, Marli Ray, lead the cast around the stage, pointing out its features so that the cast could learn how the set works and where their props were located. The crew began assembling the set a little less than a week before the cast came in to rehearse. The three-layered shelf that housed a dozen or so cans of peas was transformed into a large shelf with over 140 cans.

INISHMAAN, 9

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A Conscious Crook It’s important to take time for selfreflection, even in the middle of an arrest, apparently. University of Arizona Police Department officers caught an oddly self-aware bicycle thief in the act on the morning of Oct. 24. A UAPD officer was searching for two other men suspected of bicycle theft when he spotted a man near the bike racks outside the Student Recreation Center messing with multiple bikes. The officer parked his patrol vehicle nearby and watched the man remove parts off two different bikes. After calling for backup, the officer approached the man, who was still holding the stolen parts, and instructed him to sit on the ground. The man immediately complied. Then, according to the report, the man, without any prompting, said, “That was stupid of me, getting caught stealing bike parts. I just sell the parts for money.” The man further cooperated by identifying himself to the officer and informing him that he had multiple arrest warrants. A records check conducted by the officer confirmed that the man truly did have four warrants out under his name from the Tucson Police Department. The officer placed the man under arrest for the theft and outstanding warrants. A second officer arrived on scene and searched the man. The officer found a clear plastic bag that contained a smaller plastic bag with a white powder in it. He also found bike parts in the man’s jacket. The second officer put the man in the squad car. The first officer searched the man’s bag after the man admitted to possessing drugs and having a syringe. Inside the bag, the officer did find a syringe but no narcotics. There was a clear plastic bag inside and pieces of foil with burnt residue on them. A field test of the residue in one of the bags revealed the substance as methamphetamine. Also inside the bag were several bike parts, a pair of 18-inch bolt cutters and wire cutters. The second officer issued a sixmonth exclusionary order from all UA property to the man. He was then transported to Pima County Jail.

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B4 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

NEWS | ELECTIONS

MIDTERM RESULTS: 'BLUE WAVE' FIZZLES IN ARIZONA

BY THE DAILY WILDCAT STAFF @DailyWildcat

So ... did you vote? Arizona Senate Race Closest in Recent Memory Republican Rep. McSally had a slight lead in the Arizona Senate race, and the results were too close to call as of 11 p.m. Arizona time. The last midterm election, which took place in 2016, had a drastically different outcome than this year’s race. The late Republican Sen. John McCain beat Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick by 13 percent and over 300,000 votes, according to the Arizona Secretary of State website. Renewable Energy Initiative Fails to Pass Arguably the hottest initiative on the Arizona ballot was Proposition 127, also known as the Renewable Energy Standards Initiative, which failed pass on Tuesday. The rejection of the proposition means that Arizona will retain its current goals for renewable energy that require electricity companies to acquire 15 percent of total energy from renewable sources by 2025. According to officials who opposed the initiative, such as the Pima County Republican Party, there was concern over the initiative’s lack of flexibility in its goal of 50 percent renewable energy by 2030. “That’s a good thing ... It would’ve raised electric rates substantially here in Arizona, and so we’re quite happy about that,” said David Eppihimer, chairman of the Pima County Republican Party. Prior to the election, Proposition 127 was supported by groups such the Arizona Democratic Party. “We’re going to sit down with city leaders, talk about it and come up with a strategy,” said Ann Kirkpatrick, who promised to make Arizona a solar state starting with Tucson. As of 11 p.m. Tuesday night, a reported 69.8 percent of Arizona voters chose yes on Proposition 127 and 30.2 percent chose no.

THE GOP

Republican Steve Gaynor Wins Secretary of State Steve Gaynor, a candidate that ran on a business background, has won over Arizonans with his premise that Arizona needs a shakeup in how administrators and traditional politicians have handled the state and its decisions in the last

couple years. As a native Arizonan, he ran on a premise that locals know and can fix the issues better than transplants who move here strictly for political gain and prosperity. His grassroots movement has taken hold, and we will see over the next couple of years if he can make the impact that he is promising.

THE DEMS

Republican Kimberly Yee wins Arizona State Treasurer Native Arizonan Kimberly Yee won the Arizona State Treasurer seat Tuesday night. The fiscally conservative Republican currently serves as the Senate Majority Leader. Firsts aren’t a new thing for Yee as she looks to take Arizona to new heights fiscally, as this has been a serious issue over the last decade since the recession. She is the first Asian-American candidate to be elected to serve in the Arizona State Legislature. Superintendent of Public Instruction too close to call As of 11 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, the race for Superintendent of Public Instruction had not yet been called. Below is information on both candidates. Kathy Hoffman (D) Hoffman is an educator and administrator who has expressed a passion for changing Arizona at the grassroots level through education. According to Hoffman’s campaign website, she is interested in the specific issue of allowing children more access to “high-quality public education, regardless of a student's race, gender or zip code.” She was elected in a year when Arizona educators went on a massive strike in their Red for Ed campaign this past spring, making their voices heard about the lack of funding the state has been investing in education. Hoffman looks to take advantage of this unrest and hot-topic issue by injecting a youthful energy and vision into the state. Frank Riggs (R) Riggs was the elder statesman in the race. He was also the most established and boasted a much more diverse resume than his opponent, Democrat Kathy Hoffman. In a traditionally Republican state, Riggs may have been seen as a safer option. He looks to change the narrative and Arizona classrooms by being a new voice of change in a state that has seen unrest in the last year among its administrators.


The Daily Wildcat • B5

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Doug Ducey wins Arizona Governor's Race The Arizona Governor’s seat stays red, as incumbent Republican Doug Ducey won re-election for another four-year term. Ducey won with a 58.1 percent majority over Democrat David Garcia, as of 11 p.m Tuesday night. “Every vote is going to count,” Ducey said in a video to his supporters early Tuesday morning. “This isn’t over until it’s over.” He was first sworn in as governor in 2015, previously being the State Treasurer from 2011 until 2015. In his time in office he has increased funding to secure the southern border, cleared the backlog of child safety cases and highlighted his

58%

support for K-12 education in Arizona. During his first term he supported the $2.7 billion increase in education funding and has signed a plan for teacher pay raises that will reach 20 percent by 2020. During his campaign, Ducey said he wanted to continue to focus on the economy, highlighting the state’s low unemployment rate and his focus on education. He has at times been known to call himself the “education governor.” "I think he's the person we need to be Governor of Arizona over his competitors," said Brad Cowan when asked about Ducey's re-election.

of Arizona voters voted for Ducey

COURTESY DOUG DUCEY

PROP RESULTS PROP 125 APPROVED Arizonans chose to approve Proposition 125, also known as the Adjustments to Elected Officials’ and Corrections Officer’s Retirement Plans Amendment, with 52.3 percent of voters voting yes as of 11 p.m. Tuesday night. The approval of the amendment means that a change will be made to the Arizona constitution that will allow state lawmakers to adjust the retirement pension plans of correctional officers, probation officers, surveillance officers and elected officials based on the calculated cost of living. Currently, these pension plans are based on fixed increases to benefits. The passage of Prop 125 does not automatically adjust these pension plans.

PROP 126 APPROVED COURTESY MARTHA MCSALLY AND KYRSTEN SINEMA

Senate race too close to call As of 11 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, the Arizona Senate race was too close to call. At just 33 percent of precincts reporting, the voting stood at 49.2 percent for Martha McSally and 48.5 percent for Kyrsten Sinema. Be sure to visit dailywildcat.com for the final results. In the state of Arizona, Democratic Representative Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Representative Martha McSally were battling to become the first female Arizona senator in history. The two candidates were running vastly different campaigns and disagreed on key issues, including healthcare, immigration and border walls. Republican Rep. McSally had a slight led in the Arizona Senate race as of 11 p.m. local Arizona time. Regardless of the outcome of the Arizona Senate race, the state will have its first female Senator.

COURTESY RAUL GRIJALVA

House Raul Grijalva takes District 3 Arizona House District 3, which includes part of Tucson and the University of Arizona area, was won by incumbent Democrat Raul Grijalva. Grijalva defeated his Republican challenger Nicolas Pierson. Out of the nine congressional districts in the state of Arizona, five Democrats and four Republicans won their respective districts. The key U.S. House races in Arizona include House Districts 1 and 2, who were won by Democrats. Seventy-five highly competitive seats were up for the U.S. House of Representatives during the 2018 midterm elections. It was projected that Democrats needed to flip at least 23 Republican-held seats to retake the House, according to the New York Times. 218 seats were needed to control the House. Votes are still being counted as of 11 p.m. Nov. 6. The Democrats are projected to be in control of the U.S. House of Representatives. Before the midterm election, Republicans held 235 seats and the Democrats held 193 seats. If the Democrats prevail, this would be the first time in eight years that Democrats have been in control of the House.

Proposition 126, or the Prohibit New or Increased Taxes on Services Initiative, passed with 65.7 percent of Arizona voters voting yes as of 11 p.m. Tuesday night. With the approval of the initiative, the Arizona constitution was amended to prohibit officials from adding new or increasing existing taxes on services within the state, including sales tax. In addition to sales taxes, lawmakers are now also barred from increasing taxes on personal activities, financial activities and healthcare.

PROP 127 REJECTED Voters chose to reject Proposition 127, known as the Renewable Energy Standards Initiative, on Tuesday with 69.8 percent of Arizona voters choosing no as of 11 p.m. Tuesday night. The passage of Prop 127 would have amended the Arizona Constitution to mandate that utility companies within the state must acquire a certain amount of their energy from renewable sources annually. The state’s goal for renewable energy will remain unchanged. Currently, Arizona is aiming to have 15 percent renewable sources by 2025, in accordance with an earlier bill.

PROP 305 REJECTED Proposition 305, or the Expansion of Empowerment Scholarship Account Referendum, failed to pass with 66.9 percent of Arizona voters voting no as of 11 p.m. Tuesday night. Currently, Arizona students with disabilities or students who meet other certain criteria are eligible to apply for an Empowerment Scholarship Account. ESAs allow for students to un-enroll from public school and attend a private school or be homeschooled, using the ESA to help fund this switch. The passage of Prop 305 would have made all Arizona students eligible to apply for an ESA.

PROP 306 APPROVED Voters approved Proposition 306, or the Clean Election Account Uses and Commission Rulemaking Measure, with 55.9 percent of voters voting yes as of 11 p.m. Tuesday night. The measure prohibited candidates in future elections from taking money from their public financing accounts and giving it to political parties or tax-exempt organizations that participate in candidate elections. The commission must now gain approval from the Governor’s Regulatory Review Council before voting on rules.


B6 • The Daily Wildcat

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Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The Daily Wildcat • B7

ARTS & LIFE | ORIGINAL UA TWIRLER

‘Grande Dame’ of UA passes the baton BY AMBER SOLAND @DailyWildcat

In 1954, Shirlee Bertolini — already a twirling champion — travelled by train from Detroit, Mich. to Tucson, Ariz. The band director at the time, Jack Lee, had plans for the Pride of Arizona and personally asked Bertolini to become the University of Arizona’s first featured twirler. At this year’s Homecoming game, Bertolini , the “Grande Dame” of the UA, twirled her baton on the football field at 82 years old in honor of her coming retirement as UA’s Twirling Team coach. After earning a degree in psychology, Bertolini was approached by Lee once again and was invited to create a program for twirlers at the UA. She went on to coach UA twirlers for 60 years. Bertolini devoted her life to her twirlers, taking the time to ensure the girls were comfortable, financially stable, safe and surrounded by good people. She even donated her salary to the Shirlee Bertolini Scholarship Fund, a sum of scholarship money specifically for UA twirlers. “[My twirlers] are like my daughters,” Bertolini said. As a coach, Bertolini is a strict-yet-loving perfectionist. “You have to be strict, but you have to do it with a loving heart,” Bertolini said. “They know when they hear me say, ‘Do it again’, they know I mean for them to readily execute the way it should be done.” Kirsten Grabo, a UA Twirling alumna and Bertolini’s successor as coach, thinks of Bertolini as her “second mom.” When Grabo arrived in Arizona for twirling camp as a freshman from Minnesota all alone, she stayed at Bertolini’s house the first night. Bertolini was with Grabo every step of her college career. She contacted Residence Life and made sure everything was “just perfect” so Grabo felt at home. “She’s very motherly, and she’s like that with everyone,” Grabo said. “She brings us into a family, this amazing sort of sorority-fraternity of twirlers.” Bertolini is very protective of her twirlers and puts them before herself at every turn, according to former twirlers. “She looks after all of her girls,” said twirler alumna Judy Sutter. “She’s like a mother hen. If they’re not all around her, she gets very nervous.” Sutter has known Bertolini since her first year at twirling camp in 1967, when Bertolini instructed each of her girls to bring a jar of honey to practice because “they needed the energy”. Back then, the marching band was nearing 200 members, but the field only had two drinking fountains. Under the desert sun, the lines for the drinking fountains were long. “She always made sure we finished five minutes early so we could get to the drinking fountain first,” Sutter said. The two have known each other for 50 years — Bertolini even advised Sutter on marriage prospects; after Sutter’s first marriage to a man Bertolini did not like, Bertolini said “I told you so.” One of Sutter’s most prominent memories of Bertolini is from a football game her first year as a twirler. “Me, being 18 years old, I got turned around, and all of a sudden I am around all these big football players,” Sutter said. “And here comes Shirlee, a little more than five feet tall. ‘Get away from her! Don’t even touch her!’ she said. And these guys are backing away completely terrified.” According to Sutter, Bertolini is one of the strongest people she has ever met and likely ever will meet. “She walks across that field with purpose,” Grabo said. After 64 years, everyone has their favorite stories of

AMY BAILEY | THE DAILY WILDCAT

THE PRIDE OF ARIZONA twirler coach Shirlee Bertolini performs during the halftime show of the Arizona-Oregon game Saturday, Oct. 27 in Arizona Stadium. Bertolini was accompanied by previous members of The Pride of Arizona that helped celebrate her achievement.

Bertolini, according to Grabo. She brings apples for the band director, because she knows he likes a certain kind of apple. She brings her twirlers their favorite snacks. “Sometimes she doesn’t focus on the big details so much as the little details that make your day brighter,” Grabo said. “She is just one of those good people. She’s like a light. When you find somebody like that, you hold onto them.” To people like Grabo and Sutter, Bertolini is an inspiration. She taught them much and still has much to teach. “It won’t be the same without her. She is irreplaceable,” Grabo said. “I hope I can live my life half as well as she has lived hers.” Bertolini’s retirement was celebrated during Homecoming this year on Oct. 27. “She was amazing [that] night. At 82 years old, she was out there twirling on the field, and I was watching her husband watch her on the field, and it was beautiful to see,” Grabo said. “He turned 90 yesterday, so it was pretty special.”

The family she has created over the years said they hope for Bertolini to find some rest and relaxation, something she has set aside for the past 64 years. According to Bertolini, this retirement has been a long time coming. So many hours under the desert sun coaching her girls was finally getting too difficult. “My energy level is not what it used to be, and I have known this for a while,” Bertolini said. “That is why I have groomed Kirsten in every way I could, because I see her as a second me.” But Bertolini has no plans to leave her twirlers to the proverbial wolves. She plans to stay on doing administrative work and ensuring that her girls are financially stable, and she will be attending twirling competitions and game days to support them for as long as she is able. “I hope not to drop out of the picture entirely, but I know that now I won’t have to have a schedule that requires me in the sun on the field,” Bertolini said. “[These girls] are the most fantastic team I have ever coached in my life.”


B8 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

ARTS & LIFE | UA ALUMNA FILMMAKER

Second Assault to be featured at Loft Film Fest Jillian Corsie, a former Wildcat and an award-winning filmmaker, shares her story of being a sexual assault survivor through a documentary that will be featured at the Loft Cinema’s 2018 film festival BY ARIDAY SUED @DailyWildcat

Imagine being an 18-year-old, outof-state freshman at The University of Arizona. It is your first month in college, and no one believes you. This narrative was true for 2010 UA alumna Jillian Corsie, a sexual assault survivor, documentary filmmaker and film editor. Corsie, 12 years after the assault, turned her experience into a documentary called Second Assault, which will be featured at the 2018 Loft Film Fest. Second Assault is named after what sexual assault survivors often go through when they are not believed or have no support, according to Corsie. Her main message in her film for everyone is to believe each other. “As college students, it is hard to have the tools or even general sense of how to help others in that situation,” Corsie said. When Corsie was 18 years old, she came to UA and lived in Coronado Residence Hall, where she was sexually attacked. When she reported this in 2005, law enforcement did not give the case the attention it deserved, she said, and instead decided that the assault was consensual and offered Corsie the advice of “don’t mix alcohol with beauty.” Afterward, the police officer handed Corsie his business card with her case number on it. Following law enforcement’s failure to give her case the attention it needed, Corsie said she stayed silent about her assault for 12 years. In these 12 years, Corsie said that no one believed her — not her roommates, not her friends, not even her boyfriend. According to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 20 to 25 percent of college women are victims of forced sex during their time in college, 27 percent of college women have experienced some form of unwanted sexual contact and more than 90 percent of sexual assault victims on college campuses do not report the assault. In October 2016, Kelly Oxford tweeted, “Women, tweet me your first assaults. They aren’t just stats. I’ll go first.” Oxford’s tweet went viral, and many women responded to it. This, according to Corsie, gave her the courage to share her story for the first time publicly, including the advice the cop once gave her of “don’t mix alcohol and beauty.” According to Corsie and Amy Rosner, Corsie’s best friend and another documentarian, the tweet may have gone viral so quickly due to the rise of the #MeToo movement, a movement against sexual harassment and assault.

Corsie’s story went viral, and within 12 hours, her story was shared across platforms. Filmmakers had an interest in telling that story. Since Corsie is a filmmaker herself, she felt as though she would be the best person to tell her story, she said. “We did not only want to confront Jillian’s past, but more importantly address the system that is broken and that continues to fail sexual assault survivors every day,” Rosner said. According to Rosner and Corsie, they originally had no agenda, which allowed them to have full control of the film. “When kids are young, boys are taught to be aggressive while girls, in turn, are taught to be hard to get,” Rosner said. “Those attitudes and behaviors are embedded into society, which eventually creates a rape society.” Second Assault is a documentary that is a “conversation,” Corsie said. The film concerns rape culture and what options people have if it was to occur to them, she added. “Rape culture is everyone’s problem, not just women,” Rosner said. Corsie and Rosner said they hope that the film speaks not only to college students, but also to adult men. “Men need to be involved and comfortable in the conversation, because, unfortunately more times than not, they are the gender that are perpetuating it,” Rosner said. The film is one of about 43 that will be featured in the Loft Film Festival, ranging from short films to documentaries to classics like that of 1992’s Wayne’s World. According to AJ Simon, assistant manager at the Loft, “[Second Assault] will do very well here, and patrons will be very excited to see it. The more information the public can have in such an important issue, the better. It can help the UA be more diligent.” Rosner and Corsie, who are both codirectors of the film, have both won best director, best documentary and audience choice awards from other film festivals. Second Assault will premiere in Tucson at the Loft Film Festival Sunday, Nov. 11, at 12 p.m., and tickets can be purchased online or at the Loft Cinema. There will also be a screening on campus at the Physics and Atmospheric Sciences Building, Room 224, at 2:30 p.m. on Nov. 13. Following the screening, there will be a discussion with Corsie, a UAPD officer and potentially UA’s new Title IX officer., Ronald Wilson.

COURTESY JILLIAN CORSIE

THE PLAYBILL FROM JILLIAN Corsie’s documentary Second Assault. The film is about Corsie’s personal experience with sexual assault and how her life has been affected after 12 years.


Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The Daily Wildcat • B9

ARTS & LIFE | COMMENTARY UA THEATER

There’s some info you can’t just Google. But you could go directly to the source.

SOFIA MORAGA | THE DAILY WILDCAT

THE CAST OF THE Cripple of Inishmaan rehearsed on the newly constructed set in the Tornabene Theatre Thursday, Oct. 25. Opening night will be Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m.

INISHMAAN FROM PAGE 3

A couple of scenes had to be reblocked to accommodate for the new space, and the actors played as big a role in that as the director himself. “What if I do this?” an actor suggested. “Well, I don’t know,” Stratton responded. “Here, let me see.” The actor showed their idea and looked at Stratton’s eyes as he pursed his lips and watched the adjustment. “Ohhh! Yes, that works. Let’s keep it,” he said as he turned to Rowerdink and saw his stage manager already mid-way through writing it down. Rowerdink and his team now have linked headsets, so they can communicate around the set and theater. With all the lines being memorized already, the only thing still needing refinement was the Irish accents. If the actors caught themselves making miniscule mistakes, they would correct themselves on the spot.

Dylan Cotter, playing the role of Billy, made a mistake on the pronunciation of the word Inishmaan but caught himself and silently cursed his mistake while the rest of the cast nodded in encouragement of his correction. A more noticeable adjustment to the accent occurred with the word “film” when used in the play. As Johnny Pateen, played by Peter Martineau, announced his “third piece of news,” he told the Osbourne sisters and Billy Claven that there was a “fillum” being “filllumed” in the neighboring island of Inishmore. Kevin Black, the dialect coach, and the rest of the audience looked on, nodding their heads along with the intrigued aunties and Billy Claven. The amount of time and effort that the students and professors have put into this show so far really shows in the performance, and it can only get better from now until opening night Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m.

SOFIA MORAGA | THE DAILY WILDCAT

JOE KLUG, LEFT, AN assistant professor aiding in design, and Hank Stratton, right, the director of the play, discuss the finished set before rehearsals Thursday, Oct. 25 in the Torabene Theatre. The play will open for audiences the week of Nov. 5.

These companies and over 60 more are participating in UA’s first job shadow program that’s open to ALL students. Explore an industry, organization or job function by shadowing a professional in the field during a one day, one-of-a-kind opportunity held over Winter Break, December 17, 2018 – January 8, 2019.

SUBMISSIONS CLOSE ON NOVEMBER 12

career.arizona.edu/jsp


B10 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

NEWS | CAMPUS PROTESTS

GRIFFIN RILEY | THE DAILY WILDCAT

PROTESTORS IN THE 2018 SlutWalk chant feminist songs as they walk down University Boulevard Nov. 5 in Tucson, Ariz. The StutWalk movements fight against rape culture and slut shaming.

SLUTWALK IN THE WAKE OF #METOO MOVEMENT BY LAUREN ALBRECHT, PRIYA JANDU, ALANA MINKLER @DailyWildcat

Protesters dressed as “sluts” marched from the Women’s Plaza of Honor to the Rialto Theatre in SlutWalk 2018. This was a worldwide protest aimed at reclaiming the word “slut” and fighting for women’s rights over their bodies. Protestors sought to bring awareness to sexual violence, end rape culture and discuss consent. This year’s protest was hosted by FORCE, the University of Arizona Women’s and Gender Resource Center and the Southern Arizona Aids Foundation. FORCE stands for Feminists Organized to Resist, Create and Empower, and it is a feminist group on campus. Mekayla Walters, one of the coordinators of the SlutWalk, said that she and other planners had a new goal in mind this year. “Historically speaking, people included in SlutWalk have been cis white women. The whole idea, especially this year, is intersectionality. That was our main priority — encouraging diversity,” Walters said. Yoleidy Rosario, director of the Women and Gender Resource Center, spoke at the beginning of the protest at the Women’s Plaza on campus. “It’s great to see people who are passionate and coming out here and demonstrating unity and being in solidarity with one another,” Rosario said. “I think that’s really important and healthy right now, given all of the things happening in our nation.” Alejandra Pablos, a field coordinator for the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, spoke at the Rialto Theatre about sexual violence and consent. “The SlutWalk is a rally, march, protest and a movement into making visible the prevalence of victim blaming, rape culture, street harassment and sex violence,” Pablos said. Pablos talked about her experience and feelings about victim-blaming and slutshaming. “I’ve been considered a slut from every deportation officer I’ve encountered.” Pablos said. “I’ve been considered a slut by every man that’s asked me out on a date and I’ve refused. Consent is something new to me.” She expressed gratitude for the Tucson community that supports her and was one of the leading protesters in the SlutWalk. Lily Cain, another volunteer at the SlutWalk, had her own interpretation of what the SlutWalk means. “The mission is to chip away at the idea that rape culture provided us with — people who survive these sort of events are sluts, and that to be a slut is a thing,” Cain said. “I think it’s to reclaim the word slut and to show that anyone can be a victim.” Tucson activist Leilani Clark was one of the leading voices in the SlutWalk. She carried a megaphone and led protestors down University Boulevard and Fourth Street while

ERIC HUBER | THE DAILY WILDCAT

BEFORE THE MARCH, STUDENTS and other protesters gathered in the Women’s Plaza of Honor on the UA campus to craft signs and socialize.

leading chants like: “We have the right to walk alone at night,” “Yes means yes! No means no!” and “Solidarity is our weapon!” At the Rialto Theatre, Clark gave a speech about the movement for women’s rights over their bodies and bringing awareness about sexual violence. “This movement to end rape culture and to dismantle sexual violence is going to be survivor-led. It needs to be that way,” Clark said. Jackie Joslyn, a graduate student of sociology at the UA, spoke on what it meant to be a

SLUT WALK, 11


The Daily Wildcat • B11

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

NEWS | CAMPUS PROTESTS

1

SLUT WALK

2

SlutWalk

ERIC HUBER | THE DAILY WILDCAT

FROM PAGE 10

participant in the demonstration in light of the #MeToo movement. “Sexual assault is such an important issue right now. It’s bringing a lot of women together in ways that they never have before,” Joslyn said. “The identity of being a woman has always been kind of secondary to other identities, and this year, and in the past couple of years, this has been brought more to the surface.” Another participant in the SlutWalk shared her motivation for participating. “I, myself, went through sexual assault last year,” she said. “I wasn’t able to use my voice then, but I think the events that the Women and Gender Resource Center has put on, such as the ‘I Will’ week last semester and the SlutWalk this semester, I’ve been able to find my voice in a community that helps me get through it.” Once protestors arrived to see the band, Vasectomy, perform at the Rialto Theatre different speakers came on stage and shared. Alejandra Pablos did introductions. Kristen Godfrey, SAAF representative, made a speech at the Rialto theatre discussing the the importance of the movement. “The Senate will not do it,” Godfrey said. “They do not give us progressive laws. The Supreme Court does not give us progressive laws. People demand change. We do that.”

3

ERIC HUBER | THE DAILY WILDCAT

2018 4

ERIC HUBER | THE DAILY WILDCAT

GRIFFIN RILEY | THE DAILY WILDCAT

1: TWO FRIENDS HOLD up their signs as they prepare to march from the UA Women’s Plaza to the Rialto Theatre. 2: DURING THE SLUTWALK, two of the leaders rile up the crowd with a rap about abolishing the patriarchy. 3: A PROTESTER HOLDS up a sign while waiting to cross the street. 4: DURING THE MARCH, protesters displayed a variety of emotions, including solemnity.


B12 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

SPORTS | FIVE STATS

Defining the UA vs. Colorado game The Arizona Wildcats came into their Friday night matchup with Colorado coming off their biggest win of the season. Colorado came in after blowing a large lead against Oregon State at home, which was the Buffaloes’ thirdstraight loss after starting the season 5-0. Something had to give, and the game did not disappoint, as the scoreboard operator had a busy night in Arizona’s 42-34 win.

Yards

Arizona has had one of the Pac-12’s most lethal running games coming into this year, and that isn’t set to end any time soon as long as J.J. Taylor is on the Arizona roster. The redshirt sophomore was the workhorse for the Wildcats, carrying the rock 40 times for 192 yards. Taylor’s threat on the ground allowed the passing game to open up, after the Wildcat’s runpass-options were keeping Colorado’s linebackers close to the line of scrimmage as they had to respect the threat of Taylor and Khalil Tate. Taylor’s runs weren’t flashy, but they were back-breaking nonetheless. Taylor’s last ten carries of the night helped seal the deal for the home team, securing a second win on the bounce as they head into Pullman to face a top-10 Washington State team in two weeks’ time.

Points int he second quarter

J.J. Taylor carries

Rushes

The Wildcats sleepwalked through the start of the game but were quickly awakened by the couple punches to the mouth that Colorado delivered. They then scored 17 unanswered points to take the lead 17-10 and ended the half on Lucas Havrisik’s 55-yard blast to put the home team up 26-24 as time expired. Arizona’s defense, like the week before, carried the majority of the load, due to the constant pressure they put on Colorado’s Steven Montez. Forcing four sacks in the first half, as Montez finished the first two quarters with ten rushes for just eleven yards, the junior quarterback spent the rest of the game avoiding Wildcat defensive linemen who invaded the Buffaloes backfield. Khalil Tate finished the first half with an efficient 13/16 passing for 242 yards and three touchdowns, as he carved the Buffaloes up through the air, the same team he carved on the ground for 327 yards just last year. Tate was dynamic for three quarters, and that’s all the Wildcats needed to grab their second consecutive win, putting them just one win away from bowl eligibility.

On a night where the Arizona football team needed a player to step up and take the reins, the Wildcat talisman took over at the right time. Putting together his most complete game of the season, tossing five touchdowns to four different Wildcat receivers, Khalil Tate made plays outside of the pocket all night, extending plays with his feet and finishing them with his arm. The Inglewood-bred gunslinger threw 22 passes, picking his spots and gashing the Colorado defense at the perfect times. Tate finally showed flashes of the dynamic playmaker that took over the reins last fall, showing no signs of the limp that has followed him ever since his legs got tangled up early on in Arizona’s second game of the season against Houston. If Arizona wants to finish the season strong, Tate is the catalyst for that to happen, and he looked more than ready for that role on Friday night.

TD passes

After holding Oregon to their lowest yardage total in almost a decade, the Wildcat front seven put on another dominant display and picked up exactly where they left off last Saturday by making Colorado one-dimensional on offense, shutting down the run game as the Buffaloes averaged just over a yard a rush in the first 30 minutes of the game. After giving up an average of 190plus yards a game, according to Pac-12 statistics, going into the matchup against Oregon last year, defensive coordinator Marcel Yates’ unit has grown leaps and bounds in days. That growth couldn’t have come at a better time for Arizona, as it is just one win away from finishing with a .500 record on the season, something that seemed completely out of the question after the Wildcats’ one-point loss in the Rose Bowl to UCLA.

Points in the first

BY DAVID SKINNER @DavidWSkinner

Starting games slowly and without urgency has become a bad habit that the Wildcats haven’t been able to kick so far this season, and that was the case again on Friday, as Arizona scored exactly zero points in the first quarter. The defense was left to put out fires from kickoff and depending on a fourth-down stop and fumble recovery on the first drive to keep the Buffs at bay in the opening couple of minutes. Colorado will come away from this game frustrated at the amount of points that it left on the table during the opening 15-minute period, like an overthrown ball from Colorado’s Steven Montez that sailed on the intended receiver, which forced the Buffaloes to settle for a field goal that made it a 10-point lead instead of 14.


The Daily Wildcat • B13

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

SPORTS | FOOTBALL ANALYSIS

Can Arizona win the Pac-12 South? BY DAVID SKINNER @DavidWSkinner

Arizona’s upset victory over Oregon was just two weeks ago. The transformation of Arizona’s team in a week-and-a -half has been nothing short of astounding, but the transformation of the Wildcats’ potential postseason prospects have seen the most improvement. Arizona went from one loss away to missing out on a bowl entirely to possibly being the Pac-12 South’s representative champion for the first time since 2012. The upset seemed impossible on the eve of the Homecoming game. Arizona fans, including ones like myself, were bracing themselves for the Justin Herbert-led onslaught that we thought Oregon was going to bring to town. The loss would have placed Arizona’s record at 3-6, and would have been the third-straight loss on the bounce for the Wildcats. Pac-12 writer and analyst Jon Wilner wrote an article for The Mercury News in the Bay Area breaking down the different teams in the Pac12 South and the different outcomes that could come to fruition in the season’s last four weeks. Arizona needs another upset as it takes on

Read & Ride

No. 10 Washington State in Pullman in two weeks, then a win over in-state rival ASU in Arizona Stadium, while also needing Utah and USC to lose at least one of their last remaining games. Utah hosts Oregon and travels to Boulder to round out its year. USC has a home dates with Cal, Notre Dame and its annual battle with UCLA to round out its season. For Arizona fans hoping and praying for a shot to play in Levi Stadium, it isn’t completely out of the question. With the way Utah played last week, and USC seemingly quitting on Clay Helton, everything is on the table. Utah’s remaining schedule is tougher than USC’s on paper, but with USC playing two in-state rivals, a former staff member in Justin Wilcox and longtime USC-killer in Chip Kelly, the Trojans’ remaining games are no easy task for any team in the conference. Arizona State currently holds its destiny in its own hands, as it does not have to depend on any other teams losing; winning the rest of the games on its schedule (including Arizona in Arizona Stadium in the finale) would land the Sun Devils in the Pac-12 Championship game. This could lead to an explosive and extremely meaningful Territorial Cup on Thanksgiving

AMY BAILEY | THE DAILY WILDCAT

ARIZONA’S KHALIL TATE DROPS back to pass against Colorado in their Friday night clash Nov. 2 in Arizona Stadium. The Wildcats look to finish the season strong to secure a postseason bowl game.

weekend. However the season ends up, it is going to be one to remember. It’s been a rollercoaster

ride from the start, and I would expect this ride to finish just as wild or jaw-dropping as it opened.

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B14 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

NEWS | TRANSPORTATION PROHIBITION

Electric scooter ban in full effect

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

ELECTRIC SCOOTERS ARE BANNED on the UA campus. Bird and other electric scooter-sharing companies will not be present on the University of Arizona.

BY CONNOR FRIES @cfries_19

UA Parking and Transportation Services announced a ban on all electric scooters on campus that went into effect Oct. 24. This recent ban has raised many questions as well as posed new issues to UA students that regularly use electric scooters to commute around campus. Gail Nazarenko, UA Parking and Transportation Services interim executive director, explained the transportation safety issues and concerns on campus that electric scooters pose. “The UA has safety concerns for riders and pedestrians, since the scooters can reach speeds of up to 15 mph,” Nazarenko said. The issue of electric scooters creating hazards for traveling around campus was mentioned in the official press release. The goal is to mitigate e-scooters blocking Gail Nazarenko, doorways, walkways and other campus paths. Additionally, UA does not want e-scooters to be brought into campus buildings, which would pose safety and accessibility concerns, according to the press release. Nazarenko stressed the limitations and dangers electric scooters can pose to those on campus, specifically to disabled students. “Since riders can leave scooters wherever they stop, UA has safety concerns about the scooters limiting accessibility,” Nazarenko said. Mia Seannell, a freshman architecture student, has been directly affected by the recent ban. “I’ll be really upset. This is all that I have; I don’t have a bike or anything,” Seannell said. “It [the scooter] goes fast, but only as fast as a bike … I’m in more

control of this thing than a bike, I feel.” Seannell purchased the scooter earlier this year for around $500, which can be a large financial setback for student. Students that have purchased a scooter recently will no longer be able to use it, which could potentially be a financial burden on finding another method of transportation. If the scooter is found illegally parked or abandoned, the scooter may be impounded or the owner fined, according to the press release. “I don’t know what I would do without it,” Seannell said. “I guess I would just have to park it somewhere and leave it there. It’s disappointing.” Many other campuses, in particular Arizona State University, recently banned electric scooters and Bird and Lime electric scooter services on campus. UA PTS interim executive While this ban may negatively impact director some UA students, Nazarenko said that the UA and the City of Tucson are currently working toward a long-term solution for the scooters. The City of Tucson is currently in the process of making rules for an electric scooter pilot program, and the UA will in turn use the data from to come to a final decision of whether or not electric scooters will be banned campus in the future, according to the City of Tucson website. For students that will need to find other methods of transportation around campus, services such as the Cat Tran can provide safe transport around campus for no cost. Cat Tran schedules and real-time tracking can be found on the TransLoc Rider and the UA Mobile apps.

There are also concerns about the scooters limiting accessibility around campus.” —


Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

The Daily Wildcat • B15

NEWS | UA MILESTONE

A century of Campus Health care The Campus Health Service celebrated its 100-year anniversity and was recognized for its care to students and staff at the University of Arizona BY JANELLE ASH @janelleashxx

University of Arizona Campus Health Service recently celebrated their 100-year anniversary of serving the student body and the Tucson community by promoting health, wellness and safety. Campus Health began because of a flu epidemic that was affecting people worldwide in 1918. The entire UA campus was quarantined, and they turned a wing of Old Main and one floor of the Agriculture building into a hospital to help care for the sick patients. After occupying various spaces across campus since its inception, Campus Health has been located at the Highland Commons Building since 2004. University of Arizona Campus Health celebrated their anniversary at an event Oct. 18 in the courtyard of the Highland Commons. Festivities included a performance by Fred Fox School of Music’s Speakeasy Ragtime Band, which played popular music from 1918. Notable speakers included UA President Dr. Robert C. Robbins, dean of students and assistant vice president for student affairs Kendal Washington White and Tucson mayor Jonathan Rothschild. Lee Ann Hamilton, assistant director of health promotion and preventative services at Campus Health, said, “We have excellent integration here and are in a good position to address the most common health issues students have, such as upper respiratory infections, injuries and testing for sexually transmitted diseases.” She also added that on average, Campus Health sees about half of the student population each year. “Outreach, education and prevention are key here, and that is something that sets us apart from other health clinics,” Hamilton said. Amanda Kraus, the assistant vice president of Campus Life, said she wanted to thank the entire Campus Health Department for the dedication to the health and safety of not only students, but the entire Tucson community. “It is because of your exemplary service and dedication that our students and our on-campus housing residents stay healthy,” Kraus said. She also said she wished the department luck on its next 100 years of service. Aaron Robinowitz, co-director of the Student Health Advocacy Committee,

DARIEN BAKASCLOSE | THE DAILY WILDCAT

THE CAMPUS HEALTH BUILDING is currently located in the Highlands Commons Building on Sixth Street. In its hundred-year history, it has also been located in Old Main and the Agriculture building.

said that the commitment to the wellbeing of the student body is seen in every member of the Campus Health Department. He also said he wanted to thank the department for their guidance and support throughout multiple collaborated projects throughout the last several years. The SHAC teamed up with Campus Health to make the UA a tobacco-free campus and increase Meningitis B vaccinations. “We feel fortunate to attend a university that wholeheartedly cares about the health of its students and faculty alike,” Robinowitz said. “Beginning college is a vulnerable and confusing time for many students; Campus Health mitigates these concerns by providing access to an on-campus pharmacy, emergency psychiatric services and counseling and online appointment scheduling.”

DARIEN BAKASCLOSE | THE DAILY WILDCAT

THE CAMPUS HEALTH CLINIC is available to any student or faculty member that needs healthcare.


B16 • The Daily Wildcat

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

OPINION | TOPIC OF THE WEEK

Is this much technology good for us? BY MARISA LATZMAN @DailyWildcat

If technology is akin to an extremely addictive drug, then the process of withdrawal is nothing short of harrowing. I’m the last person to ever want to group myself into the technology-obsessed teen category, but maybe I don’t have a say in the matter. It almost appears as if neither me nor the rest of the people residing in the age of the internet know the extent of their smartphone usage in all its glorious, glowing excess, let alone the extent of how much it holds us back. In some ways, it’s taken away our free will. Even if we wanted to give it up and start a new, technology-free life, we probably couldn’t. Our actions no longer reflect our desires. Smartphones, computers, tablets, etc. are revolutionary in that they have shaped the way that members of the human race interact with one another. As a result, our world has become smaller and less mysterious, and we have come to believe that there is no possibility of a normal life without these handy gadgets. The relinquishment of our beloved contraptions would likely leave us feeling embarrassingly behind on current events and gossip. Smartphones are not just parts of our lives, but the entirety of them. Everything we need and want is within their beautiful-yet-fragile glass screens: banking, stocks, phone, calculator, camera, email, music, shopping, family updates and more. It’s almost as if the abandonment of our phones would entail the abandonment of our lives. We’re not just hooked to these devices because we think it’s fun to tweet and text and send funny pictures to our friends on Snapchat; we’re hooked to these devices because our lives reside in them. How did we let it get this way? Is it possible that we’re just empty-minded consumers vying for some kind of Jetsons-like future, completely oblivious to Silicon Valley’s probable master plan of world domination via complex technological advancements? Or are we just, as human beings, partial to things that allow us a better grasp on daunting concepts that may otherwise be too grandiose to tackle? I’m sure you’re familiar with the classic “when I was your age” diatribe. Individuals who grew up during a time in which emails and social media were unfathomable concepts have a tendency to argue that a lack of technology in the past did not negatively affect them. I cannot fathom a more irrelevant and careless argument. Children in the 1950s, for example, never knew technology in the way children nowadays do. No man, woman or child was ever armed with little square devices and high-powered thumbs, both probably bound to cause some weird evolutionary trait in the near future. The lives of adults were not confined to technological devices: they went to banks for their banking, used telephones to make calls, wrote letters instead of sending emails and obtained their news via radio and TV programs or newspapers. It’s not like we can’t do any of that stuff now, but it’s turned into one big game of catch-up. We are constantly trying to one-up the generations before us, parading our technology around with gratuitous pride. And we must not forget to make everything easier. After all, the less work, the better. We certainly have come a long way with technology that even someone from 40 years ago would be mind-blown. We have proven our technological prowess time and time again. To strive to be better than those before us is not a new phenomenon. But now, it appears as if we’re less human than ever before. Have we crossed a line? Is there even a line at all?

GRAPHIC BY NICHOLAS TRUJILLO | THE DAILY WILDCAT

Alexis Richardson

uncle were fairly new to military life, they relied on paper mail to communicate. Even fifteen years ago, when my dad was deployed, we relied on the occasional phone call. When I was in high school, technology allowed us to graduate to instant messaging and video chats. Children now have the opportunity to recognize their parents rather than seeing them as strangers, significant others can share good news more quickly and friends can keep in touch, even oceans apart. Technology has been a blessing for military families, helping us to maintain connections.

Anika Pasilis

realized how much of a drag not having technology is in modern American society. It brought me back to middle school, when we all had lousy disposable flip phones and passed notes in class. They were not necessary back then. That was less than a decade ago. It is humbling to think of how far technology has come and how it makes our lives more convenient. Technology has affirmed its grip on the rest of the world, too. According to a United Nations report, more people have access to mobile phones than toilets. I’m not sure we can really get away from it at this point.

Toni Marcheva

to “need” a smartphone, despite what many people my age would say. Many people cannot comprehend why I would choose to live without a smartphone. If I thought I was better off with one, I would have one. However, I feel so free without one — free to be alone, to see the world, to be in my own thoughts, to communicate and work only when I want to. My communication and time with people must be genuine. Smartphones are a beneficial tool, but they almost always become more than that. Look up: the adventure of life is around you, not in your hand.

Ariday Sued

the world, and now up-to-date news is always at our fingertips. Social platforms have also allowed us to unite together as a country for causes we believe in, sympathize in crises and help causes across the country. Speaking from my own experience, thinking about the effects of technology in my life is rather positive. Being able to video call my family back home on the East Coast in real time is truly special to me, and I am not sure how I would survive without being able to do so.

When you are part of a military family, communication is key to maintaining balance and sanity during times of separation and stress. The ease with which we communicate with absent friends and family has been aided enormously by the evolution of technology. In an age of instant gratification via texting, Snapchat and WiFi, it is often easy to forget that we have only recently moved away from dial-up internet, pay phones and snail mail. That’s not to say these don’t exist, but they’re not as prevalent as they were twenty years ago. Just thirty years ago, when my aunt and

I had no interest in this topic of the week when it was first proposed. That was, until I was without a phone for a week. I can say now, it was the most frustrating week of my college career. Whenever I was bored in between classes or on my way home, I would automatically reach into my backpack for my phone, only to find it was not there. Logging into D2L and UAccess was impossible without a phone due to the new Duo Authentication. I found myself getting so unnecessarily angry by minor things. I saw everyone around me happily on their phones. I

Avoiding technology is possible. I am in the six percent of people ages 18-24 who do not own smartphones. I would guess most of us are in this statistic because we want to be. Believe me: not having a smartphone can be inconvenient. Professors expect we all have smartphones and assign work accordingly. Some services (like Venmo) are leaving their desktop platforms and switching to mobileonly services. I get lost while driving, I sometimes get left out of event invitations, and I’m left out of the loop on what people are up to. None of these inconveniences cause us

I agree with Marisa that it appears that we are less human than before. However, I do not know what I would do without technology. I rely on it for everything I do. I do believe that technology has had a positive effect on our lives. Because of the advancement in technology, as a society we are able to connect with people from anywhere in the world in real time. That is absolutely amazing! Before, people had to rely on once-aday newspapers for what was going on in


The Daily Wildcat • B17

Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

SPORTS | SOCCER

‘Cats burn Devils in ultimate showdown BY MAURY URCADEZ @Maurcadez

One goal was all the difference for the University of Arizona women’s soccer team in its victory over in-state rival Arizona State Friday, Nov. 2. For the past three years the Wildcats have come out on top with only one goal over their opponent. It seems that the defenders always step up to make that difference against ASU. In 2016, center back Samantha Falasco scored the game-winning goal off a corner kick. This time it was outside back Morgan McGarry scoring in the 7th minute who would give her team the lead and eventual win. A ball was played in for a corner kick. Two of McGarry’s teammates were able to get a touch on the ball in toward the goal, but an ASU defender deflected one out and the other hit the top bar. McGarry scored a rightfooted volley off the top bar deflection and into the back of the net. With that win, Arizona has won another Territorial Cup series and finished its season 12-5-2. Head coach Tony Amato said he was happy to pick up another win on the road

before hopefully heading into the NCAA Tournament. “I think every game is a challenge. Everyone knows in the Pac-12 that anyone can beat you, and no matter what the record is, you go into a game and you throw it out the window,” Amato said. “Hopefully you have the mentality that you can beat anyone and anyone can beat you, and that keeps you on an edge to perform well.” It’s always a battle between rivals. The ‘Cats stepped up first by winning a corner kick in the first minute, scoring in the 7th and maintaining much of the possession throughout the first half. Arizona had six corner kicks to ASU’s one by the end of the game. The fantastic four – McGarry, Falsco, Hallie Pearson and Sabrina Enciso – protected their net and caused Arizona State a lot of stress. It came down to small things, like sliding tackles, getting goal side and making runs to get behind the ball, that made it all worth it in the end. Arizona knew it had to get a result out of this match to possibly host a game at the NCAA tournament. Before the game, Arizona was ranked No.

ALEX MCLNTYRE | THE DAILY WILDCAT

ARIZONA MIDFIELDER LEXE SELMAN Richards (13) stays one step ahead of ASU defender Taylor Coon (30) in Sun Devil Soccer Stadium in Tempe Nov. 4, 2016. The Wildcats shut out the Sun Devils 1-0.

27 per the NCAA Women’s soccer RPI and Arizona State was No. 40. The win helped the Arizona reach the NCAA Tournament as the

Wildcats were selected to host Denver in the first round on Friday.

5th Generation Wireless:

Technological Revolution or Pandora’s Box? •A free public forum• Communications technology is advancing at lightning speed, and the race to deploy and install 5th Generation Wireless technologies across the nation as the fastest, most connected, wireless communications innovation in history is on. Yet, federal and state efforts are underway to preempt local government authority over siting and management of antennas, causing loss of local control over this new wireless infrastructure. What’s more, serious questions are being raised about the potential for 5G Wireless to negatively affect our health, the environment, our security, our privacy—and even our democracy!

November 17, 2018 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm St. Mark’s Presbyterian Church 3809 E. 3rd Street Public inquiries: info@emsafetyalliance.org

What are our options? Join the Pima County 5G Awareness Coalition and the Electromagnetic Safety Alliance at a free public forum where some of the nation’s leading wireless technology authorities will address these issues and risks and offer practical solutions. The Electromagnetic Safety Alliance is a federally recognized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization registered in Arizona.


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B18 • The Daily Wildcat


Wednesday, November 7 - Tuesday, November 13, 2018

EXCELLENCE IN JOURNALISM 1

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2017–Society of Professional Journalists, Region 11 First Place: Best Non-Daily College Newspaper First Place: Best College News Website Top 3: Best Photo Top 3: Best Multimedia Sports Story

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2017-Arizona Press Club – State

2nd Place: Front-page layout/design (Sam Gross) 1st Place: Non-deadline layout/design (Sam Gross) 1st Place: Sports Beat Reporting (Ezra Amacher) 3rd Place: Sports Column Writing (Justin Spears) 2nd Place: College Photographer of the Year (Alex McIntyre)

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The Daily Wildcat • B19


B20 • The Daily Wildcat

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11.7.18  

In this issue: Midterm election results; the UA's first featured twirler retires after 60 years; UA alumna premieres film about sexual assau...

11.7.18  

In this issue: Midterm election results; the UA's first featured twirler retires after 60 years; UA alumna premieres film about sexual assau...