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THE DAILY WILDCAT Printing the news, sounding the alarm, and raising hell since 1899

DAILYWILDCAT.COM

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2013

VOLUME 107 • ISSUE 65

Wildcats fall victim to ASU By MarK arMao

NEWS - 3

SEE STUDENT REACTION TO ASU PRANK

The Daily Wildcat

The “Wildcat Family” went to bed last night in all its UA glory, but as classes began this morning, the bronze statue was streaked with ASU gold. The spray-painted sculpture seems to be in retaliation for a prank last week in which Tempe’s “A” Mountain was given a makeover, with the “A” going from its normal white to bright Wildcat red. But while the repainting of the rival’s mountain is generally seen as a fun, if slightly devious tradition, many at the UA are calling foul when it comes to the statue. Along with the blotchy yellow coat on the cats themselves, “ASU” was scribbled on the statue’s cement base, which is inscribed with the names of the donors who funded the project. “It’s clearly in retaliation to the ‘A’ prank,” said Morgan Abraham, president of the Associated Students of the University of Arizona. “But I don’t think it was appropriate at all. … This was literally vandalism of artwork.” The University of Arizona Police Department arrived on the scene at approximately 10:30 a.m. to investigate what it considers destruction of state property, said Sgt. Filbert Barrera, public information officer and crime prevention supervisor for UAPD, adding that there are no suspects in the case. The 14-foot statue, which was sculpted by Nicholas Wilson in 2004, cost around $170,000, according to Kristen Schmidt, registrar at the UA Museum of Art. The museum oversees much of the art on campus. “My main responsibility is to care for artwork,” Schmidt said, “so when anything like this happens … it’s heartbreaking.” Schmidt was on hand to make sure the cleaning treatment wouldn’t damage the sculpture.

STATUE, 3

SPORTS - 6

SHOT CLOCK IN COLLEGE IS TOO LONG

ARTS & LIFE - 10

EATERY BRINGS CARIBBEAN TO OLD PUEBLO

OPINIONS - 4

KiMBeRly cain/The daily WildcaT

JenniFeR BeeBe, a damage restoration contractor, uses a high-pressure hot water system to remove graffiti on the bronze “Wildcat Family” sculpture on the UA Mall on Monday. The prank happened after the “A” on ASU’s “A” Mountain was painted red last week.

Researchers study Admissions looks at insects to learn GPA, not Facebook about humans By MaGGie driVer The Daily Wildcat

Although more and more universities are using social media sites to vet college applicants, the UA continues to make its annual student selection based only on applications. Kaplan Test Prep’s 2013 Survey of College Admissions Officers showed that 31 percent of admissions officers visited an applicant’s social networking

page to learn more about them. This is a 5 percent increase from the 2012 survey. However, Arezu Corella, the director of undergraduate admissions processing, said UA admissions looks at only the information prospective students provide, such as whether they took challenging coursework, volunteered or held a job in high school. Corella added that a student’s success is determined by their academics.

SOCIAL MEDIA, 2

UA TAKES LOGO PROTECTION TOO SERIOUSLY ODDS & ENDS - 2

SEE WHAT THE CAMPUS IS SAYING FIND US ONLINE ‘Like‘ us on Facebook facebook.com/dailywildcat

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WEATHER lili sTeFFen/The daily WildcaT

leslie TolBeRT, a neuroscience professor, looks at fruit flies in her lab with Sarah MacNamee, fourth-year graduate student studying neuroscience, on Nov. 15 at the Gould-Simpson building. Tolbert studies the cells of moths and flies to better understand humans.

By GaBrielle FerNety The Daily Wildcat

The human body is similar to the bodies of other animals in ways most people would never expect. Although it might sound strange, UA neuroscientists said animal research is one of the best ways to begin understanding the human body. Leslie Tolbert, a regents’ professor of neuroscience who studies the interactions between cells in the brains of moths and flies, said the genes of other animals have been found to function the same way as those of humans. “You can study genes and

gene products in any species,” she said, “and find that at a fundamental level, they’re working the same way in humans.” A large percentage of the genes that play a role in human diseases were first discovered in fruit flies, according to Tolbert. Though the creatures are small, their actual body systems are relatively much larger than the complex systems found in humans, making their bodies easier to observe and manipulate in the lab. According to Tolbert, researchers can use a process called “gene knock-outs and knock-ins” to observe changes in

RESEARCH , 2

Haiyan hits close to home

HI

67 Sunny 45 LoW

Spray, Fla. Paint, Pa. Monument, Colo.

By GaBrielle FerNety The Daily Wildcat

After seeing how Typhoon Haiyan affected her family, a UA student began a donation drive to aid victims. Sabrina Segui-Lovely, a biochemistry junior, has been following news reports and speaking to her mom on the phone to get updates on Typhoon Haiyan, which struck the Philippines on Nov. 8, affecting millions and leaving thousands dead. Segui-Lovely’s immediate

CHARITY, 3

74 / 52 35 / 32 39 / 24

QUOTE TO NOTE

shane BeKian/The daily WildcaT

sTePhen hall, a library sciences graduate student, donates to the Arizona Takes on Haiyan Food Drive. The drive was started by a UA student whose relatives live in the Philippines.

It seems as though tuition money and “miscellaneous” charges are going toward a committee set aside for investigating and scoping out every little town’s school logo.” OPINIONS — 4


Tuesday, November 26, 2013 • Page 2

ODDS & ENDS

Compiled by: Greg Gonzales twitter.com/dailywildcat

FAST FACTS

oFF BeAt

—Aluminum is the most common metal on the planet.

— Material from a used aluminum can is usually back on the shelf as a new can within 60 days.

— Throwing away an aluminum can is the energy equivalent of pouring out half the can’s volume in gasoline.

— About 113,204 aluminum cans are recycled every minute.

on the

SPot

KiMBeRly cain/The daily WildcaT

nic WolF, a biology sophomore, spins poi on the UA Mall on Monday. Spinning poi is a flow art that is performed with poi on fire. Wolf is the founder and president of the UA fire dancing club, Flow Cats.

HOROSCOPES Today’s birthday (11/26/13): You have the gifts of communication, partnership and optimism this year. You contribute to a rise in family prosperity until midsummer, when higher education tempts you to explore and travel. Take great strides in health and vitality. Balance your busy schedule to include romance, love, creativity and playtime with friends. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — Communication is key and comes easier than normal. Write a business proposal, a love letter or both. Apply discipline to communications and they’re potent. Let your partner take the lead on a project. Confide to a wise relative.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 6 — The skies are clearing up, figuratively speaking, but it’s still not a good idea to argue, especially with authority. Phone a neighbor or friend for support, or ask someone with more experience. Emotion wins over logic.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Improve your living conditions and your loving. Don’t be afraid to express your true feelings. It’s a great time for meaningful conversation. Silence can also be fun. Consider the game you’re playing, and edit for awesomeness.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 7 — Look far and wide for bargains. Don’t take “no” for an answer. Keep your word. Plan a trip to a favorite place, and advance through distant contacts. Build a fun game with friends, and turn your phone off for a while.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 6 — Your home could use some tender loving care just about now. Do a tough job yourself and save money, or just pay for it. Take a serious approach, regardless, and get it done. Then you can announce it and celebrate.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — It’s easier to make yourself understood today. What can you say for the greatest impact on your community? You’re included in that. Be your best. New ideas come in odd moments; catch them. You’re gaining respect.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Simplify your daily routine to improve working conditions. Take pride in your basic principles. An older person offers help. The action you’re taking feels exactly right. Send out communications, and they travel far.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is an 8 — A friendship formed now will last. Heed wise words from a loving woman. Be open to change for others and yourself. You can delegate some of your chores. It’s a winwin. Keep good records and build security.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Take a big step toward a new level of financial independence. Get in touch with old acquaintances and profit arises naturally. Do what seems right, even if nobody else knows. Offer compassionate listening.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — Trust the structures you’ve built, and continue developing support. Improving skills increases your benefits, and your level of fun. Ask for more and get it. Reassure someone who’s wobbly.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 9 — Reminisce with old friends. Heed a friend’s concerns, but don’t be stopped by them. A private conversation results in greater financial flexibility. Being in charge can be sexy. You’ve got it cooking. Make poetry.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is an 8 — Keep track of what you’re doing, and take copious notes, or record it. Increase your level of optimism and you’re contagious. Others love to be around you. The result is stability. Relax and have fun.

neWS

reSearch from page 1

gene expression in an animal when certain genes have been added or removed from its system. In this way, Tolbert can manipulate different genes in moths and compare their results to the genetic patterns seen in humans. The next steps would involve looking at possible treatments for diseases and applying them to other animals, seeing how the animals are affected and producing medicine for humans based on the findings. Tolbert said she recognizes that it is not always so simple when it comes to finding a cure for a disease, but that she believes animal research serves as the basis

NEWS TIPS: 621-3193 The Daily Wildcat is always interested in story ideas and tips from readers. If you see something deserving of coverage, contact news editor Stephanie Casanova at news@wildcat.arizona.edu or call 621-3193.

The Daily Wildcat is an independent student newspaper published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters at the University of Arizona. It is distributed on campus and throughout Tucson with a circulation of 10,000. The function of the Daily Wildcat is to disseminate news to the community and to encourage an exchange of ideas. The Daily Wildcat was founded under a different name in 1899. All copy, photographs, and graphics appearing in the Daily Wildcat are the sole property of the Wildcat and may not be reproduced without the specific consent of the editor in chief.

A single copy of the Daily Wildcat is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies will be considered theft and may be prosecuted. Additional copies of the Daily Wildcat are available from the Student Media office. The Daily Wildcat is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.

of modern medicine. “You simply cannot do these types of experiments in humans,” she explained. “But we’ve got this amazing opportunity to do experiments in an insect that give us insights to development in mammals, including humans.” Alan Nighorn, head of the neuroscience department, said he credits many medicinal advancements to animal research. “It really has saved lives,” Nighorn said. “The kinds of things that we understand about the nervous system have helped us treat people.” Although certain animals are often treated as models for humans, they are also studied for reasons that have nothing to do with making medicine. Konrad Zinsmaier, a professor of

Colin Wallace, post-doctoral research associate, Center for Astronomy Education What do you do here? My background is in astronomy and physics, and I also have training in education and how people learn, and I’m part of a group of people here that are interested in studying how we can best teach and how people can better learn astronomy. What is the best way to learn, in terms of visual versus purely informational — if that’s even a right way of talking about learning? I wouldn’t divide in terms of purely visual versus purely informational because what a lot of research shows is you really understand something when you can use multiple representations to describe that thing. … So it’s really developing that ability for students to work with multiple representations, to think about their own thinking, and providing opportunities in class for them to intellectually engage with the material, collaborate with each other in order to confront the conceptual and reasoning difficulties we know they have. That is what leads to effective learning. What do you think about pop scientists, like Neil deGrasse Tyson, for instance, who go on the news or do magazine interviews? What do they contribute to education? I think the sort of things that people like Neil deGrasse Tyson do, or Bryan

Greene, are very good at creating fans of science. They’re very good at promoting interest among people, getting people excited about science, and that is a very worthy endeavor. So, in the spirit of interviews with people like deGrasse Tyson, what do you think is the most astounding fact about space? What always interested me about astronomy is that we talk about the history and evolution of the universe as a whole. It’s amazing to me that we are privileged enough to have scientific explanations about how the universe began, and how it has changed over time, and how it’s going to change. So, when you look up at night, what do you see? A lot of people, when they look up at the night sky, notice the bright things: the stars, the planets, maybe the moon is out. One of the most profound things to look at, though, is that most of the night sky is black. And that’s actually a very significant thing when you talk about the history of the universe, because the fact that the night sky is black means that the universe cannot be infinitely old, or it cannot be infinitely big. … The fact that the night sky is black is very interesting because it tells us our universe had a beginning.

Overheard on Campus Man: “Do you ever just get drunk alone and pee on your couch?” — Gila Residence Hall

neuroscience and molecular and Nov. 9-13, when more than 30,000 cellular biology, as well as the chair people convened at the San of the Graduate Interdisciplinary Diego Convention Center for the Program in Neuroscience, said Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting. curing diseases One of the is just one aspect You would not key topics of medical was related to advancements. want to be alive research done “If we in a world today on animal understand how that hadn’t benespecies. Five the brain works, fited from animal s p e a k e r s it will radically research. were elected change society to explain and how we — Leslie Tolbert, why certain interact with regents’ professor species are each other,” of neuroscience being studied Zinsmaier said. and what the “The brain makes us human, and understanding that implications might be. As far as a specific future for this means that we may understand research, it remains somewhat of a ourselves.” The latest findings in animal mystery. “The thing about research is research were discussed in depth

THE DAILY WILDCAT

you never know what’s around the next corner,” Tolbert said. “Every experiment you do may answer a couple questions, but it always generates more.” Tolbert added that she believes without animal research, the world would not be as advanced as it is today. “The point is that you would not want to be alive in a world today that hadn’t benefited from animal research,” Tolbert said. “The vaccinations, surgical procedures, so much of the medication that we take for granted was only developed because of the possibility to do animal research.”

— Follow Gabrielle Fernety @Daily Wildcat

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for corrections or complaints concerning news and editorial content of the Daily Wildcat should be directed to the editor in chief. For further information on the Daily Wildcat’s CORRECTIONS Requests approved grievance policy, readers may contact Mark Woodhams, director of Arizona Student Media, in the Sherman R. Miller III Newsroom at the Park Student Union.

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News • Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The Daily Wildcat • 3

Community

Social Media from page 1

“It’s really about their ability to be successful academically and do well at the institution,” Corella said. “The social components of the choices they make ... outside of the classroom, is part of their personal life.” Kasey Urquidez, the associate vice president for Student Affairs and dean of undergraduate admissions, said the UA would never make it a point to search a student’s social media site to determine admission. “We’re looking at the full package that the student submitted to us,” Urquidez said. “We’re not going out and actively seeking social media that a student may have posted about or on.” While students will sometimes reach out to the UA Office of Admissions through social media, admissions officers do not go to their page to learn more about the student, Urquidez said. However, Briar Aben, a freshman studying gender and women’s studies, said students should still be careful about what they post online. “I don’t have anything that I’m afraid to post on Facebook,” Aben

chatter

What do you think of the recent pranks between ASU and the UA? “I think ASU’s prank was pretty lame because they didn’t even do a good job of it.” — Kyle Morris, undeclared freshman savannah douglas/The Daily Wildcat

AREZU CORELLO, director of admissions processing, reviews student applications. While some admissions officers across the U.S. have started to look at social media to learn more about applicants, Corello said the UA only uses information in the applications it receives.

said. “I know people are looking at it.” Urquidez said while it’s ultimately the decision of each university whether or not to consider prospective students’ online presence, students should be cautious because businesses also turn to social media to learn more about applicants. Urquidez advised students to only put information on the Internet that they would be comfortable having

a close relative see. “I think that students just need to really be aware … that it could be a bad thing for them, way down the road, if they’re putting things out there that are inappropriate,” Urquidez said.

“I think it’s just classic rivalry to be honest but I think, I mean maybe I’m just being biased but I think that what they did this morning … I think that was a little too far because the mountain is kind of classic, but that statue means a lot to U of A so hopefully they know they’re going down at the game.” — Kylie Boardman, pre-physiology sophomore

— Follow Maggie Driver @Maggie_Driver “I think it’s pretty cool. It makes good competition and I think it’s cool, you know? It just makes for a good rivalry.” — Astin Chavez, education junior

Statue

from page 1

The cleanup was handled by TM Building Damage Restoration, a group hired by Facilities Management. They used a pressure-soaker and a mild solvent to rid the sculpture of the graffiti. “There’s a lot of fine detail on the wildcats there, and so we’re going to be very cautious and make sure we get it clean, but also that we don’t damage the artwork,” said Chris Kopach, assistant vice president of Facilities Management. Cleaning the statue could cost between $200 and $500, Kopach added. Many students on campus took offense to the statue being defaced.

Charity from page 1

family lives in the U.S., but her parents and some relatives are from the Philippines. “All forms of communication were gone,” Segui-Lovely said. “My mom’s grandma is 102 [years old], and they had no idea where she was.” Segui-Lovely’s cousin, whom she considers a sister, was unable to hear from her mother’s side of the family amidst the chaos. “We hadn’t heard anything from them, we didn’t know if they were OK,” Segui-Lovely said. “To see the effect it had on her had a really strong effect on me. I don’t like to see the people that I love hurting.” Segui-Lovely said her grandmother’s house is nearly demolished. The roof was torn off and the family now uses a tarp as a cover.

“I’m pissed off,” said Jack Kretschmar, a pre-business junior. “I get that we painted their ‘A’, but that’s not an expensive statue.” That sentiment was echoed by several people who were walking past the statue as it was sprayed clean, the brightyellow paint dripping down to reveal the familiar bronze underneath. “I think it’s fun to have the rivalries, but vandalism of historical statues on campus is over the top,” said Alison Burnette, a UA alumna and faculty member. “Stay classy, ASU.”

“I think they’re just kind of playful fun. I’ve heard of it every year, of the thing at ASU every year, but I haven’t ever heard of them coming down here to do anything. I think they did a shitty job with getting us back though.” — Nicholas Yonke, biomedical engineering freshman

­— Compiled by Jazmine Foster-Hall

— Follow Mark Armao @MarkArmao

“I didn’t really see how big of chairs in her sorority and other an effect it was until I saw it affect Greek organizations and has been people I know,” Segui-Lovely said. successful in getting six Greek “The relief isn’t getting there soon houses to keep a donation box. She then spoke to the Honors enough.” Student Council That was her cue and was able to to step in. SeguiI didn’t really put donation Lovely decided boxes in Slonaker to take initiative see how big of House, as well by starting her an effect it was as Likins Hall own donation until I saw it and Árbol de la drive within the affect people I Vida and Yuma UA community, know. residence halls. to get relief to the — Sabrina Segui-Lovely, The importance Philippines as biochemistry junior of the cause quickly as possible. motivated her Arizona Takes to take on the on Haiyan is project, Seguicollecting clothes, shoes, hygiene products, non- Lovely said. “I’ve never actually put on a perishable food items and money project like this by myself,” Seguito help Haiyan typhoon victims. Segui-Lovely said she used Lovely said. “I didn’t know how to her membership in the Honors go about starting something big, College and Pi Beta Phi sorority to but I wanted more people and spread the word about her drive. more donations, so I put myself She spoke with the philanthropy out there and took the risk.”

Joseph Domby, a criminal justice junior and a friend of SeguiLovely’s, said he is impressed by her initiative. “It’s a huge task to take on,” Domby said. “I know it’s taking up a lot of her time, but it means a lot to her.” Domby said he appreciates Segui-Lovely’s efforts and is currently collecting canned foods to donate. Segui-Lovely said she hopes to find a church in Tucson that is already doing a drive so she can consolidate her donations with its. However, if she can’t find a church drive, she said her mother has several contacts for people and facilities who can help her distribute her donations. The donation drive around campus isn’t the only way the UA is helping relieve Haiyan victims. Asian Pacific American Student Affairs hosted an event on Friday titled “I’m More Than a Single Story.”

The goal of the event was to allow students to share stories about their culture, identity and struggles, said Jayme Wong, an ecology and evolutionary biology senior and a member of the APASA board of directors. After Haiyan hit in Philippines, APASA made the event two-fold, giving attendees an opportunity to support the relief efforts as well. “They need our help, so we’re doing what we can,” Wong said. Segui-Lovely said she wants everyone to be able to donate because she believes that every effort, however small, can help those in the Philippines. “A lot of people complain about little things, but things like this show you how blessed you are,” she said. “If you can help, why not help someone that really needs?” — Follow Gabrielle Fernety @DailyWildcat

Freedom to CHOOSE how you do your Banking...

Look to Vantage West for Free Student Advantage Checking, plus many convenient ways to access your accounts. • • • • •

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013 • Page 2

ODDS & ENDS

Compiled by: Greg Gonzales twitter.com/dailywildcat

FAST FACTS

OFF BEAT

—Aluminum is the most common metal on the planet.

— Material from a used aluminum can is usually back on the shelf as a new can within 60 days.

— Throwing away an aluminum can is the energy equivalent of pouring out half the can’s volume in gasoline.

— About 113,204 aluminum cans are recycled every minute.

ON THE

SPOT

KIMBERLY CAIN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

NIC WOLF, a biology sophomore, spins poi on the UA Mall on Monday. Spinning poi is a flow art that is performed with poi on fire. Wolf is the founder and president of the UA fire dancing club, Flow Cats.

HOROSCOPES Today’s birthday (11/26/13): You have the gifts of communication, partnership and optimism this year. You contribute to a rise in family prosperity until midsummer, when higher education tempts you to explore and travel. Take great strides in health and vitality. Balance your busy schedule to include romance, love, creativity and playtime with friends. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 9 — Communication is key and comes easier than normal. Write a business proposal, a love letter or both. Apply discipline to communications and they’re potent. Let your partner take the lead on a project. Confide to a wise relative.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 6 — The skies are clearing up, figuratively speaking, but it’s still not a good idea to argue, especially with authority. Phone a neighbor or friend for support, or ask someone with more experience. Emotion wins over logic.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 7 — Improve your living conditions and your loving. Don’t be afraid to express your true feelings. It’s a great time for meaningful conversation. Silence can also be fun. Consider the game you’re playing, and edit for awesomeness.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 7 — Look far and wide for bargains. Don’t take “no” for an answer. Keep your word. Plan a trip to a favorite place, and advance through distant contacts. Build a fun game with friends, and turn your phone off for a while.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 6 — Your home could use some tender loving care just about now. Do a tough job yourself and save money, or just pay for it. Take a serious approach, regardless, and get it done. Then you can announce it and celebrate.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is a 7 — It’s easier to make yourself understood today. What can you say for the greatest impact on your community? You’re included in that. Be your best. New ideas come in odd moments; catch them. You’re gaining respect.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 7 — Simplify your daily routine to improve working conditions. Take pride in your basic principles. An older person offers help. The action you’re taking feels exactly right. Send out communications, and they travel far.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is an 8 — A friendship formed now will last. Heed wise words from a loving woman. Be open to change for others and yourself. You can delegate some of your chores. It’s a winwin. Keep good records and build security.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Take a big step toward a new level of financial independence. Get in touch with old acquaintances and profit arises naturally. Do what seems right, even if nobody else knows. Offer compassionate listening.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is a 7 — Trust the structures you’ve built, and continue developing support. Improving skills increases your benefits, and your level of fun. Ask for more and get it. Reassure someone who’s wobbly.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 9 — Reminisce with old friends. Heed a friend’s concerns, but don’t be stopped by them. A private conversation results in greater financial flexibility. Being in charge can be sexy. You’ve got it cooking. Make poetry.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is an 8 — Keep track of what you’re doing, and take copious notes, or record it. Increase your level of optimism and you’re contagious. Others love to be around you. The result is stability. Relax and have fun.

NEWS

RESEARCH FROM PAGE 1

gene expression in an animal when certain genes have been added or removed from its system. In this way, Tolbert can manipulate different genes in moths and compare their results to the genetic patterns seen in humans. The next steps would involve looking at possible treatments for diseases and applying them to other animals, seeing how the animals are affected and producing medicine for humans based on the findings. Tolbert said she recognizes that it is not always so simple when it comes to finding a cure for a disease, but that she believes animal research serves as the basis

NEWS TIPS: 621-3193 The Daily Wildcat is always interested in story ideas and tips from readers. If you see something deserving of coverage, contact news editor Stephanie Casanova at news@wildcat.arizona.edu or call 621-3193.

The Daily Wildcat is an independent student newspaper published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters at the University of Arizona. It is distributed on campus and throughout Tucson with a circulation of 10,000. The function of the Daily Wildcat is to disseminate news to the community and to encourage an exchange of ideas. The Daily Wildcat was founded under a different name in 1899. All copy, photographs, and graphics appearing in the Daily Wildcat are the sole property of the Wildcat and may not be reproduced without the specific consent of the editor in chief.

A single copy of the Daily Wildcat is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies will be considered theft and may be prosecuted. Additional copies of the Daily Wildcat are available from the Student Media office. The Daily Wildcat is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.

of modern medicine. “You simply cannot do these types of experiments in humans,” she explained. “But we’ve got this amazing opportunity to do experiments in an insect that give us insights to development in mammals, including humans.” Alan Nighorn, head of the neuroscience department, said he credits many medicinal advancements to animal research. “It really has saved lives,” Nighorn said. “The kinds of things that we understand about the nervous system have helped us treat people.” Although certain animals are often treated as models for humans, they are also studied for reasons that have nothing to do with making medicine. Konrad Zinsmaier, a professor of

Colin Wallace, post-doctoral research associate, Center for Astronomy Education What do you do here? My background is in astronomy and physics, and I also have training in education and how people learn, and I’m part of a group of people here that are interested in studying how we can best teach and how people can better learn astronomy. What is the best way to learn, in terms of visual versus purely informational — if that’s even a right way of talking about learning? I wouldn’t divide in terms of purely visual versus purely informational because what a lot of research shows is you really understand something when you can use multiple representations to describe that thing. … So it’s really developing that ability for students to work with multiple representations, to think about their own thinking, and providing opportunities in class for them to intellectually engage with the material, collaborate with each other in order to confront the conceptual and reasoning difficulties we know they have. That is what leads to effective learning. What do you think about pop scientists, like Neil deGrasse Tyson, for instance, who go on the news or do magazine interviews? What do they contribute to education? I think the sort of things that people like Neil deGrasse Tyson do, or Bryan

Greene, are very good at creating fans of science. They’re very good at promoting interest among people, getting people excited about science, and that is a very worthy endeavor. So, in the spirit of interviews with people like deGrasse Tyson, what do you think is the most astounding fact about space? What always interested me about astronomy is that we talk about the history and evolution of the universe as a whole. It’s amazing to me that we are privileged enough to have scientific explanations about how the universe began, and how it has changed over time, and how it’s going to change. So, when you look up at night, what do you see? A lot of people, when they look up at the night sky, notice the bright things: the stars, the planets, maybe the moon is out. One of the most profound things to look at, though, is that most of the night sky is black. And that’s actually a very significant thing when you talk about the history of the universe, because the fact that the night sky is black means that the universe cannot be infinitely old, or it cannot be infinitely big. … The fact that the night sky is black is very interesting because it tells us our universe had a beginning.

Overheard on Campus Man: “Do you ever just get drunk alone and pee on your couch?” — Gila Residence Hall

neuroscience and molecular and Nov. 9-13, when more than 30,000 cellular biology, as well as the chair people convened at the San of the Graduate Interdisciplinary Diego Convention Center for the Program in Neuroscience, said Society for Neuroscience’s annual meeting. curing diseases One of the is just one aspect You would not key topics of medical was related to advancements. want to be alive research done “If we in a world today on animal understand how that hadn’t benespecies. Five the brain works, fited from animal s p e a k e r s it will radically research. were elected change society to explain and how we — Leslie Tolbert, why certain interact with regents’ professor species are each other,” of neuroscience being studied Zinsmaier said. and what the “The brain makes us human, and understanding that implications might be. As far as a specific future for this means that we may understand research, it remains somewhat of a ourselves.” The latest findings in animal mystery. “The thing about research is research were discussed in depth

THE DAILY WILDCAT

you never know what’s around the next corner,” Tolbert said. “Every experiment you do may answer a couple questions, but it always generates more.” Tolbert added that she believes without animal research, the world would not be as advanced as it is today. “The point is that you would not want to be alive in a world today that hadn’t benefited from animal research,” Tolbert said. “The vaccinations, surgical procedures, so much of the medication that we take for granted was only developed because of the possibility to do animal research.”

— Follow Gabrielle Fernety @Daily Wildcat

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News • Tuesday, November 26, 2013

The Daily Wildcat • 3

Community

Social Media from page 1

“It’s really about their ability to be successful academically and do well at the institution,” Corella said. “The social components of the choices they make ... outside of the classroom, is part of their personal life.” Kasey Urquidez, the associate vice president for Student Affairs and dean of undergraduate admissions, said the UA would never make it a point to search a student’s social media site to determine admission. “We’re looking at the full package that the student submitted to us,” Urquidez said. “We’re not going out and actively seeking social media that a student may have posted about or on.” While students will sometimes reach out to the UA Office of Admissions through social media, admissions officers do not go to their page to learn more about the student, Urquidez said. However, Briar Aben, a freshman studying gender and women’s studies, said students should still be careful about what they post online. “I don’t have anything that I’m afraid to post on Facebook,” Aben

chatter

What do you think of the recent pranks between ASU and the UA? “I think ASU’s prank was pretty lame because they didn’t even do a good job of it.” — Kyle Morris, undeclared freshman savannah douglas/The Daily Wildcat

AREZU CORELLO, director of admissions processing, reviews student applications. While some admissions officers across the U.S. have started to look at social media to learn more about applicants, Corello said the UA only uses information in the applications it receives.

said. “I know people are looking at it.” Urquidez said while it’s ultimately the decision of each university whether or not to consider prospective students’ online presence, students should be cautious because businesses also turn to social media to learn more about applicants. Urquidez advised students to only put information on the Internet that they would be comfortable having

a close relative see. “I think that students just need to really be aware … that it could be a bad thing for them, way down the road, if they’re putting things out there that are inappropriate,” Urquidez said.

“I think it’s just classic rivalry to be honest but I think, I mean maybe I’m just being biased but I think that what they did this morning … I think that was a little too far because the mountain is kind of classic, but that statue means a lot to U of A so hopefully they know they’re going down at the game.” — Kylie Boardman, pre-physiology sophomore

— Follow Maggie Driver @Maggie_Driver “I think it’s pretty cool. It makes good competition and I think it’s cool, you know? It just makes for a good rivalry.” — Astin Chavez, education junior

Statue

from page 1

The cleanup was handled by TM Building Damage Restoration, a group hired by Facilities Management. They used a pressure-soaker and a mild solvent to rid the sculpture of the graffiti. “There’s a lot of fine detail on the wildcats there, and so we’re going to be very cautious and make sure we get it clean, but also that we don’t damage the artwork,” said Chris Kopach, assistant vice president of Facilities Management. Cleaning the statue could cost between $200 and $500, Kopach added. Many students on campus took offense to the statue being defaced.

Charity from page 1

family lives in the U.S., but her parents and some relatives are from the Philippines. “All forms of communication were gone,” Segui-Lovely said. “My mom’s grandma is 102 [years old], and they had no idea where she was.” Segui-Lovely’s cousin, whom she considers a sister, was unable to hear from her mother’s side of the family amidst the chaos. “We hadn’t heard anything from them, we didn’t know if they were OK,” Segui-Lovely said. “To see the effect it had on her had a really strong effect on me. I don’t like to see the people that I love hurting.” Segui-Lovely said her grandmother’s house is nearly demolished. The roof was torn off and the family now uses a tarp as a cover.

“I’m pissed off,” said Jack Kretschmar, a pre-business junior. “I get that we painted their ‘A’, but that’s not an expensive statue.” That sentiment was echoed by several people who were walking past the statue as it was sprayed clean, the brightyellow paint dripping down to reveal the familiar bronze underneath. “I think it’s fun to have the rivalries, but vandalism of historical statues on campus is over the top,” said Alison Burnette, a UA alumna and faculty member. “Stay classy, ASU.”

“I think they’re just kind of playful fun. I’ve heard of it every year, of the thing at ASU every year, but I haven’t ever heard of them coming down here to do anything. I think they did a shitty job with getting us back though.” — Nicholas Yonke, biomedical engineering freshman

­— Compiled by Jazmine Foster-Hall

— Follow Mark Armao @MarkArmao

“I didn’t really see how big of chairs in her sorority and other an effect it was until I saw it affect Greek organizations and has been people I know,” Segui-Lovely said. successful in getting six Greek “The relief isn’t getting there soon houses to keep a donation box. She then spoke to the Honors enough.” Student Council That was her cue and was able to to step in. SeguiI didn’t really put donation Lovely decided boxes in Slonaker to take initiative see how big of House, as well by starting her an effect it was as Likins Hall own donation until I saw it and Árbol de la drive within the affect people I Vida and Yuma UA community, know. residence halls. to get relief to the — Sabrina Segui-Lovely, The importance Philippines as biochemistry junior of the cause quickly as possible. motivated her Arizona Takes to take on the on Haiyan is project, Seguicollecting clothes, shoes, hygiene products, non- Lovely said. “I’ve never actually put on a perishable food items and money project like this by myself,” Seguito help Haiyan typhoon victims. Segui-Lovely said she used Lovely said. “I didn’t know how to her membership in the Honors go about starting something big, College and Pi Beta Phi sorority to but I wanted more people and spread the word about her drive. more donations, so I put myself She spoke with the philanthropy out there and took the risk.”

Joseph Domby, a criminal justice junior and a friend of SeguiLovely’s, said he is impressed by her initiative. “It’s a huge task to take on,” Domby said. “I know it’s taking up a lot of her time, but it means a lot to her.” Domby said he appreciates Segui-Lovely’s efforts and is currently collecting canned foods to donate. Segui-Lovely said she hopes to find a church in Tucson that is already doing a drive so she can consolidate her donations with its. However, if she can’t find a church drive, she said her mother has several contacts for people and facilities who can help her distribute her donations. The donation drive around campus isn’t the only way the UA is helping relieve Haiyan victims. Asian Pacific American Student Affairs hosted an event on Friday titled “I’m More Than a Single Story.”

The goal of the event was to allow students to share stories about their culture, identity and struggles, said Jayme Wong, an ecology and evolutionary biology senior and a member of the APASA board of directors. After Haiyan hit in Philippines, APASA made the event two-fold, giving attendees an opportunity to support the relief efforts as well. “They need our help, so we’re doing what we can,” Wong said. Segui-Lovely said she wants everyone to be able to donate because she believes that every effort, however small, can help those in the Philippines. “A lot of people complain about little things, but things like this show you how blessed you are,” she said. “If you can help, why not help someone that really needs?” — Follow Gabrielle Fernety @DailyWildcat

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013 • Page 4

OPINIONS

Editor: Nathaniel Drake letters@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-3192 twitter.com/dailywildcat

Early life education important to society BY ANTHONY CARLI The Daily Wildcat

D

oes anybody remember their preschool education? While we may not explicitly rely on the lessons we learned while playing with blocks and participating in sanctioned naptime, it is increasingly evident that early childhood education plays one of the most important roles in determining the path to success in adulthood. According to the National Education Association, those of us who were enrolled in preschool can expect to earn $2,000 more per month than those who were not. Preschool-educated individuals are also more likely to graduate high school, become homeowners and have lasting marriages. Similarly, those who were enrolled in an early education program are 35 percent less likely to have been arrested five or more times before age 40. These staggering statistics show that it’s not just playtime for these children; it is one of the most important developmental periods in their entire lives. This is why President Barack Obama made a bold call to expand early childhood education programs in his State of the Union speech this year. “I propose working with states to make high-quality preschool available to every child in America,” Obama said. In Arizona, many school districts offer some sort of preschool education, but space is limited and there is no guarantee a child will be able to attend. In the Tucson Unified School District, there are several early childhood education programs available to the public, but there is a selection process in most cases. Programs such as TUSD’s Parent and Child Education require a teacher’s nomination of a child, for example. There should be affordable options for every child to participate in these important early education experiences. An investment in preschool education in Arizona would be a positive change and could provide great returns. In fact, according to the HighScope Perry Preschool Study, for every dollar spent on early childhood education, a state can see seven or more in return. But our state budget, which already underfunds education, cannot afford to expand or offer preschool programs to every child in the state. Perhaps Congress can be relied on to usher in this necessary component of education. Rep. George Miller, D-Calif., has offered a bill called the Strong Start for America’s Children Act of 2013. This bill would create a federalstate partnership to help ensure that low- and moderate-income families can enroll their children in early childhood education programs. According to the NEA, it “promotes high-quality early learning opportunities for children from birth until age 5.” The Strong Start for America’s Children Act does not establish across-the-board public preschool, but helps those who cannot afford pricey programs for their children find a way to give their child the foundation that they need. According to Obama, “fewer than three in 10 4-year-olds are enrolled in a high-quality preschool program. Most middle-class parents can’t afford a few hundred bucks a week for private preschool.” Childcare is an expensive part of caring for an infant or toddler, but it is incredibly important. Therefore, sensible solutions, such as the Strong Start for America’s Children Act, should find support from Americans. These types of steps to improving early childhood education could usher in a new generation of exceptional Americans.

Protecting ‘A’ design from high school unnecessary BY ASHLEY POWELL

The Daily Wildcat

O

ver the summer, the UA sent Appomattox County High School in Virginia a cease and desist letter regarding its large “A” logo. The UA said the high school’s blue and grey block “A” was identical to the UA’s red, white and blue block “A.” The schools reached an agreement and Appomattox will phase out its logo. A large institution like the UA, with a total enrollment of more than 34,000 students, should not have sent that letter to a high school of more than 600 students over the “A” design. To spend money and take legal action against the school, whose district has barely a fraction of the students that the UA does, is unnecessary. Appomattox will have to phase out the “A” logo over time, according to a TimesVirginian news article. Alixe Holcomb, director

of trademarks and licensing faculty member or alumni at the UA, said in a previous wants to see Arizona State Daily Wildcat article that it University or the University wasn’t about causing financial of Alabama with our block hardship, but it was a duty to “A.” But I doubt the Wildcat protect UA’s brand. community would have been The UA brings in an worked up about the Virginia outrageous amount of money high school’s logo before it hit per year, the kind of money I newsstands. am sure “As an Appomattox institution County that promotes I have never High School education, I heard of the has never find it strange high school and seen at that we would don’t really think once. In do anything a small school fact, the that hindered UA brings another using a logo in so much school,” said would cause any money, it Brittany threat to somecan afford McEvoy, a thing as large as to spend psychology a university. $538,000 on senior. its General “Especially — Brittany McEvoy, Counsel, financially, psychology senior according since schools to the UA’s have seen fiscal year consistent 2013 budget budget distribution. The General decreases.” Counsel is made up of 10 Aside from the difference in attorneys, six administrative colors in Appomattox County staff members and one vice High School’s variation of the president for legal affairs and block “A,” a distinguishing the counsel. element of Arizona’s “A” is the Frankly, no UA student, total serif “A” inside the block

Letter to the Editor In response to “More emphasis on creativity needed in our education” (by Anthony Carli, Nov. 20) This article is spot-on about the issues pertaining to modern education. Hands-on, real-world projects should be implemented to educate students, rather than fact memorizing. Instead of droning on about ancient algorithms, students can better appreciate these concepts when they are being used directly to create something innovative. How can you expect college kids to get excited about coming to class if they are expected to sit and be passive listeners? If you are a professor who gives credit for attendance, you should re-evaluate yourself as an educator. The material you are presenting and knowledge you are imparting on your students should be the only incentive necessary. If you are a professor and can’t make a course worthwhile to attend without counting it as part of their grade, you are doing something wrong. Don’t act surprised when students cut corners and copy work when professors do the same by regurgitating lectures from Stanford and Princeton, show movies for class, and use pre-fabricated PowerPoints from textbook companies. What I really appreciate about Carli’s article is that he didn’t simply contribute to the outcries of education reform, but also provided specific solutions to the matter. — Connor Young is senior studying engineering management

ONLINE COMMENTS FROM DAILYWILDCAT.COM In response to “Virginia school says farewell to ‘A’ design” (by Brittny Mejia, Nov. 14)

— Anthony Carli is a political science senior. Follow him @acarli10

I cannot express how disappointed I am in this topic and the university in this. I love my alma mater, but seriously?

The Daily Wildcat Editorial Policy Daily Wildcat staff editorials represent the official opinion of the Daily Wildcat staff, which is determined at staff editorial meetings. Columns, cartoons, online comments and letters to the editors represent the opinion of their author and do not represent the opinion of the Daily Wildcat.

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letter, which Appomattox lacks. It’s a technical distinction, but nonetheless, it’s different. To have even found this school’s logo in the thousands of high schools across the country is baffling. “I have never heard of the high school and don’t really think a small school using a logo would cause any threat to something as large as a university,” McEvoy said. It seems as though tuition money and “miscellaneous” charges are going toward a committee set aside for investigating and scoping out every little town’s school logo that shows even the slightest resemblance to the UA’s trademark. It’s hard to say whether a majority of people have heard of Appomattox County High School or even Appomattox County, Va. Regardless, its block “A” logo never posed such a threat that was worth the high school having to fund all of these upcoming changes. — Ashley T. Powell is a journalism senior. Follow her @ashleytaylar

Last time I checked, the UA block “A” logo was red, white and blue; this logo is blue and white. The UA logo also has a peaked red internal “A” whereas the high school logo is a flat topped blue “A”. I’m no “logo” lawyer, but while they are similar, they are not copies. Why don’t they just attack any organization with an “A” in its name? I hope the university decides not to make the Collegiate Licensing Company lawyers rich and puts those dollars to better use of improving the university. I hope Appomattox High School fights this. — bigMAC099 In response to “Week of events will promote transgender awareness” (by Casey Knox, Nov. 20) “I hope as a campus we move beyond the notion of tolerance and celebrate instead.” Really? I find officially-sponsored university events that focus on “celebration” of different lifestyles instead of “acceptance,” insensitive, biased, and potentially narrow-minded. How would LGBTQ feel if we had a straight person parade or polygamist event on campus? Since gender identity is at least partly a moral decision, any attempt to applaud and celebrate people who make such a decision isn’t “acceptance,” it’s persuasion. So naturally I find a “celebration” of transgender lifestyles as disturbing, insensitive and offensive as a radical Christian demonstration, racist bake sale (like at UCLA), or polygamist event. Now, I do believe there is too much hatred against minorities like transgender people and how much violence transgender people have suffered is an urgent problem. So let’s keep the emphasis on treating each other like humans and preventing hate crimes, not on campus celebrations of what we believe to be right. Events that flaunt behavior that many people consider wrong and disturbing in their faces is exactly what the radical preachers on campus do, and they don’t exactly make people feel warm and fuzzy about Christianity. Such celebration of behavior that others disapprove of doesn’t help the cause of tolerance. — Cody P.

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Tuesday, November 26, 2013

•5

Police Beat BY stephanie casanova

The Daily Wildcat

Picking on ‘the kids’

Three UA students were cited at a parking lot on Helen Street for minor in possession of alcohol on Nov. 16 at 1:30 p.m. One of the students was also arrested for an outstanding warrant from UAPD for failure to appear in court. A University of Arizona Police Department officer was conducting a routine check when he saw two men and a woman playing football in the parking lot. The officer also noticed another man standing near a car and a woman sitting in the car who seemed to be affiliated with the three students playing football. The officer noticed a can on the car and another in one of the students’ hands. The woman playing football had thrown a third can on the ground when she saw the officer park. When the officer got closer she noticed several cans of Bud Light Lime-A-Rita on the ground and on the floor of the car. The officer asked the students for identification. All provided their IDs except the student standing near the car. The student standing said he was 21 and began to pace around the car saying the officer was picking on “the kids.” The officer then called an assisting officer due to the possibility of underage drinking. A records check showed that one of the students had a warrant with UAPD for failure to appear on a charge of minor with spirituous liquor in body and was taken to Pima County Jail. A third officer was called to the parking lot to help determine which students had been drinking and who had provided the alcohol. One of the students, who was underage, admitted to buying Straw-ber-itas for her and her roommate who was also underage. She was arrested, cited and released at the scene for providing liquor to a minor and for a minor in possession. One other student who also showed signs of alcohol consumption was arrested, cited and released at the scene. A code of conduct was also sent to the Dean of Students Office.

Had to see it

A UA student was caught trespassing in Arizona Stadium on Nov. 16 at 4:10 a.m. A team security employee in Arizona Stadium called UAPD to report a man laying in the middle of the football field. Two officers met the man on the field. The student said he knew he wasn’t supposed to be there but had wanted to see the inside of the stadium and did so by hopping a short wall on the northeast end. The student was diverted to the Dean of Students Office.

Wrong way

A UA student was arrested for a misdemeanor criminal warrant from the Tucson Police Department on Nov. 16 at about 2:20 a.m. Two UAPD officers were parked on Eighth Street east of Euclid Avenue when they saw the student in a black sedan going eastbound on Eighth Street from First Avenue to Euclid Avenue. Eighth Street is a one-way westbound street from Third Avenue to Euclid Avenue. The officers pulled the student over and asked for his license. A records check showed that the student had a warrant for trespassing from TPD. The student also showed signs of alcohol consumption and was given a standard field sobriety test though it didn’t indicate that he was impaired. The student was arrested and taken to Pima County Jail

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EVENTS

ArizonA Daily

Wildcat EVENT CALENDAR

TUE.

26 NOV 2013

all over! ENJOY EVERY DAY

CAMPUS EVENTS

CAMPUS EVENTS

CAMPUS EVENTS

Green Fund Open Meeting, 1pm-1:30pm, Student Union Memorial Center, Madera Room, 1303 E. University Blvd. The UA Green Fund will hold an open meeting to consider mini grant applications, a program alteration request and other related business.

of Arizona’s Department of Psychiatry is looking for participants for a research study on the effects of an alternative procedure on major depressive disorder. Participants will be compensated for their time. For more information, visit mddstudy.org or call Kim Kelly at 621-0181.

Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter. Explore the universe like never before with the largest dedicated public viewing telescope in the Southwest. Observe spectacular planets, galaxies and nebulae along with incredible sunsets at the summit of Mount Lemmon. Cost $50.

‘Curtis Reframed: The Arizona Volumes’, 10am-5pm, Arizona State Museum, 1013 E. University Blvd. Edward S. Curtis, famed photographer of the American West, created iconic images of Native peoples at the start of the 20th century. Cost $5, free with Catcard.

TUCSON EVENTS

‘Review of Punctuation’, 4pm-5pm, Physics and Atmospheric Sciences, Room 220. Joe Stefani of the Writing Skills Improvement Program will discuss “Review of Punctuation.” This lecture is part of a semester-long series of free workshops held every Tuesday. Cooking on Campus: Food Gifts, 5:15pm6:30pm, Student Recreation Center, Outdoor Adventures. Classy gifts on a student budget. Our student and celebrity chefs will amaze you with how easy it is to make quick and simple yet tasty meals and snacks. Taste them for yourself at the Student Recreation Center’s Instructional Kitchen in the Outdoor Adventures area. Cost: $5. Research Study - Alternative Treatment for Major Depression, 8am-5pm, UA Medical Center, 1501 N. Campbell Ave. The University

Mirror Lab Tours, 1pm, Steward Observatory Mirror Lab, East side of UA football stadium. UA Steward Observatory Mirror Lab offers a unique opportunity to experience and learn how this facility melds cutting-edge scientific research with innovative manufacturing techniques that are changing the way we explore the Universe! $15 for adults, $8 for students. SkyNights Stargazing Program, 4-9pm,

Tuesday Night Open Mic Comedy, 4:30pm7pm, Golden Pin Lanes , 1010 W. Miracle Mile. Enjoy Open Mic Comedy in “The Back Alley” showroom at Golden Pin Lanes every Tuesday night starting at 7:30pm. Admission is free and there will be food & beverage available to purchase. Poinsettia Open House, 5am-3pm, Green Things Nursery 3235 E Allen Road. Green Things Nursery features some of the finest locally grown Poinsettia’s in the Tucson area. Come explore and wander 20 greenhouses full of different variations of Poinsettias.

Information Compiled by Symone Gittens

To sponsor this calendar, or list an event, email calendar@dailywildcat.com or call 621.3425 Deadline 3pm 2 business days prior to publication.


Tuesday, November 26, 2013 • Page 6

SPORTS dailywildcat.com/blog

CAREY NAMED DOAK WALKER FINALIST

Editors: Megan Coghlan & James Kelley

sports@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-2956 twitter.com/wildcatsports

FOOTBALL

ON TO THE NEXT ONE Arizona has moved past win over Oregon and is focused on ASU

dailywildcat.com/blog

WILDCATS EARN WEEKLY AWARDS

ALEXANDER PLAUMANN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

SCORE CENTER NINERS DEFEAT REDSKINS San Francisco 49ers 27 Washington Redskins 6

HEAT TOO HOT FOR SUNS Miami Heat 107 Phoenix Suns 92

QUOTE TO NOTE

HEAD COACH Rich Rodriguez speaks with his team during a time out at the Oregon game on Saturday at Arizona Stadium. Rodriguez has encouraged his team this week to move past the 4216 win and finish out the season strong against No. 12 ASU on Saturday.

BY JAMES KELLEY

The Daily Wildcat Arizona football has its “24 hour” rule, but head coach Rich Rodriguez doesn’t expect it to be an issue this week despite the Wildcats’ upset of then-No. 5 Oregon a few days ago. Rodriguez gives his team 24 hours to celebrate wins or dwell on losses before the focus moves to the next game. This time, after a review of the Oregon game on Sunday and a day off Monday, Rodriguez said he thinks the team will be ready to prepare for No. 12 ASU this week. “By the time we get together again Tuesday, they’ve probably heard enough talk about ASU and the rivalry that they’re ready to get focused on that,” Rodriguez

said. Rodriguez has previously pinned up quotes from the opposing team, but he hasn’t put any in the Lowell-Stevens Football Facility to motivate his team. “I don’t want to dirty the walls up,” Rodriguez said. “I just think that you’d have to be living under a rock if you’re playing for Arizona and you don’t realize how important the ASU game is and the rivalry is.” Coaches prepare the same amount for the ASU game as any other game during the week because there isn’t enough time to do extra, but they do watch more film of their rivals during the offseason. And players come in more on their own to watch film during rivalry weeks. “It’s ASU; we shouldn’t have

to pump anyone up,” senior quarterback B.J. Denker said. Rodriguez said rivalry games are easier to get players motivated for because they hear the buzz about it all around campus. However, Rodriguez added that if their players aren’t giving 100 percent for every game, then they have the “wrong dudes on the field.” Still, he keeps the game in perspective. “If we lose, I’m going to be really mad, but I’m not going to jump off a bridge,” Rodriguez said. “We ain’t got a lot of bridges around here anyway.”

Red storm

The celebration after the game was memorable for Rodriguez, but he was able to stay dry,

VOLLEYBALL

If we lose [to ASU], I’m going to be really mad, but I’m not going to jump off a bridge. We ain’t got a lot of bridges around here anyway.” — Rich Rodriguez, Arizona football head coach

Former Wildcat basketball star Derrick Williams was traded from the Minnesota Timberwolves to the Sacramento Kings Monday night. Minnesota will obtain Luc Mbah a Moute. Williams was the second overall NBA draft pick in 2011.

The Arizona indoor volleyball team still has a chance to finish the season on a good note. The team stands with a 19-11, 9-9 Pac-12 Conference record after being swept by both L.A. schools, No. 8 USC and UCLA . The road didn’t treat the Wildcats very well this season. They currently are 15-2 at home but finished 2-9 on the road. The only two conference matches Arizona was able to win on the road were on Oct. 13 against Washington State and Nov. 3 against Oregon State. The Wildcats have two final home dates, as they hold on to a two-home match winning streak . Arizona recorded 22 errors in the last match against UCLA . The Wildcats currently have 559 attack errors as a team, and if they want to defeat Stanford and ASU this week, they probably shouldn’t add any more. The UA is ranked No. 24 out of 332 in RPI rankings. That’s a pretty decent spot. However, Stanford, the upcoming opponent, is ranked No. 7 . Maybe rankings don’t matter, but Stanford has the right to visit Arizona with confidence knowing it is ranked 17 spots better than the Wildcats. Going back to the beginning of the season, Arizona’s defense held some teams pretty well. The team has recorded 398 blocking assists and 280.0 blocks in total and only 61 block errors. Offensively, Arizona has players like sophomore Olivia Magill , who had the best offense for the Wildcats in the last match. Junior Madi Kingdon is ranked No. 3 in the conference with an average of 4.37 kills per set . Kingdon is also ranked No. 4 with an average of 0.34 serving aces per set . She leads the Pac-12 with a total of 529.0 points. Freshman setter Penina Snuka is the only freshman listed in the top 10 players who have contributed the most assists. She is No. 6 with a total average of 10.13 assists per set. Head coach Dave Rubio has talked about how the team has to keep getting better before going into tournament play. Something interesting the team should keep in mind — ASU currently has the same hitting percentage as the Wildcats for the season . Both teams hold on to a .215 percentage. The Wildcats’ offense will have to step up and do what the coach expects to beat ASU’s offense Friday night .

ketball ticket in the nation, with a median price of $92, according to a Vivid Seats report.

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BASKETBALL

shot clock in college

BY ROSE ALY VALENZUELA

EX-WILDCAT WATCH

basketball is tied for the 13th most 13 Arizona expensive college bas-

FOOTBALL, 7

UA has two more matches Time for to improve NCAA résumé shorter The Daily Wildcat

NUMBER OF THE DAY

avoiding the inevitable Powerade bath. “I saw it out of the corner of my eye, and those guys aren’t very athletic,” Rodriguez said. “I think they kind of tripped.” The second-year coach said players usually block the coach before pouring Powerade on him, but the Wildcats didn’t on Saturday. “We must not have won a lot of big games, because our guys aren’t experienced in coachdousing,” Rodriguez said. “This is all a learning experience for all of us.” Although Arizona has beaten three ranked teams and won a bowl game in Rodriguez’s tenure, the Wildcats may need more experience winning big games.

BY EVAN ROSENFELD

The Daily Wildcat

O

AMY PHELPS/THE DAILY WILDCAT

JUNIOR OUTSIDE HITTER Madi Kingdon spikes the ball against Colorado on Nov. 17 at McKale Center. Kingdon has the offensive power the Wildcats need to win the last games of the season.

Arizona leads the Pac-12 in average digs per set, with a total of 17.09. Senior Candace Nicholson is No. 6 in the Pac-12 with a 4.31 digs per set average. Nicholson has two opportunities left in the season to keep that spot. The Wildcats have had a solid season overall, but the concern now is tournament play. If Arizona beats Stanford and ASU this week, it will put the team in a good mindset for when tournament play begins. The NCAA tournament selection show is on Sunday. The Wildcats missed the big dance last year. — Follow Rose Aly Valenzuela @RoseAlyVal

f the many inconsistencies between games of collegiate and professional basketball, the difference in the length of the shot clock poses the most substantial disadvantage to athletes trying to develop their skills in hopes of eventually achieving a successful NBA career. The NCAA should decrease the current 35-second shot clock time so that college coaches can better prepare players for one of the many adjustments those who advance to the professional level will face, and to create a more fast-paced, entertaining game for fans. “Shrink the shot clock,” head coach Sean Miller said. “Instead of it being 35 seconds, [maybe try] 30 seconds. More than anything, it would create a faster flow, styles would change and I think you’d see a lot more scoring.” The primary appeal of shortening the shot clock time is that it would increase game speed and intensity. It would lead to an emphasis on quality transition defense while rewarding teams that make quick, concise decisions offensively. Less time on the shot clock will lead to a more fluid, intuitive game style, where players will be coaxed into making more effective plays with much less lag time before finding the open shot. Overall, it will open the sport up to higher scoring contests and limit the trend of over-coaching, which occurs when an offense mindlessly runs through the motions instead of reading the defense and adjusting

BASKETBALL, 7


Sports • Tuesday, November 26, 2013

football

The Daily Wildcat • 7

women’s basketball

Wildcats must play larger than life today

from page 6

Rodriguez said the celebration was big for senior football players and senior students. He didn’t see the students storm the field at first because he was being interviewed. “Thankfully I had a couple of our finest around me to shove me through the crowd, but it was a fun shove,” Rodriguez said. Half the team was on the field instead of in the locker room when Rodriguez got there. He let the team celebrate and watched them enter the Lowell-Stevens Football Facility one by one.

of the season. The Wildcats are averaging 36.2 total rebounds per game so far but have struggled to limit offensive rebounds for their opponents. In the last two games alone they gave up nine The Arizona women’s basketball team has a offensive boards to Stephen F. Austin and 12 to quick turnaround after losing to the University Pacific. of the Pacific on Saturday. The Wildcats (1-4) Giving up offensive rebounds not only will match up against the Wake Forest Demon lengthens each defensive possession, but Deacons (3-2) today at 11 a.m. at McKale Center. generally gives the opponent a favorable shot near The game will be streamed live on pac-12.com. the basket. More often than not those easy shots The Wildcats are coming off two consecutive equal easy scores or free throw opportunities for close losses in which Pacific and Stephen F. the opposition, both of which fall into the category Austin made comebacks to stun Arizona. On the of second chance points. other hand, the Demon Deacons Second chance points can just blew out Radford on Friday demoralize a defense and Keeping teams by a score of 92-65. invigorate a struggling offense. off the glass Wake Forest presents a This is something the Wildcats has been a considerable challenge, as it will have to figure out before Pachave a noticeable size advantage consistent 12 play, when teams will feast in this game. It has five players on battle for off their mistakes. Arizona gave its roster that are 6-foot-3, which up 10 second chance points Arizona in the is five more than Arizona has to Pacific on Saturday. That first five games on its roster. The tallest Arizona number should rise significantly of the season. player is 6-foot-2 senior forward by the time they play Stanford or Erica Barnes, and she most likely Oregon. won’t play big minutes as she’s Securing rebounds is the final returning from a concussion that measure of defensive stops, and each and every kept her out of the first four games of the season. defensive rebound will be key for Arizona as the That puts a lot of pressure on freshman Demon Deacons average 17.4 offensive rebounds forwards LaBrittney Jones, Dejza James and per game. Those rebounds help key an offense Breanna Workman. Each stands 6-foot-1 but that has three players score at least 19 points per will need to play bigger if the team wants to be game. competitive both in the paint and in rebounding. Senior guard Chelsea Douglas (23.2), Keeping teams off the glass has been a freshman guard Kelila Atkinson (20.0) and junior consistent battle for Arizona in the first five games forward Dearica Hamby (19.2) each contribute BY Roberto Payne

The Daily Wildcat

Hill over the hump?

Junior receiver Austin Hill suited up last week and participated in warm ups, but Rodriguez said he wasn’t sure if he could play in a game yet. “I think he’s a little bit better every week, but again, is he going to be ready to play in a game? That’s another leap,” Rodriguez said. “It’s really up to Austin and how he feels and the training staff.” The Wildcats release their injury report later in the week. Hill was Arizona’s leading receiver last year and a Biletnikoff Award Semifinalist. Hill tore his ACL in April but can’t redshirt because he already has. Hill did announce he will return for his senior year, rather than enter the NFL draft.

— Follow James Kelley @jameskelley520

ryan revock/The Daily Wildcat

freshman forward Breanna Workman guards against Fort Lewis on Nov. 2 at McKale Center. Workman has to step up as one of the tallest players on the team.

considerable offensive production to their team. To put that in perspective, junior guard Candice Warthen leads the Wildcats in scoring at 17.4 points per game. The Wildcats’ next game is back on the road as they take on BYU on Saturday in Provo, Utah, at 2 p.m. MST.

— Follow Roberto Payne @HouseofPayne555

basketball

pac-12 power rankings

Bowl prospects emerge in week 13 memory. But because of a rocky start, for now the Wildcats look to be heading back to the Gildan New Mexico Bowl.

BY luke della

The Daily Wildcat

1. No. 8 Stanford (9-2, 7-2 Pac-12) Last week: 2

7. Washington State (6-5, 4-4) LW: 8

The Cardinal should really write Arizona a thank you letter. With the Wildcats’ 42-16 win this past week over then-No. 5 Oregon, Stanford clinched the Pac-12 North title. If the Wildcats defeat No. 12 ASU next week, that locks up the home field advantage for the Cardinal in the conference championship game.

The Cougars are going bowling for the first time since 2003. WSU scored 49 points to lock up its sixth win. It could get better, but for now the Cougars will probably replace a Mountain West Conference team in the San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl.

2. No. 12 ASU (9-2, 7-1) LW: 3

8. Washington (7-4, 4-4) LW: 7

A well-balanced Sun Devils team has strung together six straight wins, most recently defeating then-No. 14 UCLA on the road, 38-33. The win secured a Pac-12 South title, and a win next week over rival Arizona will force Pac-12 North champion Stanford to come to Tempe, Ariz., to play the championship game on Dec. 7. The winner earns a spot in the Rose Bowl.

There’s just nothing exciting about this Huskies team. While a good start to the season means the Huskies are just one win away from an impressive 8-4 record, a poor finish to their season means head coach Steve Sarkisian is one loss away from being fired. Expect Washington to attend the Fight Hunger Bowl.

Royal Purple Las Vegas bowl, but a win this week over USC would bump them into a “better” one.

12. California (1-11, 0-9) LW: 12

6. Arizona (7-4, 4-4) LW: 9

Don’t worry, Golden Bears fans, the season is finally over.

— Follow Luke Della @LukeDella

— Follow Evan Rosenfeld @EvanRosenfeld17

9. Oregon State (6-5, 4-4) LW: 6 With a good offense but terrible defense, the Beavers fill a Conference USA spot and get invited to the Heart of Dallas Bowl.

The disappointed Ducks made it clear early last week that they didn’t care to play in the Rose Bowl because they already won it in 2012. Well, after losing to Arizona this past weekend, the Ducks are probably going to play in the Valero Alamo Bowl or National University Holiday Bowl.

10. Utah (4-7, 1-7) LW: 10 For the first time since 1998, the Utes will miss a bowl game for a second consecutive year. alexander plaumann/The Daily Wildcat

The Trojans could still tie ASU for first place in the Pac-12 South, but ASU holds the tiebreaker because of its 62-41 win over the Trojans on Sept. 28 that cost former USC head coach Lane Kiffin his job. Since taking over, interim head coach Ed Orgeron has led the Trojans to a 6-1 (6-0 Pac-12) record. Whether or not Orgeron loses the interim title could be determined this week when USC hosts rival No. 22 UCLA. Currently,

UA junior safety Tra’Mayne Bondurant celebrates after the Arizona defense stopped Oregon at the goal line on Saturday at Arizona Stadium.

USC appears to be attending the Hyundai Sun Bowl.

5. No. 22 UCLA (8-3, 5-3) LW: 5 Despite winning three of their last four games, the Bruins’ 38-33 loss last week to ASU showed that while the Bruins are a talented team, they are not an elite one. As of right now, UCLA is likely looking at a trip to the

11. Colorado (4-7, 1-7) LW: 11 Efforts to rebuild are working in Boulder, Colo.

The Wildcats were perfect against Oregon last week. If they can play that well against ASU next week, they could have one of their most successful seasons in recent

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Head Coach Sean Miller yells from the bench to his team against Augustana on Oct. 28 at McKale Center. Miller said the shot clock should end at 30 seconds instead of 35.

accordingly. Players will have to rely more on their natural instinct and skill to execute effectively. Less time on the clock would also force offenses to draw up faster plays in order to get a shot off more quickly and would lead to much faster ball movement and an increase in the amount of possessions per game. Offenses wouldn’t utilize as many flare screens and pick and rolls would become more common. It would cause offenses to do whatever they could to get a good shot up quickly. Developmentally, it doesn’t make sense to have so much variation in rules between the different levels of basketball. High school, college and NBA rules lack uniformity in such areas as game duration, distance of the three-point arc and number of personal fouls allowed. If rules in college and high school basketball start to inch closer to the standards the NBA has implemented, it will make the transition from amateur to professional a much smoother ride.

3. No. 13 Oregon (9-2, 6-2) LW: 1

4. No. 23 USC (9-3, 6-2) LW: 4

from page 6

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or liquor before beer ?

We get asked this question a lot! It’s based on the sayings “liquor before beer, you’re in the clear; beer before liquor, never sicker.” Drinkers want to know which statement is “true,” and some swear from their personal experiences that one or the other works for them. The premise is that drinkers are trying to find ways to avoid getting sick from drinking, and believe that the secret lies in the order in which different types of alcohol are consumed. There’s also a belief that mixing different types of alcohol can make a drinker sick. We’re sorry to say that neither statement is scientifically proven. So why do some drinkers feel sick? • The most common reason for feeling sick during or after drinking is drinking too much. Whether it’s shots, mixed drinks, beer, or any combination of these beverages, too much is too much. When drinkers get sick, it’s easy to look for the cause and assume it was due to a consumption pattern other than quantity. In reality, our body absorbs alcohol and doesn’t “recognize” the difference between a vodka shot or Keystone Light beer (taste preference is another topic). • However, the fact is that alcohol can be an irritant in our system, causing inflammation of the stomach lining. Alcohol in the stomach stimulates the secretion of hydrochloric acid. Basically, you may feel nauseous sometimes. • Another major factor is drinking on an empty stomach which increases your chances of feeling more intoxicated (translation: sick). Consuming food before drinking slows alcohol absorption and minimizes the likelihood of feeling sick. • Some drinkers have a sensitivity or allergy to sulfites that are added to alcohol or are present as a natural by-product of wine fermentation. • Blame congeners. Alcohol with more congeners may lead to more side effects like headaches and nausea. So the answer is to drink moderately; for males, that’s less than 5 drinks over a 2 hour period, and for females, less than 4 drinks over 2 hours.

85% of UA students typically party one night a week or less. (2013 Health & Wellness Survey, n=3055)

Got a question about alcohol?

Email it to redcup@email.arizona.edu

www.health.arizona.edu

The Red Cup Q&A is written by Lynn Reyes, LCSW, LISAC, David Salafsky, MPH, Lee Ann Hamilton, MA, CHES, and Spencer Gorin, RN, in the Health Promotion and Preventive Services (HPPS) department of the UA Campus Health Service.

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The Daily Wildcat The Only Paper the Cool Cats Read #1 Source of News on Campus


Tuesday, November 26, 2013 • Page 10

ARTS & LIFE

Editor: Kyle Mittan arts@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-3106 twitter.com/dailywildcat

Saint House offers true Caribbean BY CASEY KNOX

The Daily Wildcat The ocean remains a foreign place in land-locked Tucson, a land of bean burritos and taco shops, driven by fast food desires and unhealthy urges, where the closest attempt to authentic seafood is usually only found at Red Lobster. Saint House Rum Bar, a three-monthold downtown restaurant, breaks free of the Mexican food mold and brings the Caribbean a little closer to home. When I first walked into the restaurant, I was immediately greeted by a friendly waitress, which added an additional level of comfort to the already comfortable sunlit and spacious setting. The dark wood floors and sleek chairs were juxtaposed with shades of orange and green, coupling modern aesthetics with the traditional hues that come to mind when you think of a day at the beach. Although the tables were adorned with cloth napkins, Saint House had an air of casual afternoon dining, providing the perfect place to converse about the weather during an awkward first date. For the appetizer, I ordered coconut shrimp, which was coupled with the restaurant’s signature sauce. The jumbo tiger prawns were floured and fried with grated coconut, balancing sweet and delicate flavors with a salty crunch. Unfortunately, the sweetness of the sauce — made with a pineapple base, habanero powder and lemon juice — was a little overwhelming. However, my next dish didn’t disappoint. I ordered a traditional Caribbean meal, the stew del mar ($18 plus tax), a brightly-

colored coconut curry dish topped with mussels, bay scallops, poquito shrimp and pacific whitefish. The curry was flavored with a perfect combination of tangy lime and subtle spice, giving zest to the dish. The seafood was fresh and cooked until it was tender, but I was exceptionally impressed with the mussels, which sent my taste buds straight to the Atlantic coast. The dish was garnished with thin slices of red bell peppers and crisply fried basil leaves, balancing the spice of the curry with refreshing vegetables. While prices are a little steep, entrees ranging from $15-$20, the food was worth every penny spent. Although Saint House Rum Bar finds its niche in its excessive drink menu and large bar, this restaurant’s menu and atmosphere provide a worthwhile dining experience for people of all ages. Venture away from Italian and Mexican food over the break, and journey downtown for a Caribbean delight. — Follow Arts reporter Casey Knox @Knox_Casey

IF YOU GO What: Saint House Rum Bar Where: 256 E. Congress St. Hours: 11 to 2 a.m. Price range: $$$

‘Catching Fire’ strong follow-up, fails to thrill like original BY ALEX GUYTON

The Daily Wildcat The opening shot of “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” is of Katniss Everdeen in a cold, sparse forest, looking ahead at her target, some wild game that will provide a meal. Like our huntress, the film is looking ahead, to bigger and better things, losing sight of the task at hand. Though Katniss and company are back in the increasingly volatile world of Panem, rife with both death and hope, this sequel does nothing to further, or detract from, the groundwork of the original. Despite its flaws, “Catching Fire” is a worthwhile installment in a series that has assumed the financial and critical crown of “Harry Potter” for the young-adult-novel-turned-

KYLE MITTAN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

SAINT HOUSE RUM BAR’S stew del mar features a take on a classic Caribbean dish, coupling coconut curry with scallops, shrimp and red bell peppers. The meal cost $18 plus tax.

LIONSGATE

movie-franchise throne. Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) are back at home in the impoverished, coal-mining District 12. They haven’t fully enjoyed the spoils of being champs of the 74th Hunger Games (the events of the first film), or the artificial romance they created in order to survive the previous games. Peeta wants something real while Katniss loves hometown sweetheart Gale Hawthorne (Liam Hemsworth). Katniss and Peeta will have to learn to

deal, though, as they embark on a victory tour to the other districts. The graces of the Capitol are praised, as well as the tyrannical government that lords over the 12 slums-for-Districts. It’s pretty disturbing, and the movie shows Panem in all its moral perverseness. The embers of rebellion are beginning to glow as Katniss tours. The denizens of the district raise three-fingered salutes in solidarity, and faceless soldiers, whose armor finds a happy medium between Master Chief from “Halo” and Stormtroopers, beat them down. President Snow (Donald Sutherland), observing from his ivory tower of power, plots to extinguish the growing resistance with his toothy sneer. He schemes with Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Hoffman) the new head gamemaker, and they decide to use a very special 75th Hunger Games, with new rules, to assassinate hope. Katniss and Peeta find themselves suiting up once more, where they must kill their peers to stay alive. Lawrence must once again be the allaround anchor of these films, and she does so fairly convincingly. Her Katniss is a tenacious, skilled hunter who must battle with PTSD-like symptoms after the horrors of the first games. I’d offer a three-fingered salute to her, as well as all creatively involved, in making such a strong heroine. As we’ve seen since the first film, this is not a young woman who is crippled in the absence of a boyfriend (what’s up, “Twilight”?) but really doesn’t have much time for love, even though it’s nice from time to time. However, this feels like a movie of two halves. Everything leading up to the 75th

Hunger Games — the victory tour, the training, the rumbling of rebellion, the behind-the-scenes look at the Capitol with Snow and Plutarch — is the first half of a whole. We mostly slog through this to reach the much-awaited main attraction, the game itself. Between a forest filled with poisonous fog and aggressive apes and a beach with its own set of hazards, the games’ sequence is harrowing and darker in both mood and content than most large set pieces of adventure films. In fact, the title of the movie is a great summation of this film’s place in the pantheon of the “Hunger Games” series, as well as the film itself. The first movie thrilled audiences — even those unfamiliar with the books — with its bleak, industrial, stylish and outlandish Panem. Autocratic oppression mixed with high fashion, and the gladiator games of ancient Rome had a futuristic spin. All that which dazzled audiences is back in the second installment. But nothing really is bigger or better. The ending, with an abruptness that is rather shocking, tells us the end is nigh, that “Mockingjay” is going to be in two parts. Although the series’ second installment indeed leaves its audience “catching” fire, it fails to engulf.

Grade: B— Follow Arts reporter Alex Guyton @TDWildcatFilm

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11.26.13  

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