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THE DAILY WILDCAT Printing the news, sounding the alarm, and raising hell since 1899

DAILYWILDCAT.COM

TUESDAY. OCTOBER 1, 2013

VOLUME 107 • ISSUE 26

OFF THE PAPER WALL

ODDS & ENDS - 2

OVERHEARD ON CAMPUS OPINIONS - 4

SOCIETY SHOULD FOCUS MORE ON MENTAL HEALTH SPORTS - 6

MEET PITTS, UA’S OTHER FRESHMAN

KIMBERLY CAIN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

ZACHARY REBERT, an architecture freshman, constructs a parametric screen wall for Architecture Foundation Studio 101 class outside the Architecture building on Monday.

Old Main seeks funding for renovation project BY MICAH MONTIEL The Daily Wildcat

Although Old Main is already under construction, the project has yet to reach its $13.5 million funding goal. In January 2013, Sundt Construction Inc. began renovations for the building which was estimated to be finished April 2014. The renovations were initially for the roof, stairs and porches after the second floor flooded in February 2012, but became a more extensive preservation project as construction went on. The estimated cost for the

project is $13.5 million but the building renewal fund could only provide $1 million. Most of the construction has been selective demolition and peeling away the outside layers of Old Main, which has been sponsored by the renewal funds. However, rather than limiting the construction to “bandaid work,” the UA has taken an initiative to preserve the oldest building on campus, according to Peter Dourlein, assistant vice president of UA Planning, Design and Construction. “It wasn’t really a choice of whether or not to do something for the building,” Dourlein

said. “It had gotten to the point where parts of it were closed because they couldn’t be used, essentially.” As part of an initiative to create more funding from the public, the UA will host a “Save Old Main Kickoff ” event today. UA Foundation members have been working on both private and public fundraising projects for about a year to establish more funds for Old Main’s renovations, according to Jim Moore, Chief Executive Officer of the UA Foundation. The UA Foundation helps

UA works with film companies for early screenings

ARTS & LIFE - 10

FLANDRAU HOSTS WEEKEND LASER SHOWS

FIND US ONLINE ‘Like‘ us on Facebook facebook.com/dailywildcat

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OLD MAIN, 3

ON OUR WEBSITE

Fair targets undeclared majors

AMY PHELPS/THE DAILY WILDCAT

For breaking news and multimedia coverage check out

STUDENTS WATCH “The Lone Ranger” at the Gallagher Theater on Thursday.

BY EMILY BREGGER

BY MAGGIE DRIVER

The Daily Wildcat

Students will have the chance to talk to advisers from various UA colleges at the Meet Your Major fair on Wednesday. The annual Meet Your Major fair, which will be held in the Grand Ballroom of the Student Union Memorial Center, hosts representatives from different college majors to provide students who are looking to explore various majors an opportunity to do so. The fair also assists students who have already declared a major in finding a minor. Sara Yerger, a senior academic adviser for the College of Education, said a student would normally have to go to each adviser or website for the department they are interested in to learn about the majors that are offered. “It’s a really excellent opportunity for students to have a one-stop-shop experience with finding and learning about different majors on campus,” Yerger said. Students can prepare for the fair by coming up with questions they would like to ask the adviser, and by having

Marlow added. If students want to further explore a major’s opportunities, they can ask advisers if there

This semester, through thirdparty film companies, Gallagher Theater is offering UA students a chance to see movies before they’re out in theaters. This is the first year that the theater, located in the Student Union Memorial Center, is offering free movies, which are planned for screening on Thursdays and Sundays. “Different representatives that work for the universities are reps for the movie companies,” said Thomas Dotterer, a student lead for the theater and a sociology senior. “They contact us and their job is to set up these free screenings.” One of the main providers of the advanced screenings is Olson Communications Inc., a public relations and marketing company, according to Yuri Makino, an associate professor of the School of Theatre, Film and Television. The free screenings are mainly funded by student fees, which provide the Gallagher Theater roughly $30,000, according to Melissa Carreño, the student engagement marketing assistant

MAJOR FAIR, 3

MOVIES, 2

The Daily Wildcat

PHOTO COURTESY OF CLAS ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER

STEVE PRZYMUS, a graduate research assistant,and Es Teran, Colleges of Letters, Arts, and Sciences student ambassador explain the opportunities in Global Studies to students.

an idea of what their interests are, said Debbie Marlow, a senior academic adviser for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Being open to new interests is important as well,

DAILYWILDCAT.COM

WEATHER HI

92 SUNNY 61 LOW

Pumpkin, Ga. Spice, W.Va. Latte, Italy

82 / 62 73 / 52 72 / 65

QUOTE TO NOTE

If House Republicans want to help low-income individuals get back on their feet again, taking away a program that provides these individuals with food is surely not the answer.” OPINIONS — 4


Tuesday, October 1, 2013 • Page 2

ODDS & ENDS

Compiled by: Greg Gonzales twitter.com/dailywildcat

FAST — Human brains only consist of 2 percent of a person’s body mass, but require 20 percent of caloric and oxygen intake. — The crew of the International Space Station can see a sunset or sunrise every 45 minutes because of how fast the station travels. — The Earth spins at approximately 460 meters per second. — We are orbiting the sun at approximately 30 kilometers per second. — The solar system (and all the Milky Way) is thought to be orbiting Sagittarius A*, the location of a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, at 220 kilometers per second.

KIMBERLY CAIN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

SHARIF FARUQUE, AN ECONOMICS graduate student, plays chess at Espresso Art Cafe on University Boulevard.

FACTS

HOROSCOPES Today’s birthday (10/01/13): Building a profitable career, thriving partnerships and improvement at home all take priority this year. Satisfy the urge to explore and learn. Get involved with a passionate cause. Weed out time sucks and prioritize projects for balance. Cultivate friendships and magic moments with loved ones. Simple joys delight. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — For the next two days, fulfill promises you’ve made. Chores need attention. New information threatens complacency. Communicate with teammates. Caring for others is your motivation. Minimize risks. Catch your dreams in writing. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 6 — You’ll soon have time to pause and relax. Invest in success. Take a new angle. Keep a dream alive with simple actions. Avoid a controversy. It’s a good time to ask for money … be creative with your budget. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 7 — Allow yourself to dream, but don’t buy treats, yet. Accept the support that’s offered. Stay close to home as much as you can the next few days. Passions get aroused. Make a delicious promise. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 9 — It’s easier to find family time. You’re extra brilliant today. A solution to an old problem is becoming obvious. Costs are high. Arguments about money inhibit love. Keep a secret. Recount your blessings. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Money’s rolling in over the next few days. Costs are higher than expected, too. Avoid reckless spending. Make sure others know their assignments. Feel the magnetism. Your greatest asset is your own determination. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 6 — Give loved

ones more attention. They want your time, not money. An invitation says to dress up. Let another person take over, and defer to authority. Accept encouragement. Share your dreams … the audience is receptive.

Overheard on Campus

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 7 — Get yourself moving! Make sure you have the facts. Get serious about your strategy, but don’t get stuck. You’re very persuasive. You’ll think of something. It’s easier to finish projects.

Man: “That’s why I had to go make myself vomit. I just wanted to feel better so I could have sex already.”

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 7 — Work quickly but carefully. Obligations get in your way. Being polite is a virtue. Talk over plans with family. Try not to provoke jealousy. Don’t waste your money. Friends offer comfort and advice.

— Main Gate Square

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is an 8 — Begin a new project. Take time out for love. Include a female in your plans. You’ll have to report on your activities. Assume responsibility. Exceptional patience could be required. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Let yourself be drawn outside your safety zone. The possibility for hurt feelings is high now. Don’t get stuck. Write down longrange goals today. Goodness comes your way. Act quickly to gain your objective. Balance is essential.

ON THE SPOT

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — It’s time to get started. There’s a temporary clash between love and money. Review your current budget. Note all the considerations. Passion grows now that the stress is reduced. Travel boosts your self-esteem. Follow your fascination.

Tiffany Lee, creative writing senior

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Have faith. Negotiate your way through minor adjustments. Temporary confusion could befuddle. Get family to help. Let another take the lead. Invest in your future without gambling. Respect your partner.

What’s the most beautiful thing in the world? Gosh, that’s a hard question. I think our interconnectedness, which is scientifically proven.

NEWS MOVIES

FROM PAGE 1

and a marketing senior. “Students’ money is going toward this program,” Carreño said. “It gets them to come in, be engaged and more involved in school. It is something to enjoy on your downtime after class when you need a break.” While the theater pays $1,000 per regular screening using the student fees, the third-party film companies pay for the pre-screenings. These companies involve many American universities to pre-screen their films, according to Carreño, allowing film companies to get feedback on films before they reach the general public. “It is kind of like a marketing research tool,” Carreño said, “This is more promotion for them. Students can watch the movie before anyone

NEWS TIPS: 621-3193 The Daily Wildcat is always interested in story ideas and tips from readers. If you see something deserving of coverage, contact news editor Stephanie Casanova at news@wildcat.arizona.edu or call 621-3193.

The Daily Wildcat is an independent student newspaper published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters at the University of Arizona. It is distributed on campus and throughout Tucson with a circulation of 10,000. The function of the Daily Wildcat is to disseminate news to the community and to encourage an exchange of ideas. The Daily Wildcat was founded under a different name in 1899. All copy, photographs, and graphics appearing in the Daily Wildcat are the sole property of the Wildcat and may not be reproduced without the specific consent of the editor in chief.

A single copy of the Daily Wildcat is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies will be considered theft and may be prosecuted. Additional copies of the Daily Wildcat are available from the Student Media office. The Daily Wildcat is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.

else and then spread the word. They [film companies] can also see the reactions and see how it is actually going to perform in theaters when it does release.” For a recent premiere, the thirdparty company asked students to create a Vine video to promote the movie, according to Carreño. Social media and word of mouth help promote new releases, Dotterer said. This marketing research also asks students to give feedback following the screening. “I’ve heard of the free movie nights, but I’ve never been able to go,” said Isabella Stepanovic, a veterinary science sophomore. “I would be open to going to one in the future.” Students are starting to catch on to the free opportunities to get involved on campus, Dotterer said. The pre-screenings always sell out and, depending on the movie, for

What do you mean? I’m learning about metabolism in bio-chemistry: We cannot live without oxygen, a waste product of photosynthesis, and plants cannot live without carbon dioxide, a waste product of oxidative phosphorylation, how we convert food to energy. And all of these carbons are from the exploded guts of long-dead stars.

regular screenings 50 to 100 students typically attend, Dotterer added. Trevor Liberty, a philosophy, politics, economics and law freshman, said he saw Don Jon in the Gallagher Theater recently and that he plans to continue attending the screenings if they play movies he is interested in. “It was a good movie,” Liberty said. “I’m glad they do that. I wouldn’t have seen Don Jon otherwise.” Upcoming screenings include Whitehouse Down, Pacific Rim and R.I.P.D. “You don’t have to go too far,” Carreño said. “Our prices will beat any others, there’s no cost for students when they have their CatCard. We want all students to come in and take advantage of this opportunity that they are contributing to.”

So, we’re connected, as in: We all come from the same stuff? We do, but not just that. We can only exist if plants exist. We are interdependent. And even some oxygen we breathe was once from an exhaled breath of someone else. Yet, despite that, people often feel extremely distant from each other. What makes people feel so isolated in a connected world? I think mostly they don’t think about just how connected they are and how their actions effect others. How can people learn to be more connected? Just sit down and take the time to meditate on it or think about it. Maybe take a slow walk or take some science classes.

— Follow Emily Bregger @ebregger_news

THE DAILY WILDCAT

Editor in Chief Brittny Mejia

Online News Editor Alison Dorf

Arts & Life Editor Kyle Mittan

Online Opinions Editor Razanne Chatila

Design Chief Joey Fisher

Assistant Copy Chief Lynley Price

Digital Media Editor Casey Lewandrowski

Sports Editor Megan Coghlan

Online Arts & Life Editor Callie Kitterdge

Visuals Editor Ryan Revock

Assistant Design Chief Charlotte Drenkhahn

Science Editor Dan Desrochers

News Editor Stephanie Casanova

Sports Editor James Kelley

Opinions Editor Nathaniel Drake

Assistant Visuals Editor Cole Malham

Copy Chief Sarah Precup

News Reporters Mark Armao Katie Bickell Emily Bregger Maggie Driver Fernando Galvan Micah Montiel Investigative Reporters Meggie Costello- Kessler Kasey Shores Sports Reporters Luke Della Derek Evans Brittney Klewer Scarlett McCourt Brian Peel Joey Putrelo Evan Rosenfeld Zach Tennen Makenzie Thiel Rose Valenzuela

Arts & Life Writers Erin DeSoto Gabby Ferreira McKinzie Frisbie Greg Gonzales Alex Guyton Amy Johnson Casey Knox Jessica Schrecker Erin Shanahan Columnists Rose Barnett Brianna Bartos Jessica Draper Anastasia Gorshkova Nick Havey Anthony Karli Kayley Koontz Colin Oglesbee Ashley Powell Wade Shields Stephanie Smith Carson Suggs

Kalli Wolf Photographers Cecilia Alvarez Tyler Baker Shane Bekian Kristen Brockel Amy Johnson Michaela Kane Alex Plaumann Rebecca Sasnett Lili Steffen Science Reporters Zane Johnson Mary Rinker Stephanie Zawada Designers Rosie de Queljoe Emily Gauci Laura Jackson Jess Kohley

Nicole Thill Alicia Vega Torsten Ward Jessie Webster Copy Editors Natalia Farr Katie Gamboa Greg Gonzales Tymon Khamsi Jess Kohley Ashwin Mehra Nicole Prieto Lucy Randazzo Galina Swords

Oliver Muñoz Karen Cynthia Poulsen Classified Advertising Leah Corry Katherine Fournier Katelyn Galante Katherine Greer Joel Mintz Anna Yeltchev Accounting Anna Lee Samantha Motowski Isaac Ji Soo Park

Advertising Account Executive Jake Levine Giana Siska Advertising Designers Seandean K. Anderson David Alejandro Gaxiola

for corrections or complaints concerning news and editorial content of the Daily Wildcat should be directed to the editor in chief. For further information on the Daily Wildcat’s CORRECTIONS Requests approved grievance policy, readers may contact Mark Woodhams, director of Arizona Student Media, in the Sherman R. Miller III Newsroom at the Park Student Union.

CONTACT US Editor in Chief editor@wildcat.arizona.edu News Editor news@wildcat.arizona.edu Perspectives Editor letters@wildcat.arizona.edu Photo Editor photo@wildcat.arizona.edu Sports Editor sports@wildcat.arizona.edu Arts & Life Editor arts@wildcat.arizona.edu

Newsroom 615 N. Park Ave. Tucson, Arizona 85721 520-621-3551 Advertising Department 520-621-3425


News • Tuesday, October 1, 2013

THE DAILY WILDCAT • 3

OLD MAIN

MAJOR FAIR

DID YOU KNOW:

FROM PAGE 1

manage the university’s fundraising programs. Moore said he hopes events such as the kickoff will give Old Main more exposure. “As most private support projects go, you work quietly and try to garnish some support and engage people,” Moore said. “Then, you do a more public appeal later on, so that’s where we’re at now.” Rick Myers, chair of the Arizona Board of Regents, said the foundation had a plan and was very confident that they would raise all the money, so the board approved the project before it was fully funded. Seeking donations for these kinds of projects is common especially with an “iconic” building such as Old Main, Myers said, adding that a majority of the funding for Old Main will come from “thousands of alumni” donating hundreds of dollars at a time. “Millions of dollars, there’s not a lot of people that can give that overnight,” Myers said. “They really think most of that funding will come over the next three or four years.” If the foundation doesn’t raise the money in time, it will give the UA a zero interest loan to finish the project while it continues to raise money to pay off the loan, Myers added.

FROM PAGE 1

– The first UA classes, consisting of 32 students and six teachers, convened in Old Main in 1891. – Old Main was sunk six feet below the ground in order to keep the building cooler. – Students rode their horses to school and tied them to hitching posts near Old Main. – Students who ran on the balcony of Old Main would receive 10 demerits. – Classroom heating came from fireplaces in classrooms. Sources: UA Factbook, UA History & Traditions, UA Old Main Preservation Plan ALEX PLAUMANN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

AN EMPLOYEE works on interior renovations in Old Main, on Aug. 27. The UA is working to restore Old Main, which will cost $13.5 million.

“The foundation is taking the risk because if they don’t raise the money in time they’ll … fund it themselves,” Myers said. “We wanted to make sure that there was no risk that it would come back and we’d have to take tuition money or something to do the project.” The loan will cover the difference between what is raised in one year and the $4 million first-year goal, Moore said. Funding efforts will continue until the four-year $13.5 million goal is reached and if it’s not met, the construction of Old Main may be prolonged. The current goal

for completion is the summer of 2014 so the building can open for use in August. Once construction is completed, the building will house the president’s office and her staff. Administration is also planning for a board meeting room, a multi-function room and a regents office, according to Dourlein. Old Main will also feature casework and displays from the Arizona State Museum collection and possibly the UA Museum of Art, Dourlein said in an email. “Its not a matter of if it’s reached, but more a matter of

Community Chatter “I was invited to Ventana Medical Systems and it was for Young Scientists Day and it was just kind of cool seeing the scientists do their job and I got to work in their labs [and] do little experiments.” — Romy Phillips, molecular and cellular biology junior

“The King of the Falafel”

“Last year of high school I became really healthy and decided to become fit and just go to the gym a lot. Then I started learning a lot about food on my own … so it just seemed like it was a good major for me to go into.” — Allegra Barth, nutritional sciences freshman

IF YOU GO: What: Save Old Main Kickoff Event When: Today, the 122 anniversary of the first day of classes at Old Main, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Where: On the Mall on the east side of Old Main

when it’s reached,” Dourlein said. “Old Main will be restored. The university will make sure of that.”

— Follow Micah Montiel @MicahMontiel

are any introductory courses provided from the college to see if they would like to join the major, Marlow said. Cynthia Koiki, a media arts senior, said students who are unsure of their major should try taking different courses before deciding. “Test a couple things out under gen eds,” Koiki said. “You’ll learn to find you like some stuff.” Student ambassadors from various colleges will also be available at the fair to provide a student perspective and personal approach to the major. “Our ambassadors are there the entire time so that students can actually meet real students that are in the major and find out their perspective about what they’ve done and what they want to do,” said Jessica Kiesling, an academic adviser for students in the family studies and human development pre-major. Marlow recommends students ask specific questions about technical aspects of the major, such as requirements and job opportunities, as well as ensure that the major is one they’ll enjoy. “I think the most important question to ask there is ‘What’s fun about this major?’,” Marlow said. — Follow Maggie Driver @Maggie_Driver

What made you choose your major?

“It’s all I know how to do basically. It’s one of the few things I like doing. Never pictured myself sitting behind a desk.” — Hutch Hagendorf, a dance junior

“I always wanted to do some type of engineering and I thought all the other choices were really boring and a random lady at the dentist office in Washington just turned me on to optics and told me all about it.” — Dakota Luepke, optical sciences and engineering junior

STUDENT SPECIALS

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Chicken Shawarma ................$399 Beef Shawarma ......................$399 Gyro.......................................$399 Greek Salad w/Chicken..........$699

Be your own boss. Build your own business. Discover a future in Entrepreneurship. Are you passionate about: • Solving problems through innovation? • Commercializing research? • Founding startups? Spend a year with the McGuire Entrepreneurship Program and build an innovative idea into an investor-ready venture. Open to grad and undergrad students in all fields of study.

Information sessions October 7-11 www.entrepreneurship.arizona.edu

Read the Daily Wildcat It’s so sweet


Tuesday, October 1, 2013 • Page 2

ODDS & ENDS

Compiled by: Greg Gonzales twitter.com/dailywildcat

FAST — Human brains only consist of 2 percent of a person’s body mass, but require 20 percent of caloric and oxygen intake. — The crew of the International Space Station can see a sunset or sunrise every 45 minutes because of how fast the station travels. — The Earth spins at approximately 460 meters per second. — We are orbiting the sun at approximately 30 kilometers per second. — The solar system (and all the Milky Way) is thought to be orbiting Sagittarius A*, the location of a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy, at 220 kilometers per second.

KIMBERLY CAIN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

SHARIF FARUQUE, AN ECONOMICS graduate student, plays chess at Espresso Art Cafe on University Boulevard.

FACTS

HOROSCOPES Today’s birthday (10/01/13): Building a profitable career, thriving partnerships and improvement at home all take priority this year. Satisfy the urge to explore and learn. Get involved with a passionate cause. Weed out time sucks and prioritize projects for balance. Cultivate friendships and magic moments with loved ones. Simple joys delight. To get the advantage, check the day’s rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging. Aries (March 21-April 19) — Today is a 7 — For the next two days, fulfill promises you’ve made. Chores need attention. New information threatens complacency. Communicate with teammates. Caring for others is your motivation. Minimize risks. Catch your dreams in writing. Taurus (April 20-May 20) — Today is a 6 — You’ll soon have time to pause and relax. Invest in success. Take a new angle. Keep a dream alive with simple actions. Avoid a controversy. It’s a good time to ask for money … be creative with your budget. Gemini (May 21-June 20) — Today is a 7 — Allow yourself to dream, but don’t buy treats, yet. Accept the support that’s offered. Stay close to home as much as you can the next few days. Passions get aroused. Make a delicious promise. Cancer (June 21-July 22) — Today is a 9 — It’s easier to find family time. You’re extra brilliant today. A solution to an old problem is becoming obvious. Costs are high. Arguments about money inhibit love. Keep a secret. Recount your blessings. Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) — Today is a 9 — Money’s rolling in over the next few days. Costs are higher than expected, too. Avoid reckless spending. Make sure others know their assignments. Feel the magnetism. Your greatest asset is your own determination. Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Today is a 6 — Give loved

ones more attention. They want your time, not money. An invitation says to dress up. Let another person take over, and defer to authority. Accept encouragement. Share your dreams … the audience is receptive.

Overheard on Campus

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) — Today is a 7 — Get yourself moving! Make sure you have the facts. Get serious about your strategy, but don’t get stuck. You’re very persuasive. You’ll think of something. It’s easier to finish projects.

Man: “That’s why I had to go make myself vomit. I just wanted to feel better so I could have sex already.”

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) — Today is a 7 — Work quickly but carefully. Obligations get in your way. Being polite is a virtue. Talk over plans with family. Try not to provoke jealousy. Don’t waste your money. Friends offer comfort and advice.

— Main Gate Square

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) — Today is an 8 — Begin a new project. Take time out for love. Include a female in your plans. You’ll have to report on your activities. Assume responsibility. Exceptional patience could be required. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Today is a 7 — Let yourself be drawn outside your safety zone. The possibility for hurt feelings is high now. Don’t get stuck. Write down longrange goals today. Goodness comes your way. Act quickly to gain your objective. Balance is essential.

ON THE SPOT

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) — Today is an 8 — It’s time to get started. There’s a temporary clash between love and money. Review your current budget. Note all the considerations. Passion grows now that the stress is reduced. Travel boosts your self-esteem. Follow your fascination.

Tiffany Lee, creative writing senior

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) — Today is a 7 — Have faith. Negotiate your way through minor adjustments. Temporary confusion could befuddle. Get family to help. Let another take the lead. Invest in your future without gambling. Respect your partner.

What’s the most beautiful thing in the world? Gosh, that’s a hard question. I think our interconnectedness, which is scientifically proven.

NEWS MOVIES

FROM PAGE 1

and a marketing senior. “Students’ money is going toward this program,” Carreño said. “It gets them to come in, be engaged and more involved in school. It is something to enjoy on your downtime after class when you need a break.” While the theater pays $1,000 per regular screening using the student fees, the third-party film companies pay for the pre-screenings. These companies involve many American universities to pre-screen their films, according to Carreño, allowing film companies to get feedback on films before they reach the general public. “It is kind of like a marketing research tool,” Carreño said, “This is more promotion for them. Students can watch the movie before anyone

NEWS TIPS: 621-3193 The Daily Wildcat is always interested in story ideas and tips from readers. If you see something deserving of coverage, contact news editor Stephanie Casanova at news@wildcat.arizona.edu or call 621-3193.

The Daily Wildcat is an independent student newspaper published Monday through Friday during the fall and spring semesters at the University of Arizona. It is distributed on campus and throughout Tucson with a circulation of 10,000. The function of the Daily Wildcat is to disseminate news to the community and to encourage an exchange of ideas. The Daily Wildcat was founded under a different name in 1899. All copy, photographs, and graphics appearing in the Daily Wildcat are the sole property of the Wildcat and may not be reproduced without the specific consent of the editor in chief.

A single copy of the Daily Wildcat is free from newsstands. Unauthorized removal of multiple copies will be considered theft and may be prosecuted. Additional copies of the Daily Wildcat are available from the Student Media office. The Daily Wildcat is a member of The Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.

else and then spread the word. They [film companies] can also see the reactions and see how it is actually going to perform in theaters when it does release.” For a recent premiere, the thirdparty company asked students to create a Vine video to promote the movie, according to Carreño. Social media and word of mouth help promote new releases, Dotterer said. This marketing research also asks students to give feedback following the screening. “I’ve heard of the free movie nights, but I’ve never been able to go,” said Isabella Stepanovic, a veterinary science sophomore. “I would be open to going to one in the future.” Students are starting to catch on to the free opportunities to get involved on campus, Dotterer said. The pre-screenings always sell out and, depending on the movie, for

What do you mean? I’m learning about metabolism in bio-chemistry: We cannot live without oxygen, a waste product of photosynthesis, and plants cannot live without carbon dioxide, a waste product of oxidative phosphorylation, how we convert food to energy. And all of these carbons are from the exploded guts of long-dead stars.

regular screenings 50 to 100 students typically attend, Dotterer added. Trevor Liberty, a philosophy, politics, economics and law freshman, said he saw Don Jon in the Gallagher Theater recently and that he plans to continue attending the screenings if they play movies he is interested in. “It was a good movie,” Liberty said. “I’m glad they do that. I wouldn’t have seen Don Jon otherwise.” Upcoming screenings include Whitehouse Down, Pacific Rim and R.I.P.D. “You don’t have to go too far,” Carreño said. “Our prices will beat any others, there’s no cost for students when they have their CatCard. We want all students to come in and take advantage of this opportunity that they are contributing to.”

So, we’re connected, as in: We all come from the same stuff? We do, but not just that. We can only exist if plants exist. We are interdependent. And even some oxygen we breathe was once from an exhaled breath of someone else. Yet, despite that, people often feel extremely distant from each other. What makes people feel so isolated in a connected world? I think mostly they don’t think about just how connected they are and how their actions effect others. How can people learn to be more connected? Just sit down and take the time to meditate on it or think about it. Maybe take a slow walk or take some science classes.

— Follow Emily Bregger @ebregger_news

THE DAILY WILDCAT

Editor in Chief Brittny Mejia

Online News Editor Alison Dorf

Arts & Life Editor Kyle Mittan

Online Opinions Editor Razanne Chatila

Design Chief Joey Fisher

Assistant Copy Chief Lynley Price

Digital Media Editor Casey Lewandrowski

Sports Editor Megan Coghlan

Online Arts & Life Editor Callie Kitterdge

Visuals Editor Ryan Revock

Assistant Design Chief Charlotte Drenkhahn

Science Editor Dan Desrochers

News Editor Stephanie Casanova

Sports Editor James Kelley

Opinions Editor Nathaniel Drake

Assistant Visuals Editor Cole Malham

Copy Chief Sarah Precup

News Reporters Mark Armao Katie Bickell Emily Bregger Maggie Driver Fernando Galvan Micah Montiel Investigative Reporters Meggie Costello- Kessler Kasey Shores Sports Reporters Luke Della Derek Evans Brittney Klewer Scarlett McCourt Brian Peel Joey Putrelo Evan Rosenfeld Zach Tennen Makenzie Thiel Rose Valenzuela

Arts & Life Writers Erin DeSoto Gabby Ferreira McKinzie Frisbie Greg Gonzales Alex Guyton Amy Johnson Casey Knox Jessica Schrecker Erin Shanahan Columnists Rose Barnett Brianna Bartos Jessica Draper Anastasia Gorshkova Nick Havey Anthony Karli Kayley Koontz Colin Oglesbee Ashley Powell Wade Shields Stephanie Smith Carson Suggs

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News • Tuesday, October 1, 2013

THE DAILY WILDCAT • 3

OLD MAIN

MAJOR FAIR

DID YOU KNOW:

FROM PAGE 1

manage the university’s fundraising programs. Moore said he hopes events such as the kickoff will give Old Main more exposure. “As most private support projects go, you work quietly and try to garnish some support and engage people,” Moore said. “Then, you do a more public appeal later on, so that’s where we’re at now.” Rick Myers, chair of the Arizona Board of Regents, said the foundation had a plan and was very confident that they would raise all the money, so the board approved the project before it was fully funded. Seeking donations for these kinds of projects is common especially with an “iconic” building such as Old Main, Myers said, adding that a majority of the funding for Old Main will come from “thousands of alumni” donating hundreds of dollars at a time. “Millions of dollars, there’s not a lot of people that can give that overnight,” Myers said. “They really think most of that funding will come over the next three or four years.” If the foundation doesn’t raise the money in time, it will give the UA a zero interest loan to finish the project while it continues to raise money to pay off the loan, Myers added.

FROM PAGE 1

– The first UA classes, consisting of 32 students and six teachers, convened in Old Main in 1891. – Old Main was sunk six feet below the ground in order to keep the building cooler. – Students rode their horses to school and tied them to hitching posts near Old Main. – Students who ran on the balcony of Old Main would receive 10 demerits. – Classroom heating came from fireplaces in classrooms. Sources: UA Factbook, UA History & Traditions, UA Old Main Preservation Plan ALEX PLAUMANN/THE DAILY WILDCAT

AN EMPLOYEE works on interior renovations in Old Main, on Aug. 27. The UA is working to restore Old Main, which will cost $13.5 million.

“The foundation is taking the risk because if they don’t raise the money in time they’ll … fund it themselves,” Myers said. “We wanted to make sure that there was no risk that it would come back and we’d have to take tuition money or something to do the project.” The loan will cover the difference between what is raised in one year and the $4 million first-year goal, Moore said. Funding efforts will continue until the four-year $13.5 million goal is reached and if it’s not met, the construction of Old Main may be prolonged. The current goal

for completion is the summer of 2014 so the building can open for use in August. Once construction is completed, the building will house the president’s office and her staff. Administration is also planning for a board meeting room, a multi-function room and a regents office, according to Dourlein. Old Main will also feature casework and displays from the Arizona State Museum collection and possibly the UA Museum of Art, Dourlein said in an email. “Its not a matter of if it’s reached, but more a matter of

Community Chatter “I was invited to Ventana Medical Systems and it was for Young Scientists Day and it was just kind of cool seeing the scientists do their job and I got to work in their labs [and] do little experiments.” — Romy Phillips, molecular and cellular biology junior

“The King of the Falafel”

“Last year of high school I became really healthy and decided to become fit and just go to the gym a lot. Then I started learning a lot about food on my own … so it just seemed like it was a good major for me to go into.” — Allegra Barth, nutritional sciences freshman

IF YOU GO: What: Save Old Main Kickoff Event When: Today, the 122 anniversary of the first day of classes at Old Main, from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Where: On the Mall on the east side of Old Main

when it’s reached,” Dourlein said. “Old Main will be restored. The university will make sure of that.”

— Follow Micah Montiel @MicahMontiel

are any introductory courses provided from the college to see if they would like to join the major, Marlow said. Cynthia Koiki, a media arts senior, said students who are unsure of their major should try taking different courses before deciding. “Test a couple things out under gen eds,” Koiki said. “You’ll learn to find you like some stuff.” Student ambassadors from various colleges will also be available at the fair to provide a student perspective and personal approach to the major. “Our ambassadors are there the entire time so that students can actually meet real students that are in the major and find out their perspective about what they’ve done and what they want to do,” said Jessica Kiesling, an academic adviser for students in the family studies and human development pre-major. Marlow recommends students ask specific questions about technical aspects of the major, such as requirements and job opportunities, as well as ensure that the major is one they’ll enjoy. “I think the most important question to ask there is ‘What’s fun about this major?’,” Marlow said. — Follow Maggie Driver @Maggie_Driver

What made you choose your major?

“It’s all I know how to do basically. It’s one of the few things I like doing. Never pictured myself sitting behind a desk.” — Hutch Hagendorf, a dance junior

“I always wanted to do some type of engineering and I thought all the other choices were really boring and a random lady at the dentist office in Washington just turned me on to optics and told me all about it.” — Dakota Luepke, optical sciences and engineering junior

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Information sessions October 7-11 www.entrepreneurship.arizona.edu

Read the Daily Wildcat It’s so sweet


Tuesday, October 1, 2013 • Page 4

Opinions

Editor: Nathaniel Drake letters@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-3192 twitter.com/dailywildcat

SNAP vital to aid low income citizens BY Anthony Carli The Daily Wildcat

T

wo weeks ago, the House of Representatives passed a $40 billion cut to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as food stamps. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimates that, beginning next year, this would remove 3.8 million lowincome Americans from the lifesustaining program. This bill is bad policy. The idea that those utilizing SNAP benefits are disincentivized to find work because the government is providing them with food is a fallacy. This bill, if signed into law, will negatively affect our nation’s most vulnerable population. “In the real world, we measure success by results,” Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-Ind., said on the House floor. “It’s time for Washington to measure success by how many families are lifted out of poverty and helped back on their feet, not by how much Washington bureaucrats spend year after year.” But cuts to SNAP do nothing to aid Stutzman’s mission of lifting low-income families out of poverty. According to Feeding America, a nonprofit organization that seeks to end hunger, the average net monthly income for a household receiving SNAP benefits is $338. The recent cuts target able-bodied adults without any dependents. Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., told constituents that the cuts should target any “adults who refuse to work.” Cutting a population out of a vital program in order to address the abuse of a small minority is not prudent or reasonable. The vast majority of able-bodied adults on SNAP use the program for its intended purpose — to secure food. According to Feeding America, “The perception that a sizeable portion of SNAP participants do not really need benefits is flatly wrong.” SNAP provides a necessary service to the lowest-income individuals in America. To qualify, one’s gross income can be up to 130 percent of the poverty line. The flawed logic presented by McHenry and House Republicans fails to recognize the multitude of reasons that adults cannot find work. Adults can struggle due to undiagnosed mental illnesses, an inability to qualify for disability benefits, or because they live in an economically depressed region. Nevermind the fact that we are still reeling from the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression. “Arizona is the nation’s thirdhighest state for food insecurity,” said Rep. Ron Barber, D-Ariz., whose district includes much of Tucson. “As families struggle to recover from the economic downturn, it is unconscionable for us to be making it more difficult for millions of Americans to eat.” Arizona’s unemployment rate is 8.3 percent, which is a full percentage point above the national average. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, SNAP kept nearly four million people above the poverty line in 2012 and has prevented millions more from sinking further into poverty. “I think the cuts are too drastic and too draconian,” Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., told Fox News. “Those that really need the program will suffer.” Stutzman said he disagrees and claims that in order to be fiscally responsible, the cuts are needed. However, the cuts are unnecessary, as the program is expected to reduce on its own as the economic recovery continues. As the number of available jobs increases and unemployment decreases, enrollment in SNAP will also decrease. If House Republicans want to help low-income individuals get back on their feet again, taking away a program that provides these individuals with food is surely not the answer. Congress should be focusing on how we can aid our economic recovery and provide more jobs to those SNAP participants who are actively searching instead of stripping them of a necessary program. — Anthony Carli is a political science senior. Follow him @acarli10

More support required for mental health BY Max Weintraub The Daily Wildcat

W

hen I saw the reports of a mass shooting in our nation’s capital two weeks ago, I knew that we would have the same arguments about guns that we had after Newtown, Conn., Aurora, Colo., and our city’s own mass shooting. I was much more concerned about the other topic, however, that has become associated with gun violence: mental illness. We need to eliminate the stigma and misconceptions surrounding mental illness. Whenever one of these shootings occurs, it is a doubleedged sword for advocates of mental health treatment. While it brings awareness to our society’s deficiency in acknowledging and treating mental illness, it also increases the stigma associated with those health problems. The benefits of disclosing that one suffers from a mental illness, or even taking exploratory steps to discover if one does, do not greatly outweigh the stigma of being lumped into a similar category as a Jared Loughner or an Adam Lanza. This problem is

magnified at the university level. According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, one in four people aged 18-24 have a diagnosable mental illness, and college students are some of the most at-risk individuals. College students routinely experience heightened levels of stress, feelings of being overwhelmed and a sense of hopelessness. In a study by the University of Maryland, 93.4 percent of counseling center directors reported that they are seeing more students with severe psychological problems on their campuses. Based on these trends, the researchers expect the demand for mental health services will increase nationwide. The UA’s Counseling and Psych Services is one of the institutions that has noticed an increase in the volume of students with mental health issues. Marian Binder, director of CAPS, said she has seen the number of visits increase almost 25 percent in the past two years. Even with the increase in visits, Binder estimates that it only represents 7.5 percent of the student body. Even if you were to account for students who receive treatment off-campus, those numbers don’t account for the full range of individuals who could benefit

from mental health services. According to a survey on mental health from NAMI, “Forty percent of students with diagnosable mental health conditions did not seek help,” with concern over the stigma from faculty and classmates listed as the number one reason for not seeking help. Another major impediment is that students don’t know the resources exist, Binder said. “People believe that if they are depressed or anxious, they should be able to fix it on their own,” making them resistant to seeking help. She said she believes that students would be surprised by the effectiveness of one-onone counseling. According to a 2012 CAPS survey, 85 percent of students found it helpful to talk to a trained professional. “Mental health issues, if recognized and treated, shouldn’t prevent [students] from succeeding in college,” Binder said. But, unfortunately, they frequently do. According to the NAMI survey, “Sixty-four percent of young adults who are no longer in college are not attending college because of a mental health-related reason,” and of those students, 45 percent did not seek any mental health accommodations. Extrapolating those statistics

to the UA’s 2012 freshman class (7,401 students) and average retention rate of 78 percent according to US News, it can be estimated that roughly 1,000 students dropped out because of mental health issues, almost half of whom did not seek treatment of any kind. Battling the stigma and misconceptions surrounding mental health is best accomplished through outreach and education. CAPS provides mental health training to all graduate teaching assistants and resident assistants, and works to accommodate all requests for training. Currently, there is no mandatory training for faculty members. Eliminating the misconceptions surrounding mental illness doesn’t just foster a more inclusive campus environment, it can also save academic careers. Considering that retention rates are considerations for national college rankings, which can affect federal funding, investing more resources in mental health education and training for faculty and students would benefit everyone. — Max Weintraub is a senior studying creative writing and Italian studies. Follow him @meintra10

Your Views: Online comments In reponse to “Letter to the editor” (by Eric Tompkins, Sept. 30) There is actually a comma between “arms” and “shall” so it isn’t a stand alone clause. Good try though. — Jake Well said! I am tired of people alienating lawabiding gun owners with fear, lies, and ignorance. I do not own a firearm, but I wouldn’t want to lose my right to one because of ridiculous feel-goodism. We seem to be so eager to legalize pot, but also so eager to ban alcohol, guns, and other “bad” things because of their supposedly “negative effects”. Guns do not kill people. People kill people. — GoodGuyGreg In response to “Societal morals need reconsideration before we judge” (by Shelby Thomas, Sept. 30) It’s mainly the culture that woman like to be seen as attractive and appealing to men and other women that is the problem. Women judge other women on

The Daily Wildcat Editorial Policy Daily Wildcat staff editorials represent the official opinion of the Daily Wildcat staff, which is determined at staff editorial meetings. Columns, cartoons, online comments and letters to the editors represent the opinion of their author and do not represent the opinion of the Daily Wildcat.

the skin tight yoga pants and spaghetti strap tops women normally wear out even though they are not going out to exercise. How many men do you see with any sort of pants shorter than knee length or that are skin tight? Maybe Speedos at the beach, but the beach is a whole different area. Men cannot stop being visually their appeal and gossip about them behind their “intrigued”, its imprinted on our DNA, so if you want backs, otherwise I don’t see why other women us to stop staring at women and objectifying them as would watch Miley doing her naked wrecking ball slutty then change the fashion culture first. dance and VMA performance if it wasn’t to chat However, let’s face it, that is not going to happen. with other women about it or they were really into Women keep buying the trashy, slutty clothes and the music. the other non-slutty clothes go to In contrast, you don’t the bargain bin so there is no profit see men flocking to go for corporations to change. Men like to look to see “Magic Mike” or Women also need to change at pretty things, “Brokeback Mountain” so the way they gossip about other women like to be that we can gossip with our women behind their back. If looked at in an male friends about it later. women buy the non-slutty clothes, Men watch mainly because attractive manner they are told they are wearing ugly we are visual creatures, and women like clothes that look like they were women not so much (that handed down from their grandma. to gossip about is why there is “50 Shades You don’t see men dissing other women behind of Grey”). men’s clothes (except maybe their back. So if women don’t want at Walmart, that place is fun to to be objectified, then they “people watch” at). should not dress half naked So for a short summary of and slutty. Sometimes I feel objectification: men like to look at pretty things like women even enjoy the attention they get from (not gonna change), women like to be looked at in men that objectify them. an attractive manner (not gonna change), women For example, this coming Halloween, how many like to gossip about women behind their back (not women are going to be dressing up in sexy nurse/ gonna change). Hey, look at that — the problem is policewoman/witch/Disney princess with skirts not gonna change, so I’ll see you ladies at Halloween. and other attire that would normally only be found — Tim at strip clubs and bachelor parties. Not to mention

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Letters should be no longer than 350 words and should refrain from personal attacks


Tuesday, October 1, 2013

•5

POLICE BEAT BY EMILY BREGGER The Daily Wildcat

my!place

Can’t touch this

New con onc cerrtt series! First Fri rid day of the Month

A non-UA affiliated juvenile was arrested for shoplifting more than $150 worth of merchandise from the UofA Bookstore on Wednesday. At 11:30 a.m., a University of Arizona Police Department officer responded to the bookstore and was shown the direction of where the boy headed. While the officer was on patrol he approached the boy. When the boy saw the police officer, he started to run toward South Campus Drive. He removed the green backpack he was wearing and continued running. The officer told the boy to stop and get on the ground. The boy refused and began running toward the ROTC basketball court screaming, “You can’t touch me.” The officer got out of the vehicle and began chasing the boy. The officer asked three more times for the boy to get on the ground and he continued to refuse. The officer then tackled the boy to the ground and turned him on his stomach. The boy refused to answer any of the officer’s questions and said, “I just wanted to draw on some coloring books.” The officer told him he was under arrest for shoplifting and the stolen items were returned to the bookstore The boy refused to give the officers his parents’ contact information. Another officer arrived at the scene and transported the boy to the Pima County Juvenile Court Center.

Hide and seek

A non-UA affiliated man was spotted on Wednesday, hiding something in the bushes near Campbell Avenue and Lester Street. A UAPD officer was patrolling around University of Arizona Medical Center when he noticed the man standing in the bushes. The officer tried to talk to the man, but the man grabbed a bicycle and fled the scene. The man crossed four lanes of oncoming traffic and the officer attempted to stop cars in order to cite the bicyclist for multiple traffic violations. The officer turned on his emergency lights but the man didn’t stop. The officer returned to the bushes and discovered a black bag. Inside was a glass pipe with burnt white residue on the inside, as well as tools and knives. The bag was placed into custody.

presents

Frida riday y,, October 4th y 5pm on the Nor North Plaza

Don’t be afraid

Two UA students were charged for trespassing on Wednesday after they were found in the Hillenbrand Aquatic Center. At 1:07 a.m., two UAPD officers responded to the alarm in Hillenbrand. The main entrances were locked and there were no lights on inside the aquatic center. One officer was placed at the south entrance and the other at the west entrance. The officer at the south entrance said he saw two people inside of the building, under the high dive. One officer tried to engage with the students but they both began running toward the west gate. The officer at the west entrance quickly stopped them. The students said they ran because they were afraid of the officers. After a careful inspection the officers concluded that there was no one else inside the building and there was no damage to the property. They were both cited a misdemeanor for second degree trespassing and released at the scene.

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CAMPUS EVENTS

CAMPUS EVENTS

TUCSON EVENTS

Cooking on Campus: Protein for Every Body at the Student Recreation Center, Outdoor Adventures from 5:15 PM – 6:30 PM. $5 a class or $30 for all seven classes. For students, students and celebrity chefs will teach you how easy it is to make quick and simple yet tasty meals and snacks.

language about social identity and collective consciousness.

required, contact 877-6004 for Sallie Muse. Free of cost, ages 12 and up.

Exhibit – ‘Cultures Intertwined’ 8 AM – 5 PM at the School of Art, Lionel Rombach Gallery. All audiences are welcome.The exhibition will showcase bonnie HalseyDutton’s paintings that focus on past and present globalization of world cultures. Parking is available on Second Street, east of Park Avenue or in the parking garage north of Speedway Boulevard on Park Avenue.

Archaeology Cafe: Archaeology in the Great Bend of the Gila at 5:15 PM – 7:30 PM at Casa Vicente, 375 S. Stone Ave. Dr. David Doyel will share his expert perspective on archaeology in the Gila Bend area. Seating is open and unreserved, but limited. Adult age restriction. Free of cost but guests are encouraged to purchase their own refreshments from the menu.

TUCSON EVENTS

Tucson Tuesday Laughter Yoga 6 PM – 7 PM every Tuesday. At St. Francis in the Foothills Church, Room 30-31. Breathing and yoga exercises and laughter designed to promote peace and healing. All ages are welcome and free of cost, donations are appreciated.

‘Exploring Sky Islands’ Exhibit at Flandrau Center at 1601 E. University Boulevard. Last day to experience the hands-on activities and fun that will show how the Sky Islands Mountains of Southern Arizona are the most bio-diverse region in the world. $7.50 for adults, $5 for children 4-15, free for children under 4, $2 for Arizona college students with ID. Catcard holders get $2.50 discount. ‘A World Separated by Borders’ Exhibit 10 AM – 5 PM at the Arizona State Museum. Continued through Oct. 19. Photographer Alejandra Platt-Torres shares her powerful images of people, the border, and the landscape between Sonora and Arizona to illustrate two states and countries. Price is $5, all are welcome. Exhibit- ‘Culture Cache’ 9 AM – 5 PM at the Joseph Gross Gallery at the UA College of Fine Arts, 1031 N. Olive Road. All are welcome. A group exhibition exploring the reappropriation of consumer culture as a

“The Importance Of Being Earnest”at 8 PM at the Temple of Music and Art, 330 S. Scott Ave. For the Box Office, call 6222823. Cost ranges from $36-$77. Oscar Wilde’s beloved classic takes the stage for this popular play. Tour of Hacienda de la Canoa at the historic Hacienda de la Canoa at 5375 S. Interstate 19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. From 9 AM to 10:30 AM take a walking tour of the historic ranch headquarters and gain insights into the stories of the people that lived and worked there. Reservations are

Beat Cancer Boot Camp Exercise Classes Tuesdays at 5:30 PM and Saturdays at 7 AM. All ages and all fitness levels are welcome, $35 for 8 weeks. Exercise and support classes for cancer survivors and anyone touched by cancer in their lives. At the Brandi Fenton Memorial Park, 3482 E. River Road. Information compiled by Katelyn Galante

10, 2014. The otes, etc. To sponsor this calendar, or list an event, email calendar@dailywildcat.com or call 621.3425 Deadline 3pm 2 business days prior to publication.


SPORTS

Tuesday, October 1, 2013 • Page 6 Editors: Megan Coghlan & James Kelley

sports@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-2956 twitter.com/wildcatsports

BASKETBALL

Pitts playing in the shadows

LUKE DELLA

The Daily Wildcat Before there was Aaron Gordon and even before there was Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, Arizona’s 2013 recruiting class began with the 6-foot-5, 180 pound Elliott Pitts. While reporters rushed to meet with Gordon and Hollis-Jefferson during media basketball day last week, freshman shooting guard Pitts sat in his foldout chair, legs crossed, on the far side of the gym waiting for someone, anyone, to approach him. “Today has been interesting,” Pitts said with a chuckle an hour into media day. “College has so far been mostly everything I expected and some.” On August 12, 2012 Pitts committed to Arizona, choosing the UA over conference rival Washington, historic Georgetown and his local school, Cal. The consensus four-star recruit’s decision was followed by Hollis-Jefferson’s and a few months down the road, Gordon joined to form what many have called head coach Sean Miller’s most talented recruiting class ever. “Elliot has shown a great attitude,” Miller said. “And his best days are ahead of him. That doesn’t mean he’s not a good player now. But when you’re going to see the best of Elliott Pitts, it’s not going to be this season.” Pitts comes to Tucson from prestigious De La Salle High School in Concord, Calif. While in high school, Pitts, who was ranked as the No. 18 shooting guard by ESPN, was scouted as an above average shooter who rarely forced the issue. Though he was highly touted, Pitts’ gravity paled in comparison to that of Hollis-Jefferson and Gordon, who were YouTube sensations by the time they were 16. Pitts’ videos of his step-back jumpers, flashy passes, and athletic drives to a layup were wellliked, but Gordon’s half-court 180-degree alleyoop dunk over a defender was all the rage. “I played with Aaron [Gordon] eighth and ninth grade year so we know each other pretty well,” Pitts said. “He’s a one-of-a-kind. Impressive – happy we’re teammates again and not opponents.” Pitts said that when he chose Arizona he had no insight to Gordon or Hollis-Jefferson’s decisions to come as well. Pitts made the choice not knowing whether he was going to be the

PITTS, 7

RYAN REVOCK/THE DAILY WILDCAT

WILDCAT GUARD Elliott Pitts speaks with reporters at Arizona basketball media day on Wednesday.

BASKETBALL

BASKETBALL

Miller: newcomers bring depth, versatility to Arizona’s defense

No need to doubt Wildcats’ leadership

EVAN ROSENFELD

The Daily Wildcat Arizona men’s basketball continues to add depth and versatility to its rotation with the additions of Duquesne University transfer, junior T.J. McConnell and highly touted freshmen Aaron Gordon and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson . The Wildcats are beginning their annual quest for a national championship. In head coach Sean Miller’s first press conference of the year last week, he discussed the addition of the team’s newest talent and stated his expectations for the upcoming season. “We have a team that really has a great chemistry and togetherness and as much as that’s about the returning players, it’s about the willingness of these freshmen to be great teammates [while] listening and FILE PHOTO/THE DAILY WILDCAT learning,” Miller said. “They UA HEAD COACH Sean Miller said he is happy with the team’s chemistry and that one of its strengths is the attitude of its freshmen. kind of come to Arizona with their ego checked at the door, and while we haven’t played due to NCAA transfer rules, but “We have a lot of [new] Game where he went on to games yet, we’ve been around was still part of the team. talent on defense,” Miller said. score 24 points and collect eight each other long enough to know “He practiced with us every “Looking at Rondae and Aaron rebounds, leading his team that one of our strengths this day last year, so he has great here early on … as exciting as to victory and subsequently year is our freshmen attitude. familiarity with not only it is to add them as basketball being named the game’s Most It’s really refreshing, g reat to his teammates, but also our players, they are not like your Valuable Player. see, and fun to be around.” The San Jose, Calif., native system,” Miller said. “He’s not normal freshmen where they McConnell represents the a new player. He brings the have a lot to learn defensively. won two state championships Wildcats’ first his high school element of And although they are learning during true, pass-first e x p e r i e n c e . our system, they are both well- basketball career and was the point guard since His style versed, competitive and have leading scorer and rebounder We have a Josiah Turner for the USA squad that won the of play is talent on that side of the ball.” team that and will focus on FIBA U19 world championship Hollis-Jefferson signed with one where really has collecting assists I believe he the Wildcats last September this past summer. He was a great and leading the impacts the and came out of Chester High also MVP of the world chemistry and court instead game on School as the No. 21 overall championships. togetherness... of shooting for “He’s earned the right for defense and prospect in his class as ranked points. by ESPN. The 6-foot-7 , 205 people to talk about him,” Miller offense.” — Sean Miller, The Pittsburgh Miller said pound small forward played said. “ His approach has been head coach native averaged while people in both the McDonald’s All- drop-dead professional. You 10.8 points, 3.8 tend to focus American Game and the Jordan have a sense that he is here to rebounds, 4.4 on offense, Brand Classic this year and accomplish things, and part of assists and 2.8 steals per game to him, defense is one thing is expected to function as the what he’s here to accomplish is as a freshman. He was ranked that has been a problem in Wildcats’ sixth man this season. to win. His attitude is refreshing fourth nationally in steals recent years and said he thinks Gordon was ranked as the and can become contagious. It’s and boasted a 2.50 assists to McConnell can help solve that. fourth best recruit in the country easy to be his teammate because turnovers ratio, the sixth highest In addition to McConnell, by ESPN and 247Sports.com I think his gift as a player is he for a freshman in NCAA history. highly regarded freshmen and committed to Arizona in does so many things well.” After transferring to Arizona Hollis-Jefferson and Gordon are April, announcing his decision — Follow Evan Rosenfeld last year, McConnell couldn’t expected to play instrumental in a press conference before @EvanRosenfeld play during the 2012-13 season defensive roles. the McDonald’s All-American

MEGAN COGHLAN The Daily Wildcat

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ormer UCLA basketball coaching legend John Wooden once preached to his team, “Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.” Out of all the overused Wooden quotes tossed around college basketball, this particular cliché is most valuable to Arizona basketball. Good old Wooden always knew character and leadership were connected. The Wildcats are at a standstill as to who is going to step up as the leader of the pack this season. Just look at the roster and you’ll see there is one lone senior in back-up guard Jordin Mayes. So the big question is, who is the chief this year? Last season’s roster was gifted with five seniors, Solomon Hill and Kevin Parrom led the team as seasoned veterans. They were sort of the Superman and Batman of the Justice League, minus the capes. However, the loss of these leaders and the fact that there is only one senior this season are not necessarily bad news for Arizona. It just means that each team member has to step up, even the freshmen. Junior Nick Johnson has been noted by the rest of the team and coaches as being the loudest player, shouting words of encouragement and motivation to his team during

BASKETBALL, 7

...everybody can be a leader. It’s about being vocal on the floor and off the court.

— Jordin Mayes, senior guard


Sports • Tuesday, October 1, 2013

THE DAILY WILDCAT • 7

BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 6

FILE PHOTO/THE DAILY WILDCAT

NICK JOHNSON plays in the NCAA tournament against Harvard on March 23.

practices and games. Johnson named his older brother junior Chris Johnson, Mayes, junior T.J. McConnell, and sophomores Kaleb Tarczewski and Brandon Ashley as other leaders on the team. His own leadership strategy comes from learning from others. “My freshman year I had Kyle Fogg. He’s like a big brother to me,” Nick Johnson said. “He really taught me how to work hard in offseason and really fight for what you want.” Mayes is more of a quiet leader. He has been on the team the longest and has worked with head coach Sean Miller the longest. Mayes said he knows his role as the only senior means he will have to work harder, but that the weight of the team is not all on his shoulders.

“Actually it feels kind of good being the older guy, being a leader for my team,” Mayes said. “I think I’ll have to step it up from the years that I have been here, but also we have other leaders on the team too and everybody can be a leader. It’s about being vocal on the floor and off the court.” The reality for this Arizona team is that there is not one individual leader to look up to. Everyone will be expected to take the reigns and gain the trust of the pack, and with the regular season not starting until November, there is time to do that. The six freshmen have a variety of leaders to learn from and a wide selection of “big brothers.” After all, when you’re 7 feet tall like Tarczewski, your team literally has to look up to you anyways.

half. But the point is, we’re five weeks along and Arizona has yet to really find their identity. Maybe the bye week will help, and maybe USC will be the defining moment. Regardless, it needs to come sooner rather than later.

— Follow Scarlett McCourt @scarlettnoelani

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— Follow Megan Coghlan @MeganCoghlan

Wildcats yet to form identity SCARLETT MCCOURT The Daily Wildcat

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e’re heading into week six of the season and it’s hard to judge the Wildcats’ true potential. The first three games of the season were obviously lopsided. The first Pac-12 game of the season was under unusual weather conditions, which played a role in Arizona’s less-than-satisfactory performance. The rain doesn’t excuse the Wildcats’ performance, but it certainly was a factor. So when will we see Arizona’s true caliber? When will the Wildcats finally perform on a stage that accentuates their true talent? Heading into the season, there was so much discussion about who would win the starting position as quarterback. Head coach Rich Rodriguez told the media after the fact that senior B.J. Denker was always the front runner, but that redshirt freshman, Javelle Allen really stepped up. We’ve gotten a taste of Allen —

TYLER BAKER/THE DAILY WILDCAT

HEAD COACH Rich Rodriguez watches his team warm-up before the NAU game on Aug. 30.

It’s evident that the defense is a completely different squad from last year. Depth was the key last year, and depth is what they have. Freshmen like linebacker Scooby Wright have stepped up since the home opener against NAU, suggesting that this season will not be a repeat of the last. But even during the Washington game, the defense seemed deflated during the second

FROM PAGE 6

golden star or the “other guy”, but he said he believed in Miller. “I knew I wasn’t going to be the only recruit but I obviously wanted to go to a winning program and one where I thought I could make an impact but also improve as a basketball player,” Pitts said. It’s early, but also safe to assume Gordon and Hollis-Jefferson will find a way into multiple Wildcat rotations early in the season. Where Miller sees Pitts fitting in might take some time. Miller admitted at the press conference that this year’s team lacks depth. Instead of averaging around 10 players a game as they did last season, this year’s Arizona team will run only eight deep. With Gordon and Hollis-Jefferson being cornerstone, Pitts is not factored into that group of eight. “Whatever coach wants from me, I’m going to give him and my team that and some more,” Pitts said. Pitts’ freshman season could be compared to that of fellow guard Gabe York. The current sophomore was a highly recruited prospect coming out of high school but was a low point of the 2012 recruiting class that featured Brandon Ashley, Kaleb Tarczewski and current Oklahoma City Thunder player Grant Jerrett. “Elliott will find his place as the season goes on,” York said. “He wouldn’t be here if coach didn’t think he could play a role.” As a freshman, York spent more time sitting on the bench than the rest of the recruits, only playing in 15 of the Wildcats’ 35 games. It wasn’t until the end of the season that York established a spot on the roster. But now the guard is expected to play a pivotal role for Arizona. For now, Pitts appears comfortable in the shadows of Gordon and Hollis-Jefferson. He might have committed to Arizona first, but he likely won’t be the first to leave. Pitts is in Tucson for the long haul and said he knows his time will come. “I don’t know where my spot will be on this team in March,” Pitts said. “All I can control is today. And I’m pretty happy with where I’m at but I of course want to get better and help the team as much as coaches need me to.”

FOOTBALL

he’s made brief appearances in three out of four games. Against NAU, he scored a 61-yard rushing touchdown. But Rodriguez hasn’t said anything to suggest that he’s looking to give Allen any more playing time. He hasn’t suggested a possible two-quarterback scheme. After Denker’s performance against Washington, it might not be a bad idea to throw Allen into the mix. Yes, rain was a factor, but Denker was still throwing passes into no-man’s land. Denker admitted after the game that he didn’t execute like he should have. So why not, going forward into Pac-12 play, let Allen have a shot? Obviously junior running back Ka’Deem Carey is performing like an All-American. But the entire success of the team can’t be on him and we have yet to see any receivers really show up. Every team will load the box and try to force Arizona to beat them by the pass. The offensive line has yet to impress this season either. After the game on Saturday, Rodriguez said if the O-line had executed better, Carey would have had more opportunities for longer rushes.

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BEAR DOWN TIMES

Q

I don’t drink every day and I don’t need it to start the day, but when I party I like to party hard and I don’t turn down an opportunity to drink. A friend told me I might be an alcoholic... am I?

A. that determination. Fortunately you don’t have to be a medical professional to start answering your question. Maybe, maybe not. We don’t have enough information to make

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One simple option is to use the CAGE self-assessment: • Have you ever felt you should Cut down on your drinking? • Have you felt Annoyed by others criticizing your drinking? • Have you ever felt bad or Guilty about your drinking? • Have you ever had a drink first thing in the morning to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover (Eye opener)? One “yes” answer signals a possible problem, and more than one means check-up time. This may be a case of alcohol abuse vs. alcohol dependence. So how can you tell the difference? The following comparisons can help you determine this. Substance Abuse Indicators: • A pattern of use with negative consequences and multiple incidents • Using despite knowledge that use causes or contributes to problems • Use in situations that are physically dangerous • Moderation possible Substance Dependence Indicators: • Tolerance • Periodic loss of control in terms of how much you use and/or behavior • Persistent desire or unsuccessful effort to cut down • Substance use despite knowledge that use causes or contributes to problems • Substance use criticized by family members or friends • Moderation doesn’t work People who abuse alcohol can limit the amount they drink when the consequences become severe enough. People who are truly dependent on alcohol cannot do this. If you are still wondering, then check it out. Don’t delay. Get an alcohol assessment by calling Counseling and Psych Services at (520) 621-3334.

Freshmen, don’t forget to complete your eCHECKUP To Go before the deadline today. Go to www.health.arizona.edu/echeckup

Got a question about alcohol?

Email it to redcup@email.arizona.edu

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The Red Cup Q&A is written by Lynn Reyes, LCSW, LSAC, David Salafsky, MPH, Lee Ann Hamilton, MA, CHES, and Spencer Gorin, RN, in the Health Promotion and Preventive Services (HPPS) department of the UA Campus Health Service.

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Tuesday, October 1, 2013 • Page 10

ARTS & Life

Editor: Kyle Mittan arts@wildcat.arizona.edu (520) 621-3106 twitter.com/dailywildcat

Students prepare for MovieFest BY Erin Shanahan

The Daily Wildcat It’s not every day that students aspiring to make their own films are given all the necessary equipment and creative freedom to do so. The Campus MovieFest will make its return to the UA this week, giving students the week of Oct. 2-8 to film their short movie projects. On Oct. 12, the top 16 films will be screened in Gallagher Theater in front of a student audience. The festival is free to participants, said communication sophomore AJ Torre, arts director for the Wildcat Events Board, who helped bring the nationwide festival to the UA. Torre helped organize last year’s Campus MovieFest and said she was surprised at how diverse the films were. Genres last year included comedy, horror and even films that focused on social justice. The judging panel will consist of Students On Stage members, professors, Campus MovieFest crew and representatives from the Wildcat Events Board, Torre said. Film senior Alfred Gruber, public relations director for theater club Students On Stage, will be judging the films, which he said are meant to give students across campus the chance to experience the filmmaking process. “Campus MovieFest allows anyone to display their creative talent,” Gruber said. “The event is open to anyone and everyone, and participants are given all the resources. There are limitless ideas for what the filmmakers can produce.” Gruber said he is asking for the filmmakers to look deep into

themselves and come up with a weird and unique idea — one that can be presented in a limited amount of time. “You have to get to the point of your film in five minutes,” Gruber said. “You can’t be subtle.” The panel will be accepting a variety of film topics, as long as they are covered in a way that is respectful and appropriate. “If there’s something you want to bring attention to, then we are open to it,” he said. Biology sophomore Dillon Driscoll said he plans to film a romantic-comedy adventure. Driscoll added that he signed up on a whim and developed an idea in four days. “It will be a challenge organizing a crew, but I am looking forward to the laughs during filming,” Driscoll said. The final screening of Campus MovieFest will have a red carpet theme, and awards will be given to the film crew that has support from the largest number of audience members, which is tallied as they arrive. Two members of Students On Stage, as well as a representative of Campus MovieFest, will host the event, Torre said. Past winners have been featured at other film festivals, Torre said, adding that participating in a film festival like this one is a great way for aspiring filmmakers to get a foot in the door — even if they’ve never actually tried it before. “There’s nothing to lose,” she said. “You might realize you love film.” Amy Phelps/The Daily Wildcat

— Follow Arts reporter Erin Shanahan @ItsErinShanahan

Media Arts Senior Alfred Gruber (left) is on the judging panel for the Campus Movie Fest competition. Organized in part by ASUA Arts Director AJ Torre (center), Campus Movie Fest gives students in all areas the resources and one week to create their own short film. Biology sophomore Dillon Driscoll (right) is one of several aspiring filmmakers who will be participating in this year’s competition.

Flandrau laser shows ‘Enough Said’ aim to draw attendees boasts superb Movie Review

performances BY Alex Guyton

The Daily Wildcat

Kimberly Cain/The Daily Wildcat

TUCSON RESIDENTS Barbara Appleton (left) and Marely Beard pay Joseph Howdeshell (right), a pre-pharmacy junior, for tickets to the Flandrau Laser Show at the Flandrau Science Center and Planetarium on Sunday.

Since their start three years ago, laser shows at Flandrau The Daily Wildcat have become a source of alternative entertainment When the Flandrau Science compared to the astronomy Center and Planetarium isn’t events the planetarium is showcasing the biodiversity known for. of Arizona’s Sky Islands or “I think it’s really studying the mineral heritage interesting,” said Stephanie of China, it is hosting Romo, a business a far different kind of management senior attraction — with a lot and a student more lasers. employee at the The center has center. “You think it’s hosted countless just a red laser but laser shows since • What: Flandrau Laser Show they have all sorts of 2010, and they’re set shapes that go with • Where: Flandrau Science Center to continue this year, the music.” and Planetarium said Michael Magee, “Electrolaze” is just the planetarium’s the start. Though its • When: Friday and Saturday, 8-9 technical manager. run is now finished, p.m.; Sunday, 5:30-6:30 p.m. and The end of September Flandrau will show marked the end of 8-9 p.m. Pink Floyd’s “The “Electrolaze,” a new Wall” on Friday nights • Admission: $5 show that featured and have a Saturday lasers played to matinee entitled dubstep music by “Laser Zeppelin.” artists like Skrillex Flandrau will still and Deadmau5. The also show “Dark Side show, along with “Dark Side of said she noticed a change in of the Moon” on Saturday the Moon,” the planetarium’s the audience itself, especially nights. Additionally, a show regular laser show set to run with “Dark Side of the Moon,” called “Fright Lights” will begin throughout the semester, which features music from as it gets closer to Halloween, is intended to draw more classic rock band Pink Floyd. Mankel said. students to the center, event “Pink Floyd has a nostalgic organizers said. audience,” Papenfus said. “Old “We wanted to try to get more people don’t like [Electrolaze] — Follow Arts reporter Gabby college students,” said Roseann much.” Ferreira @Its_GabbyF BY Gabby Ferreria

Mankel, program coordinator at the planetarium, adding that “Electrolaze” had plenty of attendees. While “Electrolaze” may have attracted more people, Emily Papenfus, a general studies junior and a student employee at the planetarium,

IF YOU GO

What does the dating landscape look like when in your 40’s or 50’s? “Enough Said” addresses this question in a charming way, with elements of both comedy and drama. The film is a mature comedy, that delves into the world of postdivorce dating. In one of his final leading roles, James Gandolfini delivers an effortless performance that is complemented by Julia Louis-Dreyfus’. Eva (Louis-Dreyfus) is a middleaged, divorced masseuse who makes house calls to clients that irk her in one way or another. While at a party with her married friends, Will and Sarah (Ben Falcone and Toni Collette), she makes two new acquaintances: Albert (Gandolfini) and Marianne (Catherine Keener). Marianne becomes a client, and ultimately a friend, and she proceeds to vent to Eva by perpetually knocking her ex-husband. Eva and Albert, despite both saying that they were not attracted to anyone at the party, begin to date. They are also both facing empty nests, as their only daughters are preparing to leave for college. The relationship between Albert and Eva is a unique screen romance. Given the way they interact with one another, one would never have guessed that these two characters had been previously married. They awkwardly flirt with each other like two school children that are on their first date. They make goofy jokes and then steal a glance to see if the other person laughed. Although the portly, balding Albert is not the stereotypically attractive man, Eva quickly grows to like him, and they fall for each other. Albert, with all of his quirks (like swirling guacamole with a chip so as not to get any onions), could have easily devolved into a cartoonish character. However, Gandolfini treats the character with respect, and delivers a performance that makes it feel like Albert is not just one dimensional. This praise is not given lightly. Louis-Dreyfus has a livelier, comedic role compared to Gandolfini’s dry humor. She effectively portrays a woman who is

Fox Searchlight Pictures

optimistic yet anxious about falling in love again, and is able to deftly navigate between being both the driving comedic and dramatic force. The movie explores many themes and situations that help it strike significant chords with an older audience. Only one couple in the film is not divorced, and even they seem to toe the line of openly admitting that they are miserable. Everyone comes with baggage and a kid that they split 50-50 with their ex. This is a story about getting back on the horse, about venturing into the murky, dark waters of dating after marriage and love that didn’t pan out the first time. The film as a whole, along with director Nicole Holofcener, approaches this without a hint of cliché or insincerity. Still, younger members of the audience will be able to empathize with the situations of uncertainty and heartbreak, and the film may open their eyes to what dating is like 20 or 30 years down the road. Dramatic enough to be insightful, yet light enough to not become bogged down, “Enough Said” shows that there is life, hope and love after marriage. Grade:

B+

— Follow Arts reporter Alex Guyton @TDWildcatFilm


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