Page 1

THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


THE OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE ARCHEPARCHY OF PITTSBURGH

lighting the way

Inside

Four new gold leaf crosses placed on St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa. Page 6

VOL. 63 NO. 12

holy ghost rocks pierogi festival Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. serves up pierogis at Kennywood Page 7

An audience with Pope Francis archbishop william skurla attends synod of bishops in rome

NOVEMBER 2018

welcome back

Serrans host brunch for seminarians to begin new academic year Page 13

Bishops say young people should be heard, not lectured synod in rome focuses on youth by Junno Arocho Esteves Catholic News Service

Archbishop William C. Skurla greets Pope Francis in Rome, Italy during last month’s Synod of Bishops on Young People, the Faith and Vocational Discernment. Archbishop William publicly thanked Pope Francis “for restoring our ancient practice of marriage for priests,” including those living outside the traditional East European homeland of the Ruthenian church. “The restoration of the married clergy in 2014 has increased the number of seminarians and allowed ordained married priests from our churches in Eastern Europe to come to the United States” and minister, the archbishop said. “The new priests have renewed and revitalized our church in the United States.” Archbishop William had a very practical suggestion for after the synod: Each diocese or eparchy should have a priests’ assembly that would include representative young people. The purpose would be to share ideas from the pope, the synod’s final document and, “most importantly,” examples of successful programs already taking place in parishes. Reporting by Cindy Wooden, Catholic News Service. Photo courtesy of Vatican Information Service.

“Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship” byzantine spirituality conference set for Nov. 10 Press release

The disciples walked with Jesus for three years, shared meals with him, were present during his most difficult moments and yet Peter denied Jesus three times. Disciple-making is a process, quite often a long one that requires constant patience and abandon to the grace of God. This year’s Byzantine Spirituality Conference is designed to help participants identify where God is already present in their lives and how to engage

others in their parish community to articulate their Byzantine Catholic faith.

What you need to know The Conference is scheduled for Nov. 10 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. The title of this year’s Spirituality Conference is: “Parish Life from Maintenance to Discipleship.” Deacon John Evancho will present “The Immigrant Disciple” and “Being a Disciple of

Christ Today” and Christopher Russo will present “The Challenge of Discipleship for the Future.”

Meet our presenters Deacon John Evancho earned a Master’s Degree from Harvard Divinity School and Bachelor’s Degrees in Theology from Duquesne University and the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He serves at Annunciation Church, Homer Story continued on page 15

VATICAN CITY — The Catholic Church needs to communicate the beauty and intelligence of faith to young men and women without resorting to condescending and aggressive methods, Auxiliary Bishop Robert Barron of Los Angeles told members of the Synod of Bishops. A "renewed apologetics and catechesis" can help young people who are tempted to leave the church due to convictions "that religion is opposed to science or that it cannot stand up to rational scrutiny, that its beliefs are outmoded, a holdover from a primitive time, that the Bible is unreliable, that religious belief gives rise to violence, and that God is a threat to human freedom," Bishop Barron said in his speech to the synod Oct. 4. "I hope it is clear that arrogant proselytizing has no place in our pastoral outreach, but I hope it is equally clear that an intelligent, respectful, and culturally sensitive explication of the faith ('giving a reason for the hope that is within us') is certainly a 'desideratum' ('desire')," he said. Later that evening, Bishop Barron joined Nigerian Bishop Godfrey Igwebuike Onah of Nsukka at an event dedicated to the synod on youth, faith and vocational discernment. The University of Notre Dame's Center for Ethics and Culture sponsored the event in Rome. Seven Notre Dame students spoke at the event about their Story continued on page 3


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23


PAGE 2

NOVEMBER 2018

News from the Vatican UPS 081500 ISSN 07442289 Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh Serving parish communities in central and western Pennsylvania, Louisiana, eastern Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas and West Virginia Published monthly (12 issues) plus two seasonal special issues Byzantine Catholic Press Associates 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org Archbishop William C. Skurla President David Mayernik Jr. Editor Sister Elaine Kisinko, OSBM Copy Editor Donna Obsincs Subscription/Circulation Manager Gregory S. Popivchak Business Manager Annual Subscription Rates US $14 Canadian $17 International $20 Periodicals Postage PAID at Pittsburgh, PA

Postmaster: send address changes to: The Byzantine Catholic World ATTN: Donna 66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Please allow 2 to 3 weeks for address changes to take effect. Submissions deadline: 15th of the month prior to the month of publication.

The Byzantine Catholic World is a member of the Catholic Press Association.

mission The mission of The Byzantine

Catholic World is to spread the Gospel message in the rich tradition of the Byzantine Catholic Church; to encourage

Lack of progress fighting hunger is shameful, pope says “we are all called to go further. we can and we must do better for the helpless” by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

ROME (CNS) -- At a time of technological and scientific progress, "we ought to feel shame" for not having advanced in "humanity and solidarity" enough to feed the world's poor, Pope Francis said. "Neither can we console ourselves simply for having faced emergencies and desperate situations of those most in need. We are all called to go further. We can and we must do better for the helpless," the pope said in a message to world leaders attending a meeting of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome. The World Food Day ceremony Oct. 16 marks the date the organization was founded in 1945 to address the causes of world hunger. The theme for 2018 is "Our actions are our future: A zero hunger world by 2030 is possible." The 2030 agenda seeks to end hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. Local programs are just as important as global commitments to ending hunger, Pope Francis said in his message. "Global indicators are of no use if our commitment does not correspond to reality on the ground," the pope said. "This must be done in the context of suitable institutional, social and economic support that offers fruitful initiatives and solutions so that the poor do not feel overlooked again." According to the FAO 2018

official appointments by metropolitan archbishop william A man sells roasted chicken on a road in Peshawar, Oakistan Oct. 15, the eve of World Food Day. The international day is celebrated Oct. 16 to mark the date in 1945 the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization was founded. Catholic News Service photo by Arshad Arbab.

State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report, world hunger is on the rise again, and over 820 million people are suffering chronic undernourishment. The pope called for policies of cooperation for development that are oriented toward meeting the real needs of the people: "The struggle against hunger urgently demands generous financing, the abolition of trade barriers and, above all, greater resilience in the face of climate change, economic crises and warfare," he said. While one can dream of a future without hunger, the pope said it is only reasonable to do so "when we engage in tangible processes, vital relations, effective plans and real commitments." The poor expect real help from world leaders, he wrote, "not mere propositions or agreements." However, it not only requires political decision-making and effective planning, but also a more proactive and sustainable long-term vision from world

Sept. 26, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh: resignation as a member of the Presbyterate of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh accepted. Sept. 25, 2018 • Father Ryan L. McDaniel accepted for ministry in the Archeparchy. Sept. 12, 2018 • Deacon Timothy Corbett: relieved as deacon for the Cathedral of St. John, Munhall, and appointed deacon for St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, both in Pennsylvania. Aug. 20, 2018 • Father S. Peter Leigh relieved as chaplain for the Sisters of St. Basil the Great, Mt. Macrina, Uniontown, Pa. and administrator of St. Mary Church, Morgantown, West Virginia and placed on administrative leave. n

leaders, Pope Francis said. "We overlook the structural aspects that shroud the tragedy of hunger: extreme inequality, poor distribution of the world's resources, consequences of climate change and the interminable and bloody conflicts which ravage many regions," he said. "Some may say that we still have 12 years ahead in which to carry this out" to meet the 2030 goal, the pope acknowledged. But "the poor cannot wait. Their devastating circumstances do not allow this." n

Clergy retreat Amid the pastoral splendor of the grounds at Antiochian Village near Latrobe, Pa., clergy of the Archeparchy gathered for a commemorative photo during their 2018 retreat the week of Oct. 1. n

faithful to reflect the image of Christ in everyday activities of life; to offer spiritual formation through changing times; and to celebrate community among Byzantine Catholics in the Archeparchy of Pittsburgh, throughout the Metropolitan Church in America, and around the world. the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 3

Synod 2018 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment

Young people continued from page 1

faith, highlighting their positive experiences while also expressing their concerns that internal divisions and the scandal of sexual abuse are wounding the church. Bishop Onah, 62, told participants it was important for bishops to listen to young men and women, otherwise the synod risks becoming a meeting of "only old people" talking about young people. "As one bishop rightly pointed out," he said, "sometimes we talk about our own experience of youth thinking that it corresponds with the present experience of young people, not remembering that our experience 30, 40, 50, 60 years ago is quite different from the experience of young people today." Nevertheless, Bishop Onah added, "even though many old people are talking about youth, it is still positive that they are doing that." The Nigerian bishop said he was moved by the testimonies of the students, including Aly Cox, a Notre Dame law student, who said that the church -- wounded by the scandal of division and abuse -- "is in need of healing." Bishop Onah said that like Christ's wounds, which were still visible after his resurrection, the church's wounds do "not deprive the church from being a healer." "The wounds on the body of the church, the wounds on

Pope Francis greets Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, England, as he leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops on young people, the faith and vocational discernment at the Vatican Oct. 5. Next to the pope is Cardinal Vincent Nicholas of Westminster, England. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

the body of Christ, will never destroy the church," he said. "That is my feeling because that body is risen." He also said one root of the scandal is that seminarians, priests and bishops are "wrongly made to believe that we are different." "We are not (different)," Bishop Onah said. "We are struggling with the same emotions, the same passions and rejoicing over the little achievements we make on our road to holiness as you do." If church leaders had realized that sooner, he added, "we wouldn't have had to cause all this harm in hiding the fact that we are just men, ordinary men." Earlier that day, Bishop Barron told the synod that his work as founder of Word on Fire Catholic Ministries confirmed that inadequate education about church teaching is among the "crucial stumbling blocks to the acceptance of the faith among young people." Among the major religions, he explained, "Catholicism was

second to last in passing on its traditions," and the "army of our young who claim that religion is irrational is a bitter fruit of this failure in education." While some may view apologetics as "something rationalistic, aggressive, condescending," he said he would propose a new way of explaining and defending religious doctrine that "would not be imposed from above but would rather emerge organically from below, a response to the yearning of the mind and the heart." The works of St. Thomas Aquinas, for example, often emerged from lively debates over disputed questions "that stood at the heart of the educational process in the medieval university," he said. "Thomas was deeply interested in what young people were really asking. So should we." He also told the members of the Synod of Bishops that, without "denigrating the sciences," a renewed catechesis can show young men and women that there are "non-scientific and yet eminently rational paths that conduce toward knowledge of the real." Bishop Barron said the beauty of faith as depicted in music, art, architecture and liturgy as well as the compelling lives of the saints can also provide "a powerful matrix for evangelization." The church, he said, "must walk with young people, listen to them with attention and love, and then be ready intelligently to give a reason for the hope that is within us. This, I trust, will set the hearts of the young on fire." n

U.S. cardinal: Abuse crisis discussed at synod, will top bishops’ agenda by Cindy Wooden Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — While the clerical sexual abuse crisis did not dominate discussions at the Synod of Bishops, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston said it was discussed, and everyone in the room clearly believed the crisis has to be dealt with. Cardinal DiNardo, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, spoke to Catholic News Service Oct. 22 as the synod was winding down and preparations for the U.S. bishops' November general meeting moved into high gear.

The agenda for the November meeting will include multiple items for dealing with the abuse crisis and, particularly, the issue of bishops' behavior and accountability, Cardinal DiNardo said. One suggestion the bishops will examine, he said, is to draw up "a code of conduct for bishops," similar to those that most dioceses have for priests and for lay employees. Another would be to establish a "third-party reporting system" that would allow someone with an abuse complaint against a bishop to report him to someone not connected with his dio-

Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo of Galveston-Houston, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, leaves a session of the Synod of Bishops at the Vatican Oct. 18. Catholic News Service photo by Paul Haring.

cese or the bishops' conference. "All of these involve issues that we are going to have to Story continued on page 15

the byzantine catholic world

Church should meet youth where they are, says observor by Anne Condodina Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY — To reach young people and teach them the faith, Catholics must first show them that they are loved, "not just judged, discarded, or abused," said a 29-year-old observer at the Synod of Bishops. Yadira Vieyra, who works with migrant families in Chicago, told Vatican News Oct. 8 that the church needs to meet young people where they are. And while "a good portion" of the bishops at the synod are listening, she said, others are "still focused on preaching the truth to our youth." "Yes, it's important to communicate the truth," she said, "but also you can't just communicate the truth without treating someone with love and care and attentiveness." According to Vieyra, the church's message should be attentive to where youth are right now. It is important for the church to hear their needs and adapt its ministry so that they feel the church recognizes their humanity as well, she said. In her small working group at the synod, she said she reminded the bishops that young people are not the same everywhere in the world. "I have made it a point to bring them back to the reality that not all of our youth are the same and their lives are not the same, not just in the U.S. but in other parts of the world." For example, Vieyra said, "In the U.S. not everyone is raised by a mother and a father, or in a heterosexual couple. And so, that's important for us to be mindful of, because that's where our youth are. And it's important to honor their experiences and, again, minister to what life is like for them now and find a way to make them understand that they are so deeply loved by God and that he is just so excited to embrace them" Recognizing what life is like for young people will help the church "find ways to meet them, whether it's through social media, through more innovative, fun, happy catechesis," Vieyra told Vatican News. n


PAGE 4

NOVEMBER 2018

text messages

Confession is good for the soul by David Mayernik Jr. Editor

For more than a year, I have been taking walks through nearby Riverview Park, a few steps down the street from the Chancery. It’s a good way to burn off a few calories, enjoy the Great Outdoors and clear the mind. Since I’ve made this trek dozens of times, I’ve memorized the 25 names — in order — carved into a border around the perimeter of Allegheny Observatory. Here we go. And this is fully from memory, I promise: Draper Keeler Gould Rittenhouse Fraunhofer Adams Le Verrier Secchi Huygens Airy Struve

Arago Bessel Kepler Tycho Copernicus Galileo Herschel Newton Laplace Langley Newcomb Peirce Newton Bond It makes sense the names on the Observatory commemorate important astronomers and astrophysicists throughout history. For example, Joseph von Fraunhofer (1787-1826) was a Bavarian physicist and optical lens manufacturer and invented the spectroscope. I have a good memory for things I view repeatedly. I can still recite the Preamble to the Constitution (thanks to “Schoolhouse Rock”) and the opening voiceover to “The A-Team” television series. During one of my walks last

Allegheny Observatory

month, I met Father Will Rupp, Director of Spiritual Formation at the Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius, who was out with his two dogs. As we walked around the observatory, I thought to myself: “I finally have the opportunity to tell someone about this memory exercise I’ve kept to myself for well over a year.” As we passed by “Bessel” and “Kepler,” I confessed. Have you ever revealed one

Photo by David Mayernik Jr.

of your odd, personal quirks to someone else at what felt like the “right” time? I would have kept it to myself if not for that perfect confluence of circumstances with Father Will. It felt really good to get it off my chest and tell someone else after so long a time. So good, in fact, that I’ve decided to tell readers of The Byzantine Catholic World. Confession is good for the soul. n

making a difference

The courageous witness of SS. Oscar Romero, Paul VI by Tony Magliano

Two very different men, facing different sets of dire challenges with prophetic courage, faithfully journeyed along two different paths to the same destination: sainthood! Who would have predicted it? Who would have imagined on Feb. 23, 1977, the day of his appointment as Archbishop of San Salvador, that the highly conservative Oscar Romero – who was suspicious of the Catholic Church’s involvement in political activism – would die a martyr’s death for courageously defending his people against the murderous assaults of the Salvadoran government, military and right-wing death squads? Romero’s appointment was welcomed by the government, but many priests were not happy. They suspected their new archbishop would insist they cut all ties to liberation theology’s defense of the poor. However, as Romero started

getting to know the poor and how they were oppressed by the government and rich coffee plantation owners, his conscience seemed to gradually awaken. But the most important event affecting Romero’s decision to wholeheartedly stand with the poor and oppressed was the assassination of his close friend Jesuit Father Rutilio Grande; who was promoting land reform, worker unions, and organizing communities to have a greater voice regarding their own lives. Romero, who was deeply inspired by Grande said, “When I looked at Rutilio lying there dead I thought, ‘if they have killed him for doing what he did, then I too have to walk the same path.’ ” In a letter to U.S. President Jimmy Carter, Romero warned that continued U.S. military aid to the government of El Salvador “will surely increase injustices here and sharpen the repression.” Romero asked Carter to stop all military assistance to the Salvadoran government. Carter ignored Romero. And later, President Ronald Reagan

greatly increased military aid. During his March 23, 1980 Sunday national radio homily, Romero said, “I would like to make an appeal in a special way to the men of the army … You kill your own campesino brothers and sisters … The law of God must prevail that says: Thou shalt not kill! No soldier is obliged to obey an order against the law of God … In the name of God, and in the name of this suffering people … I beg you … I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression!” The next day while celebrating Mass in the chapel of the hospital compound where he lived, Saint Romero’s loving heart was pierced with an assassin’s bullet. With numerous armed conflicts raging in various parts of the world, and the Vietnam War worsening, Pope Paul VI on Oct. 4, 1965 proclaimed before the U.N. General Assembly: “No more war, war never again. It is peace, peace which must guide the destinies of peoples and of all mankind.” Unfortunately, in 1965 the world did not heed Paul VI’s prophetic words. And sadly, it

the byzantine catholic world

has not heeded them since. Saint Paul VI in his prophetic encyclical letter Populorum Progressio (“On the Development of Peoples”) wisely said, “When we fight poverty and oppose the unfair conditions of the present, we are not just promoting human well-being; we are also furthering man's spiritual and moral development, and hence we are benefiting the whole human race. For peace is not simply the absence of warfare, based on a precarious balance of power; it is fashioned by efforts directed day after day toward the establishment of the ordered universe willed by God, with a more perfect form of justice among men.” n Tony Magliano is an internationally syndicated social justice and peace columnist. He is available to speak at diocesan or parish gatherings. Tony can be reached at tmag@ zoominternet.net.


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 5

At your service priests, deacons serve at annual deanery pasta dinner

Deanery priests and deacons served complimentary dinners during the annual Deanery Pasta Dinner Oct. 21 at St. Elias in Munhall, Pa. Free-will offerings were accepted and any profit went to the Archeparchy Priests Pension Fund. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


parish news PAGE 6

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john chrysostom in greenfield, pa.

Lighting the way

by Father Thomas Schaefer St. John Chrysostom, Greenfield, Pa.

Four new 12-foot gold leaf crosses were placed on the domes of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield. Pa. on Sept. 27. Bad weather and then a recent lightning strike required us to repair rotted wood inside the domes and a complete reworking of the crosses with gold leaf. The crosses were blessed and the exciting addition is new LED lighting into the central cross which was illumined Sept. 27 for the first time. About 30 years ago, there was functioning red neon lighting on the cross but bad weather destroyed that lighting, as neon tubes are fragile. New technology has allowed us to use LED white lighting which will outline the entire 12-foot three-bar Eastern Cross. In 2010, Astorino Corp. worked with us to illumine the entire outside of the church in celebration of the 100th anniversary. Today, working with Richard Gromo and his son Darrell Gromo from Unique Services and Applications Inc., we have completed the work on all of the crosses. From the Parkway East as you look down into “The Run� you will see St. John Chrysostom, a beautiful tribute to the faith and traditions of the Byzantine Catholic People of Pittsburgh. The parish is famous today as the childhood place of worship for the artist Andy Warhol and his family. We want people to see the beautiful church today, both outside and inside. Tours can always be arranged. For more informatrion, see www.sjcbcc. com n

Father Thomas Schaefer, pastor of St. John Chrysostom in Greenfield, Pa., blesses new 12-foot gold leaf crosses which were placed on the domes Sept. 27.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

continued

PAGE 7

holy ghost in mckees rocks, pa.

Holy Ghost rocks Pierogi Festival by Kathe Kress Holy Ghost, McKees Rocks, Pa.

This was the second year for the Pierogi Festival at Kennywood but the first for Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. Holy Ghost was one of 16 new vendors this year, but left a mark for years to come. The kitchen was extra busy due to the Serra Club Brunch scheduled the same day. Everything went smoothly without stepping on anyone’s toes. The crew packed 200 dozen — or 2,400 pierogi — and transported them Sept. 23 to Kennywood in West Mifflin, Pa. Just prior to the 1 p.m. opening for business, they had begun to pull batches of hot pierogi to serve. Soon a long line of hungry folks lead to the Holy Ghost tent, and by 4 p.m., everything was sold out!

Workers had prepared 40 dozen farmers cheese, 60 dozen sauerkraut and a hundred dozen potato-cheese pierogi for sale by the dozen or individually for takeout. Sauerkraut work had begun on Wednesday morning prior to the festival, along with preparation of the farmers cheese plates. The Thursday night crew made sauerkraut balls from the refrigerated sauerkraut/onion mix. On Friday morning the full crew arrived early to make dough, mix potatoes and cheese together, and pinch, pinch, pinch! The volunteers are anticipating increased orders when the Pierogi Kitchen opens for business at Holy Ghost on Nov. 2. Other sale dates are: Nov. 9, 16, 30 and Dec. 7, 14. (For more information, see page 16.) n

Clockwise from top: Frank Revtai, Peg McCuster, Father Frank Firko; Kennywood patrons wait in line; Anastasia Bedard; Ted Babin; Frank Revtai, Chuck McCusker, Peg McCusker, Anastasia Bedard, Carol Lipchick, Beth Zurawski; Mary Ann Goyda

Photos by Lynne Ann Sarrick Deliman

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 8

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

Celebrating Founders’ Day by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Sept. 23 was special at St. Gregory as we celebrated Founders Day and witnessed the blessing of our ECF teachers and our children. As part of our celebration we offered our prayerful supplications for all our living and departed founders of our parish family. Following the Divine Liturgy, we gathered in our Church hall to continue with our celebration. Great food, music and games were on the schedule as we gathered to have fun, fellowship and give thanks to Almighty God for such a wonderful day. n

Photos by Jennifer Kehm

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

PAGE 9

continued

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Blessing of Animals Very Rev. Andrew Deskevich blessed animals on Oct. 4, the Feast of St. Francis, at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. n

Fall fun On Oct. 14, dozens of parishioners enjoyed a crisp autumn day at Holy Trinity's annual hay ride and apple bee at the farm of Ron and Marge Kennis

near Sykesville, Pa. In addition to hayrides, parishioners and a few friends also enjoyed a bonfire and fresh apple cider. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa. by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa.

Even though the weather was not cooperating this year, pet lovers came to St. Gregory Oct. 4 for the annual Blessing

of Animals. This Blessing takes place every year as we honor the memory of St. Francis of Assisi, one of the patron saints of animals and livestock. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Bingo for a cause

st. michael in campbell, ohio The Blessing of Pets took place on the Vigil of the Feast of St. Francis at St. Michael on Oct. 3. Father Kevin Marks is pastor. n

Blessing of Pets

by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was a busy month at SS. Peter and Paul, as it began with a semi-annual Bingo-Card Party. This is a fundraiser for the Ladies Guild of the parish, who in turn use the funds to provide many activities for both the young and older parishioners, as well as baking and delivering gifts to our parishioners who are homebound or are in nursing facilities. Some members of the Ladies

Guild, along with other parishioners, volunteer their time at St. Vincent de Paul Soup Kitchen once a month to provide meals for those less fortunate. The need for a pizza warmer arose at St. Vincent de Paul facility. Our Ladies Guild, with the blessing of Father Simeon Sibenik, purchased a new pizza warmer and presented it to the manager of the St. Vincent de Paul facility on "Make-a-Difference Day." And it did make a "big" difference. n

Photo by Macala Blake

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 10

parish news

holy trinity in sykesville, pa.

Catechetical Sunday

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

mount st. macrina in uniontown, pa.

Special blessing Children from the Kosko, Hallam, D’Angelo and Plasko families receive a blessing from Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, (center) of the Eparchy of Parma,

on Saturday during the annual retreat at Mount St. Macrina in Uniontown, Pa. Sept. 1 to 2. Father Peter Borza is on the right. n

st. gregory in upper st. clair, pa.

by Father Valerian Michlik St. Gregory, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Father Vasyl Banyk and Deacon Luke Crawford with catechists on Sept. 23

st. john the baptist in scottdale, pa.

church of the resurrection in monroeville, pa.

Remembering James A. Silvestri by Father Don Bolls Church of the Resurrection, Monroeville, Pa.

It’s been a year since the beloved cantor of the Church of the Resurrection entered the eternal kingdom. James A. Silvestri was born in Vandergrift, Pa. on June 15, 1937 and died at age 80 on Oct. 14, 2017. After his retirement from AT&T as a communications consultant, he started a pizzelle and biscotti business, earned an International Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language and completed his Masters in Theology at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in 2008. He was a longtime member, cantor, and catechism teacher at Church of the Resurrection and worked long hours volunteering at the Lenten fish fry and making pirohi, cookies and nutrolls. He was a talented woodworker, gifted linguist (English, French and Italian) and loved University of Notre Dame football.

Happy anniversary A social was held at St. John the Baptist in honor of the anniversary of Father Oleh

James A. Silvestri

He was that rare indiviual everyone of all ages liked and about whom no one could think of anything bad to say. He is greatly missed by daughters Amy and Maria, family and friends, and all whose lives he touched at church. In his honor, in addition to several liturgies this fall in his memory, a movie projector is was given to the Sunday School. This seems especially appropriate in light of his teaching and how he would begin each Sunday catechetical event leading the children and teachers in song and dance. Eternal memory! n the byzantine catholic world

Seremchuk’s ordination to the priesthood. n


NOVEMBER 2018

parish news

st. elias in munhall, pa.

continued

PAGE 11

Food Fest Sunday

School days Father Vitalii Stashkevych, pastor at St. Elias, blessed ECF teachers and students on Oct. 7, followed by a parish brunch. n

St. Elias held its annual Food Fest Sept. 21 to 23. Parishioners and guests enjoyed a fish fry, pirohi, haluska, stuffed cabbage, Hungarian desserts and music. n

ss. peter and paul in warren, ohio

Pastor Appreciation Day by Sister Barbara Pavlik, OSB SS. Peter and Paul, Warren, Ohio

October was designated as Pastor Appreciation Month, as SS. Peter and Paul showed their love and appreciation to their pastor, Father Simeon Sibenik, Oct 21 to 22. Parishioners gathered in the Social Hall after each of the three Divine Liturgies and greeted Father Simeon by singing "God grant him many years!" They shared coffee and a beautifully decorated cake with the inscription: "Thank You and God Bless You Father Simeon." The cakes and beverages were provided by the Ladies Guild. n

Parishioners gather following the 11 a.m. Oct. 21 Divine Liturgy to honor Father Simeon Sibenik. Photo by Victoria Smolak.

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 12

parish news

continued

NOVEMBER 2018

st. john the baptist cathedral in munhall, pa.

Fall Craft Show by Carol Lawson St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa.

Our 10th annual Craft Show was held Oct. 20 at St. John the Baptist Cathedral. It was a huge success with 60 tables of crafters and vendors and lots of customers who enjoyed our stuffed cabbage, dumpling haluski and our homemade nut rolls. The next craft show is planned for May 2019. n

Photos by Nick Havrilla Sr.

the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

report from the

PAGE 13

Byzantine Catholic Serra Club

Welcome back

seminarians begin school year with brunch courtesy of serra club by Kathe Kress Serra Club communications liaison

Serrans gathered with Seminarians and their families for brunch at Holy Ghost in McKees Rocks, Pa. following the 9 a.m. Sept. 23 Divine Liturgy. The Byzantine Serra Club has made this brunch their tradition of welcoming the Seminarians who are beginning a new academic year at The Byzantine Catholic Seminary of SS. Cyril and Methodius in Pittsburgh. The brunch, catered by Lynn’s Café in West Park, Pa., was plentiful and delicious: omelets, pancakes, waffles, bagels and fresh fruit salad. “The Men in Black” piled their plates high and there was still plenty of food to send back with them to the Seminary. The traditional brown bag auction followed the brunch and there were duds as well as treasures. This year’s bidders had “deep” pockets and a record amount of money was donated to the Seminary. The surprise gift bags for the children were a big hit. There was a scramble to figure out what the brown bags contained. This popular fun-filled event was well-attended by Serrans, Seminarians and their families.

Front: Kyprian Wojciechowski, Christopher Davel, John Welch, Rob Jones, Chris Lo Grippo and Tim Fariss. Back: Deacon Tom Wells, Deacon Kevin Bezner, Riley Winstead, PauL West, Michael Kunitz, Nathan Adams, David Venderohe, Mikhael Naddaf and Miron Kerul’-Kmec.

n

the byzantine catholic world


PAGE 14

NOVEMBER 2018

thoughts for our day by Archpriest David M. Petras

the power of prayer What is prayer really? The common conception is that it is asking God for something. You only pray in real emergencies when you know that you're going to fail just by yourself. We must not scorn prayer as "asking," sometimes we exalt ourselves too much to see the reality that exists between God and ourselves. As we shall see, much of the primitive Christian prayer was "asking God for things," and this has persisted in intercessory prayer in the office to this day. It is more than that. Prayer must be a continuous reality in our lives, we must pray daily, morning and evening. St. John of Kronstadt described it as "the breath of the soul, our nourishment and our spiritual drink." Prayer becomes communication with God, in which not only an exchange of information takes place, but we are ourselves transformed into the divine image. St. Ignatius Brianchaninov wrote: "When prayer seizes people, it transforms them progressively, making them spiritual, therefore, from their union with the Holy Spirit.” Likewise in the Western tradition, Mechtild of Magdeburg, Revelations, describes prayer in a more practical way as transforming: “That prayer has great power which a person makes with all his might. It makes a sour heart sweet, a sad heart merry, a poor heart rich, a foolish heart wise, a timid heart brave, a sick heart well, a blind heart full of sight, a cold heart ardent. Prayer ultimately is possible only if it becomes true commu-

nion with God (contemplation) which points to the action of God in our prayer. All this must happen when we pray alone or in the community. For this reason, all prayer is done "in the Spirit." As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit too comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). In liturgical

Prayer is truly powerful, and it works and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed... prayer, the importance of the Spirit is most clearly expressed in the epiclesis, the invocation. Nothing happens sacramentally without the work of the Spirit. The epiclesis is a characteristic of every eucharistic prayer except the traditional Roman Canon, which tended to obscure the role of the Spirit in the Liturgy for centuries. We cannot ever skip our daily prayer. And sometimes, it gets tough to do, we get up in the morning, we have a full agenda, we hardly have time to prepare ourselves, and so our spiritual life goes on auto-pilot. Even so, it is not enough to simply pray, we need quality prayer. And we are living in a world which has a lot of distractions, a lot of noise, and a low level of spirituality. We

also live in a world that fosters narcissism. Business prefers it that way, because if you dote on yourself you will buy more for yourself and that’s good for business. It may also make you self-centered. People that are self-centered cannot pray as they should and inevitably confuse their own ideas with divine grace. When we pray, we imitate Christ. In the gospels, Jesus, “the leader and perfecter of faith” (Hebrews 12:2), frequently prayed by himself in quiet. “After doing so, [Jesus] went up on the mountain by himself to pray. When it was evening he was there alone” (Matthew 14:23). St. Mark tells us: “And when he had taken leave of them, he went off to the mountain to pray” (Mark 6:46). St. Luke witnesses: “The report about him spread all the more, and great crowds assembled to listen to him and to be cured of their ailments but he would withdraw to deserted places to pray” (Luke 5:15-16). Of course, there is the story of his prayer in Gethsemane, on the night he was arrested. Jesus came back and found his disciples asleep, so he reprimanded them: “Could you not watch one hour with me in prayer?” When we pray, if we use our own words, we must take care not to fall into the trap of “spiritual self-deception,” making our own ideas and concepts in the place of God’s. “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8). The highest form of prayer is when God takes hold of us, which the spiritual teachers called, in Greek , theoria, or “contemplation.” We have no control over that at all. All we

can do is to empty ourselves as much as possible so that God could fill our soul. As St. Paul said: "...the Spirit comes to the aid of our weakness, for we do not know how to pray as we ought, but the Spirit itself intercedes with inexpressible groanings" (Romans 8:26). The initiative, however, comes always from God. We cannot force God to fill our soul, it is the height of pride to think we can do this. How do we know that God answers our prayers? In three ways, I think, first, by simply existing. We must become aware that “I exist, the world is real, God is holding me in existence, and everything that I am, everything that I have, everything that happens to me is because God is present and fills all things.” Our very existence is God’s answer. Second, because sometimes God acts in a very concrete way in his providential love for us. There is not a big fanfare, it is not accompanied by thunder and lightning and voices from on high, but “things happen” that brings us through a rough spot. There are little “miracles” every day. Third, because when we pray, we become a part of the Body of Christ, and our prayers and words become Christ’s prayer and words. As one of my students so accurately said: “When we pray as a community and become the incarnated body of Christ, the prayer of the community is literally God speaking to us.” Prayer is truly powerful, it works, and when we pray sincerely, we are changed and transformed and become a different person. n

BYZANTINE DIVINE LITURGY View Liturgical Services (various times) streamed LIVE online at:

St. John the Baptist Cathedral, Munhall, Pa. www.stjohnsbyzantinecathedral.com Holy Ghost Church McKees Rocks, Pa. www.holyghost-byzantinecatholic.org St. John Chrysostom Church - Pittsburgh, Pa. www.sjcbcc.com the byzantine catholic world


NOVEMBER 2018

PAGE 15

Byzantine Spirituality Conference continued from page 1

Glen, Ill. Deacon John has been a cantor, choir director and catechist for many years. Currently, he serves as the Chief Compliance Officer for the insurer, OSF HealthPlans which is owned and operated by the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Peoria.

Christopher Russo, Deacon John Evancho

Christopher Russo was selected by Archbishop William Skurla to represent the United States Byzantine Catholic Metropolia at the Pre-Synod for Youth in Rome, March 2018. He graduated from Penn State University in 2016 and works as a research technolo-

gist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Christopher helped create a program for young adults entitled “Theosis in Action”. He is the son of Deacon Stephen and Heather Russo of Southbury, Conn. They are members of St. Nicholas in Danbury, Conn. n

Send Name, Phone number, Parish and $35 per person by Nov. 5 Check payable to: Office of Religious Education, 3605 Perrysville Ave., Pittsburgh, PA. 15214 Parish table of 5 or more is $25 per person. Submit together. Information at: www.archpitt.org, link ORE. 412-322-8773

Mark your calendar The following events will take place at Mount St. Macrina House of Prayer, 510 W. Main St, Uniontown, Pa. To register for programs or more information, call 724-4387149.

Morning Retreat n Christine Freeman presents "Life's Transitions" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 3. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Christine, a practicing psychotherapist for 18 years with a bachelor’s degree from Seton Hill, a Master of Divinity from Pittsburgh Theological Seminary and a Master of Social Work from the University of Pittsburgh; will guide attendees through difficult changes in lives. Her area of interest is the intersect of Psychology and Spirituality.

Helenanne Hochendoner presents "Prophetesses of Scripture" 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Nov. 10. Offering of $35 includes lunch. Register by Nov. 6. n

Iconography Retreat An Iconography Retreat, presented by Marylyn Barone, will be held 6 p.m. Nov 16 to 4 p.m. Nov. 18. For adults and requires no previous icon-writing experience. Participants write an icon of the Archangel Uriel, known as the angel of wisdom, on an 8-by-10 gesso-covered board. Using a pre-prepared prototype, learn techniques for faces, garments, background and gilding with 23-karat gold leaf. Offering of $225; Commuters: $200. Supplies included. Register by Nov. 9. n

Christmas Preparation Retreat Father Cyprian Constantine, OSB, will pressent “The Time of Salvation is Near: Prepare by Prayer, Fasting, Repentance and Almsgiving” 1:15-5:30 p.m. Dec. 16. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will be offered along with a conference and a prayer service. Offering of $35 includes dinner. Register by Dec. 12.

n

Open House n An Open House will be held 1:30-3:30 p.m. Jan. 13, 2019. Come and spend some time with the Sisters in the warmth of the House of Prayer!

Winter Respite n A Winter Respite will be presented by Sister Carol Petrasovich, OSBM, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 2, 2019. Registration due by Jan. 30, 2019. Offering of $35 includes lunch. The stillness and unhurried days of Winter are an ideal time to experience “Rest in the Lord.”

Learn about Marriage Annulments Divorced Catholics and others who may be interested in learning about the annulment process are welcome to attend a free workshop with Jay Conzemius, JCL, judge and moderator; and Diane Kass, Tribunal Notary, of the Byzantine Catholic Metropolitan Tribunal and Diocese of Pittsburgh Tribunal. Topics will include: theology of marriage; ministry of the tribunal; marriage annulment types; why, when and how to start the petition for annulment

process; and a process overview. Afterward participants can ask questions and/or start the process. This important presentation will take place at St. John Byzantine Catholic Cathedral, 210 Greentree Road, Munhall, Pa. on Tuesday, Dec. 4, at 7 p.m. No reservations are required but if you do plan to attend email archpitt@aol.com, or call Diane Kass at 412-456-3033 so seating arrangements can be made. n

Abuse crisis discussed at synod continued from page 3

discern," the cardinal said. "We want to do something that will help intensify our commitment to change." For any real change to take place, he said, the bishops must collaborate with each other and with lay experts. Cardinal DiNardo said the bishops would begin their meeting Nov. 12 with some introductory business, but then would go directly into a day of prayer and fasting focused on the abuse crisis. Many of the items that the bishops were due to consider at the November meeting, he said, will be postponed to devote more time to considering concrete steps to take in response to the abuse crisis. However, he said, they will vote on the proposed statement, "Open Wide Our Hearts: The Enduring Call to Love -- A Pastoral Letter Against Racism." Cardinal DiNardo is a veteran of the Synod of Bishops. The gathering Oct. 3-28 on young people, the faith and vocational discernment was his third synod. "One of the best parts of this synod is obvious: the young people," he said. The 34 synod observers under the age of 30 "are lively, they applaud sometimes. They take a great interest in the speakers. They have been a very, very important part of the language groups," where synod members, observers and experts make recommendations for the gathering's final document. The young adults are serious about the church "listening to them, the church being attentive to them," he said. "They also are not opposed to the church's teaching necessarily at all. They want to be heard and

the byzantine catholic world

listened to, but they also want to draw on the vast beauty and tradition of the church and do some listening of their own." In his speech to the synod, Cardinal DiNardo asked that the final synod document include a reference to how following Jesus includes a willingness to embrace his life-giving cross. Young people are not afraid of a challenge, the cardinal said. "They may not always 'get' things of the church, but they know who Jesus is and Jesus is not mediocre; he doesn't want you and me to be mediocre. He wants us to follow him to the cross and only then to glory." Cardinal DiNardo said he was struck at the synod by the variety of young people and especially the variety of their experiences, including experiences of being persecuted for their Christian faith or the challenges of being part of a Christian minority. "Young people are much more serious than I think we give them credit for," he said. And, hearing a young person's story of faith probably is the most effective way to evangelize other young people. As for the Catholic Church's outreach to young people struggling with church teaching on sexuality or who are homosexual, Cardinal DiNardo said it is not a marginal issue in the lives of young people and it was not a marginal issue at the synod. "A lot of us wanted to mention it and say, 'Yes, it's a real issue; we have to accompany people,'" he said, "but we can't forget the words of the Lord, 'Follow me,' and that requires sometimes for all of us a conversion of hearts." n


PAGE 16

NOVEMBER 2018

liturgical schedule at the Seminary “Come, let us sing joyfully to the Lord”

around the archeparchy PIROHI SALE — Holy Ghost, 225 Olivia St., McKees Rocks, Pa. To order, call 412-331-5155 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday prior to sale. Pick-up 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fridays Nov. 2 to Dec. 14. Handmade, fully cooked, made fresh and ready to eat. Potato, sauerkraut and cheese. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT BREAKFAST BUFFET — 9 a.m.1 p.m. Nov. 11, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Cost is $6 for adults and $3 for ages 5 to 10. No charge for ages 4 and under. Sponsored by St. Mary’s Youth Group.

Join the Byzantine Catholic Seminary community for liturgical services at 3605 Perrysville Ave, Pittsburgh, Pa. Enter through the chapel door that faces Perrysville Avenue. It’s recommended visitors call 412-3218383 in advance so that we may be awaiting your arrival. For more information about the Seminary: go to www.bcs.edu. Schedule of Services for November:

1 2 3

7 a.m. Orthros (M), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 8:30 p.m. Small Compline (R) 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 4 p.m. Great Vespers (R), 7:45 p.m. Small Compline (R) 4 7 a.m. Festal Matins (R), 3:30 p.m. 9th Hour (R) 5 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 6 to 8 No services 9 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 7th Kathisma (R) 10 No services 11 7 a.m. Festal Orthros with Divine Liturgy (M), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 12 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy for the Departed (R) 13 7 a.m. Akathist to the Theotokos (R) 14 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 15 7 a.m. Matins (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 16 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 8th Kathisma (M) 17 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 5 p.m. Great Vespers (M) 18 7 a.m. Festal Matins with Divine Liturgy (R) 19 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R) 20 to 25 No services 26 11 a.m. Sixth Hour (R) 27 7 a.m. Emmanuel Moleben (R) 28 7 a.m. Divine Liturgy (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 29 7 a.m. 1st Hour (R), 4 p.m. 9th Hour (R), 9 p.m. Small Compline (R) 30 8 a.m. Divine Liturgy (M), 4 p.m. Vespers with 9th Kathisma (R) (M) Melkite

CHRISTMAS MARKET — Noon-6 p.m., Nov. 11, St. Elias, 4200 Homestead-Duquesne Road, Munhall, Pa. Start your Christmas shopping and enjoy stuffed cabbage, chicken paprikash, csoroge; and nut, poppyseed, apricot, apricot/ nut and levkar rolls. For information, call 412-461-1712 or email steliasbcc@comcast.net. ST. MARY’S (PAPER) TURKEY BINGO — 1-4 p.m. Nov. 18, St. Mary’s Center, Route 981, Trauger, Pa. Frozen turkeys given away; not grocery gift certificates. Doors open at noon. Admission: $5. Specials and Extra Sets will be sold. There will be a 50/50, door prizes and one Quickie. Kitchen will be open. For information, call 724-787-5631. TASTE OF HEAVEN COOKIE SALE — 9 a.m.-noon Dec. 1, St. Gregory, 2005 Mohawk Road, Upper St. Clair, Pa. Containers provided for you to select favorites from a large assortment of homemade cookies and holiday treats. Small container: $8; large container: $15. For directions, visit stgregoryusc.org. For information, call the Parish Office at 412-835-7800.

REMINDER: There will be a CHRISTMAS ISSUE (Dec. 25) of The BCW in addition to the monthly December issue. Please submit photos and stories about Christmas in your parish! Submissions deadline for the Christmas issue is Dec. 14.

(R) Ruthenian

dates to remember NOV. 4 Standard Time (“fall back”) resumes at 2 a.m. NOV. 8 Feast of Archangel Michael and All Angels

Official publication of the Byzantine Catholic Archeparchy of Pittsburgh

Byzantine Catholic Press Associates

NOV. 11 Veterans Day National Observance

66 Riverview Avenue Pittsburgh, PA 15214 Tel: 412.231.4000 Fax: 412.231.1697 E-mail: bcw@archpitt.org Web site: www.archpitt.org

NOV. 15 to DEC. 24 Philippian Fast

next issue:

NOV. 21 Feast of the Entrance of the Theotokos NOV. 22 Thanksgiving Day — Chancery closed Nov. 22 to 23 See more upcoming events at www.archpitt.org

the byzantine catholic world

DECEMBER 2018

submissions DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 23

November Issuu  
November Issuu