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SOUTH

EDI

Designing with purpose this Texasbased firm focuses on residential and commercial projects from coast to coast which have grown in scale since they opened their doors in 1976.

NORTHEAST

Wallover Aquatics With just five highly trained and specialized employees, Wallover Architects maintains exceptional design in the niche of aquatic architecture throughout the U.S. and beyond.

NATIONAL

Approaching each project with a zeroego attitude and a free-flow of ideas between clients and designers, The M Group cultivates the best environment for a building to grow.

ARCHITECTURE LEADERS TODAY

T H E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A P TA I N S O F I N D U S T RY www.architectureleaderstoday.com

Fall 2010 $24.95 USD $26.30 CAN

The M Group

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ARCHITECTURE LEADERS TODAY T H E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A P TA I N S O F I N D U S T RY www.architectureleaderstoday.com

Hoffman Architects | 66 SOUTH FLORIDA'S FINEST Providing beautiful and sustainable solutions, Hoffman Architects has a design portfolio that is as local as it is diverse and emphasizes modern architecture with a sense of culture and place.


in this issue T H E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A P TA I N S O F I N D U S T RY

ARCHITECTURE LEADERS TODAY

Editor-in-Chief Todd Weaver Editor Diana Doyle Executive Editor Jonathan Mack Assistant Editor Joseph Orange Creative Director Emily Detoro Art Director Stephanie Hess Director of Advertising Julian Vu Production Coordinator Jason Rone Assistant Production Coordinator Elizabeth Macks Photography Editor Ian Palmer Video Director Susan Maybach Editorial Director Kate Darling Editorial Production Rachel Goldberg Copy Editor William Finch Assistant Copy Editor Amy Roberts Content Directors Brandon McBride (W), Aaron McGaskey (SW), Juan Orellana (NE), Mike Rodgers (Nation), Juan Stewart (SE) Vendor Relations Director Diana Stephens Vendor Relations Eric Miller, Steve Peters Advertising Sales Director Peter Jostens Advertising Sales Coordinator Patricia O’Brien Advertising Sales Moe Kazemi, David Levi, Tom Nichols Publisher Steve Reed oZ WORLD MEDIA, LLC 1100 H Street NW, Suite M Washington D.C. 20005 www.architectureleaderstoday.com Architecture Leaders Today is an international quarterly B2B trade journal that services the architecture industry in design/ build, education and healthcare architecture, interior design, and residential and commercial sectors. ALT has a readership of 200,000 C-Level executives within the architecture industry. We do not accept subscription requests from the general public, however an abbreviated version is available on our website.

06 Editor’s Note 09 Letters to the Editor 10 Hot Ten List NORTHEAST HISTORIC

14 Guggenheimer Architects Originally from Switzerland, Tobias Guggenheimer grew up living and learning in many diverse places. His highly successful architectural design firm continues to expand around the world.

MULTI-DISCIPLINE

20 Baranski, Hammer, Moretta & Sheehy Through knowledge, experience and enthusiasm, Baranski Hammer Moretta & Sheehy has remained a driving force in custom residential, institutional and commercial design and planning through Illinois and beyond.

AQUATIC

24 Wallover Aquatics With just five highly trained and specialized employees, Wallover Architects maintains exceptional design in the niche of aquatic architecture throughout the U.S. and beyond.

WEST

32 Berman & Brent Berman & Brent, AIA Architectural Corporation is all about working for generations, with Berman originally developing his talents in architecture while working in construction.

HOSPITALITY

34 Degen & Degen Seattle-based Degen & Degen approaches each project with the belief that commercial hospitality design is one of the most complex and multifaceted forms of architectural and interior design.

CUSTOM HOMES

40 Jeffrey L. Miller Architects From his first project, his grandmother’s house, through word of mouth, Jeffrey L Miller has expanded his clientele to a variety of projects across the Pacific Northwest.

MIDWEST

48 RDL Architects

RDL Architects is a company with a big heart, building under a threetiered vision of simple, economical, and beautiful designs of which, 75 percent are tax credit housing and urban revitalization projects.

4 Architecture Leaders Today


GREEN BUILDING

HISTORIC

52 Ann Arbor Architects Collaborative

94 Thomas H. Hughes Architecture

A3C Collaborative Architecture, a leader in green design, has been partnering with clients to create responsive, sustainable solutions since its founding in 1983.

CUSTOM HOMES

56 SKD Architects Steve Kleineman and his firm SKD Architects have kept their staff small on purpose, driving their success through focusing on client relations ships and a severe attention to detail.

SOUTH

66 Hoffman Architects

A strength of Thomas H. Hughes Architecture, P.C. is its diverse portfolio. Starting with mainly retail projects they branched out to commercial, educational and religious projects, helping keep strong during these tough economic times.

EDUCATION

98 Gideon Toal This Fort Worth-based company tackles a variety of speciality architecture projects and has a flair for bringing out the best in each and every project.

NATIONAL

108 Brendel Architects

Providing beautiful and sustainable solutions, Hoffman Architects has a design portfolio that emphasizes modern architecture with a sense of culture and place.

With constant attention to the personality and taste of the client, Brendel Architects is perfectly suited to provide your dreams the way you want them.

72 Cope Associates

CORPORATE

Since Lanis Cope was a boy he knew that he wanted to be an architect and his dream came true. The firm of Cope & Associates can boast over 30 design awards and an extremely varied client base.

110 The M Group

76 Pimsler Hoss Architects

GOVERNMENT

Balance, creativity and diversity have carried the Atlanta-based firm of PHA towards being one of the most successful firms in the southeastern United States.

116 Leach Mounce

80 Cummings McCrady Dating back to 1911 the Charleston-based firm of Cummings & McCrady focuses on sustainable architectural design that will stand the test of time.

MULTI-DISCIPLINE

84 Brown Chambless This highly regarded firm handles a variety of projects, from lodging/hospitality and retail development to commercial facilities and healthcare. Services include architecture, interior design, project management, planning and cost management.

HOSPITALITY

86 EDI International Designing with purpose, EDI International focuses on residential and commercial projects from coast to coast which have grown in scale since they opened their doors in 1976.

The M Group approaches each project with a zero-ego attitude and a free-flow of ideas between clients and designers, cultivating the best environment for a building to grow.

Leach Mounce Architects has proven expertise in the public safety architecture market, providing a full range of services to architects designing law enforcement facilities, communications centers, detention facilities, security systems, and a myriad of other public safety structures.

INTERNATIONAL

122 HOK Since its founding in 1955, HOK remains committed to providing exceptional services, helping clients find innovative, artistic and responsible project solutions. Now with 23 offices around the globe, HOK is world renown for their exceptional work for a variety of industries.

LANDSCAPE

128 David Gates & Associates Environmental awareness is a vital for Gates & Associates, a landscape architecture, land planning and urban design firm based in San Ramon, Calif., that has maintained a 33 year history of success in designing natural environments.

Fall 2010 5


editor’s note

TODD WEAVER editor@ozworldmedia.com

jane caffrey

Jane Caffrey earned a B.A. from Carleton College in Minnesota. Currently in her Master’s program at New York University, Jane’s work has been published in both the U.S. and Europe.

rob janis

is the second tallest building in the city at 590 ft. The building is famous for its daring architecture by Pritzker Prize winner Sir Norman Foster and ex-partner Ken Shuttleworth. Spire- Chicago On hold. (designed by Santiago Calatrava and Perkins and Will, structural engineering by Thornton Tomasetti, developed by Shelbourne Development) While Calatrava designed the spire to evoke images of a smoke spiral coming from a campfire on the Chicago River lit by indigenous Native Americans, the public labeled the design a giant drill bit. This 2,000 ft. skyscraper on Lake Shore Drive will include LEED Gold Certified condominiums. Sustainable features include recycled rainwater, river water used for cooling, ornithologically-sensitive glass to protect migratory birds, intelligent building and management systems, waste storage and recycling management, and monitored outdoor air delivery. SEED- Haiti In prototype stage. (research and development by Clemson University in partnership with Containerit, Intermodal Steel Building Units Assn, Sargent Metals and Tri-County Technical) After being influenced by the record-shattering Haiti earthquake, professors and students utilized an existing surplus of shipping containers, to researching and developing an affordable housing solution for the Caribbean Region. Shipping containers can carry 67,200 pounds and resist winds up to 140 mph. With modification, a 40-foot shipping container can be a safe, comfortable and environmentally friendly home for thousands.

With over 30 years of business writing experience for titles such as Black Enterprise and Hispanic Business Journal, Rob brings an insightful perspective to issues in the construction, energy and education industries.

joan tupponce

his holiday season, we’re not only thankful for our friends, family and health. We’re also raising our glasses to this millennium’s amazing architectural milestones and even paying our respect to the many noble failed attempts due to the recession. Here are ALT staff ’s most appreciated projects or concepts of the decade: Burj Al Arab- Dubai Opened 1999 (designed by Tom Wright of WS Atkins PLC, built by Said Khalil, interior design by Khuan Chew of KCA International, developed by Jumeirah) The world’s only seven-star hotel in Dubai, UAE standing at 1,053 ft. was once the tallest building in the city. It stands on an artificial island 900 ft. off Jumeirah beach and is connected to the mainland by a private curving bridge. It is an iconic structure, designed to symbolize Dubai's urban transformation and to mimic the billowing sail of a boat. Dongtan Eco City- Shanghai Behind schedule, 2050. (master plan by Arup, developed by Shanghai Industrial Investment Corp.) The world’s first fully sustainable cosmopolis is situated on an island three hours from Shanghai. Originally, phase one was scheduled for completion in 2010 and would accommodate 10,000. Ultimately, it will be the size of Manhattan expected to be completed in 2050. 30 St. Mary Axe- London Opened 2004 (designed by Norman Foster, built by Skanska, owned and occupied by Swiss Re) Located in the main financial district, this building, also known as The Gherkin or Swiss Re Tower,

contributors

Joan’s experiences as a writer have taken her places that wouldn’t have been possible in other careers. Her success is evident in the awards and recognitions her writing has received.

joel cornell

T

TOP OF THE CHARTS

rebecca rodriguez

With a background in technical writing, Joel excels at translating complex jargon into vivid narratives. Past works include projects with the Department of State, Department of Defense, World Bank, and other retail giants.

Rebecca enjoys a career of writing about critical issues and prominent business leaders of our time. Her work has been recognized both locally and nationally.

6 Architecture Leaders Today


Letters to the Editor

INDUSTRY LEADERS TODAY AND OZ WORLD MEDIA ARE CONTINUOUSLY WORKING TO IMPROVE THE EDITORIAL EXPERIENCE THROUGH INSIGHTFUL CONTENT AND IMPECCABLE CUSTOMER SERVICE. HERE’S WHAT OTHER INDUSTRY LEADERS ARE SAYING...

THANK YOU SO MUCH for the wonderful article in Construction Leaders Today! What a pleasant surprise to see a full page reference to our article on the first page on the e-magazine on your website. We feel honored to have such a beautiful multi-page spread in your magazine. We also appreciate the photo credit reference to Leper Studios. The photo looked splendid and where laid out exquisitely. It was a pleasure working with your company that not only has high integrity but also created an impressive end result. We look forward to future collaborations with your company! Thank you again!

corporate profile | electric

Margie Grace Grace Design Associates Summer 2010

electric | corporate profile

spotlight | post-tensioning

post-tensioning | spotlight

international

| architecture

architecture

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A Full Menu at FPU

Stepping Out by Jane Caffrey

Although it was invented years ago, post-tensioning remains somewhat of novel concept within the construction industry. With this method, a network of steel cables are laid out to provide high tensile strength to a structure, and are then covered with concrete to ensure compressive strength. Once the concrete hardens, the cables are pulled by a hydraulic jack and held in place by anchors, creating a reinforcing system commonly used on parking garages, sky rises, tanks, bridges, and residential fountains. “Post-tensioning is a real niche service, and not a lot of people know what PT is,” Dawn Kori, President of Post Tensioning Cables, Inc., said. “There are some new construction companies that have never done post-tensioning, so they don’t know the scope of our work. We want them to know we’re there for them, with a focus on service and quality.” Beyond assisting with advanced technology and a unique method, Kori breaks new ground in the construction industry by serving as the only female president of a post-tensioning company in the nation. “Right now, PTC is the only womanrun post-tensioning company in the

Fayetteville Public Utility’s (FPU) breadth of services has made them a high-tech, one-stop-shop for customers. In addition to electric and natural gas, this public utility in South-Central Tennessee offers water, waste water, cable and Internet. Last July, voice over IP was offered for the first time. The popularity of the utility’s telecommunications services is taking off. The department was added in 1999 and is now serving about 3,000 customers. “We see our company as being one of the leaders in new technology,” said Britt Dye, CEO and general manager. There are not many municipal utilities in the nation offering telecommunication services, he added. The telecommunications department is growing its customer base by about 2 percent per year. Dye is pleased with the growth rate but would like to see it increase even further. He is also looking to soon expand into rural areas, explaining that he is pursuing more grant and federal stimulus money. “We are looking into all avenues to get funds to build that infrastructure,” he said. Growing the telecommunications department into such a strong Energy Leaders Today Spring 2010 31

You did a great job with the Fayetteville Public Utilities story. We are very proud of the article and would like all our employees and board members to have a copy to keep.

Britt Dye Fayetteville Public Utilities Spring 2010

2

Dawn Kori breaks new ground with an innovative construction method, and by heading the only woman-run posttensioning company in the nation

by Rebecca Rodriguez

30 Energy Leaders Today Spring 2010

| international

ALL PHOTOS COUTESY OF INTERNATIONAL DESIGN GROUP.

1. Old World “Heaven Sent” Estate, Pebble Beach, Calif. 2. John E. Matthams, left and Jun A. Sillano, A.I.A., right.

26 Construction Leaders Today Spring 2010

Spring 2010 Construction Leaders Today 27

Your staff did a wonderful job delineating our company goals and products. Thank you very much to all involved.

Dawn Kori PTC Inc Spring 2010

Legacy homes are created by International Design Group, where exemplary design defines success in the architectural field. by Jane Caffrey

110 Construction Leaders Today

Jun A. Sillano, A.I.A., President of International Design Group, holds projects completed by the company to the highest standards in modern architecture and design. “I call them modern American castles,” he said. “In America, there are no castles. But I call them legacy homes; testaments to American individual success.” While specializing in high-end, luxury homes IDG has also been a pioneer in the commercial, hospitality, and sports fitness industries, designing structures across the nation and the globe. With each project, sound architecture meets detailed interior design, resulting in

buildings that live up to royal standards. International Design Group became a recognized name on the West Coast in the mid 1980s, when founder John E. Matthams started to remodel Victorian homes in Pacific Grove, Calif. Matthams has been working in the fields of architecture and design for more than 45 years, including the 25 years that he has served the Pacific Grove area. Sillano joined forces with Matthams soon after the company’s foundation, bringing diversified expertise in Urban Planning, Resort Design, and Sustainable Design. As the company grew under the two business partners, IDG began to Summer 2010 111

The magazine looks great! And our two boxes of brochures look great! We can’t wait to update our website with this wonderful new material!

Evelyn Lambdin International Design Group Summer 2010

Fall 2010 9


hot

10 list

we scoured the market and selected our favorite new products to line your projects - inside and out.

1 2 3 4

Big Ass Fans

These low energy fans have a lot more going for them than just their interesting name. With ten blades ranging from six to 24 feet long, these babies can move up to 337,000 cubic feet of air per minute over 20,000 sq. ft. That’s some serious wind power.

green fiber Cellulose Insulation Cellulose insulation is made from recycled newsprint and other paper sources which would normally end up in landfills. If all the paper currently being put into landfills were converted to cellulose insulation, it would save approximately eight million tons of CO2 emissions per year.  That’s the equivalent of taking every car off the road in New Mexico and Nevada. So pump that recycled installation in your walls and warm your house while cooling your planet.

staff pick! $66/pair

SMART Solar Stepping Stones Illuminate garden paths and walkways with our solar-powered stepping stones made from natural slate stabilized with a resin base. These garden path lights are powered by an integral solar panel, that auto-charges to provide up to eight hours of LED light. No wiring; simple installation; rechargeable battery pack included.

10 Architecture Leaders Today

Cyber rain Weather Detecting Sprinklers No more over-grown lawns or dry, crunchy grasses for you. Cyber Rain, probably the most technologically advanced sprinkler system out there, uses your internet to get real-time weather updates and seasonal conditions to decide when to water your lawn, so you can save double the green in cash and grass.


5 6

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10 list

ikea Sunnan solar lamps These solar powered work lamps come in a variety of colors that are bound to brighten your day. Each lamp includes three solar rechargeable batteries. While the lamp is for indoor use, you simply remove the solar panel package and charge it outside in maximum sunlight.

Benjamin Moore Natura Paint This zero VOC, virtually odorless formula doesn’t compromise on performance. It dries fast, has excellent adhesion and provides a durable finish with an unlimited color selection. Natura features their Green Promise designation, so you can breathe easy knowing that you’ve used the very best for your environmentally sensitive projects.

modern eco homes Earth Friendly Furniture

This vertical grain bamboo table is “eco chic” and lets your guests know that you are both hip and environmentally savvy. Stronger than oak, bamboo is considered the most durable hardwood and when laminated, it’s nearly as strong as soft steel. Farmed bamboo stabilizes the earth with its roots, preventing erosion and produces 35 percent more oxygen than an equivalent stand of trees.

Mitticool clay fridge

7 8 9 10

This fridge might not be the most techy or shiny, but it does its job with no electricity required – which makes it one of the most savvy fridges out there. Developed in 1997 in Gujarat, India, this clay fridge, with it’s terracotta exterior, would be perfect energy-saver for your deck or patio. Plus, the glass door ensures you’ll never run out of beer on a hot day.

sun mar Composting toilettes At first thought, the idea of composting your own waste is kind of... gross. But this self-contained toilet is certified by the National Sanitation Foundation, who found this ecopotty to be clean and odorless. It produces safe composting material, so you can line your garden with the most ecofriendly, affordable manure out there.

Moby Rain Barrel This huge 65 gallon capacity rain barrel is a fantastic and easy to use method for cutting the cost of your water bill. The green and black Moby barrels featured here are made from 100 percent recycled plastic and produced in North Carolina. The top of the barrel has a large catchment area so it’s easy to divert water from your downspout into it. It has a brass spigot at the base.

Fall 2010 11


NORTHE A ST

INSIDE: GUGGENHEIMER ARCHITECTS; BARANSKI, HAMMER, MORETTA & SHEEHY; WALLOVER AQUATICS


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TOBIASGUGGENHEIMER ARCHITECTS, P.C.

14 Architecture Leaders Today


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REIMAGINING THE POSSIBILITIES OF DESIGN by Joel Cornell

Originally from Switzerland, Tobias Guggenheimer grew living and learning in many diverse places around the world. His highly successful architectural design firm, Guggenheimer Architects, is currently based in Westchester County, New York and continues to expand around the world via a new office in the Philippines and several more to come. Guggenheimer had first gained an interest in architectural design from the perspective of an academic. “My initial interests were in a career in academia,” Guggenheimer said. “I first gained a degree in literature and had intentions on developing that as a career. My interest had always intersected with my hobbies in art, and particularly in sculptures. Over time, I began slowly drifting away from working in academia and began taking a more active interest in three dimensional artistry and design.”

After graduating from Binghamton University in New York, Guggenheimer went back to Europe, where he had several old friends who were active in the architecture business in Italy. Through his experiences during this time, he gained great exposure to some of the classic and vast traditions in architectural design. “I realized that architecture would be a great combination of the academic and the cultural, the artistic and the technical,” Guggenheimer said. Before fully committing to his career in architecture, Guggenheimer moved his family to Evergreen, Colorado where began learning every OPPOSITE PAGE & ABOVE: Tuxedo Park Lakefront House. View from the southeast, the living room, kitchen and den.

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16 Architecture Leaders Today

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"I REALIZED THAT ARCHITECTURE WOULD BE A GREAT COMBINATION OF THE ACADEMIC AND THE CULTURAL, THE ARTISTIC AND THE TECHNICAL."

CARLISLE WIDE PLANK FLOORS When working to design a new home, or remodel an existing one, it is critical that every aspect carry the homeowners’ vision thru to the finest detail.  With the variety of decisions that are made it is important to recognize what aspects of your home will act as the foundation for the myriad of decisions you have to make.  Carlisle Wide Planks Floors believe that clients’ floors are the one thing that needs to be right.  Homeowners can always paint a room or change the curtains, but floors will always be the centerpiece of a home’s design for years to come.  In order to get this right Carlisle pursues long term relationships with their architects and designers, such as Tobias Guggenheimer, so that, as partners, they can fulfill clients’ unique vision every time.  Carlisle’s Design Consultants work one on one to clearly understand the expectations and turn that vision into a precise specification for their craftsmen.  From rustic to contemporary, each floor is then created one board at a time and tailored for each customer’s vision by Carlisle’s skilled New England craftsmen. For more information, visit www.wideplankflooring.com.

aspect of the construction process. In 1980, he quite literally built his own house from the ground up, from digging the holes out of recycled materials to installing all the passive and active solar systems to creating the initial designs for the project. After years of experimenting with creative styles in architectural design, Guggenheimer completed a new design for a retiring architect who loved his designs and helped to establish his love for design. He attended the School of Architecture at the University of Colorado in Denver to receive his license in architecture before moving to New York to establish his firm in 1991. Guggenheimer Architects began small and has stayed that way ever since. Over the years, they have come to specialize in higher end residential work, mainly concentrated in the metropolitan New York region. There was always far less opportunities for new construction projects in the bustling towns surrounding New York City, so the firm learning to specialize in renovating older residences. Approximately 40 percent of their work is in the heart of New York City; an additional 40 percent takes place in the nearby suburb of Tuxedo Park; and about 20 percent near Guggenheimer’s headquarters in Westchester County, N.Y. “We began our work in Tuxedo Park about 12 years ago,” Guggenheimer said. “It was already established as a historic and attractive planned community to cater to workers and middle class folk located in the Ramapo Mountains. It was meant to be something akin to a northern Italian lake country where people would rent houses for varied periods of time. “Our first project there was for a project called the Hay House (verify spelling). We took the whole place apart and rebuilt it in a new contemporary style that also respected the original intentions of the architect. Our work there went on to bring us dozens of projects within Tuxedo Park, ranging from similar renovations to new homes to feasibility studies. Over the past decade, we’ve been the single most active architecture firm in that neighborhood.” Much of the work that Guggenheimer Architects does is unique in that their renovations projects rarely require the occupants to leave their home during the construction process. On one notable project, the owner suffered from severe illness triggered by even low level toxins or allergens such as dust, dirt or off gassing due to glues and chemicals. Guggenheimer designed a temporary second home for the family directly on the property that was connected via a covered walkway to the main building. This allowed the family to remain close by during construction while still able to live comfortably and easily. Although 95 percent of the design and building work that Guggenheimer Architects does is in the metropolitan New York area, they have taken on a massive expansion of the presence internationally. The firm has recently completed a master plan for a new resort hotel in Egypt just off the OPPOSITE TOP & ABOVE: Restored Historic Mansion in Tuxedo Park. View of the house exterior and the kitchen after restoration. BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Twin Turret House in Tuxedo Park after restoration. Exterior view and west view of the kitchen.

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coast of the Red Sea. Several years ago, Guggenheimer establish a satellite office in the Philippines to help facilitate work with their clients there. “We have our office here where we get the majority of our design work done,” Guggenheimer said,” while our office in the Philippines works in person with our clients during our nights so we don’t have to change our process or do any work without daily, direct input from the client.” Guggenheimer Architects also has done work across the U.S., into Sri Lanka, Nepal and Bhutan. Guggenheimer also maintains a wide range of contacts throughout Southeast Asia for two reasons: he is highly involved in doing non-profit work for schools and health clinics, especially for women in communities there where they are under served; and also for providing his clients in the U.S. with a diverse collection of Asian antiques, art, sculptures and rarities. Parallel to his architectural practice, Guggenheimer also gives back to the architectural community in tremendous ways. He still remains active in the academic community. During the first few decades of his practice, he was involved with the Pratt Institute as a professor of architectural design and technology. Afterwards, he became the director of interior design at Marymount College in New York, before being asked to teach at the Parson School of Design. He has also authored two books: A Taliesin Legacy, a study on the students and apprentices of Frank Lloyd Wright; and a new book concerning the history and utility of direct competition within the industry of architectural design. Despite their small size, Guggenheimer Architects is able to offer a broad range of experience and expertise to each client. Whether in renovating a Depression Era building in Tuxedo Park or non-profit projects in Sri Lanka, Guggenheimer is able to provide specialized and professional service to high end and non-profit clients alike. Currently, Guggenheimer Architects is focusing on their international development throughout Southeast Asia, as well as developing their presence with the realm of non-profit and social service design for education and healthcare. ALT BELOW: Rendering of the north view of a Shingle Style Country House in Tuxedo Park. All photos courtesy of Tobias Guggenheimer Architect, P.C.

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Baranski, Hammer, Moretta & Sheehy

True Dedication to client and community by Joel Cornell ABOVE: Private residence, Galena, Ill. This 6,000 sq. ft. house is built on a wooded site in rural Jo Daviess County. The house's wings spread out and engage the site so that most of the rooms have three walls of natural light. The first floor steps down the site allowing the living spaces in the rear to connect directly with the forest floor. The exterior brick transitions to the interior at the entry tower with the goal of unifying the entire building. Photo by Jim Baranski. OPPOSITE PAGE: LDB Corporate Headquarters, Mohave Valley, Ariz. This 6,000 sq. ft. office building is located in one of the hottest areas of the U.S. The building has a curving blue wall down its center unifying the spaces within. Every major space in the building has a view of the wall or is bounded by it. The wall's blue color was selected to temper the desert heat by providing a "visual coolness" for the occupants. Photo by Jim Baranski.

20 Architecture Leaders Today

Fueled by an expansive range of expertise and decades of combined experience, the architecture and planning firm of Baranski Hammer Moretta & Sheehy (BHMS) has kept itself on the cutting edge of technology and design. Based in Galena, Ill., with offices in Chicago, BHMS has thrived by focusing their efforts on serving their clients, embracing creativity through design and completing projects accurately, with quality and on time. BHMS serves clients on institutional, commercial, multi-family residential, and custom residential projects. Unlike many companies that start in and expand from large cities, this firm started in 1991 in the small historic community of Galena (pop. 3,000), and expanded with an additional office in Chicago in 2004. In 2006, Principals Jim Baranski and Bob Hammer acquired the well-established Evanston, Ill. firm of Moretta & Sheehy Architects to form BHMS. “Combining our firms served to broaden our range, expand our client base into institutional markets, and give us a more diverse array of specialized talents,” Baranski said. The Chicago office provides opportunities for largescale projects, and proximity to the firm’s Chicago clients, which include Loyola University. BHMS tends to manage anywhere from three or more projects for the university at one time; from renovating an older building into the university’s new law school facilities,

to the design and planning of new laboratories. Among their current Loyola projects, BHMS is working on the renovation and expansion of facilities in Woodstock, Ill. that will serve as a retreat and ecology campus for the university, and on a new 250-seat performing arts theatre in the Mundelein Center Building in Chicago. The firm’s small-town roots have established both a strong reliance on advanced technology to fully meet the needs of clients regardless of location, as well as an emphasis on personal relationships and excellent communication. The firm’s policy to work closely with clients and contractors throughout each project ensures that designs fully meet the client’s needs, and that the final construction is a true depiction of the design. 3-D computer modeling and renderings allow for clear representations of proposed designs so clients can visualize what the final product will look like, and easily participate in the design process. The technological ability to transfer information rapidly between the architect, client and contractors complements the firm’s reputation for moving quickly on projects and meeting difficult deadlines. “When working in institutional/university markets, the deadlines are non-negotiable, because the students will be coming back in the fall, one way or another,” Hammer said. The firm’s overall design philosophy is to create build-


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ings and spaces that are timeless in that they are well proportioned and elegantly detailed, and yet they also clearly reflect the period in which they have been created. Practical, functional design that meets the client’s program is the first priority. BHMS can provide LEED AP services, but sustainable design considerations are built into every project. “Clients will ultimately save money when using design methods, building supplies and energy sources that are sustainable,” Baranski said. BHMS’s approach to design and client service has allowed the firm to remain busy throughout this rough economy. Much of the work is due to repeat business and new work obtained through client referrals – the best measure of client satisfaction. As the economy improves, BHMS looks forward to expanding its client base and having the opportunity to tackle new project types. ALT

THIS PAGE: Loyola University 4th floor information commons, Chicago, Ill. Special request by the University President for BHMS to complete the top floor of a newly completed building on the lakefront. The project is a 4,000 sq. ft. glass enclosed penthouse to be used as a lounge/meeting and seminar space. Photo by Matt Krol. OPPOSITE PAGE: (TOP) RBC Tech Center, Elk Grove Village, Ill. This 100,000 sq. ft. speculative office building was designed to attract high-tech business with a need for office and warehouse space. Silver horizontal ribbed siding and patterns of flat metal panels and green glass are used to enhance the hgh-tech image of the building. BHMS receimed this commissions after winning a design competition sponsored by the developer. Photo by Tom Sheehy; (BOTTOM) Private Residence, Galena, Ill. This house is organized around a central gallery space that is naturally lit with a a clerstory. The gallery's focal point is a two story stone fireplace flanked by two window walls looking into the forest beyond. The two-car garage is attached to the house with stepped pergola structure. Photo by Bob Humbert.

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ELARA ENGINEERING Earlier this year Elara was presented with a First Place 2010 ASHRAE International Excellence in Engineering Technology Award for innovation in their engineering design for Loyola University’s Information Commons Building. Elara served as the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection and information technology engineer on the project. (Sustainability Consultant: Transsolar Klimaengineering, Architect: Solomon Cordwell Buenz).

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24 Architecture Leaders Today

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architecture

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Edwin Wallover on Archetypes in Aquatic Architecture How One Small Pennsylvania Firm Is Making Waves Around The World by Joel Cornell

It’s one thing to work a firm into a “niche” of architecture. It’s another thing altogether to maintain a firm with a staff of five highly trained employees, each with a bachelor’s degree in architecture, who can provide a specialized set of skills to clients, while still keeping a broad range of services open to anyone with a project that needs quality design behind it. First incorporated in Canton, Ohio in 1982, Wallover Architects began based on founding Principal Edwin Wallover’s love for historic renovations. “We started out as most firms do,” said Wallover, “as a general practice with no substantive direction or specialty at first. After I graduated from Kent State in the late 1970s, there was a big idea that adaptive reuse was the future of architectural design. Historic renovation was a big interest of mine, so we started to go that way; and fortunately that’s where the industry was going too.” After their initial successes, Wallover Architects relocated to Lancaster, Pa. in 1986. One of their first successful historic renovations projects in Pennsylvania was

The Hotel Wellington in Carlisle, originally designing recreational and aquatic facilities, constructed in the late 19th century. The they also offer their expertise in the form of hotel was the first four-story structure in on-site project management and feasibility the city. It had been vacant for over a decade projects. Wallover always maintains a close when Wallover took the reins, and was to working relationship with any project that be reinvented as an office and apartment his firm designs. This hands-on approach has space. Upon completion, the project won extended to clients who already have their an award from the Pennsylvania Historical designs in motion, but simply need qualified and Museum Commission in 1988. personnel acting on the client’s behalf with no Wallover Architects took on many recreational bias towards profit. projects in their early years, and quickly began “Recently we’ve observed that contracto gain a reputation for their skill at designing tors have had difficulty providing qualified, recreational and aquatic facilities. responsible personnel in a supervisory role “It all started with the first few projects that on smaller projects,” said Wallover. “As we we did well and enjoyed doing,” said Wallover. tend towards a lot of municipal projects, “My wife’s career background was municipal and therapeutic recreation. This gave us the ability to view our projects Ray Palmer Associates, Inc. (RPA) has been in the institutional and commercial from the perspective of the pool business for nearly fifty years building and servicing aquatic facilities of architect, facility managers all sizes. Their expertise in understanding pool mechanics and operations and programmers, and also, makes them uniquely qualified to construct, modify, or repair your pool or next project. It is their attention to detail and quality that have made RPA the end user.” stand out from other pool companies in owner satisfaction. Regardless of In addition to Wallover size, RPA is pleased to quote or offer guidance on any aquatic facility project. Architect’s specialization in Call Jeff Landry at 973-989-1205 to discuss your next project.

RAY PALMER ASSOCIATES

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26 Architecture Leaders Today

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architecture

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PREVIOUS PAGE AND THIS PAGE: Corona Park Aquatic Center, Flushing Meadow, Queens, N.Y. This 25 x 50 meter stretch competitive pool was developed in association with Handel Architects and Hom+Goldman Architects for a multi-use recreation facility on the site of the 1939 & 1964 World’s Fair. Designed as a potential Olympic swimming competition venue and local recreation facility, the pool includes one and three meter diving, a larger moveable floor section and dual moveable bulkheads. The 10-lane, 53 meter pool is designed to maximize performance and include flexibility for multiple aquatic sports including diving, 25 and 50 meter racing, water polo, synchronized swimming, and leisure activities.

the input and desires from the individual are often put aside for the assumed needs of the community. Before any ground is broken on any municipal or community-based project, we survey the people living in the community to engage them to refine and help form the core of what the client wants accomplished. “One of the most important parts of being an architect is the ability to communicate with everyone who is involved. Each project is unique to the wants and needs to the client, but sometimes they don’t know exactly how to articulate that. Through feasibility analysis, surveys of the community and key user groups and our own experience and expertise, we’re able to bring to the client everything they want and some things they didn’t even know they wanted.” For the past six years, Wallover had been a featured speaker of the USA Swimming’s Regional Build a Pool Conferences. USA Swimming is the national governing body for competitive swimming in the United States. These conferences help to inspire communication between architects, contractors, community leaders and swimming enthusiasts and to encourage the sport to grow in every region of the U.S. Wallover Architect has built and maintained a reputation that has carried their name around the world. In 2008, the Ukrainian National Swimming Federation invited Wallover to speak at their national conference. “Recently in the Ukraine,” said Wallover, “there has been a significant problem of accidental drowning. There’s also been a problem there, and in many former Soviet countries, of the prevalent use of tobacco and alcohol, amongst the old and the young. Our mission there was virtually the same as it is here in the U.S. We want to help to develop community facilities for recreation and sport to bring social and health issues to the forefront of people’s minds.” Though Wallover Architects acts as an advisor and feasibility consultant across the country, the majority of their projects come from the East Coast, from Florida to New England. In 2008, Wallover Architects was the Aquatic Design Consultant working with Handel Architects and Hom-Goldman Architects, both of New York City, for a new $66.3 million Corona Park natatorium and ice rink in Queens, N.Y.

PULSAIR In conjunction with Wallover Architects, Pulsair Systems’ specified and designed a SoftWater system for the new Greensboro Aquatic Center. Diffusers were installed under six diving stations including the 1 and 3 meter spring boards and the 7.5 and 10 meter platforms. The diving instructor activates the bubble generators using a hand held transmitter. For more information, visit www.pulsair.com.

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THIS PAGE: Kennett Square Golf & Country Club swimming pool, tennis pavilion and cart storage, Kennet Square, Pa. The Project involved the design and development of a new 25 meter, 6-lane competition pool with an integral diving well, and elevated decks. The raised foundation provides both participants and spectators with an exceptional view of the golf course. Integrating a separate wading pool, snack bar and tennis facilities was an important aspect of the overall design. Effective utilization of the sloped site provided for the addition of a tennis pro shop and golf cart storage facility on ground level. The project also included new ADA compliant dressing, locker rooms and shower facilities. All photos courtesy of Wallover Aquatics.

28 Architecture Leaders Today

The center has been awarded “Best Pool in New York City” for 2010. Currently, Wallover Architects is part of a team of three architectural firms designing the $19 million regional aquatic center located at the Greensboro Coliseum in Greensboro, N.C. Rosser International of Atlanta was the principal architect; TFF Architects of Greensboro, N.C was the architect of record and Wallover architects served as the aquatic design consulting architect. “The Greensboro project featured state of the art systems for filtration and lighting,” said Wallover, “and it was truly a pleasure to work on that kind of community center with such a desire to be the very best. The entire center will be a tremendous asset for the community.” Especially when dealing with buildings

for a community and not just an individual, Wallover stressed the importance of how architecture can impact people and how a community interacts. “It’s a welcome challenge to come up with facilities that respect the architecture of the surrounding environment, all while maintaining their own identity,” said Wallover. “That whole idea is incredibly important in any building we do, no matter how diverse the client type or user group. “We feel strongly about the fact that we use architecture and our profession as a way to bring a very important sports and wellness activity to communities in the U.S. and beyond. I personally love the fact that we are involving people daily outside the discipline of architecture to create a fantastic end result.” ALT

ENGINEERED TREATMENT SYSTEMS Engineered Treatment Systems LLC (ETS) is a leader in ultraviolet technology.  UV is a non-chemical approach to continually reduce harmful chloramines; a by-product of chlorine use.  Patrons, swimmers, and staff will be protected from enhanced irritation. UV as supplemental disinfection destroys chlorine resistant pathogens like Cryptosporidium with no by-products.  ETS’s nationwide distributor network provide skilled technical support close at hand to insure reliability. ETS’s five year warranty is the finest in the industry, and their Validated Systems are the most efficient in the industry and meet USEPADGM standards. Made with pride in the USA. For more information, visit www.ets-uv.com.


architecture

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WEST

INSIDE: BERMAN & BRENT AIA, DEGEN & DEGEN, JEFFREY L. MILLER ARCHITECT P.C.


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| architecture

Berman & Brent AIA

The highest quality design-build architecture achieved through technology, experience and artistry by Joel Cornell THIS PAGE: 270-Unit Spring Valley Lake Multi-Family Condominium Project, Green Tree Blvd., Victorville, Calif. TOP OPPOSITE PAGE: Five unit multi-family residential condominium project, Clark Street, West Hollywood, Calif. SECOND: Custom home, Orum Road Bel Air, Calif. BOTTOM LEFT: Five unit multifamily residential condominium project, 16th Street, Santa Monica, Calif. BOTTOM RIGHT: LA GOCCIA commercial project. Brand Blvd. Glendale, Calif. All photos courtesy of Berman & Brent AIA.

32 Architecture Leaders Today

Berman & Brent, AIA Architectural Corporation is all about working for generations. “We leverage the best technology and artistic experience as we work with each new generation of high profile real estate developers, owners and tenants. We have extensive experience in recognizing and taking advantage of innovative and cost reducing methods, techniques and strategies to successfully complete many varied projects and fulfill our client’s objective,” President and lead architect Irving Berman said on the company website. Berman & Brent, AIA was originally founded as Stanley M. Brent, AIA in 1977, though it wasn’t incorporated until 1996. Brent operated in a variety of stages over the years, by himself and partnered with other principals. It wasn’t until Berman joined in 2007 that it became the firm it is today. Although Brent has since retired, B&B, AIA is still going as strong as it has been for the past 33 years. Berman originally started developing his talents in architecture while he was working in construction. “I would always tend to draw really complex plans for certain jobs. After I had taught myself quite a lot and was able to design full sets of plans and documents, I was hired to design what was at the time considered some true avant-garde design work for some automo-

bile showrooms. It wasn’t until after that work that I went to school for architecture.” After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1959, Berman remained self employed, specializing as a design/build contractor. His work was mainly on the East Coast, where he focused on multi-family housing projects and senior care facilities. Over time, Berman expanded his business on the West Coast, where his work with Brent eventually led to their partnership. “As much as our work consists of designing and building projects,” Berman said, “we also concentrate heavily on feasibility studies for our clients. We try to maximize what the client wants to achieve so that we can be efficient and save everyone involved lots of time, money and unwanted features. Our work tends to be mostly for developers in the Los Angeles, Orange County and Ventura County area.” To this day, Berman & Brent, AIA has yet to do any marketing or advertising. Even in today’s rough economy, they only need to rely on word of mouth to keep the projects coming in. With a current total staff of just three designers and technicians, the firm has begun to focus their work on low-cost community housing, a thriving market in this modern economy. ALT


architecture

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34 Architecture Leaders Today


hospitality

Achieving design excellence requires uncompromising attention to detail, profound reverence for quality and the guts to step out of bounds in search of a new approach. It goes beyond the surface and demands that every step of the process and every component of the project be examined for its value. Degen & Degen is a full-service architectural and interior design firm providing design excellence for the hospitality industry through the integration of architecture and interior design. D&D attributes their success to a deeply rooted understanding of hospitality, a talented team, and lasting relationships that they have forged with friends and clients over the years. Their work has expanded throughout the United States, Canada and Asia. Many clients are repeats, some sharing a history with D&D that goes back to the firm’s inception. They include major international hotel companies like Marriott, Hilton, Starwood and InterContinental, as well as independent owners and developers. Projects include both new construction and renovation. No two projects are ever alike. D&D says successful design starts with thoughtful planning. Each project should create a memorable experience for the guest, be functional for both the guest and operator, be sensitive to the community, be accountable to the natural environment and finally be aesthetically and technically sound to serve OPPOSITE: Marriott Residence Inn San Diego Gaslamp Quarter, San Diego Calif. The bar and lounge area in one of Marriott’s newest Residence Inn locations. (BELOW) A one bedroom suite. This was a custom design for San Diego’s historic Gaslamp Quarter. Photos by Mark Compton.

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Design Excellence for the Hospitality Industry courtesy of www.ddseattle.com

AT DEGEN & DEGEN ARCHIETCTURE & INTERIOR DESIGN THE MISSION IS CLEAR: BEAUTY, SIMPLICITY & PURPOSE.

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CUSTOM SOURCE WOODWORKING, INC. Custom Source Woodworking, Inc, began operation in June of 2007. Founded by Joe Wadsworth and Jim Mammina, two individuals with a combined 50 years experience in the woodworking industry, the focus of the company has always been to incorporate all the lessons Joe and Jim learned from their industry experience. Their focus has allowed the firm to grow to $6 million in annual sales and work throughout the USA and beyond. CSW’s personnel are highly motivated and many of them are shareholders in the company. This has permitted growth while maintaining the highest level of quality and efficiency. From the beginning CSW has implemented new technologies in the company such as their own information management system, Crows Nest, and the use of the Nested Based CNC machining centers in manufacturing.

Photo by Custom Source Woodworking, Inc.

36 Architecture Leaders Today


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for many years, never out of fashion, with reasonable maintenance costs. Also key to a project’s success is D&D’s ability to identify unique design concepts that characterize each individual project. Every design solution fully integrates architecture with interiors for a seamless experience. D&D collaborates with experts in every field, both in-house and out, and from all disciplines – design team, owner/operator and contractor/ builder to create a strong team for all projects. The result: creative, smart and enduring. Every project tailored to its unique program. As Principal Architect of D&D, Jeffrey Degen, AIA, NCARB, directly oversees architectural design of all of the firm’s projects. Over 30 years of experience has contributed to his reputation as an authority in the field of hospitality design. He has been Principal Architect at D&D since the firm was established in 1994. Jeffrey’s prior experience includes positions as Chief Architect for Lufthansa’s Penta Hotels in Berlin, Germany, Senior Design Manager for Marriott International and Project Manager for Westin Hotels and Resorts. His work with upscale & luxury resorts and hotels spans much of the United States and 15 foreign countries. He received his Masters of Architecture from The University of Utah in 1979. Anita Degen, NCIDQ, Principal Interior Designer and co-founder has 25 years of interior design experience exclusively in hotel and resort design throughout the world. This has led to

her reputation as leader in hospitality design. Anita’s prior experience includes lead interior design positions with Marriott International and Munich-based S&S Hotel Innenarchitektur, Germany’s leading hospitality design firm, where she helped establish their Berlin office and oversaw projects throughout Germany. Anita is active throughout the hospitality industry in leadership and non-profit organizations. She recently served as International President of NEWH (The Industry Network), a non-profit organization with the mission of raising scholarship funds for students seeking an education in hospitality careers. In addition to NEWH, Anita serves on the Design Council, a select board of industry leaders who meet regularly to assess the state of the

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OPPOSITE PAGE: (TOP) Marriott Courtyard Seattle- Pioneer Square, Seattle, Wash. This adaptive re-use and expansion project of the historic Alaska Building, built in 1904 featured restored Alaska Gray Marble that was salvaged throughout the site. Featured here is the lobby foyer/elevator lobby with the bar and bistro visible beyond. Photo by Mark Compton. (BOTTOM) Degen & Degen Office, Seattle Wash. Architectural design charrette for the Nanchang City development. From left to right:: Jeffrey S. Degen, AIA, Principal; Donal McLaughlin, LEEP AP Architect; Daniel Herhold, Architectural Designer; Christopher Dukehart, Architectural Designer; Pat Ly-Au Young, Architectural Designer. Photo courtesy of Degen & Degan. BELOW: Nanjing Conference Center & Hotel, Nanjing, China. This is an exterior rendering of the Conference Hotel and the University District Botique Hotel, two of three hotels that Degen & Degen is designing on this site. Image courtesy of Degen & Degen.

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38 Architecture Leaders Today


hospitality

hospitality design and discuss developing trends. Anita earned a bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1985. D&D’s team is handpicked from across the United States and abroad and brings a wealth of talent and experience to every project. All are degreed professionals with extensive global travel experience, a dedication to public service, commitment and a proven track record of success. Each has what the firm refers to as D&D DNA -- integrity, honesty and character. It’s the underlying key to each individual’s natural instinct to excel in their work, their interpersonal and professional relationships and their drive to persevere and ultimately succeed. Each team member brings a rich and diverse background to the collective energy of the firm. D&D is registered to practice in all of the West Coast states from California to Alaska and holds nationally recognized NCARB and NCIDQ certifications. They can obtain registration in other states on an as-needed basis. Typically, D&D acts as the prime consultant, offering architecture, interiors, graphic design and all of the engineering sub-consultants under their umbrella. D&D believes that building a

strong team of leaders in each field is in the client’s best interest and leads to a project’s success. Services include: new construction, renovation, architecture, interior design, graphic design, artwork consultation, sustainability design, site evaluation, master planning, phasing studies, feasibility studies, budgeting and cost/value analysis, contractor prequalification, introduction of hotel operating companies, brand concept development and renderings and illustration. In order to achieve integrated design, principals from both architecture and interiors are intimately involved on all projects. In addition, each project has a principal-in-charge who oversees all aspects of the design concept and a project manager who oversees the day-today work of the D&D and consulting engineer teams. Each team is made up of both architects and interior designers. Each client works with the principals from start to finish ensuring continuity. Usually the project manager stays on through construction. The same people that start the project finish it. Communication is key to success, so designs are clearly communicated to the client, and clearly documented for the contractor. ALT

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OPPOSITE PAGE: (TOP) Marriott Courtyard Seattle- Pioneer Square, Seattle, Wash. This was an adaptive re-use and expansion project of the historic Alaska Building, built in 1904. Featured here is the lobby foyer/elevator lobby with the bar and bistro visible beyond. Marble is restored Alaska Gray Marble that was salvaged throughout the site. The total rennovation included a new tower, basement pool, 46 different guest room types, a two-story ballroom and custom interiors. Photo by Mark Compton. (BOTTOM):Nanjing Conference Center & Hotel, Nanjing, China. This is an exterior rendering of the Conference Hotel, one of 3 hotels that Degen & Degen is designing on this site. Image courtesy of Degen & Degen.

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west

| custom homes

Jeffrey L Miller FROM HIS GRANDMOTHERS HOUSE AND WORD OF MOUTH, THIS OREGON-BASED FIRM NOW DOMINATES THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST. by Joel Cornell

40 Architecture Leaders Today


custom homes

When designing the architecture for your next business park or apartment complex, it’s good to have a whirlwind of ideas and an office full of hands working to get big things done. When designing your family’s own upscale residence, you want an attentive, artistic and personal touch: the very method in which Jeffrey L Miller Architect, PC specializes.

In the late 1970s, Jeffrey Miller studied art, architecture and engineering in many places, including Boston University, the University of Washington and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He went as far away as Rome and returned to his roots in Portland, Ore. Upon becoming a licensed architect in 1982, Miller designed and built his first project as

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a one man operation: a new home for his grandmother. “Pictures of the house showed up in the Portland newspapers,” said Miller, “and I immediately started getting work from others who were impressed by the design.” From here, JLMA took off and became one of the most successful upscale residential Fall 2010 41


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42 Architecture Leaders Today


custom homes

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PREVIOUS PAGE: Bany Residence, West Linn, Ore. Photo courtesy of Jeffrey L Miller Architect, P.C. TOP LEFT: Miller Residence, Portland Ore Photo by Sally Painter Photography. TOP RIGHT: Hinnen Residence, Portland Ore. Photo courtesy of Jeffrey L Miller Architect, P.C. BOTTOM LEFT: Ehlen Residence, Bend, Ore. Photo by Indivar Sivanathan. BOTTOM RIGHT: Popma Residence Front, West Linn, Ore. Photo by Sally Painter Photography.

architects in the Oregon area. For each and every project the firm takes on, Miller still strives to put the same attention to detail that he put into his grandmother’s house so many years ago. “People want that personal relationship with you when you’re designing their home.” To date, the vast majority of JLMA’s business has come via word of mouth. “We still have yet to do any advertising,” said Miller. “Only because of the recent economic downturn have we begun to put up our business signs on our houses. For a long time, we couldn’t handle any more work if we hoped to maintain the deep personal involvement with each project the firm is known for. “My first projects were for relatives, then for friends and then friends of friends, and now our reputation brings us our clients. We are especially fortunate to have repeat clients who return to us to do remodeling or an entirely new house elsewhere.” Working as the sole principal with a total staff of seven, Miller is typically the one who does most of the designing, which he still does by hand. “My training occurred before computers were common in our field so I depend on my staff to put the design work into the computer and refine the details. We communicate regularly throughout the process to be sure that we stay in line with the client’s vision.” Though trained in contemporary architecture, Miller’s practice has focused mostly on traditional architectural design which is the preference of his clientele. Initially, clients call Miller and schedule an interview to see if his firm would be a good fit for them. From there, Miller is personally involved with most every project each step of the way. “We have meetings to establish the program for the home and discuss the style of home the client is considering,” Miller said. “We’ll then go through several sketching phases until they are comfortable with the design. I then work with my staff as they prepare the construction documents. Once they are approved by the clients the documents go to our contractors for bidding. “Our relationship with contractors is the most critical of all. Constant, clear communication with them is critical to the success of a project. We always strive to be a part of all dialogue concerning the project as we are better able to

MARVIN CHORZEMPA & LARSON, P.C. Marvin Chorzempa & Larson, PC represents clients throughout Oregon and Washington. Emphasizing the defense of the design and construction community, their attorneys also assist clients with contract and business formation, general business advice, and collection matters. MC&L pride their selves on their commitment to excellence for both client and community.” For more information, visit www.mca-law.com. Fall 2010 43


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44 Architecture Leaders Today


custom homes

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ABOVE: Enyeart Residence, West Linn, Ore. Photo by Sally Painter Photography. BOTTOM: Henningaard Residence, Gearhart, Ore. Photo courtesy of Jeffrey L Miller Architect, P.C.

see the impact any change might have on the final result.” Early in his career, Miller learned the benefits of working as the sole principal. “When I was an apprentice for a larger firm, I saw how much compromise was required to get a project built. For example, my firm was hired to design a large hotel in downtown Portland. Our design team’s first concept was brilliant. But by the time it had gone through countless revisions from the multiple designers involved, the contractors, the client and city officials, it became a far less successful design.” Ever since, Miller has striven to retain some creative control over the design process. “Nothing’s more personal in design than the design of a home,” Miller said. “Developing that personal relationship with the client is vital. The client needs to trust your ability to execute their vision and be confident that you have their best interests at heart. Sometimes it can be a challenge to convince a client their input isn’t always workable. They rightly have the mindset of ‘my house, my decision’, but having a special rapport with them facilitates the process that allows their dreams to become reality.” JLMA is designing several new residences currently, including some particularly remarkable designs. One of their current renovation projects is to bring a classic Southern California ranch house back to its original mid-20th century look. “The 60s and 70s weren’t exactly kind to classic architecture on the West Coast,” said Miller. JLMA’s intent is to take the home that looks ‘remodeled’ and return it to its original look. One unique Portland home is being specifically built for the purposes of observation: it is being constructed on a steep hillside, and includes a 24-story observatory. The client has a special love for Classical architecture, so the creation of such an enormous tower in the Classical architectural vocabulary is quite a challenge. “It is these challenges,” said Miller, “where a client’s fantasies can be expressed beautifully through serious architectural forms that stimulate creativity in our firm. It is this creativity that motivates the passion that members of the firm have for their work. ALT

VLMK As a Sub-consultant, VLMK works primarily for architects, providing structural engineering services for a variety of different project types (commercial, civil, retail, residential, etc.). VLMK takes great pride in their ability to provide safe, economical, and functional designs. VLMK is constantly striving to meet the highest professional standards, while providing the best possible service to their clients. For more information on VLMK, visit www.vlmk.com.

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INSIDE: RDL ARCHITECTS, A3C COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURE, SKD ARCHITECTS


midwest

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RDL ARCHITECTS

BUILDING WITH CARE By Rebecca Rodriguez ABOVE: Library Court Senior Apartments, Shaker Heights, Ohio. Image by Bob Reighard.

48 Architecture Leaders Today

RDL Architects has a big presence in six states, a big dedication to quality work, and a big heart. Most of the company’s projects are for the special needs populations, such as the financially disadvantaged, seniors, and women and children at risk. “What I’m doing is gratifying. I’m doing something more purposeful by creating affordable housing for people less fortunate,” said company president Ronald Lloyd. The company, based in Shaker Heights, Ohio, builds what is called tax credit housing with money that comes from a pool of accumulated federal funds that developers can apply for. The U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development’s LIHTC program acts as an indirect federal subsidy used to finance the development of affordable rental housing for low-income households. Seventy-five percent of what RDL builds is tax credit housing, including urban revitalization projects. It also completes some retail stores and corporate facilities. The company builds under a three-tiered vision of simple, economical, and beautiful. Lloyd explained that the “simple” principle meant defining a project at its essence and delivering what

the client is asking for. The “economical” part is meant to convey the company will act as good stewards that can deliver something that is cost effective. The “beautiful” aspect means that the end result is inviting and pleasing to the eye. A current project, the Garfield Heights Redevelopment, is slated as a three phase, $20 million per phase project set on 45 acres and consisting of 90 units of multifamily housing in Pittsburgh, Pa. The clients are KBK Enterprises and the Housing Authority of Pittsburgh. The site had been slated for demolition but was then reassigned as a tax credit program. RDL redesigned the units to be more integral with the streets of the neighborhood. They were redesigned to replicate the late 1800s feel. Instead of the shoebox, flat roof design from before, it was given a more traditional look with a two-story town house, side-by-side design. The project was on a challenging site due to a slope. RDL moved the parking areas to the back and terraced the site, graduating it in order to level it off. Another project which sits closer to home is the Library Court Senior Housing.


architecture

The city of Shaker Heights had reclaimed some property and tore down some car dealerships in order to provide room for a revitalized section of town. Lloyd introduced the city to PIRHL, the Partnership for Income Restricted Housing Leadership, a Cleveland-based owner, developer, and general contractor of affordable single family and multifamily housing. It will be a 44-unit senior housing development on a site adjacent to a public library. Set on a major thoroughfare, this transit oriented development will enjoy high visibility and will enable its residents to access a host of services and amenities that seniors need for daily living. The unit mix in these garden style apartments consists of 12 one-bedroom and 32 two-bedroom suites with up to 856 square feet. The project involves new construction of a threestory elevator building. The development will target seniors aged 55 and older earning at or below 60% of the Annual Medium Income for Cuyahoga County,

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Ohio and is funded through tax credit financ“But we do go as far as our clients go,” Lloyd ing. It is slated to be completed in Dec. 2011. said. “We’ve been as far west as California and “There’s a lot of older residents who want to as far south as Florida.” stay here (Shaker Heights) but there’s not a lot Lloyd said the company is active with supoffered,” Lloyd said. “This will help keep people porting a lot of housing authority organizations. in the neighborhood. They’ve lived here all their “We’re popular these days because of our lives but can’t pay the taxes on their homes.” access to federal funding,” he said. Lloyd said his company is active with national The tax credits come out of the federal governorganizations involved with senior care, not- ment’s stimulus package. The higher the demand ing that studies have shown only 15 percent for the credits, the more they are worth. is being met for seniors in need. “If there’s more money in the marketplace, RDL will do either preservation or new our developers have greater access. If there’s construction under tax credit funding. Lloyd said he considers himself and his staff experts at the revitalization work they have been doing for the past 14 years since LaQuatra Bonci Associates is proud to collaborate with RDL the company was founded. Architects. As landscape architects, LBA’s focus is urban design, RDL is licensed in 23 states, multi-family housing, park, and site design. LBA strives to create that are not only inviting but also responsive to their but works primarily in Michi- landscapes context. LaQuatra Bonci recommends RDL Architects for their gan, Indiana, Ohio, New York, commitment to quality. For more information on how LBA can serve Pennsylvania, and Maryland. your landscape architecture needs, visit www. laquatrabonci.com.

LAQUATRA BONCI ASSOCIATES

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less money there’s less projects and less for us,” he said. “It’s nice to see that pool is growing. When there’s more to work with than the value for credits is higher. The developers will pay more for these credits.” RDL is also dedicated to green building. But instead of using the LEED scoring system, they follow a checklist given by the Enterprise Institute which helps fund affordable housing projects. Based on LEED, it forces clients to meet certain criteria, such as indoor air quality, air exchange requirements, use of renewable wood products, and the exclusive use of florescent lighting. In the future Lloyd said he sees requirements leaning toward solar and ground source heat pumps. Lloyd said the current economic atmosphere has not had an effect on his business. “We’re pretty fortunate our expertise has depth to it. We’re recession proof but not without pain. Our clients are having a tough time closing projects,” he said. “We’re not out of the woods by a long shot,” Lloyd said referring to the state of his profession. Thirty-five percent of architects, he said, are unemployed. “The building industry just doesn’t have any legs,” Lloyd said. “But we have a niche (affordable housing). Not too many people do this stuff.”

An aspect of his business that makes RDL unique is the company’s “clarette” process. It involves brainstorming with the client from the very beginning. The master plan is developed faster. “It allows our client to be engaged immediately and really involved in the process,” Lloyd said. “It’s good clients want to participate and want to make sure they’re understood. It’s a more efficient use of their time and our time. The design process can be cut from weeks to days.” The company was started in 1994 by Lloyd who had worked for several firms prior. RDL employees 12 people, ranging from architects to construction administrators. Lloyd said that although his main job is to oversee projects, he does like to get in on them at the beginning. “My strength is conceptual design,” Lloyd said, adding that he works “old school,” drawing with pen and paper at his design desk. Lloyd said he takes much pride in his employees. “I’m a strong believer that you surround yourself with people who can do better than you can do,” he said. But Lloyd stands strongly at the helm, leading a company that works hard for the less fortunate. A commendable niche to work in, especially with such dedication and expertise. ALT

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TOP: Garfield Commons, Pittsburgh. Single family and duplex homes fronting the commons. Photo by Jan Shergalis Photography. MIDDLE LEFT: Garfield Commons, Pittsburgh.Garfield Commons Communtiy Site Plan. Image by Laquatra Bonci Associates. BOTTOM: Garfield Commons, Pittsburgh. Typical four unit cluster with a UFAS compliant accessible unit shown in the foreground. Photo by Jan Shergalis Photography.

MISTICK CONSTRUCTION For over 50 years, Mistick Construction has focused on building trusted relationships with Owners and Architects. Mistick is pleased to have enjoyed just such a relationship with the creative and talented firm of RDL on both market rate and affordable housing projects. Best wishes from Mistick Construction to RDL Architects for continued success as an industry leader.

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A3C COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURE

CLIENT FOCUSED AND ALWAYS EFFICIENT, WITH A VAST SCOPE OF EXPERT SERVICES by Joel Cornell ABOVE: LEED-CI Sustainable Showcase & UrbEn Retreat, Ann Arbor, Mich. Ariel view of A3C’s rooftop including demonstration green roof and solar PV systems. Photo by Jason Rodriguez. OPPOSITE: LEED-CI Sustainable Showcase & UrbEn Retreat, Ann Arbor, Mich. Ac3's urbEn Retreat rooftoop observation/ conferencing space overlooks the green roof and is available for use by local government and non-profit organizations. Photo by Aubrey Kane.

“We have shown through our actions, not just our words, actively training the remaining staff to become accredited. how sustainable design is worthwhile and simply makes “We asked our clients to define our strengths. The results the most sense,” said Senior Principal and Director of highlighted our commitment to collaboration, exceptional Sustainable Design at A3C - Collaborative Architecture, client relationships and environmental responsibility. Dan Jacobs. “The recent growth in the green movement A3C remains focused on building our relationships and has really helped, but that movement still needs a driving delivering exceptional service. We are active advocates force behind it and we strive to be a part of that force.” for sustainable design and an integrated design process, Upon founding the firm in 1983, Jacobs and his team serving as an example for ourselves, our community and immediately put sustainable design at the top of their our clients of what is possible when you ‘Walk the Talk’.” priorities. Initially, the firm began in custom residential As both an affirmation of A3C’s commitment to susdesign in their home town of Ann Arbor, Mich. They tainable design and a research tool for the community, expanded into the healthcare, education and corporate the firm has recently completed an entire overhaul of markets within a few short years. Today, 75% of A3C’s work their office in Ann Arbor. The LEED-CI Gold Sustainable is done in the southeast Mich. area, although their deep Showcase and UrbEn Retreat renovation poured every knowledge of the latest in sustainable design techniques sustainable technique conceivable into the design. This and technology is contracted out across the eastern U.S. effort resulted in an office that is not just a display, but The scope of services available to A3C’s clients has something their employees and clients can interact with expanded exponentially throughout the firm’s history. to raise understanding and awareness of sustainable Outside of sustainable design services, A3C excels in design. The UrbEn Retreat has become a community providing a full range of facility assessments, energy resource for local government and Not-for-Profit groups audits, renewable energy system design, interior design, to use for meetings. brand development and other consultation services. The renovation also allowed A3C to take on a new This incredibly extensive list of services goes on and on, role as researchers. The firm is working with multiple so much so that other design firms frequently contract any number of A3C’s specialty services to augment their own to assure their client’s get Xero Flor America is the exclusive U.S. provider of the patented Xero the best services possible. Flor green roof system.  Xero Flor is the lightweight, instant green roof “Our firm’s decision has been to walk the talk,” solution for hundreds of buildings around the country ranging from Jacobs said. “Three quarters of our technical staff small residential spaces to Ford’s 10.4 acre Dearborn Truck Plant are LEED Accredited Professionals, and we’re installation.  Learn more at www.xeroflora.com.

XEROFLOR

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THIS PAGE: (ABOVE) Humane Society of Huron Valley, Ann Arbor, Mich. The innovative design weaves human education throughout, incorporates a geothermal system and uses current research to prevent disease and reduce noise and stress. Rendering by A3C Staff. (LEFT) Plymouth Municipal Complex, Plymouth, Mich. Township Hall features a central two-story atrium with a "Service Center" where the offices with the greatest public traffic are grouped for convenient public access and brings all municipal services together in one site location. Photo courtesy of DeMattia Group. (RIGHT): Ann Arbor News, Ann Arbor, Mich. A3C Renovated this historic building to create office space from former manufacturing areas incorporating sustainable design features. Photo by Chris Burkhalter. OPPOSITE PAGE: (TOP) Wayne State University Community Arts Auditorium, Detroit, Mich. Constructed in 1957 and used as a lecture hall, this renovation transformed the space into a modern, flexible venue for a wide variety of performances. Photo by Charles Turok. (BOTTOM)Huron Ophthalmology PC, Ypsilanti, Mich. This new building allows the practice to reduce its carbon footprint while better serving their patients in a compassionate, comfortable, caring environment. Photo by Aubrey Kane.

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universities and local organizations to study and is incorporated from the early stages of a project. This share the data collected from their ‘green’ building. approach provides increased opportunities for client Their collaboration with The University of Michigan interaction with the design team and a far greater Architecture School’s Sustainability Lab and Colorado understanding of the process than in a traditional State University is resulting in the documentation of the design approach. potential energy savings from the various technologies “For us, sustainable design is a natural part of the on the demonstration green and cool roof. A3C along building process on multiple levels,” Jacobs said. “It with Professor Ash Ragheb of Lawrence Technological can save money and resources, increase energy effiInstitute were awarded one of three national AIA Upjohn ciency and also provide a healthy living environment Research Initiative Grants to study four buildings and for ourselves and, most importantly, every generation perform a comprehensive Life-Cycle Cost Analysis to follow in our footsteps.” ALT (LCA) on them to determine the effects of sustainable design. Through an Integrated Design Approach, A3C ensures that their clients are fully Cappy Heating has always been focused on future technologies and energy conservation. In 2007, Cappy Heating replaced the HVAC system at A3C involved in every step of the design process. with a new geothermal system. It was one of the first geothermal buildings This allows the firm to deliver sustainable, in the city of Ann Arbor. “I strongly believe in this technology.” says owner, consensus based solutions in the most Jeff Caplan. “It is exciting to be a part of all the people who work to bring efficient and cost effective manner. Par- this product to the Michigan market and to be regarded for our expertise in ticipation from different design specialties geothermal design and installation.”

CAPPY HEATING


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SKDARCHITECTS: WHERE ART MEANS SOMETHING by Joel Cornell

The founder and principal of SKD Architects, Steve Kleineman, is the kind of guy who walks through a home improvement or furnishing store, looks at the common products or building materials on the shelf, and sees interesting and creative alternate uses. “I grew up in a real ‘do-it-yourself ’ household,” Kleineman said. “The first home my wife and I owned was a small, one-and-a-half story structure with an unfinished basement. We started renovating it right away and continued to work on it through the years. By the time we moved out, it had taken on an entirely new look and feel. It sold for more than the asking price with multiple buyers. Most people understand the value of good design. “In a store, we are attracted to good design in every aspect of life. I might study a product and see ways the design could be improved and be less expensive. My workshop at home is like a small hardware store or laboratory, with thousands of bits and pieces of ‘junk’ that I’ll use and reuse to build unique things. That’s the same kind of efficient, sustainable and integrative thinking I OPPOSITE PAGE: Lynch residence, Exterior Rear. The Lynch residence in Wayzata, Minn. was built to celebrate the warmer months with access to the outdoor recreational areas by way of both the upper and lower levels. This image shows the transparency of the house to the rear, and the outdoor covered living space, where with a push of a button, screens drop down to convert the space to a screen porch. The pool and other landscape features become the focus. Photo by Jill Greer. TOP: Lynch residence, Great Room. A play on form and height gives the living area artful movement and a welcoming appeal and is further enhanced by the horizontal highlights of metal and wood detailing. For a more formal appearance to the ambience, integrated wood doors can cover the television, and the fireplace is easily set ablaze. With tall ceilings, rooms can often seem vast and uncomfortable, but staggered levels of ceiling height with lighting, break down what could be an over whelming sense of volume. By starting illumination at a height of nine-foot four inches, and reaching to 15 feet, the area maintains an intimate feeling. Photo by Jim Kruger, LandMark Photography. BOTTOM: Kitchen. Carrying through the organic contemporary theme of the home, the kitchen and adjacent hearth room incorporate the four elements. Beyond, the eye-catching effervescent light fixture, the stone details, integrated wood cabinetry and exquisite custom-designed metalwork anchor the space as the heart of the home while also making it a warm gathering space for family and friends. Photo by Jill Greer.

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ABOVE: Described as an oasis, the master bathroom features Walnut custom cabinetry, stone floors, marble countertops and glass-encased steam shower. Design Lighting and plumbing fixtures work with the architectural details to create an aesthetic and soothing spa-like environment. Photo by Jill Greer. OPPOSITE PAGE: Residence, Stair Atrium. The Barry interior stairway is a strong and elegantly expressed elements at the core of the house. The Kalwall skylight reinforces the sculptural shapes and serves as the hub of the spaces that work around it. Photo by Jill Greer.

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use in my design work every day.” Kleineman graduated from the University of Minnesota in 1976 at the top of his class, having received the AIA Gold Medal for the Study of Architecture. After his studies, he worked for a larger architecture firm in the MinneapolisSt. Paul area. “I thought I could become really successful in a large firm like that,” Kleineman said. “But, after about a year working there, I saw just how much personal control is lost when there are too many people involved in decision-making.” In 1977, at 24 years of age, Kleineman left that firm, started SKD Architects and streamlined the design process. The company started out as a general purpose architecture firm. Kleineman and his staff worked on everything from government centers and other municipal projects to corporate work, manufacturing and recreational projects. It wasn’t until the mid 1980s that SKD Architects began to concentrate on residential architecture, which is today their defining element. “Our firm began to move towards residential work for the same reason I founded SKD in the first place,” Kleineman said. “When you’re doing municipal or corporate work, you still have to go through the design process with a designated building committee as the client. You might spend ten minutes with the company’s CEO. However, when you’re working on someone’s home, the experience is far more personal. It typically utilizes more creative skill and consequently is more fulfilling.” “Our clients tend to pay much more attention

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JD WOODCRAFT JD Woodcraft was created to target high quality projects in both commercial and residential markets. Their shop incorporates some of the best talent and state-ofthe-art CNC equipment in the industry. These assets, coupled with an innovative approach, have positioned JD Woodcraft to provide premium custom cabinetry, furniture and architectural millwork to meet the demands and challenges from the Design/Build and Architectural community. Pictured are several recent projects, including one completed with SKD Architects. They reflect a dynamic process that combines great design and engineering, fine materials, quality craftsmanship and finishing. Visit JD Woodcraft’s online gallery at www.jdwoodcraft.com for examples of their work.

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to the aesthetics and detail in their home. The result is more unique work that reflects their distinct personality. In business, functionality is important and creative design can be a nice touch, but decisions that are solely based on economics can lead to boring work. Architecture can be something that nourishes our senses gives the owner a feeling of elation through visual and physical excitement. As creative architects, we are able to bring that excitement to life on a daily basis for our clients”. Once SKD Architects started to delve into the residential market, their business spread throughout that sector like wildfire. “What would be a ten minute visit with a CEO on a commercial project could be an all day meeting in my office on that CEO’s residence,” Kleineman said. “As I get to know the client better on a personal level, they understand my skills, and I would get hired for their commercial projects, too. It has been a great benefit specializing in upper scale residential work. Get to know the client well, and all types of architectural projects could come from that relationship.” The design process for SKD Architects starts with site selection. Whether the client is looking to be on a lake or a hill or in the woods, Kleineman and his staff work with the client to determine the ideal location for the structure. They attend to every detail, integrating all physical structures, feature elements, and circulation throughout the property. Their projects are at once functional and artistic. The natural environment becomes an integral part of the architecture, not just the foundation for it. SKD’s commercial architecture

ABOVE: Miller residence, Exterior Front. The Millers in Wayzata, MN wanted a contemporary and rich waterfront environment to live in, which is not to be understated. They appreciate the finer things and take notice of the details, but also wanted to want feel like they are always on vacation while home. Photo by Karen Melvin. OPPOSITE PAGE: Miller residence, Interior. The large kitchen and family room area is all about the view of the lake and accommodating larger groups of people at the core of their living space. This contemporary home shows our attention to detail, and offers clean artistic design elements. The fireplace separates the functions and a large aquarium is prominently displayed. The kitchen island is 14’ long and artfully detailed, as well. Photo by Karen Melvin.

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OPPOSITE PAGE: Pelican Clubhouse. The Clubhouse is one of the support structures on this northern Minnesota property. It is used as a business retreat. Pelican Clubhouse Interior. The interiors reflect a more formal, elegant and very permanent and eclectic structure. This view shows the entry foyer and stair and walkway to the master. The materials show what elegant lake living can be like. Columns are carved from solid stone. The stone stairway looks like it is floating. The rails and timeless decorating shows off the sophisticated décor. Photo by SKD Architects.

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reflects those same values, but priorities vary as the clients invest different levels of interest in their projects. “Our projects reflect and display a real attention to detail,” Kleineman said, “that rewards those clients who invest their interest in the process and the project.” Originally, SKD Architects’ work had focused in the Minneapolis St. Paul area and the surrounding region. But, as their growing success spread through the architectural media, both in print and online, SKD has been spreading their style and mode from coast to coast. “Our clients have an incredible interest in a wide variety of architectural styles,” Kleineman said, “and we work hard to create unique architecture at a variety of different levels. The residential work we are known for tends to reflect and reinterpret similar concepts or elements of Frank Lloyd Wright’s prairie aesthetic, and with a calming Asian influence. Studying at the University of Minnesota the school of architecture in the 1970s with Ralph Rapson, then the dean of the college, was a formative experience for Kleineman. It was there that he developed the creative tools and methodology to solve any problem creatively and with an artistic mindset. At the time, their curriculum for architecture was just behind that of Harvard and M.I.T., all known for producing a strong caliber of design architects. “In other parts of the country like in New Jersey, for example, you tend to see a lot of brick, and shingle style Cape Cod homes,” Kleineman said. “Out west, we see more timber structures; and in the southwest, stucco and adobe. When SKD comes to these other regions, we can show our clients a new and different aesthetic. It might be the way we stretch a home wider, accentuate the structure with deep overhangs and shadows, make a bold statement with glass, or create a lower, sleek look. Every project we do is uniquely tailored to each client based on the site, their dreams and their vision. “We are fortunate that Minneapolis is such a great city to work in. It has a strong sense of and appreciation for good architecture,” Kleineman said. “Also, we live in a challenging climate. In Minnesota, we can go from dry and very cold temperatures below zero, to humid and very hot in the high 90’s. As a result, our building materials and details have to address and endure extreme conditions. There can be issues of condensation damaging walls, moisture intrusion and mold, and building movement with freeze and thaw issues associated with winter construction. If we want a lot of glass,

BRIARWOOD II CONSTRUCTION Mark Larson is the owner, general contractor, and foreman of Briarwood II Construction, LLC. He works with the customer from start to finish on custom made homes, specializing in luxury vacation homes. Briarwood II Construction uses the latest innovations mixed with tried and true building practices, ensuring a high quality one-of-a-kind building experience. For more information, please call 715-236-7761. 62 Architecture Leaders Today


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RIGHT: Dachis residence. This is a view of the front entry of the Dachis residence in Deephaven, Minn. Even though it was built over a decade ago, it hasn’t lost an ounce of contemporary appeal. The home stands two stories tall, yet appears to be only one level from the exterior. Large, elegantly stretched windows and an oversized entrance help create this look. Stone and stucco make up the outside; a protective entrance extends 14 feet to accommodate arrivals during the often-snowy months of the winter. The house opens to the expansive view through to Lake Minnetonka. Photo by Saari and Forrai.

we have to think about energy consumption, and address sustainability which is important to all projects everywhere. By designing with the environment always in mind, we have developed a high level of knowledge and discipline in a variety of design styles, so we understand and focus on what’s behind the walls as much as we focus on what the walls look like.” Recently, SKD completed a remodeling job that was quite unique. They worked with the Live Green, Live Smart Institute to develop “The Sustainable House”. Kleineman served as the architect on what would become the very first LEED Platinum Certified residential remodeling project in the nation. Additionally, the house has also become the first LEED Platinum Certified residence in any class in Minnesota. Currently, efficiently utilizing a relatively small staff, Kleineman has managed to keep a tight control on every single project that comes through his office. Whether it’s a multimillion dollar home or a minor deck remodeling, Kleine-

man remains intricately involved on each and every job. He has limited the overall growth of the company so that he can remain deeply and personally involved with each project and client. “Working mainly in the upper bracket residential market,” Kleineman said, “I’ve found that clients tend to want to go for bigger, pricier,

newer, etc. However, size and expense does not often translate into a better or stronger project architecturally. By working closely and on a personal level with the client, it’s easy to use our experience and expertise to translate the exact vision our clients want. We will nourish their senses.” ALT


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INSIDE: HOFFMAN ARCHITECTS, COPE & ASSOCIATES, PIMSLER HOSS, CUMMINGS & MCCRADY, BROWN CHAMBLESS, EDI ARCHITECTURE, THOMAS H HUGHES ARCHITECTS, GIDEON TOAL


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THE DESIGN PORTFOLIO OF HOFFMAN ARCHITECTS IS AS LOCAL AS IT IS DIVERSE EMPHASIZING MODERN ARCHITECTURE WITH A SENSE OF CULTURE AND PLACE. by Joan Tupponce

A native of Tarpon Springs, Fla., Edward C. Hoffman Jr. founded his firm, Hoffman Architects, in his home town in 1981. By always providing beautiful, sustainable solutions to every project, the firm has experienced steady growth and success ever since. “We have an excellent history of meeting program parameters, schedules and budgets and receiving awards for our work,” Hoffman said. “Our real success, however, is the measure of quality in our relationships with the people work with and employ.” As a businessman, Hoffman has always valued a diverse portfolio. The company’s projects include educational, health care, religious, residential, 66 Architecture Leaders Today

RIGHT TOP & BOTTOM: Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy at Tarpon Springs High School, Tarpon Springs, Fla. To carve out its own unique niche among Pinellas County high schools, Tarpon Springs High School several years ago embarked on an aggressive program to attract students interested in the culinary arts. The school is recognized as one of the premier high schools teaching restaurant science and the culinary arts. They set an ambitious goal to increase student enrollment in the Family and Consumer Science Department to 500 students to meet student demand and this would outstrip the capabilities of the existing cafeteria used as a culinary facility, making the construction of a new, state-of-the-art Culinary Arts Academy a necessity. This academy would be able to service all students in Pinellas County. The facility is an 11,600 sq. ft. freestanding addition to the Tarpon Springs High School campus. The culinary school will maintain a 120 person dining room, a dining room kitchen, a kitchen and bakery, a 50 person Presentation/lecture room, and additional service spaces. Photos by Ric Ortega.


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commercial, preservation and environmental education centers. Services range from master planning and site and schematic design to rendering and graphic design and construction management. One of the company’s first projects was the Historic Sponge Exchange in Tarpon Springs, the sponge capital of the world. The sponge industry in Tarpon Springs generates millions of dollars every year. The Historic Sponge Exchange is an ever-present tourist attraction, featuring a vast assortment of boutiques and restaurants with a village feel in the Hellenic style. The $1.5 million job served as a fantastic launch pad for Hoffman Architects’ continuing success. Hoffman quickly began adding employees when his projects shot from the $6 million range to more than $20 million within a few short years. Most of the company’s educational projects have been concentrated in Pinellas County, in Central Florida just off the Gulf of Mexico. “We designed a prototype elementary school in the early 1990s 68 Architecture Leaders Today

which we have renovated over 17 times,” Hoffman said. “It’s been a very successful project all around. We are constantly updating it, making new additions and renovations quite constantly. “The design of the schools is sensitive to the scale of young students. Exits and entrances can be seen from the center of the school, creating a controlled and safe environment. The central area acts as a courtyard with boulevards intersecting throughout, which allows for

A.J. SANCHEZ A.J. Sanchez Consulting Engineers and Hoffman Architects have maintained a 20-year relationship that resulted in many successful projects including the most recent LEED Gold Certified Tarpon Springs Elementary School. A.J. Sanchez’s expertise is in the design of energy efficient HVAC systems, plumbing systems and fire suppression systems. For more information visit www.ajsce.com.


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a compact and efficient footprint. We just finished the renovations on my old grammar school, Tarpon Springs Elementary, which received a LEED Gold certification.� Hoffman has been using components, such as floor-to-ceiling windows that allow for the use of natural daylight. The firm has just completed the Palmetto Elementary School project in Manatee County, Fla. which was built to replace an existing school. The modern design features two-story buildings arranged around a secure central courtyard. They simplified many elements in the design and kept the scale suitable for small children. Hoffman’s designs have earned many awards including the AIA Tampa Bay 2002 H. Dean Rowe, FAIA Award of Excellence for his work on the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art/M. M. Bennett Library/Ellis Foundation Art Education Center project at St.

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PREVIOUS PAGE: Jacobson Culinary Arts Academy at Tarpon Springs High School, Tarpon Springs, FL. To carve out its own unique niche among Pinellas County high schools, Tarpon Springs High School several years ago embarked on an aggressive program to attract students interested in the culinary arts. The school has grown to more than 300 students and has become recognized as one of the premier high schools teaching restaurant science and the culinary arts. Tarpon Springs High School had set an ambitious goal to increase student enrollment in the Family and Consumer Science Department to 500 students to meet student demand and this would outstrip the capabilities of the existing, antiquated cafeteria used as a culinary facility, making the construction of a new, state-of-the-art Culinary Arts Academy a necessity. This academy would be able to reach beyond Tarpon Springs High School and service all students in Pinellas County. The facility is an 11,600 SF freestanding addition to the Tarpon Springs High School campus. The culinary school will maintain a 120 person dining room, a dining room kitchen, a kitchen and bakery, a 50 person Presentation/lecture room, and additional service spaces. ABOVE: Hoffman Residence, Tarpon Springs, Fla. The major design influence on this house was bipolar on several levels, radically split between the architect and biologist, male and female, modern and traditional, husband and wife. The result is masculine concrete supporting a more feminine delicate vernacular wood and glass form within the trees.

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TOP LEFT & ABOVE: Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art/ M.M. Bennett Library/ Ellis Foundation Art Education Center, St. Petersburg College, Tarpon Springs, Fla. Situated on a hillside overlooking a small reflecting lake to maximize community exposure, this 57,000 sq. ft. building welcomes both students and the general public. This two-story facility is composed of a museum, art studios, classrooms, an auditorium, and a campus library. The lower level of the facility acts as the service core of the building. In order to protect the works from the damaging Florida humidity, the receiving area serves as an “air lock.” The Main Gallery, with its low horizontal window, skillfully provides day lighting to the interior spaces without the risk of damage to the artworks. The building’s dominant feature, a massive exposed concrete wall, links its remote location to the campus core while serving as the backbone of the building. The overall construction budget was 9.2 million dollars. Photos by George Cott.

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Petersburg Community College. The company also does many green building and preservation projects. It is now in the construction phase of renovating an old bank building in the City of Oldsmar. When finished, it will house the City Council Chamber, media offices, a community police office, the Historical Society and the Upper Tampa Bay Chamber of Commerce. Hoffman is expecting it to have a LEED Gold certification. “My work was a natural fit,” Hoffman said. “In Florida, it’s really important that everything we do has a sense of place.” ALT

LEFT: Generations Christian Church, Trinity, Fla. First Christian Church is a new facility for a relocating congregation. The church campus is a composition of various sample modern volumetric forms, utilizing patterned tilt-slab construction, grouped around a large stand of mature oaks. The buildings are comprised of a new worship center, multiple youth and student ministries, and a large central fellowship space with a coffee shop and bookstore. Photo courtesy of Generations Christian Church.

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Historically Inspired, East Coast Design Cope Associates Inc has maintained a long and diverse history of architectural design of the highest caliber. by Joan Tupponce

Lanis Cope was only eight years old when he decided he wanted to be an architect. His father worked for American Airlines, which gave Cope and his family the chance to travel all around the country, exposing him to all varieties of architecture. “All of the travel I did as a kid influenced me,” Cope said. “I remember going to Disneyland and the 1965 World’s Fair.” Cope Associates, Inc. is well known within the industry for its innovative and meaningful designs. To date, the company has won 30 design awards, including the 2005 Honor Award from the American Insti-

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tute of Architects, East Tennessee, for the Research Support Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The firm has designed a wide variety of projects including commercial, educational, correctional, institutional, health care, conference centers and industrial developments for various federal, state, local and private clients. “We have striven to remain diverse,” Cope said, “which is largely responsible for us surviving the economic crises.” The company’s geographic range reaches throughout Tennessee and North Carolina,

BOTTOM: Biltmore Living Well Center and Greatroom, Asheville, NC. The Living Well Center, which received an AIA East Tennessee Honor Citation, is a private facility for an exclusive gated community on a portion of the original Vanderbilt estate in Asheville, NC. Cope Associates was the architect of record and Ike Kligerman Berkly, NY, was a design consultant on the project which primarily functions as a community center for gathering and wellness. The project was designed using sustainable principles. The great room design includes a stone clad fireplace as its centerpiece and stunning views of the rolling forest lands. On the lower level, an ample exercise area is provided that opens onto the pool deck. OPPOSITE PAGE: Lanis L. Cope, AIA, founded Cope Associates, Inc. in 1983 and has served since as President. Under his direction, Cope Associates has achieved honored distinction in commercial, institutional, and historical preservation works.


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and they are actively expanding through new offices in those regions. In all of their work, Cope Associates, Inc. is committed to providing complete personal attention and ownership of the project. One of the company’s most pivotal projects was the aforementioned Research Support Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The 52,000 sq. ft. center houses a state-ofthe-art conferencing facility with meeting rooms outfitted with the latest innovations in interactive audio-visual technologies as well as specialized meeting rooms for press briefings and for teleconferencing. The facility serves as the gateway. The massive leaning glass tower at the corner of the building defines it as the destination point for visitors. Cope and his firm continue to work on two projects at the lab. 74 Architecture Leaders Today

“The project has been a significant step in our sustainability initiatives,” Cope said. “It was one of the first LEED-certified buildings in Tennessee. We have always kept ourselves on the cutting edge of LEED design in all of our projects.” Cope established the U.S. Green Building Council chapter for East Tennessee in 2004. He funded the initiative himself for the first year until its accreditation, while also serving on the board of directors. Cope actively supports not only his profession, but the community arts as a whole. He currently serves as a commissioner on the State of Tennessee Arts Commission where he raises awareness of architecture as art. Over the years, Cope has also been involved in many historic preservation projects. Two notable projects are the Greek revival style

Knoxville High School originally built in 1920, and the art deco Post Office building located in Knoxville, Tenn. The 130,000 sq. ft. Post Office building, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, contains local marble and bronze interior ornamental flourishes that were renovated to their original architectural prominence. It currently houses the downtown branch of the United States Postal Service and the Tennessee State Supreme Court. “What sets our company apart is the fact that our staff actively engages the client,” Cope said. “We hear what our clients are asking for, and we tailor our services accordingly. We are very proactive about trying to help our clients achieve every single one of their goals for their project.” ALT


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LEFT: UT Athletic Center, Knoxville, Tenn. The Cope Associates/Blankenship joint venture McKenzie Lawson Athletic Center is a 132,000 sq. ft., four story addition that consolidates football operations and office space for the athletic department. It contains weight training, hydrotherapy, rehabilitation treatment, locker rooms, team meeting rooms and equipment management. It is designed to meet State of Tennessee Sustainability guidelines. TOP RIGHT: Lee University Science Building, Cleveland, Tenn. Less University expanded its campus with a new three-story, 74,500 sq. ft. science and mathematics building composed of 13 classrooms, an auditorium style lecture hall designed with Mathematics and Science curricula in mind, and 10 scientific laboratories specifically designed to take advantage of the latest in research technology in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, MolecularBiology, and Robotics. BOTTOM: Caryville Elementary School, Caryville, Tenn. This new elementary school provides Campbell County with a new state-of-the-art facility. The small, narrow site dictated a linear site design and the site topography required significant site work to create a building pad for a one-story facility. It has a core capacity for 700 and classrooms for an initial 600 students in 75,998 sq.ft. Photos courtesy of Cope Associates.

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THE PHA EXPERIENCE

ENCOURAGING INTERACTION BETWEEN BUILDINGS AND THEIR PEOPLE by Joel Cornell ABOVE & OPPOSITE: Porterdale Mill, Porterdale, Ga. Porterdale Mill sits on the Yellow River, and actually has a portion of the river diverted through a flume through the mill building. Water proofing and shoring up the old masonry flume was one of the many design challenges that helped earn the project the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation’s Marguerite Williams Award, the Trust’s most prestigious award given to the project that has the greatest impact on preservation in Georgia for that year. To bring natural light into the circulation spaces of the old cavernous mill building a central atrium was created. The atrium also acts as a way-finding device, helping orient occupants in what could otherwise be a confusing space. The metal wainscoting on the walls provides a rustic feel and is composed of reclaimed metal from surrounding buildings. Photos by Fred Gerlich Photography.

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After an incredibly successful joint venture in in 24 different states across the country thus far. 1990, architects Randy Pimsler and Allen Hoss “Atlanta has been undergoing a very consistent found that they shared three basic foundational evolution,” said Hoss. “Not too many years ago, principles for design: staying well balanced on any Atlanta might have been the poster child for subvariety of projects, representing the creative vision urban sprawl, and in some ways it still is. There are shared by them and their clients, and maintaining no natural boundaries and no reason physically for an interest in inspired diversity. These core ideals the city not to grow outward. However, over the last have carried Atlanta-based Pimsler Hoss Architects decade, the congestion and challenges we’ve seen towards being one of the most successful firms in in transportation have had a big impact on the city. the southeastern U.S. “We’ve been fortunate enough to have been able “We have always shared an enjoyment in the chal- to help Atlanta become a model for re-urbanizing; lenge of different projects, both large and small,” said taking that original sprawl and finding ways to Hoss. “We didn’t want to become typecast into a niche encourage redevelopment of in downtown Atlanta of specialty architecture.” PHA has continued in their and limit the need for long commutes. Our work is diversity, maintaining a portfolio that ranges from very community based and we find ways to support automotive dealerships and residential complexes that process for a more livable Atlanta.” to metropolitan restaurants, historic renovations, and adaptive re-use projects. “Our diversity has allowed us to learn to specialize in working with any kind of client, no matter what their size or image may be,” Horizon Engineering, Inc. is a civil engineering firm specializing in design and engineering. Since September 1999, Horizon has said Pimsler. “With a staff of eight, we can offer site provided professional consulting services for a broad range of clients professional services to those who might not including architects, developers, and municipalities. Horizon is located have been able to work directly with design in Marietta, Ga. and licensed in Georgia, Alabama, and North Carolina. professionals along every step of the process.” Horizon has worked with Pimsler Hoss on projects including the Ben Hill Recreactional Center, Peachtree Hope Charter School, Parkview Plaza, Though PHA has worked mainly in the 1450 Hills Place, and Murphy Avenue Assisted Living, all based in the Atlanta area, they have completed projects metropolitan Atlanta area. For more information, call (866) 382-1193.

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Pimsler noted that, “Atlanta is a growing city that has that unique feel of a small city and large town. It’s been relatively easy for us to become engaged and connected with the work in the metro area.” PHA has maintained a time focused design process, the key to which is above all good listening. “We rarely bring any preconceived notions. We don’t have that set style of architecture to impose on our clients,” said Hoss. “We want to draw out the vision of our clients by keeping one or both principals fully engaged and accessible throughout the entire process.” Hoss continued, “We have always found the key to success to be communication. It’s much easier to accomplish that with a small and more agile staff. We first form a team of our staff and consultants to maintain that dialogue in an attempt to understand and develop a clear design program for what the client wants to accomplish.” The principals have always shared a commitment to sustainable design. Pimsler and Hoss were early members of the Southface Energy Institute that promotes sustainable and efficient design throughout all aspects of building and architecture. PHA designed the first demonstration facility for Solar Energy International in Atlanta just prior to the 1996 Olympic Games. They are both LEED Accredited Professionals and, as Hoss puts it, “keep in mind that sustainability is not a separate entity, but is just important as quality structural design or electrical engineering.” “We started with a niche in retail design, but we’ve built our practice up by taking on a wide variety of project types and clients, including a special interest in working with non-profit organizations. We’re continuing to build a strong foundation through mentoring and educating our staff, and providing them with numerous opportunities for professional growth” Pimsler noted. PHA has received numerous awards, including two of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation awards in 2007 and most recently the Building Georgia Award in 2009 for their work in renovation. ALT 78 Architecture Leaders Today


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Project Spotlight: Howard Circle 2066 Howard Circle, Private Residence, Atlanta, Ga. The new residence is sited on a hill, its dramatic angular overhangs, patchwork of widows and materials reflect on the owners’ desire for a dynamic and modern design. The materials and colors chosen are meant to somewhat soften the dynamic-ism of the design as it is located in an urban Atlanta neighborhood developed during the early part of the 20th century. The owners wanted the living room of the house to be an open flowing space. The space was designed to have an array of windows that bring in natural light and provide the illusion of being in the trees. The double height space is adjacent to the 3storey open staircase and double height kitchen. A bridge and walkway above the kitchen provide access to the living spaces on the second floor. The owners of the house wanted natural finishes in the bathroom, as well as a light airy and open feel. The floor is a natural stone tile with white porcelain tile arranged in a stacked pattern to evoke a clean modern feel. The shower stands open in the room and clerestory windows above head height bring in natural light into the space without compromising privacy. Photos by Maggie McBride. Fall 2010 79


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CUMMINGS & MCCRADY

DESIGN WITH DURABILITY by Jane Caffrey ABOVE: Bikram Yoga Charleston, Mount Pleasant, S.C. The yoga studio is designed to maintain a temperature of 105 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity of 40 percent. A 14 inch spray foam insulated walls help the custom heating and ventilation system maintain its tasks in an efficient manner. The entry lobby greets students and guests with a custom-built display space and reception desk. The reception counter displays rolled yoga mats lit from above. An accessible writing counter is supported with an iron detail crafted by Ole Charleston Forge and designed by Cummings & McCrady Inc. to emulate the Bikram YogaCharleston brand logo. Photo by Harbor Construction. OPPOSITE PAGE: Grace Church, Charleston, S.C. The nave following the restoration of historic finishes. The restoration included the addition of new lighting a new HVAC system and the refurbishment of damaged woodwork. Photo by Cummings McCrady, Inc.

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Architecture at Cummings & McCrady, Inc. is defined by medical offices, executive suites, foodservice planning, longevity. The history of company represents endurance, fitness facilities, single family housing, assisted living, and dating back to the original firm in 1911, later merged by nursing home design—exemplified in a single project. C.T. Cummings and John McCrady, Jr. in 1957 to become While Cummings & McCrady designs durable modern a full service design firm. Today, longevity is significantly facilities, it is also dedicated to extending the lives of historic expressed in the architectural details of each completed structures. At the Military College of South Carolina, the structure. Primarily serving institutional clients, Cummings company designed a modern, full service gymnasium and & McCrady emphasizes sustainable design. fitness center from the bones of the former field house “Institutional clients obtain money only once for a on the historic campus. A prime example of historic project,” said Dan Beaman, AIA, LEED AP, NCARB, rehabilitation and reuse, the gymnasium features the President of Cummings & McCrady, Inc. “They rarely original façade and arched roof, yet also includes modern get adequate funding for maintenance. We try to give accommodations for college basketball, physical educathem a building that is easily maintained for the long tion, and extracurricular fitness activities. term, rather than something that is just a flash in the An ongoing series of Cummings & McCrady projpan in today’s market.” ects reshaped Grace Episcopal Church in Charleston, The Charleston, South Carolina-based firm works on an designed by E.B. White and constructed in 1847. After assortment of projects that include academic, healthcare, Hurricane Hugo struck the church in 1989, the comreligious, and civic structures, as well as restoration and pany repaired and restored the historic exterior and preservation projects. Beyond local projects in South sanctuary, then added an atrium and offices in the rear Carolina, the firm also designs internationally. of the structure. In 2000, the columbarium/bell tower “We’ve consulted with clients from Seattle to Philadelphia to the Ukraine,” Beaman said. In 2009, Cummings & McCrady provided construction administration for the Charleston County Detention Center, an $80 million project. The firm was also able to combine several areas of expertise Margaret Donaldson Interiors strives to create spaces that reflect the with the Bishop Gadsden Retirement Community, a lifestyles of the people who interact within the space. MDI’s work complex with residential cottages and apartments ranges from historical renovations to new construction to largecommercial projects. Regardless of the project, MDI couples integrated among natural walking paths in Charles- scale ingenuity with attentive execution to create not only a spectacular ton. With a flexible design approach, the company outcome but a wonderful experience for the client as well. For more demonstrated its broad range of experience in information, visit www.margaretdonaldsoninteriors.com.

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OPPOSITE PAGE: College of Charleston, Charleston, S.C. Randolph Hall, Towell Library and Porteris Lodge constitute the historic center of the College of Charleston campus, originally called the College Green. Work on Randolph Hall, shown here, included structural repairs to stabilize spreading of the gabled portico roof and anchorage to the main body of the building as well as careful cleaning and repair of stucco surfaces, brownstone lintel treatments, restoration of wood windows and shutters, slate tile roofing repairs and water carry-off system improvements and repainting of observatory dome painting. Photo by Cummings McCrady, Inc. LEFT: Bishop Garden Chapel, Charleston S.C. The design details were carefully developed to provide a state of the art facility for seniors while maintaining the atmosphere of a traditional Southern Colonial style building. Interior details included hidden ventilation and sprinklers, disguised audio and electrical systems, as well as wider aisles and movable seating. Photo by Cummings McCrady, Inc.

was built, simultaneously incorporating traditional and contemporary design elements. Cummings & McCrady earned the 2003 Lowcounty Design Award and Merit Award, as well as the Carolopolis Award for the columbarium, in addition to the Carolopolis Award for the Grace Episcopal Church Restoration. The columbarium was published in the English international publication, “Church Building”. Yet, the work is not finished for the church, which is currently completing a structural analysis as part of a master plan that will later incorporate a new Parish Hall with offices, a youth center, and a rooftop terrace. Cummings & McCrady is currently working on the restoration of a Carnegie Library, and the firm recently won a 2010 Honor Award for the restoration from the South Carolina AIA, Charleston Section. Longevity—whether applied to ongoing improvement projects, life extension of historic structures, or durable modern design—characterizes architecture at Cummings & McCrady. Yet most significantly, according to Beaman, the term also extends to customer service. “The most important goal is the complete satisfaction of our clients, and to have people come back,” he said. With several clients that have been working with Cummings & McCrady continuously in some capacity for more than 25 years, longevity successfully defines strong relationships with clients as well. ALT

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BROWN CHAMBLESS ARCHITECTS

ENCOURAGING INTERACTION BETWEEN BUILDINGS AND THEIR PEOPLE by Joan Tupponce

All Photos Courtesy of Brown Chambless Architects.

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Donald Brown and John Chambless credit the success of Brown Chambless Architects to its multiple specialty expertise. The highly regarded firm handles a broad variety of projects, everything from lodging/hospitality and retail development to commercial facilities and healthcare. The Alabama-based company was formed in 2000 after Brown and Chambless merged their two firms together. Services include architecture, interior design, project management, urban planning/master planning and cost management. “Much of our work comes from referrals and from contacts we’ve established over the years,” Brown said. “You get that way from working hard every day, trying to satisfy a need.” Brown and Chambless have faced and successfully conquered many challenges in the years they have worked in the industry. One of their most daunting challenges was building Wind Creek Casino and Hotel in Atmore, Alabama. The site, situated on land owned by the Poarch band of Creek Indians, lacked any type of visual interest. “We had to create a resort environment in an area without any natural amenities – no mountains, no ocean and no coastline,” explains Chambless. “We designed and constructed a lush natural environment with a three-acre lake and then built the hotel, casino, cooking school and spa around it.” The 350,000 sq. ft., 17-story structure includes 232 three-

star rooms and suites, four luxury suites, a steakhouse restaurant that seats over 350 and an entertainment lounge with capacity over 200. The building also houses 55,000 sq. ft. of gaming space, an outdoor amphitheater and a cooking school and spa. The interior design presented a unique challenge of its own. “We were charged with interpreting the tribe’s traditional concept of four elements – wind, water, land and fire – in modern ways,” Chambless said. “We did that by applying natural materials and patterns, like stone and wood, and by using other design features such as a leaf motif in the ceiling details and carpeting.” When it was finished, the elegant design mirrored the shapes and color palette of nature. “It was designed for Native Americans who appreciate the use of clean, natural materials,” Brown said. BCA’s work for Neptune Technology Group, an international manufacturer and provider of water meters and utility automation systems, in Tallassee, Alabama was another unique project. The firm not only designed the exterior and interior of the 20,000 sq. ft. facility but it also prepared and completed construction documents, bid the project and provided construction administration. The building houses about 80 research and development engineers, as well as numerous members of the company’s marketing department. “Neptune needed to recruit the best talent available


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WE HAD TO CREATE A RESORT ENVIRONMENT IN AN AREA WITHOUT ANY NATURAL AMENITIES – NO MOUNTAINS, NO OCEAN AND NO COASTLINE. WE DESIGNED AND CONSTRUCTED A LUSH NATURAL ENVIRONMENT WITH A THREE-ACRE LAKE AND THEN BUILT THE HOTEL, CASINO, COOKING SCHOOL AND SPA AROUND IT and wanted the workplace to be inspiring and the appearance impeccably professional looking,” explains Brown. “We made the interior non-hierarchical. The intent was for R&D and marketing personnel to interact with each other, exchanging ideas and concerns rather than working in relative vacuums.” BCA’s vast expertise also includes historic preservation. The firm served as the historic design consultant for the restoration of Moton Field, the original Tuskegee Airmen flying field, for The National Park Service, Southeast Region. The five-year project was completed in 2009. It was the largest park service project in the country. During the project, BCA worked with private consultants and the National Park Service. The project ended up receiving the top award given by the National Trust for Historic Preservation/Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. “It speaks to our interest and ability to work with complex teams and partnerships to achieve a desired outcome,” Brown said. ALT

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THE PERFECT COMBINATION OF DESIGN & PRACTICALITY by Joel Cornell

Recently re-formed in 2010 from EDI Architecture, Inc., EDI International’s mission is “design with purpose”. Led by Chairman / Principal Victor Mirontschuk, the firm’s portfolio in residential, hospitality, and commercial sectors showcases their focus on purposeful and inspired design. Mirontshuk began his career after graduating from the University of Arkansas in 1974 with two degrees: a Bachelor’s in Urban Studies and a Bachelor’s in Architecture. Initially, he had planned a career in the Chicago market. But like so many well laid plans, the economy had other things in mind. “The job market in Chicago was not very good,” Mirontshuk said. “There were lots of layoffs, so I went where things were looking better. An engineering friend of mine was starting to get some good work in Houston, Texas, so I started my career there.” Mirontshuk did work as a designer for an architectural firm in Houston, his work consisting mainly of residential projects and an occasional

commercial project. A few years later in 1976, he started his own design firm: EDI Architecture Inc. “Those first years started off in a great way,” Mirontshuk said. “We started out doing single-family and multi-family projects. The market in Houston at that time was booming. We were able to design and build homes within a six month timeframe; the economy was great, so we could do some experimenting with new creative styles and housing forms plus innovative land planning solutions. As a planner, that allowed me to approach each project from an entirely different angle OPPOSITE PAGE & BELOW: American First National Bank, Houston, Texas. Designed for an Asian owner, the convex curve follows Feng Shui practices to deflect negative energy around and away from the building. The opposing curve of the fountain channels positive energy toward the bank. The center slice in the building is symbolic of the number one, a lucky number. The building floor plan balances universal energy through a yin/yang inspired layout. This corporate US headquarters includes conference facilities as well as tenant rental space on multiple floors.

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to meet the shifting markets.” Over time, EDI began taking on more and more projects of increasingly larger scale. One of the first large projects for the firm was a 10-story high-rise building in downtown Houston in the early 1980s. It was a fairly prominent building and put the EDI name on the map in the Houston area. However, Mirontshuk soon realized that to significantly grow the firm, it would need to be working in more locations than just Houston.” By this time, EDI was providing design services across the country, from Georgia and Florida to the West Coast in California and Colorado. The high quality and innovative design work had brought EDI recognition in the West Coast markets and in 1984 Mirontshuk decided to open a new office in San Francisco. “The San Francisco office was a great success,” Mirontshuk said. “But after a while, I knew that there was no way I could keep up that commute back and forth. So at that time, I hired one of my college classmates, Richard Handlen, to run the San Francisco office as Managing Principal.” As the general architectural styles of different parts of the country tend to have certain defining features, especially in places like Hous 88 Architecture Leaders Today

ton and San Francisco, EDI Architecture was able to bring a new and interesting perspective to the scene of San Francisco architecture. “It was in San Francisco that we really began to grow and hit our stride,” Mirontshuk said. “We were able to take our knowledge and style out to California. There were a lot of opportunities for innovative new housing types that we hadn’t been able to do in Houston due to the topography, and that was really exciting and educational.” After some time, in the late 1980s, EDI and Mirontshuk decided to try a similar kind of expansion, this time on the East Coast. Initially, a new office was opened in Pennsylvania; but after a short while there, the office was moved to its current location in New York City. “Our growth strategy in New York was very much the same as San ABOVE & OPPOSITE PAGE: Fazio Clubhouse, The Woodlands, Texas. Located in upscale Carlton Woods, a gated community in The Woodlands, this country club offers members outstanding golf with fine dining, luxurious locker rooms and meeting facilities. This upscale clubhouse includes casual dining, including a bar and lounge area, that utilizes copious amounts of natural stones and exposed timber beams to privde abcharm reminiscent of Old World traditional clubs while meeting the operational needs of the modern golfer.


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Francisco,” Mirontshuk said. “We had built up a reputation, a brilliant staff and a knowledge base that came to define us. We then brought those qualities out into a new and vastly different market. Again, we were engaged by a style of architecture and environment that were entirely new to us and we were able to bring a unique perspective to the market.” After building up these three branches, Mirontshuk began to take his expertise and experience overseas. “Having built a large base of contacts and satisfied clients,” Mirontshuk said, “we leveraged our way into relationships within England’s development scene. We did quite a bit of work in that market.” Mirontshuk’s experience garnered him a position as a design editor for Individual Homes Magazine in the U.K. He used his broad knowledge of American architecture on all scales of projects, both commercial and residential, to write about his own experiences and ideas. He also brought to the English architectural press his love for the American open planning and housing style, and in particular the way his firm had blended that style with traditional English exteriors and techniques. Additionally, Mirontshuk spent much time giving lectures and talks for the American

ANDRES CONSTRUCITON SERVICES Legacy on the Lake was the third project Andres completed for Legacy Partners. “As usual, Andres worked hard to help us overcome difficulties,” said Spencer Stuart, Jr. of Legacy Partners. “Despite heavy rains and a tight site, they found a way minimize the loss of time and money.”a tight site, they found a way minimize the loss of time and money.” images of current and previous collaborations. With more than 11,500 completed projects, against which we can compare their work, our esteem for Gund Partnership is sincere.

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PREVIOUS PAGE, THIS PAGE & OPPOSITE: Legacy on the Lake, Austin, Texas. Known for its ultimate high rise experience, Legacy on the Lake floor plans come in a variety of shapes, sizes and heights. The building design utilizes a square building footprint to create an efficient floor plate. The site design captures lake views in three directions and downtown skyline views in two directions. The prominently displayed custom glazing, the vibrant colors and innovative designs were inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock, Martin, and Dana houses and is carried further with select interior design details. These high end luxury apartments include granite countertops, wood plank flooring and gourmet kitchens.This project design achieved LEED Silver Certification through a careful combination of materials, construction and energy saving features. Specialized amenities include flex cars, hybrid reserved recharging parking spaces, bike storage, recycling, green roofs, pool, fitness and business center, clubroom, convenience store, etc. All photos courtesy of EDI Architecture

Institute of Architects, and other groups throughout the U.S. and U.K. At one point, Mirontshuk received a grant from the Department of Trade & Industry in England to further his contributions to the U.K. design market. As EDI Architecture continued to grow, it became increasingly international. Through the Houston branch, EDI began to receive work in Angola and other countries on the western coast of Africa. Initially, the firm designed small-scale residential expatriate projects. Being the only American firm working in Angola at that time had some distinct advantages. Over time, EDI has designed some of the largest commercial projects to date in Angola. In the mid 1990s, shortly after independence was achieved for the country of Kyrgyzstan, EDI was brought in to help reinvigorate the country’s economy. They helped to accomplish the difficult task of bringing in international investors and also in developing the country’s infrastructure. Mirontshuk was appointed by the late Senator Alan Cranston to the position of Vice Chairman of the U.S.-Kyrgyz Business Council, a position he held for three years. Today, EDI International is a large and diverse firm with an impressive roster of clients: from Exxon-Mobil, Disney and Legacy Builders to Halliburton, Hilton, AvalonBay and Trammel Crow. In the past year, EDI finished one of their most comprehensive projects to date. Designed as a regional headquarters for three major oil companies, Sonangol, Esso and BP, Torres Atlantico is a Class A office building with attached condominium tower that meets the clients’ in-country needs for visibility and profile. The project consists of an 18-story office tower, a 15-story residential tower and a five-level parking garage. “Whether it’s low income affordable housing that we do pro bono or unique large-scale tunnel form high rise buildings,” Mirontshuk said, “we have the knowledge, history and capacity to a project of quite literally any size, budget or design.” ALT

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THOMAS H. HUGHES ARCHITECTURE

ENCOURAGING INTERACTION BETWEEN BUILDINGS AND THEIR PEOPLE by Joan Tupponce ABOVE: New Philadelphia Moravian Church, WinstonSalem, NC. Renovation of the existing facility and 19,000 sq. ft. fellowship hall addition. OPPOSITE PAGE: First Baptist Church, Winston-Salem, NC. The restoration and renovation of a historic 83-year-old facility.

When Thomas Hughes established Thomas H Hughes tioning high school campus and rotate from one piece Architecture, P.C. in 1987, the majority of the company’s to the next?’” Hughes said. “There was a lot of hands-on work was retail projects. Today, the strength of the com- commitment from our office. Someone from our staff was pany is rooted in its diverse portfolio. out there every few days coordinating and making sure “We’ve become much more diversified over the last four questions were handled immediately.” years,” Hughes said. “We still do a lot of commercial projects, Phasing of projects and coordinating in the field is one but we also design educational and religious projects, as of the company’s strengths. well as government and university work.” “We have the capability of providing more extensive The company’s educational projects have helped keep service during construction if the situation warrants the firm strong during these tough economic times. that,” Hughes said. “That’s where we have focused a lot of our energies over The company, currently licensed in 10 states, provides the last several years,” Hughes said. clients with a full scope of work, from design and construcOne such project was West Forsyth High School in tion documents to construction administration. Even Winston Salem, N.C., the home town of Thomas H Hughes though commercial and retail projects have lessened in Architecture, P.C. The project included the renovations the last couple of years, the company continues to excel of seven classroom buildings and the renovation and in that focus. expansion of the central administration and media center Recent commercial projects include the second phase building where visitors enter the campus and interact of the mixed use development of Mount Tabor Place in with the school staff. To modernize and set that central Winston-Salem, N.C. The complex includes an 11,000 building apart visually, the firm added a two-story glass square-foot building of retail, restaurant and secondentry element and an exterior entry courtyard. The administration, guidance and media center spaces Wilson-Covington Construction Co. is proud to be a leader in the commercial, residential, were expanded, as well. and historic restoration fields in the North Carolina Triad. Since 1947, they have provided Working on the project while the property owners with the highest quality work for reasonable costs. Their staff of highly skilled building was occupied proved to be craftsmen and carpenters, experienced superintendents, and hands-on project managers a challenge for the team. “It was a deliver excellent service to all clients. Wilson-Covington’s family-owned and operated business is proud to have worked with Thomas Hughes Architecture on projects ranging from question of ‘How do you perform residential additions and remodels to tenant upfits, new office and warehouse spaces, and renovations on an existing, func- other large commercial projects. For more information, please call 336-724-1721.

WILSON-COVINGTON CONSTRUCTION CO.

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THIS PAGE: Schematic Design meeting between to members of the staff. From Left to right: Barry Parks, staff architect; Carlos V. Espinosa, architect and firm principal. OPPOSITE PAGE: River Birch Lodge Restaurant, WinstonSalem, NC. Exterior and Interior views of the restaurant launched by local restaurateurs featuring casual mountain dining.

story office space, along with a 22,000 square-foot building for The Fresh Market. Hughes and his firm work on many regional projects for the grocery chains The Fresh Market and Lowes Foods. Grand Dunes Marketplace in Myrtle Beach, S.C. is another recent commercial retail project for the firm. “The developer was looking for a different style and design, more of a Mediterranean style architecture,” Hughes said. The 85,000-square-foot development includes a Lowes Foods supermarket, two large restaurants and several high-end boutique shops as well as lush landscaping and numerous gathering areas. Religious projects represent another company focus. One of the firm’s most unique projects was First Baptist Church in Winston-Salem, N.C., which included the interior renovation of the 1920s sanctuary. “It was a good collaboration with contractor, R. P. Murray,” Hughes said, noting how the interior work presented a distinctive challenge. “The space was very tall and we had to scaffold the entire area so we could have access to the ceiling dome for repairs and repainting. The project required extensive staging and field coordination.” Working on these diverse projects keeps the company fresh and innovative. “It’s also a safety net with the current state of the economy,” Hughes said. “If one area of expertise slows down, we have other areas we can draw from. That has really worked well for us over the last several years.” ALT


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ideon toal

sustainable and creative ingenuity by Johanna Gretschel

Designing Fort Worth Zoo’s herpetarium, a building that showcases reptiles and amphibians, presented a series of unique challenges for architectural firm Gideon Toal, Inc. But the firm’s diverse experience provided them with the skills necessary to conquer each of those challenges. CEO Michael Bennett describes Gideon Toal as a generalist architecture firm, because they undertake projects ranging from medical centers to university buildings to single family residences. This approach allows Gideon Toal to bring out the best in each individual project. “We approach each project not in a cookie cutter format. Instead, we approach it as-is and we work with how things are,” he said. Yet the Fort Worth Zoo’s herpetarium offered new challenges to the 54-year-old, Ft. Worthbased company. The architects were required to plan, design and build the structure while keeping the needs of creatures as exotic as a 16-foot saltwater crocodile in mind. The crocodile, in particular, challenged Gideon Toal to create a design that showcased the animal as much as possible while making sure the structure was strong and visitors were protected.

“The issue was having enough glass to be able to see the crocodile but also making sure it was safe,” said Bennett. The project was a first for Gideon Toal, as Bennett said the firm had never worked directly with animals before. The company was not alone on the project; Gideon Toal implemented ideas from zoo board members and herpetologists to craft the building. Artists were also commissioned to paint murals on the walls and sculpt rocks for the exhibit. “It was really interesting to work with people who knew about the animals and about the normal things the animals did and needed to do. Being able to work that into the design was pretty satisfying,” Bennett said. Work on the project began three or four TOP: Forth Worth, Texas. The Fort Worth Zoo’s Museum of Living Art steel beams and metal roof were designed to rise and fall in soft waves mimicking the rolling hills of the Texas Prairie. Photo by Jeremy Enlow. BOTTOM: Forth Worth, Texas. Interiors within the Fort Worth Zoo Museum of Living Art were designed to immerse visitors within exhibits that simulate the animals’ native environment. Photo by Jeremy Enlow.

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years ago; the renamed Fort Worth Museum of Living Art unveiled itself this past March. The building is identified as a museum because its elaborate architecture is akin to the aesthetics of a museum. The building’s most widely celebrated feature is its unusual roof. “The roof is kind of a rolling, undulating sort of roof that is in different pieces. At one level, it looks like the rolling plains of the prairie. At another

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level, it looks like snake skin,” said Bennett. One of Gideon Toal’s core values is sustainability and conservation. The recent construction of the Tarrant Regional Water District Annex Building in Tarrant County, Texas, allowed the firm to showcase its green sensibilities. The building is the first of Gideon Toal’s projects to earn LEED Gold certification. When it first opened in June 2009, the 26,000

square foot Tarrant Regional Water District Annex Building boasted the largest array of solar panels in Texas. All three wings were outfitted in rooftop solar panels producing 65 percent of the yearly energy required to run the building. Also, low-flow water fixtures were installed to reduce water usage by 44 percent or approximately 103,700 gallons per year. The complex also utilizes rainwater harvesting. “We collect the water in cisterns and use


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it to irrigate the landscape around it,” said Bennett. These features combined, qualify the complex for LEED Gold certification. The Tarrant Regional Water District requested the attainment of such status, as it is an environmentally conscious entity. “They manage the water resources within our area for drinking water primarily,” Bennett said, “so conservation and making sure

the water quality is first-class is a big part of what they do.” Prior to joining the Gideon Toal team in 2004, Bennett worked in resort development at the New York headquarters of architecture firm Hart Howerton. Bennett says that his work with Hart Howerton instilled in him the importance of designing a building while keeping the characteristics of the surrounding landscape in mind, as he calls

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THIS PAGE: Fort Worth, Texas. Tarrant Regional Water District Annex Building. The TRWD Annex was designed with a clear focus towards sustainability achieving LEED Gold certification. Sustainable features include three 7,000 gallon water run-off cisterns, a solar panel array that generates 238kw of power annually and extensive daylighting. Photo by Craig Kuhner.

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PURDY MCGUIRE ACME Brick’s Headquarters is tempered by a Condenser Water System consisting of a Cooling Tower, Self-Contained Units, VAV and Fan Powered Boxes. The system design incorporates variable frequency drives, water-side economizers and condenser water reset. An internal data center uses DX units with VAV bypass as redundancy. Also, the building envelope has above usual tightness that greatly reduces levels of heat gain and transmission losses. Lighting controls include occupancy sensors and bi-level switching via the lighting control panel and Energy Management System. The building has generator and UPS back-up. Low flow, infrared activated plumbing fixtures help with water use reduction.


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THIS PAGE: Forth Worth, Texas. The FWCD Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center was designed to incorporate extensive natural lighting which is typified along the north elevation with clear glazing 25 feet high. The blending of flexible indoor and outdoor spaces within the FWCD Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center allows teachers to easily extend their classrooms on beautiful afternoons. The FWCD Sid W. Richardson Visual Arts Center’s use of natural light illuminates the interior space and increases students’ connection with the natural environment. Photos by Craig Kuhner.

it, “marrying the building to the land.” For example, Gideon Toal’s 30-member team must always keep Texas’ infamous heat in mind when designing buildings in the area. “People need to protect themselves from the sun,” said Bennett. Strategies to combat the unbearable heat involve placing windows in more shaded areas and positioning buildings to catch breezes in the summer or to protect from winds in the winter. Bennett circles back to his description of Gideon Toal as a firm of generalists, not specialists, in saying that his experience in resort development has aided his diverse portfolio of projects with Gideon Toal. The staff typically has their hands full, with about 40 to 50 projects in some stage of development at any given time. “Being a generalist lets you draw on different types of project types,” he said. “You can take your experience in building schools and apply it to something else.” Under Bennett’s direction, Gideon Toal is a firm ready to try its hand at anything. With success in the fields of community, corporate/ commercial, economic development, educaFall 2010 103


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tion, healthcare, interior design, landscape architecture, planning/urban design and residential works, the company has a strong record of credibility. Gideon Toal’s only limits are its environmental integrity and dedication to promoting sustainability. “I think one of the things that we try not to do are projects that promote urban sprawl,” said Bennett. “We try to do things that develop the city. Sustainability is a basic foundation of our firm.” As a member of both the American Institute of Architects and the Texas Society of Architects, Gideon Toal is one of most distinguished architecture firms in the country. The company has won over 50 awards in the past 10 years, including eight in 2010. In 2007, Gideon Toal received its highest honor-Texas Society of Architects Architecture Firm of the Year. ALT LEFT: Fort Worth, Texas. The Fort Worth Museum of Science and History main courtyard was designed to incorporate an existing live oak tree with an immense 40-foot canopy with a minimalist water fountain, reflecting pool and bright jacaranda blue walls. Through the incorporation of the bright colors of Latin America, and the extensive use of glass and open space, the facility promotes the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History mission of learning through discovery by employing an exemplary blend of space, light, color, and water with the use of strong, basic geometric forms. Anchoring one corner of the internationally renown Museum District in Fort Worth and joining the works of 4 other world class designs, the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History represents a co-mingling of the architectural styles of Texas and Mexico. Photo by Lourdes Legoretta.


NATIONAL

INSIDE: BRENDEL ARCHITECTS, THE M GROUP, LEACH MOUNCE


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BRENDEL ARCHITECTS, LLC.

A SMALL AND ATTENTIVE STAFF DELIVERS DESIGN BASED ON YOU by Joel Cornell ABOVE: Highland Country Club. New Country Club OPPOSITE ABOVE & BELOW: Pacatte. New custom home and back patio. New stone fire pit with built-in seating and a Outdoor kitchen. Photos by Brendel Architects, LLC

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Custom residential architecture requires a certain breed of interpersonal thinking that can be hard to find. In larger corporate firms, plans can lose the personal touch when they are passed from one department to another. Working with a staff of four, Jeannette Brendel, of Brendel Architects, LLC, is positioned to provide clients with services that can actualize their dreams. Brendel acquired a Bachelor’s of Architectural Technology from Washington University in St. Louis, Mo. in 1992. Four years later, Brendel Architects, LLC was founded. “I started the firm alone, just working out of my home,” Brendel said. “The business began to take off immediately and I was quickly in need of more help. My husband, Bill, and I own a piece of commercial property that wasn’t completely occupied, so we decided to expand to the new location. Since then, we’ve done nothing but grow.” The staff has remained small and close-knit throughout the history of the firm. The homes are designed by Brendel herself, with two professional CAD operators working to bring those plans to fruition. The personnel and business are optimized with the help of an office manager. Brendel’s daughter and protégé, Brandy Pingsterhaus, graduated from Washington University in St. Louis magna cum laude in 2008 and has been an Intern Architect with the firm since 2000. A large majority of the design work completed by Brendel Architects, LLC is located in the Missouri/ Illinois area, within a 100 mile radius surrounding St. Louis. With such proximity to the New Madrid Fault Line, environment is a big consideration for every

project. Seismic considerations are required in every project and the bitter winters and blistering summers are a constant design dichotomy. “For the most part, clients tend to come to us with simple ideas of their dream or vision,” Brendel said. “Occasionally, they’re mindful of the style they want, but every client is different. This is where our more personal size and style come in handy. Additionally, some clients come to us just for construction documents, others for a landscape and pool design, and others still for full project management from start to finish. Usually, initial discussion topics with the client focus on their daily routine and lifestyle. From there, I sketch preliminary plans and have them ‘live in it’ for a while. I suggest they take some time and go though their plans while they go through their day to day life. I’ve found that to be the best method to really show clients what works and what doesn’t - what’s necessary and what’s entirely superfluous.” Even though certain Brendel staff members may be tasked to one or more different projects, Brendel makes quite sure that every step of every project passes through her before finalization. Brendel’s expertise with a variety of sustainable energy systems is also a key factor in her designs. While many architects know the ‘what’ and ‘where’ of geothermal or solar energy systems, or rain water harvesting systems, Brendel’s background and training gives her the knowledge and perspective concerning the ‘why’ and ‘how’, which allows for more unique and integrated design opportunities. One of Brendel’s many personal touches that set the


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firm apart is their up-and-coming cabinetry business, Architecturally Designed Cabinetry Inc. “We can design a kitchen or bathroom that embodies a certain style or mode, but the entire aesthetic can veer off course when the furnishings seem odd or out of place. Through designing the cabinetry for a space, we are even more capable of delivering the client’s vision.” Brendel Architects also has plans to take their firm online. “We have a large collection of homes that we’ve designed over the past 14 years. We’re starting to go through them and choose those we think will appeal the general public with some tweaking. With all of the personal touches that we incorporate into each design, the usual result isn’t necessarily something what would be well suited for a spec house or generic floor plan. We’re aiming to offer those generic plans combined with our specialty design services by working in person or online with the client to establish their vision. Our goal is to make our custom services available to anyone around the world, allowing them to have quality, custom architectural design with the same personal touch.” ALT

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building with humility & style 110 Architecture Leaders Today


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by Rebecca Rodriguez

The M Group has a simple philosophy that has allowed the architectural firm to thrive with both with its clients and its staff for nearly 25 years. It’s known as the “Zero Ego” approach in which the clients’ wishes are strictly adhered to and the staff has a free and open flow of ideas. “Designing for the client in a collaborative way is the best fit for them and the organization,” said Barry Harley, a graphic designer with the company and one of three members of the firm’s communications department. It is paramount to give the client the result they are after, said Danielle Covati, an interior designer at the firm and member of the communications team. Clients are initially interviewed and given detailed questions, which result in a programming spreadsheet. “That document then becomes a starting point to assist in our understanding of how that organization functions, and helps us identify unique aspects to exploit from a design standpoint,” Harley said. Rebecca Wilson, Business Manager, said there is a real “family feel” at the firm, which is based in the Washington D.C. suburb of Vienna, Va. “It’s low ego, team-oriented and there’s a constant sharing of ideas,” she said. The company holds brown bag lunches where collaboration and discussions of projects take place. “There’s such a strong group of people. We’re continually teaching each other and there’s a lot of learning opportunities,” Harley said. Staff attends conferences across the country and share what they learned so that everyone benefits. Wilson said the company is continually in search mode for new staff members. They look for individual talent, skills, and the right attitude. There’s not a lot of attrition at the company. A third of the staff has been working ten years or more and another third six to ten years. They employ about 20 workers. The firm primarily focuses on commercial work, which can be broken down into three primary categories: interior architecture, base building, and mission critical facilities. The company was founded in 1987 by company president Mitchell Freedman, AIA, NCARB. For its first five years, the firm focused on interior architecture, but soon expanded into base building design. As The M Group became more established with base building work, design opportunities for mission-critical projects incorporating data centers and network operation centers became available. Currently, the company handles an array of projects, designing 1-2 million sq. ft. LEFT: This office space features bamboo flooring, a walnut and solid surface coffee bar, sculpted and textured gypsum wallboard, an aluminum and artglass conference room fronts, and lacquered panels with custom lighting. Reston, VA. INSET: Crisp, machine like detailing of the solid surface block provides support for, as well as a strong contrast to, the live-edge Walnut slab. Photos by Mitch Freedman.

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of space annually. A recently completed project 60 miles from Washington D.C., The NAP of the Capital Region, is one of the most secure and technologically sophisticated data center campuses in the eastern U.S. Mark Bowles, AIA, lead architect on the project, said the 30-acre site will eventually contain five 50,000 sq. ft. data centers. Additionally, the 72,000 sq. ft. administration building was completed this summer. Uninterrupted power, air conditioning, connectivity, and the strength of the physical security of the campus were major factors for the customer, Terremark, a leading global provider of utilityenabled managed IT infrastructures. Some of the company’s tenants are federal government agencies or contractors. Security was of the utmost importance to Terremark, and the data centers had to be “concrete boxes with lids and able to resist any type of assault, said Bowles. Each data center is supported by 11 emergency generators to ensure uninterrupted power in the event of a utility failure. Bowles said Terremark was specific in what they wanted, and delighted with the outcome. “They required great design and expected a high-tech look that would be impressive to government and business customers,” he said. “Terremark wanted to be certain that visitors touring the campus would come away with a clear impression of a first class, professional operation. The feedback is that our design has provided that exact result.” In 2009, Reston, Virginia based E Group sought out The M Group to design a new office with TOP The reception area, with seating at the rear of the reception desk and beyond. KPGM, Baltimore, MD. RIGHT: The lunch room at KPGM features a view of downtown Baltimore’s Pratt Street. Baltimore, MD. Photos by Judy Davis.

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descriptions that included unique, crisp, clean and bright. E Group, which designs innovative recognition programs and branded product solutions, was interested in abandoning their private office plan in favor of an open-plan environment. The M Group was able to deliver what their client envisioned. The 7,500 sq. ft. space was long and narrow, featuring windows along one of the sides of the suite. “The amount of natural light flooding the entry hall and general office workstation areas is considerable,” said Mitchell Freedman, lead architect on the project. The design included workstations in a customdesigned configuration that added to the bright and open feeling. “Overall, the E Group’s new offices look and feel like the combination of a high-end, New York City advertising agency and an artist’s loft space – difficult imagery to achieve when building out the interior of the normal suburban Washington D.C. office building,” Freedman said. During the recent economic downturn, The M Group has weathered the storm and maintained a modest growth curve. They’ve also kept their goal of not contracting work out. “We are coming out of one of the most challenging economic times,” said Wilson “but as a firm we’re probably better for it. We’ll continue to balance the assignments we take on with our ability to carefully manage the quality of the way we produce the work.” “While still supporting the project load, during the less busy periods

we kept expanding our design, graphic and technical skills.” Covati stressed how the firm has been consistently strong, helped in part by being located in the D.C. metro area, allowing the company to take advantage of government supported projects. “We’re doing more government work than ever before” said Covati. Unusual projects that offer design, schedule, budget and technical challenges crowd the firm’s portfolio. Recent assignments for KPMG LLP in Baltimore, Md., McLean Va. and Norfolk Va. all offered such challenges. The Baltimore project, for example, involved the complete rebuilding of the sixth floor of what previously had been single-tenant 1970’s era building. Encompassing 30,000 sq. ft., the space overlooks Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. The tenant sought a professional and unique environment, while exploiting views of the harbor as much as possible. The project’s lead designer, Karen G. Lewis, IIDA employed the design of open workstations with three-person “quiet rooms” around the periphery. It was a new workspace concept. “Everything was kept light and open,” Lewis said. Views of Baltimore’s Inner Harbor are seen through the glass walls of both the lobby and the main conference room. The open planning meant managers were removed from their offices, but the quiet rooms give them an area for privacy. “We showed them the mock-ups of various

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designs of film on glass that allowed them to see how much privacy they’d have. They were really pleased,” she said. Recently, Lewis worked on the Tysons KPMG project in McLean, Va. The job consisted of transforming four floors, each about 35,000 sq. ft. The client wanted an updated look. Additionally, the program required creating common areas to support conference rooms, training rooms, and a lunchroom. Both the new and the updated conference rooms received stateof-the-art audio-visual systems. Furthermore, the project was designed to achieve LEED certification. Attempting LEED certification in an older building and in a renovation project was a challenge. The finishes selected showcased the LEED effort with countertops made of recycled glass in a cement matrix, recycled glass tile on the walls, reclaimed heart pine flooring, energy efficient lighting, and custom photo wall covering showcasing environmental scenes. “The client was ecstatic with the outcome,” Lewis said. “The space feels and mostly is, brand new.” With The M Group’s idea that the client’s ego is the only ego that counts, the result is a satisfied customer, pleased with the innovations and designs by a company steeped in success. ALT TOP LEFT: The administration building at Terremark’s NAP of the Capital Region. Culpeper, Va. BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: The break room and office space at KPMG, McClean, Va. Photos by Mitch Freeman.

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In Safe Hands

LEACH MOUNCE ARCHITECTS HAS PROVEN EXPERTISE IN THE PUBLIC SAFETY ARCHITECTURE MARKET, SERVING A VARIETY OF CLIENTS ACROSS NORTH AMERICA by Jane Caffrey

Leach Mounce Architects has been a safe choice for clients for more than a quarter of a century, with proven expertise in public safety architecture. While serving as an expert consultant to public agencies since 1962, in the past two decades the southern California company has also provided a full range of services to architects designing law enforcement facilities, communications centers, detention facilities, security systems, and a myriad of other public safety structures. “Safety, high security, and technology are the types of work we’ve been doing for a long time,” said Howard Leach, President of Leach Mounce Architects. “We’re on the cutting edge of it. We’ve developed a reputation, and we are specialized at doing it well.” The company has worked on fire stations, communications centers, crime laboratories, law enforcement facilities, libraries, civic centers, and detention facilities. With a strong methodology for performing needs assessments during the planning phase, Leach Mounce has completed more than 80 assessments for city and county governments in the last 20 years, as well as 26 projects for prominent firms across North America. “Since we negotiated the purchase of the Wendell Mounce firm, in 1990, we’ve become more and more specialized,” Leach said. “We have a good methodology for doing a needs

TOP: San Mateo Police Headquarters, San Mateo, Calif. Approach to front entry. Photo by Steve Whittaker, Whittaker Photography. BOTTOM: Sacramento 911 Center/ DOC/Training Facility, Sacramento, Calif. Facility completed January 2006. Photo by Steve Whittaker, Whittaker Photography (www. whittpho.com).

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TOP LEFT & RIGHT: California State University Northridge Parking Garage. Photos courtesy of Leach Mounce Architects. BOTTOM LEFT & RIGHT: Pierce County/City of Tacoma Wash. EOC. Photo by Denny Sternstein, Sternstein Photography.

assessment, which is valuable for starting a project.” While the firm has completed projects nationally, several of the most successful structures stand in California, such as the San Mateo Police Headquarters. A $50 million project, the 56,000 sq. ft. structure is LEED Silver certified. Completed in 2009, it boasts a 43,000 sq. ft. subterranean parking garage that holds 105 cars, as well as an indoor shooting range. The complex also contains a holding facility, regional dispatch center and a multi-use emergency operations center and training/ community room. Leach Mounce recently completed the needs assessment, design and construction administration for the Santa Clara Emergency Dispatch Center, which consisted of 5,500 sq. ft. and 10 operator stations. In La Mesa, the Post Office, Library and Police Headquarters are a 60,400 square-foot complex valued at $27.8 million, and part of a master plan that Leach Mounce did for the city. “We’re really getting into multi-function centers, as well as the combination of dispatch and real time crime centers,” said Leach. “We will be doing more with live camera operating facilities. It’s all in one spot, so it’s a fully integrated type of center with electronic connections to multiple public and private agencies.” The company additionally specializes in threat analysis, led by Leach, who was trained by the Institute of Security Design in Washington D.C. in Designing Facilities to Survive Terrorist Attack. Leach Mounce provided Threat Analysis for the Communications Center for Los Angeles International Airport, the Sacramento 911 Center and the City of Rochester/ Monroe County Communications Center in New York, recommending countermeasures for facility hardening and system protection. “We have several departments and agencies that we’re dealing with,” said Leach. “The main thing is to provide the services that the client needs and especially during these difficult financial times, provide more for less. People skills are extremely important. We address their concerns, needs, and wants, then we add in our point of view and experience, and that’s how we get a great project.” Now with proven expertise in public safety architecture, Leach Mounce anticipates expanding to new markets in upcoming years, such as becoming more involved in library and court design. Yet the core business model will remain: serving as a preeminent force in the national market for public safety architecture. ALT 118 Architecture Leaders Today

BRANDOW & JOHNSTON, INC. After 65 years, Brandow & Johnston, Inc. is proud to be identified among those who built the Los Angeles we see today; that includes the first all welded steel office building and the city’s first major high-rise. Since then, B&J have successfully completed over 20,000 projects; 200 using Revit/BIM (Building Information Modeling). B&J have worked with Leach Mounce on projects such as the Parking Structure & Public Services Building for CSU Northridge, La Mesa Post Office & Library, La Mesa Police Facility, Chino Police Department, and City of Stockton 911 Call Center. Brandow & Johnston now offer civil engineering as of 2007. B&J most recently completed civil engineering for the new $105 million Ronald Tutor Campus Center at the University of Southern California.


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INTERNATIONAL INSIDE: HOK, DAVID GATES & ASSOCIATES


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o H K This globally known architecture and design firm has over 23 offices world wide and is a place where ideas work. by Joel Cornell

“Buildings aren’t good enough,” said HOK CEO Patrick MacLeamy. “They cost way too much to build, they don’t work too well and they don’t last very long. Why is this true? More importantly, what can we do about it?” In 1955, three classmates from Washington University in St. Louis started doing something about it. There in St. Louis, Missouri, George Hellmuth, Gyo Obata and George Kassabaum founded their eponymous firm that was later shortened to HOK. The firm initially practiced locally, doing work on various municipal and private projects. It was only a short decade later that the firm began to expand their portfolio across the country. They opened their first additional branch in San Francisco in 1966. Over a history of 55 years, the firm has opened 23 offices across North American, Asia and Europe, run by a staff of over 1,800 professionals.

They are consistently rated by industry surveys as among the very top of virtually every list, across numerous building types, specialties and regions. Much of the longevity of the firm can be attributed to the environment of integrity at the founding of the firm. “Don’t depend on one building type,” Hellmuth wrote. “To cushion a drop in demand for any one specialty, develop a battery of them: schools, hospitals, libraries, prisons, industrial buildings, shopping centers, office buildings. Diversify in locations also; go where the work can be found. Expand into full-service related specialties: landscape design, city planning, interior design, industrial design, graphics design.” To date, HOK has accomplished all of these things, becoming masters of many disciplines and far more. As their website puts it: “Lines between sectors are increasingly blurred

ABOVE: The 11 story, 24-hour, public green parking garage in the River North neighborhood of the Chicago features wind turbines, rain water collection systems and electric car plug-in stations. A reversible meter has also been installed to measure and return power to the city’s grid throughout the year. A wayfinding system has also been implemented at each elevator lobby to educate Chicago residents on how to live more sustainably and better protect the environment.

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in the 21st century. Our market-based specialists actively share ideas and learn from their HOK Colleagues in other groups, bringing a rich blend of expertise to each client as a single creative force.” Even in the past decade, HOK has expanded rapidly, opening five new offices internationally: in Dubai, Miami, Beijing, Singapore and Mumbai. A short list of their accomplishments includes the first LEED certified airport terminal at Boston Logan International Airport and the world’s most frequented museum at the National Air & Space Museum in Washington, DC. By 2007, more that 40% of HOK’s work consisted of international projects. In 1995, then President and CEO, Jerry Sincoff, worked with Martha Whitaker work within the firm, eventually going on to establish HOK University, an internal learning in initiative that would serve to develop the firm from the inside out, even as the company continued to grow. Whitaker and her staff (including current “Dean” of HOK University, Marsha Littell) have worked to increase the firm’s internal resources for learning and for documenting learning credits to meet new AIA requirements for membership entrance. In 1999, the program won the AIA award for Excellence in Education. Some of HOK’s recent work includes the Greenway Self Park Facility in Chicago. The building’s sustainability is optimized and apparent. Featuring naturally ventilated exteriors, a cistern rain water collection system, a green roof, electric car plug-in stations and vertical wind turbines lining the southwest corning of the building, HOK has aesthetically exemplified green design. The Salvador Dalí Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida decided upon a new location nearby in 2008. From the very beginning, HOK handled the entire design process. The new building is scheduled to open in January of 2011. With more than 1,800 employees working in office locations spread from Washington, DC and Toronto and Los Angeles to Dubai, Mumbai, London and Hong Kong, keeping the staff connected, united and on one page can be difficult if not impossible through traditional means. Enter HOKLife.com, a blog and gathering place for all things HOK. The site gives employees, clients and interested parties in general a chance to look past the professional veneer of HOK and into a much more personal side of the firm and its staff. Topics can range from local interests and community life to individual outlooks on business, design and life; all written by HOK personnel around the world. HOK has sustained itself through an innovative operating method they refer to as Integrated Project Delivery. Current CEO Patrick MacLeamy described it as such: THIS PAGE: St Petersburg, Fla. As the most-visited museum in the Southeastern US, the 68,000 sq. ft. Dali Museum fronts a beautiful site on the St. Petersburg waterfront. Influenced by Dali’s Surrealism, HOK’s design creates an iconic signal of the importance of the collection. Though the museum is designed as a treasure box that shelters the priceless collection from hurricanes behind thick concrete walls, the box opens in ways that welcome and intrigue visitors.

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“Projects tend to have three main players: owner, architect and contractor. For over 150 years, architects and contractors have always worked separately. There tends to never be a contract between architect and contractor; only an agreement between both parties and the owner to exchange the information necessary. We architects are required to provide the contractor with specs and drawings. The contractor is required to provide us with material samples and shop drawings. “However, teamwork and trust do not spring naturally from this model. Instead, the architect and contractor think of each other separately, not as a team. This lack of trust often creates what I call a ‘risk gap’. Instead of sharing information freely, both sides learn that the more information is exchanged, the more the risk is increased. The risk gap is an open space and, naturally, nature abhors a vacuum. So into that gap come construction managers, lawyers, insurance companies, for example. These players do not design or build anything. Instead, they consume our time, effort and money. This traditional organization is broken. “So, we discarded that structure entirely. We still have the same three entities (owner, architect and contractor). Instead of two separate contracts creating one risk gap, we have one contract that binds owner, architect and contractor together. This single contract mandates full sharing of information, risk and reward. This model binds the three together mandating teamwork to accomplish the goal: better building, better prices, better value.” MacLeamy keeps as a motto for both himself and HOK the idea that, “buildings are assembled, not built. “Too often we get trapped by old thinking and old word usage. Take the word building. We naturally think then that we ‘build buildings’. But do we? I don’t think so. I think we assemble buildings. It’s important to improve the process as a value proposition. People need better buildings at more affordable prices. “We know that most buildings don’t work well enough. I challenge the building industry to take the steps necessary to create teams that are collaborators and partners instead of adversaries, and to insert design back into its rightful role as a real problem solving element in the creation of affordable, long lasting buildings for everybody.” ALT THIS PAGE: Sophisticated technology enables the global architectural firm of HOK to foster dynamic, real-time collaboration among multi-office project teams while reducing the firm’s overall environmental footprint. Operating within 14 of HOK’s global offices, “Advanced Collaboration Rooms” (ACRs) combine Cisco’s TelePresence high-resolution, interoperable videoconferencing technology with PolyVision’s Thunder Virtual Flipchart System. The integrated system enables the firm’s project teams worldwide to conduct videoconferencing meetings while designers sketch ideas and collaborate in real time. Participants can display images, videos, documents and live views of computer desktops as part of design charrettes, design reviews, client presentations and project status updates. Using a series of projectors in each ACR, multiple ideas can be displayed at one time, and all meeting notes and documents can be instantly saved, printed and emailed to all participants. All photos courtesy of HOK.

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GATES + ASSOCIATES

SUSTAINING ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN BY DESIGNING SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTS

by Joel Cornell ABOVE: The Fountains, Roseville, Calif. The Fountains is an upscale, lifestyle shopping destination with a series of social spaces featuring art and interactive elements along the storefronts and central median. The central fountain plaza focuses on a 25’ bronze sculpture. A Mediterranean retreat character is reflected in the plant palette, site elements, and detailing. Photo by the Bollinger Group. OPPOSITE PAGE: Bay Meadows Linear Park, San mateo, Calif. The Linear Park is the centerpiece of this mixed-use transit village, built on the site of a former racetrack. This award winning project was listed as one of America’s best new developments in the Sierra Club’s November, 2005 publication, ‘Building Better’. Photo by David Gates & Associates

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Environmental awareness is a vital aspect to any architectural design firm. These ideas are even more critical when that design firm specializes in designing natural environments. Gates + Associates, based in San Ramon, Calif., is a landscape architecture, land planning and urban design firm that has maintained a 34 year history of success in design and planning. Upon graduating from Harvard University in 1970 with two master’s degrees, one in urban design and one in landscape architecture, one of the co-founders of Gates + Associates, David Gates, worked in the public sector in Boston as a landscape architect for a period of three years. He relocated to San Francisco, where he taught courses in landscape architectural design at the University of California, Berkeley until 1980. During his tenure there, in 1977, Gates founded Gates + Associates with his wife Linda Gates. “Most of what we do is try to express the patterns that nature has already laid out in such a way that the architectural plans are integrated into nature, not on top of it,” Gates said. “This has been our method of design since our inception, but only in

the past decades has it come to the public’s attention as ‘sustainability’. Whether we’re working with a range of 2,000 acres in Vietnam, a small residential community in Nigeria, or someone’s backyard here in Calif., our awareness of the environmental and cultural settings, and of all the construction and commitment issues involved have allowed us to grow domestically and internationally, even through these difficult economic times.” The bulk of Gates + Associates’ work is done in landscape design, but that is all reinforced by their skills and experience in land planning and urban design. Backed by a staff of 24 landscape architects and designers, irrigation designers, CAD drafters and a graphic design department, Gates + Associates has the scope and attention to detail that lets them handle projects of any size or scale like a small boutique firm. “For the most part,” said Gates, “I try and keep involved in each project that the firm handles. We collaborate frequently with civil and structural engineers, architects, cities and land developers. Our firm


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will assign a specialized team of 5-10 personnel to handle a project, depending on its size and scope, and I’ll spend my time working with the people in those groups helping to aim the direction of the project, develop the character and aesthetic that the client wants; from the general path the project is taking, down to the things like the design of the fountains or monoliths, placement of buildings or choice of materials to be used.”

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Over the last four years, Gates + Associates has been working with a client in China to design a large development around an existing reservoir. The project began with Gates + Associates managing the land planning aspects of the development. However, since they have been working with the client, they have also taken to designing bridges and roads, laying out home spaces, managing the density of the subdivisions, planning the nearby golf course and converting nearby rice fields into peninsulas as part of the adjacent park. Additionally, Gates + Associates is working in Nigeria to design a 1,000 home community development near the capital city of Abuja. They are also working in Saikai Bashi, Japan on the landscape design for several upscale hotels on the Saikai Bashi straits. “Today’s idea of sustainability has always been a focus for us,” Gates said. “Not only in the sense of preserving soil structure, clean water and efficient design, but we are always extra careful because we’re not just designing for the environment; we’re designing the environment itself.” ALT OPPOSITE PAGE: Bay Street Memorialization, Emeryville, Calif. In the midst of a bustling retail district and mixeduse project, this park honors the history and culture of the Ohlone Indians who once lived on the site.  Gates + Associates worked with local artists to interpret natural history and geology of the area, as well as Ohlone life and culture. Photo by David Gates & Associates. LEFT: Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland, Calif. This former Navy deep-water port was transformed into a 38-acre waterfront park, emphasizing learning about local history, the natural environment, maritime activities, and stewardship of the environment. A regional destination for annual events and festivities, the park includes historic elements, reconstructed shorelines and native vegetation, a grand lawn and picnic area, vista points for maritime and port activities, beach, and over 1.5 miles of trails. Photo by David Gates & Associates.

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Winter Volume 2 Pre Press