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Scholar Chic

HADP ARCHITECTURE

Three different universities; three different design needs; three different approaches. Meeting the need for sustainability and student socialization.

ARCHITECTURE LEADERS TODAY T H E M A G A Z I N E F O R C A P TA I N S O F I N D U S T R Y www.architectureleaderstoday.com

July/August 2012


east CampUs bUilDing 1516 at UniversitY of georgia general Contractor: Juneau Construction mep engineer: Jordan & Skala Civil engineer: Travis Pruitt & Associates structural engineer: Trillium Structures

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Scholar CHic

Three different universities; three different design needs. Meeting the need for sustainability and student socialization. Story by Paul Charleston Photos Courtesy of HADP Architecture

opposite top: 1516, University of Georgia, Ga. The key to this project was an extremely strong respect for the architecture language of the campus. bottom left: Classic southern brick architecture is used on many buildings throughout the campus.

bottom right: Six-story facility includes 560 doubleoccupancy suite-style beds. The building’s sustainable elements have resulted in more than 50 percent savings on daily energy consumption. above: HADP incorporated color bands in the lobby to lighten up the space and help to establish an upbeat atmosphere for students.

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oday’s college students have high expectations for their Residence Halls, as do university administrators. While students are looking for private bedrooms, Wi-fi, and social lounges, administrators are looking to sustainable design elements for long-term cost-savings and well thought-out hall designs that respect the history and culture of the university. Miami, Fla. based firm HADP Architecture took three different design approaches to meet these needs for new residence halls on three unique campuses.

Building 1516 at the University of Georgia, Cougar Village at the University of Houston and Parkview Housing at Florida International University are three very different projects, each with a distinct architectural style — which also reflects the future direction of their respective universities. HADP designed the first “green” residence hall at the University of Georgia, earning LEED Gold for Building 1516 residence hall at East Campus village. The six-story facility includes 560 double-occupancy suite-style beds. It implements a grey water system July/August 2012 3


“…sustainable elements have resulted in more than 50 percent savings on daily energy consumption.”

left: Providing natural light decreases energy usage during the day and provides students with vistas of the surrounding environment. Opposite, top left: There is a lounge on each floor with floor-to-ceiling glass windows that overlooks the UH campus. These lounges are used as social space and study areas. opposite, top right: Located on the corners, the lounge spaces jut out from the edges as a large glass rectangular structure. opposite, center: HADP covered walkways under the building’s façade. The walkways draw students into the interior spaces of Cougar Village, and provide a pedestrian connector to the rest of campus. opposite, bottom: Seating and strong lighting in the exterior spaces encourages outdoor activities on the spacious green lawn outside of the building.

for all shower and lavatory waste, one of the first of its kind for a student residence hall. The implementation of FSC certified wood, high-efficiency sinks, showers and toilets, cool roof, and many other sustainable elements have resulted in more than 50 percent savings on daily energy consumption. HADP was successful in designing the modern yet traditional, sustainable student residence hall to integrate with a campus teeming with beautiful classic southern brick architecture. “The key to this project was an extremely strong respect for the architectural language of the University of Georgia campus,” President and CEO of HADP Architecture, David Harper said. “We tried to move that language forward to some extent in terms of creating a slight modernization of traditional Georgian style architecture.” The modernization can be seen in the resort-style 4 Architecture Leaders Today

lobby finishes, high tech audio/visual multi-purpose room, large catering kitchen, private baths, and inroom temperature controls. In order to better understand and conform to the architectural style and planning considerations at the UGA campus, HADP brought in Collins Cooper Carusi Architects as design consultant, due to their long-term experience on the campus. “Creating a successful residential student environment involves a critical knowledge of the current student housing market and active listening oncampus to design an environment that is optimum for each individual campus; not just take what has worked somewhere else and try to force-fit it into every university’s program,” Harper said. Unlike Building 1516, which was designed to accommodate upperclassmen at the University of Georgia, Cougar Village at the University of Houston

was purposely designed with much of the amenity space located outside of the rooms to promote socialization for first year students. Cougar Village is inspired by that freshman tradition of leaving your bedroom door open and meeting friends in the hallways, floor lounges, computer rooms, fitness rooms and common kitchens featured in the residence hall. “What we know with that profile of a student is that socialization issues are quite important,” Harper said. “Creating a lot of amenity space outside of the rooms is very important.” A tan brick color and a reddish brick are commonly used in the architecture across the campus of the University of Houston. The exterior of Cougar Village is precast concrete and in order to visually break up the wall of uniform concrete, the firm designed portions of the exterior with embedded brick. “Even though it looks like a brick structure in those


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“at haDP our in-depth understanding of what students and administrators desire ensures student housing designs that are efficient, comfortable, and, at the end of the day, marketable.”

UniversitY of hoUston, CoUgar village general Contractor: Hardin Construction structural engineer: Haynes Whaley Associates mep and Civil engineer: Bury + Partners

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floriDa international UniversitY (fiU), parKvieW hoUsing general Contractor: Moss & Associates landscape architect: EDSA structural engineer: TRC Worldwide mep engineer: SGM Engineering Civil engineer: Biscayne Engineering 6 Architecture Leaders Today


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opposite, top: Two elevated buildings with shaded breezeways on the ground floor line a “Main Street” and are connected by a 3rd floor pedestrian bridge. A “Suspended Greatroom” with 18-ft glass curtainwalls overlooks multiple outdoor recreation spaces. Rendering courtesy of HKS. center, left: The floors are a recycled man-made LEED-compliant materials that resemble wood. center, right: The apartments’ interiors adopt a fun, modern feel. HADP utilized color and open design to create a cool, young space for FIU students.

bottom: The design provides multiple outdoor recreation spaces such as this courtyard with views through breezeways and shaded seating areas on the ground level. Rendering courtesy of HKS. above: The complex features a pedestrian bridge that connects the two buildings at the third floor. The bridge has an active lounge and connects to game rooms, multipurpose rooms and a common kitchen. Rendering courtesy of HKS.

areas, it’s actually the same concrete structure, but the brick is embedded in the concrete. It provides extreme durability and softens the look and feel of the building,” Harper said. The embedded brick also helps the building blend into the existing architectural language of the urban campus that is accustomed to forward thinking, progressive design. One such progressive design element is the floorto-ceiling glass social lounge on each floor. Located on the corners, the lounge spaces jut out from the edge of the building as a large glass rectangular structure. The intent was to treat the corners as lanterns because they are brightly lit at night and provide transparency to the building. The students at Florida International University wanted a very social and inclusive living experience. Parkview Housing was designed by HADP as the lead firm in a joint venture with HKS Architects. HADP was responsible for the planning, design and management of the project, which is slated for

completion in 2013. The project accommodates 148, 4-bedroom and 2-bedroom apartments with a living room and kitchen, and 26 studios. The project scope also includes a 300-car Parking Garage, and a grass amphitheater at the edge of the nature preserve for intimate concerts and relaxation. The focus of the project was on designing a wide variety of social spaces. Designed as two, sixstory buildings lining each side of a campus Main Street, Parkview features a pedestrian bridge that connects the two buildings at the third floor. The bridge features an active lounge and connects to game rooms, multipurpose rooms and a common kitchen. Additional spaces include house lounges, study rooms, a glass-walled 20-ft. high greatroom, and multiple outdoor gathering spaces. “At HADP our in-depth understanding of what students and administrators desire ensures student housing designs that are efficient, furnishable, durable, comfortable, and at the end of the day, marketable,” Harper said. ALT July/August 2012 7

HADP Architecture  

Three different universities; three different design needs; three different approaches. Meeting the need for sustainability and student soci...

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