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AzF4 arizona forum

Spring 2015

aia arizona design awards A Publication of AIA Arizona


AzF4 team Contributing Editors Cody Deike Assoc. AIA, LEED AP Liz Farkas AIA Diane Reicher Jacobs AIA Eddie Jones AIA Matthew Salenger AIA James Trahan AIA Sara Wheatcroft Assoc. AIA Editor-In-Chief Magazine Graphics Senior Editor Christina Noble AIA, LEED AP Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP Nicholas Tsontakis Assoc. AIA

Mission The Arizona Forum (AzF) is the semi-annual peer-reviewed journal of the American Institute of Architects Arizona and AIA Phoenix Metro. AzF will advocate for contemporary design issues through critical discourse, address design excellence, quality of life, and urban design throughout the state of Arizona. AzF invites AIA members and authors to share their expertise, practice experience, visions and theories with the profession and the community in general. The Forum challenges authors and readers to solve prescient issues, provide insight into contemporary architectural practice, contemplate architectural theory, and thoughtfully consider architectural design, urbanism, sustainability and technology. The Forum is open to contributions from AIA Members and community leaders. Its roots are based in the AIA Arizona Communications Committee and it is a tool intended to increase dialogue, communication and involvement on multiple levels. The Forum will foster interaction and discussion that will cultivate relationships between members and the broader community while also encouraging critical analysis and proactive thinking. Submissions The Arizona Forum (AzF) welcomes the submission of essays, projects and responses to articles. Submitted materials are subject to peer and editorial review. Spring issues of AzF focus on the AIA Arizona Design Awards while the fall AzF issues are themed, so articles and projects are selected relative to the issue’s specific subject. Please contact the AzF Editor-in-Chief, Christina Noble AIA, at Christina.Noble@gmail.com if you are interested in contributing. Peer Reviewers We are looking for experts in all areas of architecture and design to serve as peer reviewers for future issues. Past authors are also invited to serve as peer reviewers.

AIA Arizona Board Phil Weddle FAIA President Caroline Lobo AIA President Elect Robin Shambach AIA Secretary Patrick Panetta AIA Treasurer AIA Arizona 30 N 3rd Ave #200, Phoenix, Az 85003 P: 602.252.4200 www.aia-arizona.org


Photos: Not Sure

table of contents aia arizona design award projects 2014 publisher’s note Nick Tsontakis AIA, NCARB page 4

design awards 2014 - introduction Eddie Jones AIA page 6

arid city synergy competition Text: Matthew Salenger AIA page 69

sponsor pages page 74-98

amangiri resort Architect: I-10 Studio Text: Cody Deike Assoc. AIA, LEED AP page 12 brown’s ranch trailhead Architect: Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio Text: Christina Noble AIA, LEED AP page 18 college center Architect: richard + bauer Text: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP page 24 miramar college Architect: Marlene Imirzian and Associates Text: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP page 30 vali homes infill prototype house 1.0 Architect: Colab Studio Text: James Trahan AIA page 36 sonoran shelters/marana civic center Architect: Christopher D. Trumble AIA Text: Liz Farkas AIA page 42 aspinall federal building and us courthouse Architect: Westlake Reed Leskosky Text: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP page 48 salt river pima - maricopa indian community justice center Architect: Gould Evans Text: Sara Wheatcroft Assoc. AIA page 54 prescott college Architect: Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio Text: Christina Noble AIA, LEED AP page 59

AzF4 03 table of contents

john m. roll united states courthouse Architect: Ehrlich Architects Text: Diane Reicher Jacobs AIA page 64

front cover photo by Bill Timmerman back cover photo by Joe Fletcher


publisher’s note Welcome to the print version of Arizona Forum. Our Spring 2015 issue, AzF4 features the 2014 AIA Arizona Awards winners while our Fall 2015 issue will be built around a theme concerning the architecture community in our state. Twenty Advisory Panel architectural firms have spent the last three years discussing how to put the publication together and how to make it sustainable. We have partnered with quality sponsors in the design and construction industry who support the Arizona Forum by taking out ads. The architects in turn participate in quarterly sponsor hosted networking events. This 1 networking system has proven itself with our first publication, Arizona Residential Architects (ARA), which is celebrating its fifth anniversary and is flourishing. Aristotle once said that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. When architects get together in a pursuit of a common goal, the results benefit the entire design and construction community as well as the general public. Architects Publishing Network is proud to be involved in this important undertaking. Network on‌

Nick Tsontakis AIA, NCARB Architects Publishing Network NickT@TsontakisArchitecture.com


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aia arizona design awards 2014 honor awards 1 amangiri resort by I-10 studio 2 browns ranch trailhead by weddle gilmore black rock studio merit awards 3 college center by richard + bauer 4 miramar college by marlene imirzian & associates architects

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5 vali homes infill prototype house 1.0 by colab studio with 180 degrees and vali homes citation awards 6 sonoran shelters/marana civic center by christopher d trumble 7 aspinall federal building and us courthouse by westlake reed leskosky unbuilt award

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8 salt river pima - maricopa indian community justice center by Gould Evans aps energy award 9 prescott college by weddle gilmore black rock studio srp sustiainable building award 10 john m roll united states courthouse by ehrlich architects

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05 introduction


design awards 2014 by: Eddie Jones AIA

2014 was a good year for Arizona architecture. Frankly, I think the last thirty five years have been good for Arizona architecture, despite the Recession’s dramatic impact on our profession. In the May 2002 issue of “Architecture” magazine, Reed Kroloff, then editor and chief gave our notable work a name: “The Arizona School.” Kroloff writes:…”the Arizona School is compelling in its mining of our overlapping mythic conceptions of architecture and the American west. These designers – independent, feisty, and self-confident make real architecture in a physical and social climate bent on resisting it. They’re the last cowboys, and descendants of Howard Roark as well, stubbornly defending a vision of life and practice that many of us feared was gone forever.” Arizona may be enjoying one of those unique times in history when a community, for one reason or another, experiences a consolidation of gifted, motivated, architectural thinkers not associated with the mainstream. America’s golden age occurred during the first half of the 20th century beginning with Louis Sullivan, then Frank Lloyd Wright and Mies Van der Rohe, all in Chicago, defining an architecture free from European influence. Then came post World War II Los Angeles when young architects and engineers returned home eager to bring residential architecture to the masses. Art and Architecture magazine’s “Case Study Program” became the vehicle for these young innovators to explore the potential of modernism, utilizing surplus war material. Their ideas continue to affect our ideas. Mid-century examples surround us, many created by Arizona’s own father of modernism, Al Beadle, the last case study architect. His local pioneering efforts cleared the way for my generation to evolve the development of steel construction transparency, prefabrication and modular design…minimal lines. Frequently, but not always, the best of Arizona architecture is recognized by the American Institute of Architects through a juried awards program. It can be a fascinating experience.

06 introduction


1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

Arizona may be enjoying one of those unique times in history when a community, for one reason or another, experiences a consolidation of gifted, motivated, architectural thinkers not associated with the mainstream.

1,2 Honor Award recipients, see pages 11-22

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For those of us old enough to have served on countless awards juries, I have to share our secret; being a non-voting awards committee chairman is way more fun than being the juror. One can imagine how interesting it must be to listen to comments, analysis and serious critique of one’s peers and colleagues. This is true especially when one has had the foresight to abstain and avoid… subjecting myself to stinging criticism I, otherwise, would be forced to endure! Adding to the fun is the possession of back story knowledge for at least some of the outstanding projects singled out from the larger pile; stories that most assuredly could sway opinions one way or the other. Of course this inside information is not generally known except to those who may have a relationship with the subject architect or even the architect’s client. Never the less, there are occasions when a projects reputation precedes it. However, it is expected and mandated that the jury be as objective as possible. All they can do is try their best. So we submit, we buy into the process; we play. Our project we suffered to obtain, develop, nurture and build, backed by thousands of thoughtful yet risky decisions; the weight of responsibility, the pain, the pride, years of our lives, all coming together in an arrangement of metal, concrete and glass standing in our place representing who we are, what we stand for, our goals, aspirations; We put it out there. “This is it. What do you think?” It is no wonder architects are so insecure. Our egos (and I use the term affectionately) may be as solid as our building but our self-esteem is as soft as caulking. We hope the jury will read our narratives, carefully written, proofed, edited, in a desperate attempt at perfection. We share a common vocabulary which helps us communicate with one another but, unfortunately, cause our competitor’s narratives to sound similar.


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We hope the jury will understand the power of our idea, the clarity of our composition and its relationship to the larger context. Will the jury see beyond the lines and discover the subtleties of our experiential circulation diagram? We hope so. Honestly, this is too much to expect from any one jury member, taking the day off, already overworked for the week, worried about pending deadlines come Monday. A word of advice: Training ourselves in the art of minimal expectations is an excellent reward as opposed to a mere a-ward. This is also good advice for life…expect nothing and disappointment is avoided. Regardless of judgement, enjoy the sharing with your peers. It is my pleasure to write, the 2014 jury of Oklahoma architects was quick to pick up on deeper and more unique aspects of our work and Tina Gobbel, Executive Director, AIA Metro, complimented the members for being completely prepared; the best she had seen in her considerably long career. I am very proud to be a part of an Arizona community which consistently produces excellent architecture. Using general criteria to evaluate quality of presentation, program unusualness or complexity, the jury quickly culled the original 82 to a more manageable 35 submissions. These, of course, received an advanced layer of scrutiny and were discussed individually by each jury member. Eventually, 8 were selected to represent Arizona’s 2014 year in architecture. The range in scale and site location was interesting. The two honor awards had in common the immense, “spectacular” site element but differed in building square footage by tens of thousands. However, each building design demonstrated great respect for the vastness of the natural landscape and in a poetic way, made their sites better. The jury acknowledged that a small home, in spite of being located in an older, less affluent neighborhood, can be modern, progressive, beautiful, contextual and affordable; a direct descendant of the afore mentioned case study program. Although mechanical repair shops are typically not a building type to receive an award, the jury admired the exceptional results one can only expect through sincere effort. Such effort makes the difference.

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7 3,4,5 Merit Award recipients, see pages 23-40 6,7 Citation Award recipients, see pages 41-52 8 Unbuilt Award recipient, see pages 53-57 9 APS Energy Award recipient, see pages 58-62 10 SRP Sustainable Building Award recipient, see pages 63-68

08 introduction


1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

let us use the awards program as a celebration of Arizona architecture; the success, ascension and credibility of us, together in comradery, in community.

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Each of the remaining award winners displayed an obvious care and the jury responded to the success level of each project’s new answers to old questions. So there you have it…we are exceptional. That’s a win, right? Except maybe you are one of those whose dear project was passed over. That feels just like rejection. Unfortunately, there were and always will be excellent projects overlooked for various reasons ranging from valid to capricious. In rare instances the jury gets it exactly right. But even then, we all know judging art and architecture is challenging and daunting. However, I, for one, still believe in the process and continue to submit projects knowing on any given day the results can vary from “honor” to nothing. It is true, Jones Studio has many honor awarded projects which were neglected by previous juries. We have also had, in our opinion, very special architectural outcomes never to receive recognition. So what! If this disparity of opinion can exist, it must mean a no show equals an award and vice versa. I cannot lie. I have won and I have lost. Winning is better. Our insecurities recede with every pat on the back. We are encouraged by acknowledgement. At the same time, disappointment sucks, but it does not last and it makes a good check valve for one’s degree of cockiness. Therefore, there is value in allowing one’s buildings to be judged. But, know the results ultimately depend on the jury members, their location in the country, age, gender or even day of the week. Then what is it all for? Here is an idea. Rather than focusing on awards as a measure of our individual success, let us use the awards program as a celebration of Arizona architecture; the success, ascension and credibility of us, together in comradery, in community. I look forward to more examples of Arizona’s architectural prowess and an excuse to celebrate our collective achievements. I’ll put the work in Arizona up against anything happening in the East, West or in between. Hooray for architects. We endured a major recession and a devastated economy. Yet, we are still standing. Most importantly, our work, at least most of it, is still standing and we are damn good!


“the 2014 jury of Oklahoma architects was quick to pick up on deep and unique aspects of Arizona Architecture.” - Eddie Jones AIA

AIA Executive Director AIA Design Awards Committee Chair Oklahoma Jury

Tina Litteral Hon. AIA Eddie Jones AIA Rand Elliot FAIA, Chair www.e-a-a.com

* Local Arizona Jury: Lori Singleton – Salt River Project Andrea Chalmers – Arizona Public Service Craig Randock AIA – HDR Lloyd Ramsey PE – HDR Henry Tom AIA – Line & Space A Ben Perrone AIA – Holly Street Studio

Brian Fitzsimmons AIA www.fitzsimmons-arch.com Bob Shaefer AIA www.selserschaefer.com Deliberation

Elliot & Associates Architects Oklahoma City, OK August 2014 www.e-a-a.com

Submissions

82

Awards

Arizona Juried Awards*

Honor 2 Merit 3 Citation 2 Unbuilt 1 APS Energy Award 1 SRP Sustainable Building Award 1

10 introduction


aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award


amangiri resort architect: I-10 Studio, a collaboration between Wendell Burnette FAIA, Rick Joy FAIA, and Marwan Al-Sayed by: Cody Deike Assoc. AIA, LEED AP

Three elements define the Amangiri Resort’s surrounding landscape: stone, wind, and water. The stone is heavy, an immovable force. The wind, in contrast, is in motion, refusing to remain static. The water can be swayed. Once time is considered, however, the greater complexity of the three elements and this place come into focus. Millions of years of interaction between stone, wind and water has hewn the sandstone into cliffs, slot canyons, hoodoos, mesas, and dunes. Surfaces are smooth in places, rough in others, layered in thin sheets of color as light forces them to change hue throughout the day. It takes a visionary to see the potential in developing a resort and spa in such a spartan and removed locale. It takes a creative force such as the combined practice, I-10 Studio, a collaboration between Wendell Burnette, Rick Joy and Marwan Al-Sayed, to turn that potential into a destination that is both alluring and humble. The resulting project is a transformative, engaging, and relaxing experience built from little more than stone, wind and water. Nestled against one of the five hundred foot cliffs, the Amangiri Resort hugs the base of the formation, anchoring itself around a stone outcropping. A row of suites extend to either side of the central hotel hub, using the rock formation as a guide. Cast walls rise vertically from the canyon floor recalling a “ruin” that has been re-inhabited. Integrating locally sourced sands, fines, and aggregates, these solid forms are constructed reflections of the surrounding terrain. The walls frame the view, often opening to the overwhelming scale of the site. When appropriate, the walls draw focus to detailed vignettes. They define private, secluded, meditative spaces in an otherwise expansive openness. Water is another simple and powerful element of the design. The central pool is horseshoed around the sandstone backdrop. The shape of the pool is by no means conventional but this decidedly simple move heightens the experience. The pool alludes to the water’s entrapment in worn stone recesses and the reciprocal way that water sculpts stone. Simultaneously, the pool also reflects the stone and sky, expanding their already enveloping size. Additional smaller pools and water features throughout the site contribute to the overarching sense of luxurious tranquility. The remaining materials palette is restrained, natural, and minimal. Wood walls, natural steel rails and hooks, fabric shades, are all located and designed to perform a task and little more. The pragmatic placement of these items proves that a few wellplaced utilitarian pieces deliver all the expected luxury without unnecessary layers.

12 honor award


1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

At first glance Amangiri is simple to understand. It is a collection of a few natural elements configured to respond to the offerings of the desert. But as one watches light and shadow play across its walls, rest under its shade, sit beside its pools and you begin to understand that it is as experientially stratified and complex as the land that engulfs it. Its connection to the terrain is definite and humble. Its forms are powerful. Its spaces are evocative. Simply, it is a quintessential desert experience.

1 Cast walls rise vertically from the canyon floor recalling a ruin that has been reinhabited.

1 2 Water is another simple and powerful element of the design. The central pool is horseshoed around the sandstone backdrop.

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As one watches light and shadow play across its walls, rest under its shade, sit beside its pools, one begins to understand that [the resort] is as experientially stratified and complex as the land that engulfs it.

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3 It takes a creative force to transform such a spartan and removed locale into a resort destination that is both alluring and humble. Photos: Not Sure

3 4, 5, 6, 7 The resort’s connection to the terrain is definite. Its forms are powerful. Its spaces are evocative. Simply, it is a quintessential desert experience. 8 (next page) Nestled against one of the five hundred foot cliffs, the Amangiri Resort hugs the base of the formation, anchoring itself around a stone outcropping. Photography by Joe Fletcher

15 honor award

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I-10 Studios is a collaboration between architects Wendell Burnette, Rick Joy and Marwan Al-Sayed. The three came together specifically for this project and formed a company, I-10 Studio, named after the freeway that connects their offices in Phoenix and Tucson.


brown’s ranch trailhead architect: Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio by: Christina Noble AIA, LEED AP

Weddle Gilmore’s Brown’s Ranch Trailhead celebrates the extended history of its site a connection to the Brown’s Ranch - combined with Scottsdale’s more recent history of preservation of public open space and a commitment to environmental stewardship. The trailhead is named for the Brown family, a family instrumental to the development of early Scottsdale, so much so that Brown Ave. in Downtown Scottsdale is named after the figurehead, E.O. Brown. One of many businesses and accomplishments for the prominent family was the cattle ranch established in the early 1900s including much of the land that is now the McDowell Sonoran Preserve. The simple trailhead structure, which the awards jury described as an “amazing experience” that “knocked me out,” harkens back to the original ranch through its use of materials: weathered steel, reclaimed wood, and board formed concrete, as well as the simple shape of the shed roof with a thin structure floating above the rooms below. Additionally, the trailhead includes not only shaded resting spaces, a view terrace, an amphitheater, gathering space, service spaces and restrooms but also an interpretive gallery with exhibits featuring the ranching history of Sonoran Desert women. Reclaimed weathered wood throughout the gallery is a constant reminder of the original Brown’s Ranch. Fast-forwarding a bit, it’s helpful to remember that this project, along with other trailheads for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve, would not have happened without the strong community voice demanding that the City save open space from development in the early 1990s. Spanning across 47 miles and drawing more than 350,000 visitors annually, the preserve is continually reinforced as a cherished destination for the City of Scottsdale’s residents. Scottsdale voters have twice approved a sales tax dedicated to maintaining and expanding the preserve. The Brown’s Ranch Trailhead furthers the city’s commitment to providing universal access to the preserve, offering an eleventh jumping-off point for visitors of all abilities to enjoy the desert.

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Being mindful of the community’s original vision, the Brown’s Ranch Trailhead respects the desert as it treads softly on the land. The structure marks entry while looking like it belongs to a surrounding area rich with a diversity of plant and animal life and topography that has attracted people for thousands of years. As a gracious new addition, this trailhead minimizes the negative impacts of development through open planning and a thin structure that allows space and air through while it adds to the land with its quiet and thoughtful beauty that integrates with and frames the landscape beyond. Water is incorporated as a design element calling attention to it as a precious resource to be conserved and celebrated. Parking is positioned so that it doesn’t overpower or destroy the existing environment while at the same time granting visitors ease of access. Through materials and form that spark memories of the original Brown’s Ranch, Weddle Gilmore’s Brown’s Ranch Trailhead captures Scottsdale’s pride in its origins. The structure’s weightlessness and contemporary detailing combined with a site plan that is sensitive to the desert environment conveys the love the city has today for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve – a love that invites all to come and enjoy a desert sunset, rest in the shade, hike through the mountains, ride their horse along the trails, or learn about our forebears’ experiences in the desert. 1 The trailhead includes an interpretive gallery with exhibits featuring the ranching history of Sonoran Desert Women. 2 The structure marks the entry to the trailhead and invites all to experience the desert.

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Photos: Not Sure

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2 this photo is incredibly beautiful 3 so is this photo 4 and this one too 5 don’t forget this one

3, 4 The simple trailhead structure harkens back to the original ranch through its use of materials: weathered steel, reclaimed wood, and board formed concrete, as well as the simple shape of the shed roof with a thin structure floating above the rooms below.

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The structure’s weightlessness and contemporary detailing combined with a site plan that is sensitive to the desert environment conveys the city’s love for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve


5 The structure marks entry while looking like it belongs to a surrounding area rich with a diversity of plant and animal life and topography. Photography by Bill Timmerman

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WEDDLE GILMORE Black Rock Studio is an architecture and urban planning practice focused on realizing designs that are responsive to the different cultural, economic, and environmental influences that are discovered at each project site. We believe that it is through the study of specific site conditions and patterns that one discovers an appropriate and meaningful design. We are committed to designing projects that identify, clarify, and reveal an overall sense of place. With projects completed both domestically and abroad, Black Rock Studio has been recognized for design excellence across a range of private and public design projects.


aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award


college center architect: richärd+bauer by: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP

Richard + Bauer’s College Center for Central Arizona College in Apache Junction knits Central Arizona College’s campus into a cohesive whole while the Superstition Mountains beyond inform the building materials and forms. Viewed on the horizon, the Superstition Mountains are part of a string of natural landforms that define the Salt River Valley. Traveling east towards Apache Junction, their rugged bluffs of basalt and ash begin to dominate the horizon. The Central Arizona campus is located on the edge of an alluvial fan created by water shed from the mountains while Broadway Road divided the campus site prior to this project. Arbitrary human constructs, such as Broadway, were questioned, re-evaluated, and relocated so that a larger campus vision of connectivity could be achieved - and the College Center could be located in the literal center of the future campus - while natural landforms, such as the two arroyos, were maintained, respected and celebrated in the architecture. Two existing arroyo, part of a natural floodway from the watershed, cross the site and create a distinct desert microclimate that supports native vegetation and animal habitats. The building acts as a bridge over one of the arroyos, which has become an integral feature for the project. The building forms – described by the jury as “graceful” and “intriguing” - warm colors, rugged textures, and materials reference the desert context. Integral color concrete, copper with natural patina, exposed steel, and cedar panels fold across the building, referencing and complementing the Superstition Mountains in the background. Overall, the building is organized by two academic centers: a folded roof plane spanning across open learning spaces defines the first while hand screed concrete tilt panels surrounding science-teaching labs define the second. A bridge spanning the arroyo links the two centers. Entry points around the building integrate outdoor spaces, protecting and preserving the local desert microclimate, while a pedestrian pathway meanders along an arroyo with small seating groups that allow students opportunities to pause. College Center is notable for its careful attention to detail, protection and integration of its natural surroundings, and its form and materials informed by and defining its context.

24 merit award


1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

1 The jury described the building forms as “graceful” and “intriguing”

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Integral color concrete, copper with natural patina, exposed steel, and cedar panels fold across the building, referencing and complementing the Superstition Mountains in the background. 47


Photos: Not Sure

2 this photo is incredibly beautiful 3 so is this photo 4 and this one too 5 don’t forget this one

3 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter 4 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter

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5 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter 5 interior materials, like the exterior, reinforce the building’s relationship to the desert

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richärd+bauer architecture is an architectural and interiors practice focusing primarily on Higher Education, Research, Public and Academic Library design. The firm was founded in 1996 by James Richard, AIA and Kelly Bauer, NCIDQ and subsequently joined by Stephen Kennedy, AIA, NCARB. The firm seeks to promote no style; each building is built upon a conceptual framework, metaphorically derived from the program and the response to the site and context. It is fundamental that each building speak to its purpose and internal processes in simple terms, yet aspire to an intrinsic symbolic concept.


3 2,3 College Center is notable for its careful attention to detail, protection and integration of its natural surroundings, and its form and materials informed by and defining its context. Exterior photography by Bill Timmerman Interior photography by Mark Boisclair

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miramar college

1 The center has transformed an underutilized, yet critical, dirt yard into a highly functional space that elegantly integrates a unique training facility into the large college campus

architect: Marlene Imirzian & Associates by: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP

Marlene Imirzian & Associates’ Heavy Duty Advanced Transportation Technology Center has transformed an underutilized, yet critical, dirt yard at San Diego Miramar College into a highly functional space that elegantly integrates a unique training facility into the larger college campus. As the jury describes, this “well ordered” and “handsome” project adds a “beautiful work space” to the camps as it “demonstrates how we detail a building.” Located adjacent to an existing automotive instructional building, the new complex is linked physically and visually to the rest of the college by an outdoor terrace. A perforated metal screen secures the complex at night while providing a view of the test yard beyond at all times. The terrace and test yard are at the core of the complex, surrounded by buildings. The new buildings include classrooms, vehicle shop, faculty offices, and an indoor testing bed called a dynamometer. Each building expresses the distinct function it houses through form and volume, while the use of common construction materials ties all structures together into a cohesive whole. Steel, glass, and masonry components lend elegance to the simple forms and materials. Ample daylighting and use of natural ventilation enhance the open atmosphere of the complex. Discarded diesel engine liners were repurposed to create light fixtures. Along with the view of the test yard, these fixtures showcase the College’s unique program. Sensitivity to its context, forms informed by function, and careful use of simple materials elevate Heavy Duty Advanced Transportation Technology Center beyond being a utilitarian institution into an innovative space that supports learning, teaching, and collaboration.

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1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

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Steel, glass, and masonry components lend elegance to the simple forms and materials.


2 this photo is incredibly beautiful 3 so is this photo Photos: Notone Sure 4 and this too 5 don’t forget this one

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2,3,4 Forms informed by function, and careful use of simple materials elevate the center beyond being a utilitarian institution into an innovative space that supports learning, teaching, and collaboration. Photography by Bill Timmerman

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Marlene Imirzian & Associates provides full design services for the built environment. We create finely considered and inventive buildings that weave into and improve their surrounding community. Each project is a unique response to client, program and site, exhibiting a continual pursuit of positive impact at the human and public scale. Our clients include education, public, health care, historic preservation, commercial, and residential project types. The firm is known for its design excellence, project performance, and as a leader in integration of sustainable design practices for building. The firm was named one of the top 50 Architecture firms in the U.S. in 2014 by Architect Magazine.

35 merit award


vali homes infill prototype house 1.0 architect: Colab Studio by: James Trahan AIA

Building a new model for production homes in Metropolitan Phoenix requires a paradigm shift. During the housing boom, homebuilders were building thousands of homes a month, extending the suburban sprawl that has replaced acres of Sonoran Desert. One homebuilder, however, has taken on the task of shifting expectations for the design and construction of the standard production home. Austin Trautman, the founder of Vali Homes uses community, architecture and sustainability as his guiding principles. Seeking to “fill in the gaps” of central Phoenix, Vali has focused on small infill lots to create a new model. Vali Homes partnered with Colab Studio and the Design Build Firm of 180 degrees for architecture and construction. The team had three goals for the first prototype: • Create a prototype house inspired by the “case-study” homes of the 1960’s, designed for our time and place, and with the greatest amount of sustainability possible. • Create a low-to-mid cost home with high design, quality, and sustainability. • Create a design that may be replicated for any typical lot within the City of Phoenix. The team processed designs and cost models for six versions before the final prototype was agreed upon. Each design was tested, energy-modeled, and priced to find an optimal balance between design, performance, and cost. This final two-bedroom home, designed to fit on any typical lot in downtown, presents a new model for production homes with a holistic approach to sustainability and construction techniques, combined with quality architecture, leading to a truly different product.

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Photos: Not Sure

1 Valley Homes focuses on small, infill lots to create a new model for housing in central Phoenix

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2 2 One of the three goals was to create a low to mid cost home with high design, quality and sustainability.

This two-bedroom home presents a new model for production homes with a holistic approach to sustainability and construction techniques, combined with quality architecture, leading to a truly different product.

38 merit award


Photos: Not Sure

3 This prototype takes a holistic approach to sustainability and construction techniques with a focus on quality architecture.

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4 Phoenix’s climate allows for outdoor living for large parts of the year, exterior patios help accomplish the second goal for the prototype: to be replicable on any lot in Phoenix. Photography by Mark Boisclair

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Founded in 1999, Colab Studio strives to be a cooperative-laboratory (co-lab) for art and architecture, bringing ideas together, and blurring the line that normally defines one discipline as separate from another. Working simultaneously with studio, installation, and public art as well as residential and commercial architecture, creates a synergy that strengthens the concepts, ideas and end results for every project we work on. In April 2001, 180 degrees came to fruition out of the desire to provide the highest level of quality construction for our clients through restraint, rigor, craftsmanship and patience. 180 degrees is a design-build company that holds residential and commercial licenses and our staff is comprised of both licensed architects and architecturally trained individuals. As architects, our understanding of the philosophy behind the architectural concept gives us the unique position to execute details based on natural conditions that relate to site, energy, and integration into the context in which the project is being constructed. Vali Homes is committed to creating the future generation of holistic, living homes. We focus on concepts like Conscious Capitalism to bring the most value to the most people while working with rather than against the earth. We believe in energy independence and insanely tiny maintenance bills. We believe homes should last generations rather than decades and be designed to do so elegantly. In the near future we will all live a more relaxed and fulfilling lifestyle where our homes compliment not complicate our lives. Vali aims to be a major catalyst of change to that future.

40 merit award


aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award


sonoran shelters / marana civic center architect: Christopher D Trumble AIA text: Liz Farkas AIA

Architect Chris Trumble, with a group of University of Arizona students, is re-imagining the humble bus shelter. His latest project, Sonoran Shelters, “seeks to dignify public transportation” by creating a performance-based, regionally-specific design that transforms the city bus shelter into an attractive space focused on rider comfort. Trumble’s relocation from New York City to Tucson strongly impressed upon him the challenges that a decentralized urban environment creates for social, environmental, and economic sustainability. He also noticed that although public transportation can help remedy these ills, inadequate transit infrastructure fails to address basic needs of the riders, who regularly wait for buses in any available shade rather than in the un-shaded bus shelter. These observations triggered a quest to develop a better solution. The project site near Marana’s Civic Center provided an opportunity to create a new prototype in a rapidly developing area: two bus shelters face each other across the nascent expanse of Marana Main Street. To mitigate the intense sun, the shelters employ not only overhead shade but also their most notable feature – a series of horizontal, variable density louvers. These louvers allow the east- and west-facing shelters to shade users during critical afternoon hours while maintaining visibility essential for rider safety and minimizing graffiti-prone surfaces. A process of solar analysis informed the final orientations to provide a pleasing and functional composition. Both shelters employ a similar language of unfinished metal combined with the softer presence of wood that as a passerby expressed, “speaks about the agrarian heritage of Marana but also looks contemporary and sustainable.” Pedestrians have the opportunity to walk through the east shelter, which encompasses the sidewalk, or past the west shelter. Either experience also celebrates the importance of water in the region, as exposed overhead gutters and a rain chain direct seasonal rainwater to a planter to highlight this intermittent but powerful force. The two shelters are, as the jurors put it, “serious and admirable” and “about ‘place;’” they succeed in creating a new shelter solution for the region.

42 citation award


1 Local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter

2


Sonoran shelters seeks to “dignify public transportation� by creating a performance-based, regionally specific design that transforms the city bus shelter into an attractive space focused on rider comfort

44 citation award


1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

2 2 The horizontal, variable density louvers serve many purposes: to mitigate east and west sun, to maintain visibility essential for rider safety, and to minimize a graffiti prone surface. 3 The east shelter encompasses the entire sidewalk and allows pedestrians to pass through the shelter.

3

45 citation award


4

46 citation award


5 4 The shelters celebrate the importance of water in the region as exposed overhead gutters and a rain chain to direct seasonal rainwater to a planter. 5 The design, as the jurors put it, is “serious and admirable” and “about place;” it succeeds in creating a new shelter solution for the region. Photography by Chris Trumble and Jean-Luc Cuisinier

Christopher D. Trumble is an educator, architect and public artist based in the Sonoran Desert of Southern Arizona. He is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Arizona. His teaching, research and service are focused on the actual rather than the speculative, where reality is a volatile amalgam of people, matter, energy and phenomena; a sensibility where conditions and constraints form boundaries in which creativity can be optimized, where problems become opportunities and design is the creative synthesis of the aesthetic and technical. Chris explores practice through funded projects, student-centered design-build studios and empirical methodologies for the study of structural behavior through structural design. Chris’ professional practice is focused on residential, small commercial and furniture. His work explores experience informed by materials, fabrication processes, ergonomics, place and environmental performance. His work as a public artist is media appropriate, centered on perception and the subtleties of engagement; appealing to one’s curiosity and ephemeral positions of mind, space and time.


aspinall federal building and us courthouse architect: Westlake Reed Leskosky by: Yumiko Ishida AIA, LEED AP

Originally designed under U.S. Treasury Department supervising architect James Wetmore, the Wayne N. Aspinall building was constructed in 1918 as a U.S. Post Office and Courthouse. Westlake Reed Leskosky’s recent renovation pulls away years of additions and modifications to reveal the building’s original spirit while transforming the historic landmark into one of the most energy efficient and sustainable buildings in the country, earning its status as the first net-zero energy facility on the National Register and LEED Platinum certification. The design-build renovation removed ceiling grids and a hodgepodge of other elements that were added over time and restored the original spatial volumes and finishes. Existing materials, such as doors, were restored and reused where appropriate. New modern elements, such as glass partitions and mechanical systems, are distinct yet sensitively integrated. On the exterior, the photovoltaic arrays float above the structure and are not visible from the ground level on the south side, preserving the historic character of the building’s main façade. Additional upgrades that all contributed towards a building that is 50% more efficient than code include spray foam and rigid insulation, storm windows with solar control film, variable-refrigerant flow and passive geo-exchange heating and cooling systems, dedicated ventilation units, wireless controls, daylighting strategies, and fluorescent and LED lighting. The project not only meets and exceeds the lofty goals of carbon-neutrality and historic preservation; its durable materials and flexible systems are expected to allow the building to function for 50 years without another major renovation. The modernized landmark has served to revitalize its community and has become a regional anchor.

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1 The building was originally constructed in 1918 as a U.S. Office and Courthouse. 2 The renovation removed ceiling grids and a hodgepodge of other elements that had been added over time and restored the original spatial volumes and finishes.

1

2


The project not only meets and exceeds the lofty goals of carbon-neutrality and historic preservation; its durable materials and flexible systems are expected to allow the building to function for 50 years without another major renovation. 3 On the exterior, the photovoltaic arrays float above the structure and are not visible from the ground level on the south side, preserving the historic character of the building’s main façade. 4 Existing materials, such as doors, were restored and reused where appropriate. New modern elements, such as glass partitions and mechanical systems, are distinct yet sensitively integrated.

3


Photos: Not Sure

4


5 The renovation pulls away years of additions and modifications to reveal the building’s original spirit while transforming the historic landmark into one of the most energy efficient and sustainable buildings in the country Photography by Kevin G. Reeves

5

Westlake Reed Leskosky provides comprehensive fully-integrated design and management services including Architecture, Engineering, Interior Architecture and Design, Master Planning, Programming, and Feasibility Studies. We specialize in innovative designs for Performing and Other Cultural Arts, Workplace Environments, Educational Facilities, Healthcare, Research and Technology, and Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse. We embrace the opportunities posed by working in diverse building types. This variety allows us to apply the full range of our design abilities and to draw upon existing areas of our expertise, while continually stimulating fresh, new ideas and approaches in our practice. Because of the depth and breadth of our practice, we are able to understand the specific nature of a client's singular endeavor, and realize the potential inherent in it.

52 citation award


aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award


Salt River Pima – Maricopa Indian Community Justice Center Architect: Gould Evans By: Sara Wheatcroft Assoc. AIA

The 93,000sf Salt River Pima – Maricopa Community Justice Center, a tribal court facility that will house seven courtrooms for civil, criminal, juvenile and appellate related functions along with all support spaces, seeks to reflect the Pima and Maricopa cultures by reinforcing a continuous connection to the land. Connections to the outdoors will create calming, therapeutic spaces and evoke a sense of ease that comes with a greater familiarity of inhabiting the outdoors. Throughout the facility, typical boundaries between interior and exterior space are blurred including a secured outdoor space, a rare feature in court facilities. This unique space will allow the public to enjoy the outdoors and experience the natural environment within the protected and secure environment of the Justice Center. Adding to the natural theme, the Justice Center will be constructed primarily of natural, local materials, such as textured concrete and natural steel that offer durability combined with safety as well as insulated glass that will allow views that will provide a means of respite from stress and worry. Views are considered not only from the building interior - the Justice Center is set back from Osborn Road to preserve the view of Red Mountain from the street. The building mass is arranged on the 4.3 acre site to reduce its visual impact, with the onestory volume positioned along the site periphery and the taller, two-story volume located at the center of the site. The views of the building itself are also considered where rather than a building decorated by plants, the Justice Center is set within a landscape. The vegetation and topography are integral parts of the architecture and site’s performance. Landscape forms and structures designed for retention and irrigation are celebrated throughout the project site and opportunities to experience the scarce but revered event of rain turn into focal points.

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Connections to the outdoors create more calming, therapeutic spaces and evoke a sense of ease that comes with a great familiarity of inhabiting the outdoors

1

1 The Justice Center is not a building decorated by plants, it is set wihtin a landscape.


The vegetation and topography are integral parts of the architecture and site’s performance. Landscape forms and structures designed for retention and irrigation are celebrated. 2,3,4 The center will be constructed primarily of natural, local materials, such as textured concrete and natural steel that offer durability combined with safety as well as insulated glass that will allow views that will provide a means of respite from stress and worry.

Renderings courtesy of Gould Evans

2

3


4

Gould Evans believes partnership is not about compromise. It is the expression of individual talents made manifest through a shared vision. Our portfolio is intentionally diverse—in project type, scale and location. Our work encompasses education buildings, civic spaces, cultural institutions, athletics facilities, workplaces, wineries, residences, environmental branding and urban planning. This diversity is a strength that encourages innovative, critical thinking and discourages a formulaic approach. Above all, we work to create solutions that transform their surroundings, engage their occupants, sustain their environment and support our clients’ missions.

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aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award

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1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

prescott college architect: Weddle Gilmore Black Rock Studio by: Christina Noble AIA, LEED AP

Prescott College’s motto “For the Liberal Arts, the Environment and Social Justice” pushes the small, private liberal arts college to develop a learning environment where ethics and sustainability permeates the curricula and community life. Weddle Gilmore’s ‘The Village,’ thirteen town homes along the banks of Butte Creek, translates the college’s mission into a new net-zero residential community designed to encourage social connectivity. The Village becomes an approachable, daily living laboratory for students where the architecture and site development make energy and water conservation measurable and readable in real-time as well as visually translatable to everyday activities. “In all the work we’ve tried to do at Prescott College, there is a heavy integration of sustainability and environmental strategies. They’re highly legible, so that the college can essentially use buildings and landscape as learning environments,” comments Phil Weddle, Weddle Gilmore’s cofounder. The Village is designed around varied levels of private and public spaces that strategically re-imagine spaces often thought of as indoor activities. Outdoor classrooms, dining, social gathering, meeting and individual learning nodes, many covered with polycarbonate roofing for weather protection while still allowing natural light through, are sprinkled throughout shared courtyards and across the site. By making the outdoors an active participant in campus life and learning, students are not only encouraged to foster a stronger and more connected community, but also gain a keen understanding of how their daily actions relate to their environmental impact. To achieve a net-zero project, much of the building and site were conceived relative to its impact on energy consumption. The buildings are organized along an east-west axis so that they can capitalize on solar exposure. Thoughtful planning combined with careful window placement and solatubes provide natural light that can penetrate 100% of all the living spaces while operable windows allow students to take advantage of the mild climate in the Prescott area with natural ventilation. These are combined with an efficient and smartly planned hvac system that students can use less frequently due to a combination of Prescott’s mostly mild climate and a design that uses the climate to its advantage. East and west walls are built from ground-face masonry to block the low evening and morning sun while modulating thermal heat gain. Solar shading fins on the south elevation minimize heat gain and glare while also allowing the sun to penetrate in winter months for passive heating.

59 aps energy award

These efforts - window placement, building materials and efficient systems - allow The Village to perform 90.2% better than ASHRAE 90.1-2007 baseline models. Combining efficiency measures with a 95 kW roof integrated PV array has resulted in a net-zero project that in its first year generated 149,483 kWh, exceeding the students’ consumption of 147,027 kWh.

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1

By making the outdoors an active participant in campus life and learning, students are not only encouraged to foster a stronger and more connected community, but also gain a keen understanding of how their daily actions relate to their environmental impact.

60 aps energy award


1 The Village, 13 townhomes along Butte Creek close to Prescott college, is a net-zero residential community that encourages social connectivity Photos: Not Surespaces, covered with polycarbon2 Many outdoor ate roofing for weather protection while still allowing natural light through, are sprinkled across the site.

2


3 Outdoor spaces take advantage of Prescott’s mild climate and bring students together Photography by Bill Timmerman

3

WEDDLE GILMORE Black Rock Studio is an architecture and urban planning practice focused on realizing designs that are responsive to the different cultural, economic, and environmental influences that are discovered at each project site. We believe that it is through the study of specific site conditions and patterns that one discovers an appropriate and meaningful design. We are committed to designing projects that identify, clarify, and reveal an overall sense of place. With projects completed both domestically and abroad, Black Rock Studio has been recognized for design excellence across a range of private and public design projects.

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aia arizona design awards 2014 honor award merit award citation award unbuilt award aps energy award srp sustainable building award


john m roll united states courthouse architect: Ehrlich Architects by: Diane Reicher Jacobs AIA

The John M. Roll United States Courthouse in Yuma, AZ rises to the occasion as the latest addition to the ARRA funded, GSA Design Excellence program for public buildings in Arizona. Its ambitious program established within limited resources and a demanding climate sets the bar high for achieving a balanced building design for the Sonoran Desert. Steven Ehrlich Architects provided a multi-tiered, sustainable solution resulting in a contemporary building in direct and polite conversation with it’s historic neighbors. The building’s entry, facing south onto Yuma’s First Street, is challenged with both opening gracefully to the public at large and carefully shielding the main lobby space from harsh sunlight and direct heat. Utilizing a photovoltaic array carried by narrow steel columns as an entry canopy, the building not only generates 20% of its energy needs, but makes a deliberate nod to the classical courthouse façade with both rhythm and presence on the street. Staggered stone walls, a stone plinth, and a weathered metal bridge welcome visitors and protect the building with the mandated 50 foot blast protection zone. The xeriscape surrounding the building dips into an arroyo at the entry serving as a water catchment zone during monsoon season and creating a subtle procession upon arrival to the complex. Taking care to consider the long hours spent within these walls, the two interior court rooms and perimeter support spaces benefit from dappled daylight via clerestories and vine-covered steel trellis structures along the east and west facades. Intuitive wayfinding occurs via zoning of public and private spaces, with pre-trial services directly off of the public entry lobby, facing the building’s “front porch,” a second floor waiting area, and the facility’s maximum security area on the north. Walls in the east–west direction are finished with a buff-colored sandstone and those in the north–south direction have a reddish hue. There is a clarity upon entering the building directly tied to the landscape and community it serves, while careful detailing and generous massing reveal a pride and permanence required for a federal facility. Arizona provides the perfect context for an award-winning, sustainable public building such as the John M. Roll United States Courthouse. Like its namesake, whose life sadly ended too soon, in the same shooting in 2011 that critically injured US Representative Gabrielle Giffords, the building is a proud servant for transparency, justice, and stewardship. The courthouse will undoubtedly serve its community well, while reminding those of us who build in the desert – there is beauty in embracing the present as well as the past.

47 srp sustainable building award 64


Photos: Not Sure

1 The contemporary design is in direct and polite conversation with it’s historic neighbors

1


The building is a proud servant for transparency, justice, and stewardship.

2 Perimeter support spaces benefit from mediated daylight through vine-covered steel trellis structures along the east and west facades. 3 The building’s entry faces south onto Yuma’s First Street; it both opens gracefully to the public at large and carefully shields the main lobby space from harsh sunlight and direct heat. Photography by Lawrence Anderson/ESTO

2

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Photos: Not Sure

3


4 All photography by Marc Boislair

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Honored with the AIA National Firm Award in 2015, Ehrlich Architects is a versatile practice that has earned an international reputation for design excellence and an exemplary professional culture. Founded in 1979 as a tiny residential studio, the Los Angeles-based firm is a 40 member team that has mastered building types ranging in scale from houses to courthouses, including libraries, university centers, corporate and government facilities. Ehrlich Architects has been recognized with more than 150 awards including nine national AIA awards, and the title of AIA California Council Firm of the Year in 2003. Ehrlich Architects' design philosophy starts with a profound respect for a building's inhabitants. This humanistic approach, referred to as Multicultural Modernism, has permeated the firm's culture since the beginning, informing every creation and every interaction.

4 The two interior court rooms benefit from dappled daylight via clerestories. Photography by Lawrence Anderson/ESTO

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arid city synergy competition

1st Place - Urban Arroyos Rachel Rasmussen, AIA John F. Kane, FAIA Kyle Fiano - Arizona State University Mandel McDonnell - Arizona State University

2nd Place – FS1A Doug B Sydnor, FAIA Elizabeth Sydnor - University of Texas Nathaniel Landreville - Arizona State University Monte Sturdevant - Energy Systems Design William Schubert - Energy Systems Design Matthew Klem - Energy Systems Design

3rd Place - symbioCITY Chris Trumble, AIA Chris Maltez – University of Arizona Prabhs Matharoo – University of Arizona

69 arid city synergy competition


arid city synergy competition by: Matthew Salenger AIA

Great cities in the United States share many qualities including density, walkability, multi-modal transportation, strong communities, sustainable economies, vivacious culture and great open spaces all of which help to create a clear sense of identity. To a great extent these qualities are either created or enhanced with thoughtful design. The goal of the Arid City Synergy competition was to demonstrate how, with thoughtful design, we can improve our desert cities. Phoenix is now the 6th largest city by population in the US. Out of the top ten largest cities, Phoenix is by far the youngest, yet the second largest in area. Because of its youth, lack of natural boundaries, and rapid growth over the past 60 years, the city has had a difficult time determining its identity. Tucson, by contrast, is considerably older and smaller, with a stronger sense of identity- though, like Phoenix, is still grappling with how to develop its downtown area into a great destination for its inhabitants. The amazingly sunny and arid climate of the region is a major draw for both cities, and should be a driving force in all aspects of design and development. Though there are climatic similarities to other desert cities in Africa, Arabia, and Asia, the relative youth of our cities and distinctive ecosystems and economic models provide for unique opportunities. This competition sought to demonstrate how we could develop our cities to take advantage of our climate, provide identity of place, and create great urban environments. Competition Overview The Arid City Synergy Competition provided a choice of two sites: one in Phoenix and one in Tucson. In each case, the sites were located along urban rail transportation (light rail and streetcar, respectively). Each provided distinct opportunities to feed off of their urban conditions and to build upon existing synergy. Few programmatic requirements were provided in the brief, though we asked proposals to feed, utilize, and create urban elements to make great livable cities. Entrants were also encouraged to research the sites and provide greater diversity and programmatic cross-pollination. As the sites are adjacent to rail, we encouraged greater focus towards multimodal transportation including walking, cycling, and public transport. We asked participants to create neighborhoods that have a human scale, mobility, identity, physical health, and personal security, as demonstrated in Jeff Speck’s book, Walkable City. Another important requirement of the competition was to recognize the local climate: local water independence is critical to economically viable urban areas. Proposals were asked to take advantage of passive and active climatic elements allowing comfort for people in and around the buildings. This was to be accomplished not by minimizing environmental harm, but by adding to the urban experience. Competition entries could also consider biomimicry, shade, landscape, and microclimates as well as attempt on-site water neutrality.

Jury Will Bruder, FAIA; Phoenix based architect of Will Bruder Architects. Reed Kroloff; Fourth generation Phoenix native, Director of Cranbrook Academy of Art & Art Museum; Partner of Jones-Kroloff. Teresa Rosano, AIA; Tucson based architect of Ibarra Rosano Design Architects. Jeff Frost, LFA, CSBA, LEED AP BD+C; Sustainability Project Manager for Smith Group JJR in Phoenix. Lisa Martinez, Tucson AIAS


urban arroyos

1 local climate and regional materials inform the shape and color of the shelter Photos: Not Sure

1st prize winner team: Rachel Rasmussen, AIA, John F. Kane, FAIA Kyle Fiano - ASU, Mandel McDonnell - ASU Project Description This project is a blending of the orthogonal urban form with the sculptural landforms of the desert and takes its cues from how rainfall strikes the desert floor and sheet flows its way to the arroyos and canyons of the Sonoran Desert. It is in these fissures that the water flows and life happens. The project re-translates the veining nature of the desert arroyos into three-dimensional pedestrian and water circulation channels. These protected “spaces in between� connect a variety of conditioned program space and unique exterior community spaces. They are shaped to collect and enhance cross breezes, while allowing controlled amounts of daylight to support plant growth of the vertical gardens. These gardens are not only integral to the water filtration system, but also provide cooling through evapo-transpiration and a soothing visual respite from the surrounding urban bustle.

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fs1a at

Photos: Not Sure

the west edge

2nd prize winner team: Doug B Sydnor, FAIA, Elizabeth Sydnor - Uof Texas, Nathaniel Landreville - ASU, Monte Sturdevant, William Schubert and Matthew Klem from Energy Systems Design 2 day storage system w/ gravity fed filter

overflow to gardens

longitudinal section viewing west

concrete rainwater storage vaults

conceptual rain water harvesting system

megatrough w/ gutter

solar powered pump

composting chamber vent shafts drains w/ filters

treated greywater for gardens and toilets

overflow to sewage

greywater concrete vaults

transverse section viewing north

rainwater system

concrete rainwater storage vaults

greywater system

Project Description FS1A (Fillmore Street and First Avenue) is focused on people as its reason for being. Program is to address the unmet community needs within downtown Phoenix and specifically the Business Core Character Area. Based upon an informal survey of downtown stakeholders including the Phoenix Community Alliance, Arizona State University, Phoenix Planning Commission, Downtown Business, and a City Councilman, a rich mix of uses create a dynamic hybrid program. Reviewing the neighborhood demographics also revealed that 65.2% of the population is Hispanic or Latino and has many needs, and led to the Hispanic Cultural Center (HCC) as the anchor use with complementary functions as a farmers market, natural foods grocery store, authentic Mexican restaurant, daily conveniences, and affordable housing. Infill plan, based upon the original 50 feet wide parcels, reinforces existing pedestrian connections with shaded walkways not unlike historic downtown Phoenix, an artists’ alley, a mid-block passageway, and public plaza extension that reaches out to the Civic Park. Street circulation leads to a primary entry at the HCC’s main plaza. Spilling into the plaza is a multilevel, processional, and linear paseo that leads to upper level ‘flex’ space for design firms, roof terrace with desert gardens, and ultimately to a mid-rise residential tower with 69 units composed of housing options. One of three existing First Avenue lanes is proposed for closure and use as a landscaped setting with shade trees, electrical vehicle charging stations, bike racks, Zipcar rentals, and a few parallel parking spaces for deliveries/pickups. Applicable, quality urban design requirements, like Transit Oriented Design (TOD)’s guidelines, would be addressed.

circulation

water harvesting

solar array & ventilation


symbioCITY

Photos: Not Sure

3rd prize winner team: Chris Trumble, AIA, Chris Maltez - U of A Prabhs Matharoo - U of A

. region

. contextual

Project Description The project expresses an extension of the city. In the presence of the desert, the element of water is celebrated and flows to give life to the Xeriscape. The floor gently slopes for all water to take its path, marking its motion on the concrete expressing the acceptance of nature within man’s creation. This creation presents itself as a canvas, reinventing itself through the needs of the user. Seasonal changes and eventful changes cause experiential change. The project extends Tucson’s urban culture giving locals another opportunity to experience its culturally and environmentally rich nature.

A B

2

C 3 1

. site proper

. water collection

. city

. water

. housing . housing . rec center

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. outdoor bar

. community space

. restaurant

. housing

. retail

. housing


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CLINT MILLER ARCHITECT

SWABACK PARTNERS

TSONTAKIS ARCHITECTURE

www.ArizonaResidentialArchitects.com

97


AIA-AZ Design Awards: October 3rd, Phoenix Art Museum www.aia-arizona.org

2014 AIA-AZ Honor Award: Amangiri Resort│Spa

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AIA-AZ State Conference Contagious Ideas:Design | Practice | Impact November 6th, Downtown Sheraton

Marwan Al-Sayed, Wendell Burnette FAIA, Rick Joy FAIA


Photos: Not Sure

advisory panel spring 2015

Architekton Ayers Saint Gross Blank Studio Architecture BWS Architects Circle West Architects Dick & Fritsche Design Group Gensler Gould Evans Associates Holly Street Studio Architects Marlene Imirzian & Associates LLC, Architects LEA Architects Line and Space Repp Mclain Design + Construction Rob Paulus Architects Ltd. Smith Group JJR Studio Ma Tsontakis Architecture Weddle Gilmore Wendell Burnette Architects Westlake Reed Leskosky

AzF4

aia arizona design awards


AzF4 arizona forum

Spring 2015

aia arizona design awards A Publication of AIA Arizona

Profile for Architects Publishing Network

Arizona Forum (AzF4)  

AIA Arizona Design Awards 2014 highlighted in the fourth edition of the Arizona Forum (AzF4) published by Architects Publishing Network (APN...

Arizona Forum (AzF4)  

AIA Arizona Design Awards 2014 highlighted in the fourth edition of the Arizona Forum (AzF4) published by Architects Publishing Network (APN...

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