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VOLUME 46, NO. 10 $22.50

F E A T U R I N G

Halyr Meia Lua


Patricia M. Dempsey Lady Lake, Florida | 352-430-3456

WWW.BELOVEDSFARM.COM Standing at Ted Carson Training Center White Oak, NC | 910-876-7332 WWW.TEDCARSON.COM


QR Marc x Magnums Angel JD+


Trained by:

barn 715.425.9001 • mobile 715.760.2466 www.ArgentFarms.com


RD Dynamo x HED Caramba

STONEGATE ARABIANS, LLC.

Jay Krusenstjerna & Barb Sink-Krusenstjerna Waukee, IA • 515.371.7407

Ar abian Horse Times | 3 | Volume 46, No. 10


Contents

Issue 3 • Volume 46, No. 10

90

14

Cover Story: Halyr Meia Lua by Anne Stratton

30

2015 Breeders Of National Champions

44

Meet The Faces Of AHA: Cynthia Richardson

48

Futurity Programs Show Amateurs The Money by Riyan Rivero

6spotlight

Spotlight Cover Story: Rohara … Proud To Call Region 12 Home by Anne Stratton

9spotlight

The Region 12 Spotlight Futurity—A Decade Of Celebration And One Fabulous Show by Chloe Holmes

214

VOLUME 46, NO. 10 $22.50

90

Halter … A View From The Leaders

106

Meet The Personalities: Laura Koch And Bert Sanders by Mary Kirkman

114

Leaders Of The Times: A-Jericho by Jeff Wallace and Mieke Opsteyn

116

Amateur To Professional: Carrie Cada

120

Baske Afire … Greatness Gone Too Soon

144

Al Shaqab

160

Danamye Explodes To Take Top NATRC Award by Bev Roberts

161

Gone Are The White Gloves—Lifelong Lessons Of Saddle Seat Equitation by Chloe Holmes

163

Saddle Seat Reflections From A Pro: Quincy DeSpain

165

Saddle Seat Equitation—Achieving The Dream

206

What You Need To Know About Breeding Horses Today, Part I by Dr. Mario Zerlotti

214

Scottsdale 2016 by Riyan Rivero

318

A Touch Of Style: Lisa Abraham

324

Beginnings: The Arabian Horse Role In Riding School Programs, Part I by Catherine Cole Ferandelli

328

In Memoriam

6

Comments From The Publisher

156

Faces & Places

158

Amateur Spotlight

332

Calendar Of Events

336

Looking Ahead

339

Index Of Advertisers

F E A T U R I N G

Halyr Meia Lua

On The Cover:

Halyr Meia Lua

(Ajman Moniscione x Halya De Jylbert), on lease to Royal Arabians.

Ar abian Horse Times | 4 | Volume 46, No. 10


30 APRIL - 1 MAY 2016

It’s gratifying to look around and see so many familiar faces and new ones. That’s a pleasing welcome to an event I know is going to be great. The world of Arabian Horses is an exciting field to work all together, and we’ll continue to meet and bring inspired people in event like this, to ensure the development and the promotion of Arabian Horse all over the world... Irina Stigler.

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Comments From The Publisher Publisher Lara Ames Managing Editor Charlene Deyle Advertising Account Executive Tony Bergren Multimedia Director and Photojournalist Riyan Rivero Creative Director Jeff Wallace Contributing Writer Anne Stratton Production Manager Jody Thompson Senior Designer Marketing Director Wayne Anderson Print & Web Design Tony Ferguson Leah Matzke Melissa Pasicznyk Leah Kurth Sales Assistant Rachel Ginter AHT Abroad Representative Mieke Opsteyn Accounts Receivable Deb Trebesch

© Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 46, No. 10, March 2016, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $22.50. Subscription in U.S. $80 per year, $140 two years, $200 three years. Canada $130 one year, $250 two years, $340 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $190 one year, $320 two years, $380 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • Fax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

Scottsdale—Let’s Say Thanks Have you noticed that every year after Scottsdale, everyone writes, shouts, broadcasts, posts (whatever) about how great it was? When does the Arabian community ever totally agree about something? And yet annually, year after year, we all agree about Scottsdale. It’s great. There are obvious reasons, of course. In frozen February, everyone in the world loves to go to the Valley of the Sun. This year, the weather was even more incredible than usual, and no surprise, the horses were better than ever. But that is hardly news! Scottsdale is where you go to check out last year’s champions and see who is on the horizon for this year. That means not only the top names in the ring, but because of all the young stock, also the most accomplished—or most promising—sires and dams. This is one-stopshopping for seeing who is doing the best work in breeding programs. Even with all those accolades, one of the greatest things about Scottsdale is not the weather or the horses. It is the people. Here, you have a chance to connect with people you have not seen in months or to get acquainted with those you might have heard of or maybe correspond with but never have met. Sitting on the rail, or attending parties, or having lunch or dinner with Arabian horse people who share your enthusiasm is a special treat. Scottsdale is where everything about business is so pleasantly social. That’s one reason that it is unsurpassed as a place to bring new people into the breed—everyone has such a good time (and yet, more business gets done in Arizona in February than about any other time of the year!). If I’m gushing, it’s because everyone does when talking about Scottsdale. It is the best 11 days in the Arabian horse business. And so, I believe it is important to take this opportunity to give a special thank you to everyone involved in putting on the Scottsdale Show. That is a huge undertaking, and they do an exceptional job of making it not only a great horse show, but so much more. If you have never been to Scottsdale in February, I hope you put it on your bucket list. Next year, 2017, would be a great time to start. Join the crowd. See you in Scottsdale!

Lara Ames Lara Ames Publisher

Ar abian Horse Times | 6 | Volume 46, No. 10


V ictorious

LD

(DA Valentino x Queen Adiamonds)

The Wait is Over

See Victorious LD at the 2016 World Cup in Las Vegas

Pristina

LD

Vegas DPA x Catalina SF, by Georgio AF

Please look for Pristina LD’s sister Lola VA in the 2-year-old World Cup filly class Only pure admiration can describe every moment spent with the stunning filly Pristina LD. “Easy on the eyes” is an understatement! Only days after she scored the highest points for all International fillies 2 & under at the 2016 Scottsdale Show with Jeff and Jerry Schall of Shada, Inc., she was selected by the Royal Cavalry Oman Stud of France, to become a part of their incredible breeding and show program. Thank you to the following people for all their support, encouragement and assistance in making this dream a reality … Les and Diane Van Dyke, Fernando and Kristi Poli, Franck Cibois and Dave Bilgrien. We wish Pristina LD and her new team all the success in and around the world! Ar abian Horse Times | 7 | Volume 46, No. 10

VICTOROUS LD IS STANDING AT SHADA, INC. NOMINATED SIRE: AHA Breeders Sweepstakes Minnesota Medallion Stallion OWNED BY: Les and Diane Van Dyke Chandler, MN

Elk River, MN 763-441-5849 sshadainc@aol.com www.ShadaInc.com


Extreme

By

A Jakarta x Destiny VF Nominated AHA Breeders Sweepstakes, Silver Sire Breeders, AHBA World Cup, Scottsdale Signature Stallion SCID, CA, LFS Clear


UNANIMOUS CHAMPION SCOTTSDALE SIGNATURE YEARLING FILLY

Star of Jericho

Presentd by AJ Marino (A Jericho x Lady Jeanette)

SPECIAL BREEDING INCENTIVES NOW AVAILABLE FOR 2016

For breeding information, contact: info@midwestarabian.com David Boggs • 612.328.8312 Nate White • 563.663.7383 Judi Anderson • 612.328.1057

owned by THE ABEL FAMILY Lacombe, Alberta, Canada

www.midwestarabian.com

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Photography by: Kelly Campbell Design by: mickĂŠandoliver

Unanimous Gold Champion Stallion Scottsdale International Aljassimya Farm is proud to present this stallion at the ABWC in Las Vegas, once again with Glenn Schoukens. by QR Marc ex Ekliptika by Ekstern owned and bred by Michalow State Stud, Poland leased by Aljassimya Farm: info@aljassimyafarm.com | www.aljassimyafarm.com Ar abian Horse Times | 12 | Volume 46, No. 10


Photography by: Kelly Campbell Design by: mickĂŠandoliver

Silver Champion Mare Scottsdale International 2016 Presented by Giacomo Capacci. One of our beautiful young mares now producing a home bred generation. Om El Bellissimo - Om El Sariyana by Al Lahab info@aljassimyafarm.com | www.aljassimyafarm.com

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COVER

STORY:

Halyr Meia Lua by Anne Stratton

There is a new face at Cindy McGown and Mark Davis’s Royal Arabians, in Scottsdale, Ariz., in 2016. Halyr Meia Lua is on lease from Brazil, and those who have seen the 4-year-old stallion say that he presents a breeding opportunity of special interest to North American breeders. Bred by Lenita Perroy and owned by Bolivar Figueiredo, José Eduardo Guimarães Vieira and his son, André, Halyr will be here for two years. What’s the attraction? A better question would be, ‘What isn’t the attraction?’ Rodolfo Guzzo might counter. He handled the stunning grey in 2013, during the colt’s only previous show career, and became a fan then. It was on his watch that Halyr won the title of 2013 Brazilian National Champion Junior Colt, showing with Andy Sellman. “He’s the kind of stallion you just love to see—very correct, with a body that is square in its measurements,” Bolivar Figueiredo explains. “He has very good shoulders, a beautiful head, and great movement. The day André and I bought him from Lenita, he was just 5 months old. It was a great day—I knew he could be a superstar stallion. His pedigree and bloodlines told me that. Three months later we showed him for

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COVER STORY

Filly (Halyr Meia Lua x Fyloh Serondella, by Lothar El Nyhl)

the first time and he was reserve champion. Then four months later, he was crowned with the Junior National Championship.” After that, Guzzo didn’t see Halyr for two years, and it was only when international trainers began telling him how much they liked the colt— and how well they thought he could do in American competition—that he arranged for another look. He promptly called Royal. “[We chose him] mostly because he is very typey,” says Guzzo, but adds that it was just as important that Halyr has the pedigree to back up his promise. “I’ve known Lenita’s program for over 20 years. I have known all the families, and this is one of the best ones on her farm.” For all the stallion’s many attributes, it is that pedigree which will intrigue breeders most, given its Haras Meia Lua stamp of approval. He is by Ajman Moniscione, and out of Halya De Jylbert. “I chose Ajman Moniscione for Halya De Jylbert because I felt it could be a perfect match,” says Lenita Perroy. “Halya has a strong pedigree for conformation, and an excellent body and topline, as well as a long, fine, upright neck and a fine throatlatch. She also has a great trot and attitude. I was expecting that Ajman would produce an exquisite head, which he did. All the rest was as I hoped—and I wanted a colt!” She got what she was looking for. “Halya, Halyr Meia Lua’s dam, comes from a great female line,” Perroy continues, referring to Meia Lua’s celebrated ‘H’ family. “The foundation mare was imported from the United States—SV Hileela, by the great sire El Hilal. I bred her to El Shaklan and she came to Brazil in foal. At Haras Meia Lua, she had a very beautiful filly, Hilah El Shaklan. She was tall, had long legs, a beautiful head, and a wonderful body and topline. She was bred to Ali Jamaal and gave us a splendid filly: Halyne El Jamaal—also tall, with a beautiful head, upright neck, excellent body and topline. “Halyne was bred to Jylbert De Wiec, who is by Debowiec (a Monogramm son who was a Brazilian National Champion Stallion),

Filly (Halyr Meia Lua x Bint Maynah, by FA El Shawan)

and out of Jullye El Ludjin. Debowiec had a wonderful silhouette—the longest, finest neck, with a fine throatlatch—and Jullye is one of the most beautiful mares in the world. From the cross of Halyne El Jamaal and Jylbert De Wiec came Halya De Jylbert, who inherited the best traits from her parents and grandparents. “And when Halyr was born, his family traits came together. It was an expected result because of the high quality of the horses in his pedigree.” “He really is his pedigree,” Rodolfo Guzzo agrees. “He has body and he is very athletic; he moves beautifully. He is a very tall, elegant horse.” Plans call for Halyr to compete in major shows during his stay in the United States, with his principle goals to include the U.S. Nationals. At the same time, for two precious years in North America, Royal Arabians will enjoy the excitement of helping create Halyr’s legacy as a sire. “Halyr was 2 and a half years old when he started [to be bred], and now, one year later, he has already two fillies born,” Bolivar Figueiredo says. “We just loved both; they have good bodies and beautiful heads.” About 70 mares are currently in foal to the stallion in Brazil. One of his early supporters is breeder Antonio Augusto D. Figueiredo Silva. “[After we lost] FA El Shawan, we needed to find a stallion that would preserve all the outstanding qualities we saw in his daughters,” says Figueiredo, “and at the same time, would add in large eyes, dry and short heads, from lineages proven for such characteristics. At the first encounter with Halyr, I was sure that he was all that I had dreamed. There, so close, so within reach, stood the exemplary Arabian horse to cover our mares.” “The first time that Halyr was shown to me, I really became impressed with his beauty and charisma,” offers breeder Jairo Queiroz Jorge, who has four of his best-producing mares in foal to him. “And his strong, modern pedigree will help me a lot in my breeding program.” Strong … modern … typey … athletic … exemplary … just what Royal Arabians had in mind. Welcome, Halyr Meia Lua. ■

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Andrew & Angie Sellman | 92 County Road F | River Falls, Wisconsin 54022 | 715.425.9001

www.ArgentFarms.com

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Experience Royal Arabians

It’s a remarkable adventure!” says Cindy McGown of the experience she and her family are enjoying with Arabian horses. As with so many Arabian enthusiasts, Cindy’s connection began through her daughter’s passion for horses. “From birth, Amanda loved all animals. However, once she could talk, she wanted a horse more than anything. And so Sky Fire came into our lives—our first Arabian. She was Amanda’s best childhood friend.” That was in 1990, and a lot has changed since then. Over the years, Cindy’s commitment to supporting her daughter’s rewarding involvement with one horse grew to become a business of owning over 75 horses and managing 60 Arabians, with more than 15 employees. A little girl’s pastime is now a top class breeding and showing establishment in the capital of the Arabian show horse world.

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From the beginning, Cindy has applied the business savvy apparent in her successful career as an entrepreneur to the horse operation as well. In 2003, she and Mark Davis acquired their first farm in Mesa, Ariz. “It’s a little removed from the bustle of Phoenix and fits our lifestyle perfectly,” she explains. Then, in 2015, they added a second farm, purchasing the former North Arabians on Cactus Road in Scottsdale. Currently under construction, Royal Arabians Scottsdale is being designed to state-of-the-art specifications. With the addition of the Scottsdale property, Royal also broadened its presence in the training and marketing segment of the industry by joining forces with the internationally celebrated trainer Rodolfo Guzzo, of Guzzo Worldwide LLC. What’s in the future for Royal Arabians? The answer is in the stars—the stars of the future who now occupy the Royal Arabians stalls and paddocks. If their quality is anything to go by, this adventure is going to earn a five-star rating.

Above: Jordan & Micah Fraser Right: Amanda Fraser Below: Cindy McGown

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Royal Solaro Royal Invictus x Extravagant Star • 2014 colt

Royal Mikaela Royal Invictus x Maggie Mae PGA • 2015 filly

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In 2015 Royal Arabians joined forces with Guzzo Worldwide LLC. One of the top international horsemen

In collaboration ...

in the Arabian breed, Rodolfo Guzzo is known for his ability to train and present national champions and his marketing expertise, with a global network of contacts and a proven record for spotting talent. “Combining the efforts and abilities of both organizations creates a broader base of strength and resources,” says Cindy McGown, “with superior services to both companies’ many excited clients.”

Ar abian Horse Times | 4 | Royal Ar abians


HALYR MEIA LUA

the New addition...

New on the Royal Arabians stallion roster this year is Halyr Meia Lua, on lease for two years from Brazilian owners Bolivar Figueiredo, José Eduardo Guimarães Vieira and his son, André. The 2013 Brazilian National Champion Junior Colt, Halyr boasts a knockout pedigree of classic bloodlines from Lenita Perroy’s Haras Meia Lua. A North American show career is planned with Rodolfo Guzzo, but most significant for serious breeders—why Royal Arabians felt it was important to bring him to the United States—is that the stallion presents real value as a source of type on all levels.

Ajman Moniscione x Halya de Jylbert

Ar abian Horse Times | 5 | Royal Ar abians


the Stallions ...

Royal Emanuel Eden C x Emandoria

Aston Martin Millennium LOA x Ellure A

Royal Invictus Ajman Moniscione x San Jose Javiera

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Justin Cowden ... performance

Justin grew up in Gardnerville, Nevada, where both sides of his family were prominent cattle ranchers. His grandfather also bred Arabian horses, and gave him his first Arabian mare when he was five years old. Justin competed on the class A, regional and national level as a youth exhibitor. After moving to Scottsdale, Justin had the opportunity to learn and work for a wide variety of respected horsemen in the industry, such as Cari Thompson and Ricardo Rivero. Justin has accumulated many Scottsdale, regional, and national awards in hunter pleasure, show hack, western pleasure, and halter. In 2015 he was awarded AHT Readers’ Choice Hunter/Show Hack Trainer of the Year.

Ar abian Horse Times | 7 | Royal Ar abians


Michael Carpio... halter

Michael’s first interaction with Arabian horses was at eight years old, living next to a small Crabbet Arabian Farm. Shortly after, his family purchased their first Arabian horse. After moving to Georgia, Michael and his sister developed a passion for the breed. They acquired several Arabians over the next few years and his involvement continued to grow. At the age of 14, he began working for Chapel Farms for Bob and Christine Fauls and Chris Anckersen. His summer job turned into ten years. It was there that he developed his passion for the Arabian halter horse. After an amazing 10 years, he was offered an opportunity to work for Michael Byatt. During an incredible six-year span there, he worked with some of the most iconic horses in our breed, as well as traveling the world with the Arabian horse. Under Michael’s guidance, he learned that the horses’ care and happiness are always the priority. His journey then continued to Argent Farms, where he worked under Andy Sellman for the next three years. That leads us to today, and his position as Halter Trainer at Royal Arabians. The first year at Royal started out with great success, garnering several Scottsdale wins, numerous Regional titles and many National top tens.

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the Staff ... LEO HANSEN

Barn Manager

A second generation horseman, and son of master horse trainer and founder of Don Hansen Bits. Leo has been a lover of Arabian horses since he was a child. He is a National Champion and Reserve winning trainer in halter, western and English pleasure, driving and combination. His amateurs have won multiple National Championships in performance and halter. As founder of Main Attraction Sale company, he has held 18 major auctions, managed sales for Colonial Wood, Vesti and La Lomita Farm, and has assisted in sales for Tom Chauncey and Wayne Newton. Happily married for 34 years to the love of his life, Mimi Hansen, their family is full of dogs, cats and birds.

TRAVIS RICE Marketing

Travis was exposed to the Arabian horse at a young age. His introduction was through the great Padrons Psyche, who at that time was family owned by Four Star Arabians. He has carried out business on every continent other than Antarctica, and traveled around the globe within the Arabian horse industry. As an agent, Travis has been successful marketing millions of dollars of individuals. He is passionate about breeding and marketing exceptional Arabian horses.

Ar abian Horse Times | 9 | Royal Ar abians


9720 E. C ACTUS ROAD S COTTSDALE , A RIZONA 1660 N. L INDSAY R OAD M ESA, A RIZONA INFO @ROYALARABIANS .COM WWW .R OYAL A RABIANS . COM TEL :

480.220.1108


2015 Breeders of National Arabian Champions and Reserve Champions

In breeding Arabian horses, the journey begins with great amounts of research, an understanding of strength in traits, bloodlines, and potential crosses, a revisit to past successes and failures; and once all of this is behind a breeder, only intuition and hoping for the best inspires a final decision. With all of these factors occurring before the foal even becomes a reality, it is clear that breeders take a great risk every time they pair two horses in hopes of creating the next superstar. We honor the most winning breeders of 2015. As Arabian national wins amounted over the year for the most excellent horses in the show ring, a select group of breeders stood out in their breeding choices, their hard work, and their unique intuition to create a worthwhile Arabian show horse and exceptional individual. It is their efforts that help to continue this great breed and we are grateful for their love and allegiance to the Arabian horse as the top breeders of 2015.

Top Breeders of 2015 U.S., Canadian, Youth and Sport Horse National Purebred Arabian Champions and Reserves Equitation, UPHA, Showmanship and Horsemanship classes excluded.

15 Champion or Reserve Winners

10 Champion or Reserve Winners

13 Champion or Reserve Winners

8 Champion or Reserve Winners

Bazy Tankersley

Cedar Ridge Arabians

12 Champion or Reserve Winners Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Prestige Farms LLC Marty Shea

Live Oak Arabans, Inc. R.O. Lervick Arabians Pegasus Arabians

7 Champion or Reserve Winners Vicki Humphrey

Ar abian Horse Times | 30 | Volume 46, No. 10


2015 BREEDERS OF NATIONAL ARABIAN CHAMPIONS AND RESERVE CHAMPIONS

6 Champion or Reserve Winners Buckshot Farms J. Frank Chisholm Dolorosa Arabians Ltd. Varian Arabians

5 Champion or Reserve Winners Sally Bedeker Nick and Juliet Carden Eleanor Hamilton Adrienne Hancock-Leong Shawn and Carmelle Rooker

4 Champion or Reserve Winners California State Polytechnic University Katharyn Hart Heather Johnson-Tracey Oak Ridge Arabians Petroglyph Arabians Lindsay Rinehart Victoria Arabians LLC Windholme Farm LLC

3 Champion or Reserve Winners

Boisvert Farms LLC Burrline LLC Frances Butler Conway Arabians, Inc. Edwin Crain Susan Fyfe Rick and Laura Gault Tamara Hanby William Jenkins Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna Clair and Margaret Larson Susan McAdoo Michigan State Univ. Dept. of Animal Science Murray and Shirley Popplewell Strawberry Banks Farm The Brass Ring, Inc. Toskhara Arabians LP Clarke and Karen Vesty Todd and Glena Weegens Robert Williams MD and John Brown Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc. Larry and Carla Wright

2 Champion or Reserve Winners 6D Ranch Ltd. A Shahania Stud Susan Al-Abbas Larry and Kelly Alcorn Liz, Bill and Ashley Alward

Timothy Anderson and Kim Niven Sandra Arabsky and Herman Steunenberg Battle Hill Farm Chris and Sonya Bickford David Bishop Robert and Janen Boggs BP Arabians LLC Todd and Carrie Brown Michael Byatt Gerald Canda Jewell Cantrell Sybil Collins Desert Winds Arabians LLC Bill Doughty Dream Cross LLC El Camino Ranch Empress Arabians Suzanne Eves Megan Francis Winnifred Furman Robert and Denise Gainey Marilyn and Frances Gannon Harold and Elizabeth Green S A Grove Richard Halstead Jerry, Noreen and Karen Hamilton Natacha Lesburgueres Kristin Hardin Jeremy Harper Scott and Michelle Harris Beverly Krause Erin LaCroix Elizabeth Lawrence Steve and Barbara Lazzarini Sally Leonardini Laura and Michael Medved Linda Misco Tom and Elizabeth Moore David and Maren Overly J Perry and Suzanne Perkins Robin Porter R Kirk Landon Trust Rohara Arabians Sage Hill Arabians Jeff Schaffer Lyle Sinclair and Roger Gardner Shawn Stachowski Carol Steppe Melissa Subjeck Tierra Farms Trigger Arabians LLC Venture Farms Inc. Chris Wilson

Ar abian Horse Times | 31 | Volume 46, No. 10


Breeding Champions ...

takes planning, and patience. 2015 National Champions/Reserves bred by Maroon Fire Arabians DEBONHEIR DGL DEFYING GRAVITY RGS ERIKA AFIRE EVANA AFIRE GARRISON DGL NOBLE FANTOM NOBLE ONE NOBLE REWARD NOBLE WAY NOBLES ANGEL PRODIGY AFIRE SAXTON DGL AFIRE BEY V

Maroon Fire Arabians, Dave & Gail Liniger • Castle Rock, CO

Ar abian Horse Times | 32 | Volume 46, No. 10


For over 25 years, Maroon Fire Arabians and Shea Stables have planned and established breeding programs that consistently produce champions. We offer a great selection of talented young prospects by Afire Bey V and IXL Noble Express. Visit our website for videos and information.

2015 National Champions/Reserves bred by Shea Stables

ADAMS FIRE

AFIRE AND LIGHT AFIRES ROSE

AFIRES SECRET

AFIRES SUNSET DIVA AFIRE DIVVINCI

EMPERORS FIRE EVES FIRE

LORD OF FIRE

WILDD FLOWER

X-TREME AFIRE

IXL NOBLE EXPRESS

Shea Stables, Tim & Marty Shea • St. Clair, MI

810-329-6392 • www.afirebeyv.com Ar abian Horse Times | 33 | Volume 46, No. 10


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Breed something they’ll talk about! (Or let us do it for you.) RGT Heirs Johnny

RGT Mozart

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RGT Major Tom

RGT Breathin Afire

RGT Ziminem

RGT Zymphony

Rick & Laura Gault with John Faircloth | Archdale, NC | Cell: (336) 471-8822

RGT The Boss

RGT Ziminem

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RGT Thunder Road

RGT Ziminy Cricket


Breeding National Winners For Over 40 Years!

And Proud Of It!

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What do all of these horses have in common? THEY STARTED THEIR LIFE AT CEDAR RIDGE ARABIANS! B r e e d e r s o f N at i o n a l C h a m p i o n s . . .

ALL MAXED OUT RA

Youth Ntl. Champion Limited Reined Cow Horse JTR

DUNIT MY WAY RA

AMES INSPIRATION

Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion Country Pl. Driving ATD

AMES TACOMA

U.S. Ntl. Champion H/A Reining J.r Horse U.S. Ntl. Champion H/A Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under

Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion Country Pl. JOTR 18 & Under

GONE N DUNIT RA

Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion H/A Country Pl. AAOTR 19-39 Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion H/A Country Pl. AATR 19-39

CRF INTOXICATING

Youth Ntl. Res. Champion H/A Reining JOTR 13 & Under

MISS MAXIMUS

U.S. Ntl. Res. Champion H/A Limited Reined Cow Horse AATR

SLIDE N STYLE

U.S. Ntl. Res. Champion Western Trail

KW HERO

U.S. Ntl. Champion Country Pl. U.S. Ntl. Champion Country Pl. AAOTR 19-39

TOI FABULOUS CRF

ALL CHARISMA

Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion H/A English Pl.

U.S. Ntl. Res. Champion H/A English Pl.

TOI TALENT

AMES CAPTIVATOR

Canadian Ntl. Champion Show Hack JTR 18 & Under Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion Side Saddle English ATR Canadian Ntl. Res. Champion Show Hack AAOTR

Youth Ntl. Res. Champion H/A Country Pl. W/T 10 & Under

Breeders of Futurit y Winners ...

Scottsdale

PROPER ETIQUETTE RA

Top Ten Arabian Reining Futurity Classic

DUNIT MY WAY RA

WHERES WANDA RA

Champion H/A Reining Futurity Classic Champion H/A Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under

Top Ten HA/AA Reining Futurity Classic

DUNIT ON FYRE RA

Minnesota Fall Fest

Res. Champion H/A Reining Futurity Classic Top Ten H/A Reining Horse Futurity 5 & Under

AMES GYPSY MOON

Top Five Two-Year-Old Filly ATH

DUNMINDING PS AND QS Top Ten H/A Reining Futurity Classic

SHES MAGICAL CRF

Top Five Yearling Medallion Filly ATH

J AMES BONDD

Buckeye and U.S. Nationals

MAXS GIRL RA

Buckeye Res. Champion AEPA Country Pl. Maturity AOTR U.S. Ntl. Top Ten Country Pl. AAOTR Maturity

Top Ten SSS Western Pl. Futurity 3 & 4 Yrs.

AMES INSPIRATION

Res. Champion Reining Futurity Classic

The Ames Family | 20335 Sawmill Road | Post Office Box 8 | Jordan, MN 55352 | Tel: 952-492-6590 | www.Cedar-Ridge.com Mike Brennan, Breeding Manager | 612-202-6985

Visit us to find your next champion! Ar abian Horse Times | 39 | Volume 46, No. 10


CRIADERO GAJUALÓ

The Art Of Breeding In The Heart Of The Earth by MARIO BR AGA

GALO HIDALGO A, RODOLFO GUZZO, DAVID BOGGS AND GALO HIDALGO AT CRIADERO GAJUALÓ, QUITO, ECUADOR.

T

here is something inherently magic about walking through the line that divides the northern and the southern hemispheres of our beloved planet. If you go to Quito, located in the heart of the Andes Mountains in the country of Ecuador, you could actually do exactly that. And it is an amazing experience indeed! However, after experiencing the beautiful historical and

natural sites of the region, not to mention the great hospitality and food, one should try to profit from visiting some great Arabian horse breeding farms that also happen to be there. One in particular, is a magical place that will open the doors of Ecuador into your heart and soul forever … Criadero Gajualó.

Ar abian Horse Times | 40 | Volume 46, No. 10


Owned by Galo Hidalgo, the current president of ACCAE (The Ecuadorian Arabian Horse Association) and his family, the farm has been crafting numerous international champion Arabian horses since its inception over sixteen years ago. In order to start his breeding program, Galo had chosen the lines of Padron, Gondolier, Menes and Tornado, among other important sires. “Criadero Gajualó was born out of love for the Arabian horse and with the purpose of promoting its breeding in Ecuador. The family involvement right from the beginning helped us to achieve a great structure as a basic principle. This allowed us to aim for the highest quality horse possible.” (Galo Hidalgo). Throughout the years, the search for higher levels of quality at both the national and international level led Galo Hidalgo to search for new bloodlines. Subsequent purchases were made. Among those special horses there is one in particular that will always hold a special place in the farm’s history. Magic Momentt (AP Special Que x La Cienka, by Celaddinn) was a beautiful grey mare imported from the U.S. to Ecuador and then exported to Argentina, who won national titles in several countries including Brazil and Argentina, as well as many other halter championships. An ultimate example of beauty and type, she brought international attention and recognition to the great work of selection developed by the Hidalgo family. The next step was to promote the homebreds and put their quality at test by showing them at the highest possible level under different judges and different countries. By doing so, Criadero Gajualó has broaden the scope of international sucess by collecting further national championships in Ecuador, as well as in Colombia, Argentina, Brazil, the U.S., Europe and the Middle East, with horses of its breeding.

Ar abian Horse Times | 41 | Volume 46, No. 10

MAGIC MOMENTT

GH FALCONS FEMME

GH MARWANA


GALO HIDALGO WITH A HOMEBRED FILLY.

Among those who have taken the highest flights are the beautiful national champions GH Falcons Femme (Falcon BHF x La Femme Versace, by Versace) and GH Marwana (Marwan Al Shaqab x Verona RA, by Versace). Both of them were exported and descend from internationally acclaimed champions of truly superb bloodlines that emcompasses some notable names such as Bey Shah, Padrons Psyche, Versace, Marwan Al Shaqab, Falcon BHF and Magnum Psyche.

Having proven the success of the horses born at the farm, it became clear that the time was right for the challenge of moving on to building the second generation of Criadero Gajualó’s breeding program. The stallion GH Magnum Nice, a beautful son of the famous champions Magnum Chall HVP and Caliope D, bred and owned by Galo Hidalgo, was chosen to fill the duties at the breeding barn as the stud’s chief sire. Known for producing excellent mothers, his daughters

Ar abian Horse Times | 42 | Volume 46, No. 10


display excellent conformation, beautiful throatlatches and amazing show attitude. Those traits turned GH Magnum Nice into a sought after sire among other breeders in Ecuador and many have been his champion offspring since he became available to the public. More recently, another exciting phase has started: crossing the daughters of GH Magnum Nice and the selection of the best broodmares that were preserved at the farm. New blood was also added including daughters of Ever After NA and Gazal al Shaqab, to enrich even further the original lines developed for over a decade. But it was perhaps the arrival of the new stallion Rrevolution, who became the reason to believe that a true revolution is about to take place whithin the community. A bay son of Stival and out of an impeccably bred Bey Shah daughter (a full siter to the famous stallion Kouvay Bey), Rrevolution has been imported as a colt to Ecuador where he has been undefeated in the show ring, being named National Champion twice.

2015 NATIONAL CHAMPION STALLION RREVOLUTION WITH BRIAN FERGUSON, GEORGE Z AND MARIO BRAGA.

Despite his young age, the echoes of his quality have been catching the attention of breeders and trainers around the world. There is a great anticipation regarding Rrevolution’s first babies and it is no mystery that he has some big shoes to fill. It will be great to wait for the next genearton of champions bred by Criadero Gajualó. For it is a certainty that they are on their way into the magic mountains of Ecuador.

GH MAGNA

CRIADERO GAJUALÓ Address: Arnulfo Araujo s/n y Av. Occidental. (Complejo Teleferico de Quito) Quito, Ecuador E-mail: jphidalgo@grupo-status.com / galo_hidalgo@grupo-status.com Cell Telephone: (593) 998011672 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Criadero-Gajualó

Ar abian Horse Times | 43 | Volume 46, No. 10


Ar abian Horse Times | 44 | Volume 46, No. 10


MEET THE FACES OF AHA

MEET THE FACES OF AHA

Cynthia Richardson President of AHA - 2013 to present

How many years have you been involved with AHA and what positions have you held? I began showing Arabians in 1968 and have been a continuous member of IAHA/AHA since 1971. I held my judges card from 1985 to 2015. I was Vice Chair of the Youth Committee, Chair of the Endurance Committee and the Registration Commission, Delegate for 30 years, Region 8 Director and took over the presidency in 2013.   How did you get started with AHA? While in high school, I was offered an Arabian gelding for training and stayed with the breed all these years. I first volunteered to help at a show in 1968, got involved with the local club and then eventually the region and AHA.   What does your typical day look like when you visit the AHA office? I live about 65 miles from the office and I’m the first president in many years to reside in Colo. This has allowed me to be in the office much more than previous presidents. We do a lot of work via email and phone, so my days in the office are spent in person to person meetings with individuals and groups.   As president of AHA, what has been your proudest moment? I’ve worked really hard to build AHA’s reputation of running like a service business and accomplishing that through TEAM AHA (together everyone accomplishes more). So my proudest moments are when someone comes up and asks me how they can get involved. We have a lot of competition in the equine world and disposable

income can be spent in many ways other than with horses. So, for Arabians to be the horse of choice, everyone must work together. Stop any infighting and be a welcome, fun industry to join and stay involved.   How many full time employees does AHA employ? We currently have 47.   How many of them work directly with you? I work very closely with Glenn and the senior directors. However, I’m lucky to have known many of the employees for a number of years because of my previous positions within AHA and proximity to the office. We have the best staff right now that we have ever had and I’m very proud of them and all they accomplish.   There is a lot of travel that is involved with your position; how many days a year are spent traveling and what does this travel involve? While serving as president, I’ve tried to support our members and commissions, so I attend all the National events, part of Scottsdale, the World Cup, the Arabian U.S. Open at Central Park, some regional events, a couple of Egyptian Events, at least one of the Breeders forums and numerous trips for USEF. I’m probably on the road about 75 days a year.   When you run an organization like AHA, it is hard to please all. What has been the toughest obstacle to overcome in your term? You are never going to please everyone, so the decisions have to be based on what benefits the most owners.

Ar abian Horse Times | 45 | Volume 46, No. 10


The hardest thing has to be getting people to let go of old grievances and work together for a bright future for our horses.   AHA has suffered some tough financial times over the last few years with the decline in breeding. What have you had to do during these times to encourage breeders to continue breeding this magnificent animal? Everyone has to be a responsible breeder to be successful. To me, that means that you need to breed a quality individual that not only represents the breed in beauty, but also athleticism. This takes dedication to do

your research, evaluate your mare(s), know their phenotype and genetic background and look for the best stallion to improve the mare. Breeders are faced with rising costs in maintaining their horses, so they are choosing carefully which mares to breed. We are now into quality and not quantity.   You have been a long-time owner and breeder of Arabian horses yourself; please share what your involvement has been. I started training while still in school. I loved starting the young/problem ones and turning out reliable horses that my customers could enjoy. I bred a couple of Half-Arabians and

Ar abian Horse Times | 46 | Volume 46, No. 10


MEET THE FACES OF AHA

Mary with *El Paso.

then got more interested in the purebreds while working for Shar Mar Arabians in Iowa. They stood a couple of nice Ferzon bred stallions and we foaled out about 50 mares a year. Then I got married, moved to England, had a child and worked the horses in as time allowed. I eventually got my amateur status back. At convention, I met a lot of the endurance folks and was invited to ride the Tevis as my first endurance ride. I finished and was hooked. It is a different world where, to finish is to win and friends really help each other. I’ve tried to bring that mentality to the show world to get folks to pull together and help. Our shows and events rely heavily on volunteers and deserve our thanks.   Aside from the horses, do you have any hobbies? My family are all scuba divers, so we have traveled the world for the best dive sites. We also enjoy hiking and fishing.   What will your involvement be with AHA once your term is over? I will stay on the Executive Board for

two to four years, depending on how long the next president serves. Then I’ll have to see what I can do to help in a different role.  Where do you see AHA and the Arabian horse in 10 years? One of my initiatives has been to grow the market share for the Arabian horse. The horse of choice for all walks of life and all disciplines is our breed. The U.S. is becoming less rural and horses are not easily accessible to everyone. We need to evolve as an industry. I think there will be more shared leasing and ownership, making horse involvement more affordable and sensible for middle income families. We have so much to offer as a healthy lifestyle. Many of our horses are useful up into their 20’s and we need to take advantage of that where horses can have a second or third career. So, if we continue to build opportunities for people to be exposed, then participate at all financial levels, we will succeed in a very competitive market. I think that means about 3,000 to 3,500 foals a year and 25,000 members for AHA. Join TEAM AHA … make a difference! n

Ar abian Horse Times | 47 | Volume 46, No. 10


S

HOW ME THE MONE Y

Š Georgerudy | Dreamstime.com

Scottsdale Signature Futurities

Amateur-Only Halter Futurity | Amateur and Professional Performance Futurity

Over $575,000 in cash prizes were awarded at the 61st Annual Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show in the Scottsdale Signature Stallion classes. A breeding from each 2016 Nominated Stallion was auctioned during the show. All the money raised at this auction is used for future prize money payout for all eligible SSS nominated foals. AHBA Futurities

Amateur-Only Halter Futurity

The Arabian Horse Breeders Alliance (AHBA) will award $176,000 in cash prizes at the 10th Arabian Breeders World Cup Show in Las Vegas this April.

Scottsdale Signature Stallion

Futurity Programs Show Amateurs The Money by riyan rivero

Arabian horse clubs annually sponsor amateur futurity programs that are proving to inspire both new and veteran horse enthusiasts across the country. These programs designed specifically for amateur owners and exhibitors offer thousands of dollars in cash awards. Nearly 1.5 MILLION dollars in payouts was reported by club organizers for amateur futurity classes in 2015 and 2016. These programs have significantly encouraged participation at the shows while reportedly increasing the market value of nominated horses. The chart below reflects payouts for amateur classes only. Visit the individual program websites for more information on classes and payouts.

The AHBA Stallion Auction is held online in March. All the money raised at this auction is used for future prize money payout for all eligible AHBA nominated foals in the AHBA Futurity and the Legacy Futurity programs. The Minnesota Arabian Horse Breeders Futurity Amateur-Only Halter and Performance Futurity

Over $225,000 in cash prizes are projected at the 2016 Minnesota Arabian Horse Breeders Fall Festival show. Any purebred Arabian mare in foal to a nominated Medallion Stallion is eligible to be nominated in the halter futurity. Any foal whose dam was nominated to the Futurity is eligible to compete in all performance divisions. The Minnesota program auctions breedings during the club’s Minnesota Fall Festival Horse Show, which also hosts its futurity.

Arabian Horse Breeders Alliance

Minnesota Medallion Stallion

Auction

February - Live

March - Online

September - Live

Competition Location

Scottsdale, Az

Las Vegas, Nv

Winona, Mn

Febraury and October

April

September

Halter

All Ages

Ages 1 -2

All Ages

Performance

Ages 3 -5

No Performance

All Ages

$556,382 (2016) Amateur Class Total

$176,000 (2015)

$225,000 (2016)

Stallion Nomination Fee

$500

$500

$500

Mare Nomination Fee

$100

$100

$125

-

-

-

ScottsdaleShow.com

ArabianBreedersWorldCup.com

MedallionStallion.com

Competition Date

Payout

Horse Nomination Website Address

Ar abian Horse Times | 48 | Volume 46, No. 10


Region 12 Spotlight Futurity

Amateur-Only Halter Futurity | Amateur and Professional Performance Futurity

Over $180,000 in cash prizes will be awarded at the 2016 Region 12 Horse Show in the Spotlight Futurity classes. A breeding from each 2016 Nominated Spotlight Stallion will be auctioned live on May 5th, 2016 in Perry, Ga. The successful bidder for each stallion will be eligible to compete in the 2018 Auction classes.

Anyone who breeds to a Breeders Club nominated stallion can nominate their purebred mare so that the resulting foal can compete for Breeders Club prize money. The chart reflects information on amateur futurity payouts only. There are multiple money programs offered to Arabian horse breeders for amateur and professional participants in both halter and performance nationwide.

AHA Performance Maturity

Amateur-Only Performance Maturity

Over $130,000 in cash prizes was awarded at the 2015 U.S. Nationals in the AHA Purebred and Half-Arabian Performance classes. Western and hunter pleasure classes are offered to four- to five-year-old Arabian and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian performance horses. Country English and English pleasure classes are offered to five- to six-year-old Arabian and Half-Arabian/Anglo-Arabian performance horses. Silver Sire Futurity

Amateur-Only Halter Futurity

Over $55,000 in cash prizes is projected to be awarded at the 2016 Silver Sire Amateur Futurity Show held in Scottsdale, Az at the 2016 Arabian National Breeder Finals Show. Nomination to the Open Futurity is available to any registered purebred Arabian mare bred to any purebred stallion, not just the Auction Stallions. The breeding services purchased through the online Stallion Service Auction allow participation in the Auction Futurity classes. The stallion nomination fee of $500 is waived for stallions that meet specified requirements. Visit SilverSire.com for more information.

AHA Prize Money Programs

Amateur and Professional Performance and Halter Programs

AHA awards more than $2 million in prize money annually through the Breeders Sweepstakes, Halter Futurities and Performance Futurities programs. These programs showcase yearlings, two-year-olds and threeyear-olds. Futurity winners can win thousands of dollars during their threeyear-old year, and many Sweepstakes horses are eligible to win prize money at the Regional and National level for their entire life. ArabianHorses.org AEPA Performance Futurities

Amateur and Professional Performance Programs

The AEPA Arabian Horse Times Arabian Futurity & AEPA Halcon Furniture Half-Arabian Futurity for four-year-olds, are held each year at the U.S. National Arabian Horse Show, and the AEPA Strawberry Banks Country Maturity at the Buckeye show in Ohio is open to fiveand six-year-old horses; all who were sired by AEPA enrolled stallions. ArabianEnglishPerformanceAssociation.com

Breeders Club & Three Year Old Finals Futurities Amateur and Professional Halter Futurity

Over $8,000 in cash prizes were awarded at the 2015 Arabian National Breeder Finals show in the Breeders Club and 3-Year-Old Futurity classes.

Region 12 Spotlight

AHA Performance Maturity

Visit AHTimes.com for a complete list of Futurity programs with links to their program information, including rules and regulations, payouts, nominated stallions and nomination forms. u

Silver Sire Breeders

Breeders Club

May - Live

No Auction

October - Online

No Auction

Perry, Ga

Tulsa, Ok

Scottsdale, Az

Scottsdale, Az

May

October

October

Febraury and October

Ages 1 -2

No Amateur Halter

Ages 1 - 3

Ages 1 - 3

Ages 3 -5

Ages 4 -6

No Performance

No Performance

$54,888 (2015)

$6,120 (2016) Amateur Class Total

$136,129 (2016) Amateur Class Total

$131,480 (2015)

Amateur Class Total

$500

-

*$0/$500

$1,500

$100

-

$165

$200

-

$630

-

-

SpotlightFuturity.com

ArabianHorses.org

SilverSire.com

ScottsdaleShow.com

Ar abian Horse Times | 49 | Volume 46, No. 10


OVER $2,000,000 I N PA Y O U T S

Futurity classes and shows included: both halter and performance, AEPA, AHBA Futurity, Breeders Club, Canadian Nationals, Minnesota Medallion Stallion, Region 12 Spotlight, Scottsdale Signature Stallion, Silver Sire, and U.S. Nationals. To make the Overall Sire and Breeder lists, both must have winners in halter and performance. All information based off results provided by show committees.

EvE vEr Er AftE ftEr Er NA (Sir Fames HBV x Entaicyng NA)

SuN uNd NdAN dANc ANcE cE Kid v (Desperado V x Sweet Shalimar V)

2015 FUTURITY TOP TEN LEADING LIVING PUREBRED OVERALL SIRES By number of winners 1. Ever After NA 2. Bey Ambition Sundance Kid V 3. IXL Noble Express SF Veraz 4. Eden C 5. Afire Bey V 6. Magnum Psyche 7. KM Bugatti 8. Audacious PS Justify

16 15 15 13 13 12 11 10 9 8 8

Owner Robert and Dixie North Murray and Shirley Popplewell J. Frank and Sara Chisholm Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Patti Scheier Alsayed Stud Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Haras Mayed KM Stables, Inc. Varian Arabians DST Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 50 | Volume 46, No. 10


vitorio to (DA Valentino x Sol Natique)

BEy AmBitioN (Regal Actor JP x Bey Shahs Lady)

2015 FUTURITY TOP TEN LEADING LIVING PUREBRED HALTER SIRES By number of winners 1. Ever After NA Vitorio TO 2. Bey Ambition 3. Trussardi 4. Eden C SF Veraz 5. ZT Marwteyn 6. Marwan Al Magnifficoo 7. A Jakarta Audacious PS Magnum Psyche PCF Vision

14 14 12 11 9 9 7 8 6 6 6 6

Owner Robert and Dixie North Oak Ridge Arabians Murray and Shirley Popplewell Rojo Arabians Alsayed Stud Patti Scheier Michael Byatt John Blincoe Deor Farms Varian Arabians Haras Mayed Prince Saud Bin Sultan Bin Saud Al Saud

2015 FUTURITY TOP TEN LEADING LIVING PUREBRED PERFORMANCE SIRES By number of winners 1. Baske Afire 2. Afires Heir Sundance Kid V 3. IXL Noble Express 4. Afire Bey V 5. Hesa Zee 6. KM Bugatti What It Takes 7. Nobilistic BF Noble Way Vegaz

19 12 12 11 10 9 6 6 5 5 5

Owner Strawberry Banks Farm William and Shirley Reilich J. Frank and Sara Chisholm Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Eleanor Hamilton KM Stables, Inc. Silver Spurs Equine and Kit Hall Boisvert Farms LLC Conway Arabians, Inc. Kenneth And Susan Knipe

Ar abian Horse Times | 51 | Volume 46, No. 10


BASKE AfirE firE (Afire Bey V x Mac Baske)

AfirES firES HEir Eir (Afire Bey V x Brassmis)

2015 TOP TEN OVERALL FUTURITY BREEDERS By number of winners 1. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm 2. Murray and Shirley Popplewell 3. Cedar Ridge Arabians 4. Pegasus Arabians 5. Robert and Dixie North Family Trust 6. Lawrence Jerome Lindsay Rinehart 7. Varian Arabians Victoria Arabians LLC 8. Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna

18 12 10 9 8 7 7 6 6 5

2015 TOP TEN PERFORMANCE FUTURITY BREEDERS By number of winners 1. Eleanor Hamilton 2. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm 3. Conway Arabians, Inc. 4. Cedar Ridge Farm 5. Prestige Farms LLC 6. Tamara Hanby 7. Boisvert Farms LLC Buckshot Farms Maroon Fire Arabian, Inc. Marty Shea The Brass Ring, Inc.

12 11 10 8 7 6 5 5 5 5 5

2015 TOP TEN HALTER FUTURITY BREEDERS By number of winners 1. McDonald Arabians 2. Murray and Shirley Popplewell Pegasus Arabians 3. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm 4. Oak Ridge Arabians Robert and Dixie North Family Trust 5. Cindy McGown and Mark Davis Hennessey Arabian LLC Ken and Tracy White Lawrence Jerome Stonewall Farm Arabians LLC

10 8 8 7 6 6 5 5 5 5 5

2015 TOP TEN FUTURITY BREEDERS OF CHAMPIONS 1. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm 2. Cedar Ridge Farm Conway Arabians, Inc. Murray and Shirley Popplewell 3. Eleanor Hamilton Janice McCrea Wight and Alex Chrys Joseph Bradley Herman Pegasus Arabians Tom and Earleen Walter 4. Amanda Solie Boisvert Farms LLC Buckshot Farms Lindsay Rinehart Lon Matthias Mark and Valerie Sylla Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. Oak Ridge Arabians Shawn Stachowski Thirteen Oaks Arabians Willow Tree Arabians

Ar abian Horse Times | 52 | Volume 46, No. 10

8 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2


Ar abian Horse Times | 53 | Volume 46, No. 10


Over $1 Million Excitement! Since 2007

RETURNING IN 2016 ... AEPA Strawberry Banks Country English Maturity for 5 & 6-year-olds. Paying $20,000 Will be held at the 2016 Ohio Buckeye Sweepstakes Show. Visit our website for details.

WINNING ...

$100,000 Excitement

Don’t be left out!

Breed to an AEPA enrolled sire this year or purchase an english prospect eligible to participate in the aepa futurity program.

www.arabianenglishperformanceassociation.com Ar abian Horse Times | 54 | Volume 46, No. 10


SUZANNE STURGILL

DREAM BIG. WIN BIG. U.S. & CANADIAN NATIONALS

SHOWCASE YOUR 3-YEAR-OLD THIS YEAR. OVER $190,000 AWARDED IN 2015! YOUR

FUTURITY

Ar abian Horse Times | 55 | Volume 46, No. 10

3YO

#InItToWinIt

HALTER

SHOW

THE

ENROLL


MINNESOTA ARABIAN HORSE BREEDERS

35th Annual

2016 M i n n e s o ta F a l l F e s t i va l September 30th - October 2nd, 2016

MaHB F a l l F e s t i va l All MEDALLION STALLIONS are included in the LIVE AUCTION .

All nominated foals by Medallion Stallions are eligible to compete at the MN Breeders Fall Festival for life! Our success has been built from our continued commitment to integrity, passion, and competitiveness. We were the First, strive to be the Friendliest, and are committed to being the Fairest Arabian Futurity in the equine industry.

www.MedallionStallion.com Ar abian Horse Times | 56 | Volume 46, No. 10


Continuing to Lead TheWay Our vision to double your chances to win big prize money has become reality!

In 2014 we launched the first of its kind Auction Halter Futurity and Auction Performance Maturity. All foals that resulted from a breeding purchased at the Medallion Stallion Service Auctions will be able to compete as yearlings in the Medallion Auction Futurity and as 4-year-olds in one of three Auction Performance Maturity classes (Western Pleasure, Hunter Pleasure or Saddle Seat Pleasure) . starting in

2020

Exclusive, Exciting, Enduring for more information, contact greg brown, 612-760-1048 • mahbinc@aol.com or john diedrich, 507-461-1587 • jcdiedrich@gmail.com

www.MedallionStallion.com Ar abian Horse Times | 57 | Volume 46, No. 10


Ar abian Horse Times | 58 | Volume 46, No. 10


The Breeders Club Program THE NEWEST WAY TO WIN MONEY! A halter futurity that pays out big money at the Arabian National Breeder Finals and the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show each year. Anyone who breeds to a Breeders Club nominated stallion can nominate their purebred mare so that the resulting foal can compete for Breeders Club prize money. Classes will be held each year for the nominated yearling & 2 year old get.

Get Your Mares Nominated

The one-time fee to nominate each foal is $200.

Get Your Stallion in the Program

Open to purebred Arabian stallions for a one-time nomination fee of $1500. Any purebred mare that is bred to your stallion can be nominated into the Breeders Club.

Also at the Finals

A 3 year old Arabian Breeders Club Futurity class. A one time fee of $100 will get any purebred foal nominated into this futurity. No yearly re-nomination fees for any of these programs! ARABIAN HORSE ASSOCIATION OF ARIZONA PO Box 13865, Scottsdale, AZ 85267 • T: 480.515.1500 • E: corporate@scottsdaleshow.com

www.ScottsdaleShow.com Ar abian Horse Times | 59 | Volume 46, No. 10


Ar abian Horse Times | 60 | Volume 46, No. 10


PAVOROTTO K.A. QR Marc x Palanga

A JAKARTA *Jullyen El Jamaal x Gai Schara

Rohara Stallion S H O W C A S E

MONTANA FIRENZE

Representing the finest

Ajman Moniscione x Fabrices Destiny

Rohara Arabians

KARL & ROXANN HART, OWNERS • JOHN RANNENBERG, TRAINER P.O. BOX 110, ORANGE LAKE, FLORIDA 32681 352.591.4661 • 352.266.6445, CELL • ROHARA@WINDSTREAM.NET

W W W . RO H A R A . C O M


REGION 12

Spotlight STALLIONS

Exxalt

(Excalibur EA x Vesperra, by SF Veraz) REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT STALLION

Bred and owned by Frances Butler • Jeff & Sybil Collins • James & Kay Smith

2015 Scottsdale International Gold Junior Champion Colt

Charmed

SIR

FF

(SF Sir Real x Bremervale Charmed) REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT STALLION Owned by K and D Dertell • H and A Hardwick


Mostly ML

PADRON

Padrons Psyche x HS Mostly REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT STALLION

Owned by ML Mostly Padron Syndicate

Wortex

KALLISTE

(Shanghai EA x Mirwanah Kalliste) REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT STALLION Owned by S.A.R.L. Kalliste Arabians

Training & Showing | International Marketing | Breeding & Stallion Management White Oak, North Carolina | Call or Text: 910.876.7332 | ted@tedcarson.com Farm: 910.866.4000

w w w. t e d c a r s o n . c o m


Scottsdale Champion

Ever After NA x Mystic Rose BHF by Padrons Psyche

SCOTTSDALE UNANIMOUS CHAMPION YEARLING FILLY SCOTTSDALE JUNIOR CHAMPION FILLY Shown by Keith Krichke for owner/breeder Jessie Szymanski-Hoag

Scottsdale & Las Vegas Champion

Ever After NA x Margarita PSY by Padrons Psyche

SCOTTSDALE SIGNATURE STALLION UNANIMOUS CHAMPION 2-YEAR-OLD FILLY ATH Shown by Ron Armstrong Bred & owned by North Arabians Congratulations to her new owners, Oman Royal Calvary! Ar abian Horse Times | 2 | Region

xii

Spotlight


CARESSABLE NA

BELENCIA NA

Sir Fames HBV x Entaicyng NA

Multi-Program Nominated Sire | SCID/CA Clear | Proudly owned & bred by Robert & Dixie North Contact Robert North 619.992.9832 or Mike McNally 760.500.0792 W W W. N O RT H A R A B I A N S . C O M

Ar abian Horse Times | 3 | Region

xii

Spotlight


REDEFINE EXTRAORDINARY

Proudly owned by Lesley Farms, LLC | *Jullyen El Jamaal x Mosquerade V| SettingSun-Stables.com | Contact Setting Sun Stables: 574.862.2231 Ar abian Horse Times | 4 | Region xii Spotlight


National Champions Sired by PossesionPGA

FROM THE HORSE EVERYONE WANTS TO RIDE ...

... COMES THE FOALS EVERYONE HAS TO HAVE!

PA MAYHEM PA LILLITH

MULTI-CHAMPION WESTERN PLEASURE OPEN & AAOTR Khadraj NA+++/ x RA Po Okela, by Fame VF Scottsdale Signature Stallion • Region 12 Spotlight Stallion • AWPA Enrolled Sire SCID & CA Clear • Standing at RBC Show Horses, 919.202.8384 For breeding information contact owner Nan Harley at 770.252.2705 or nan_harley@yahoo.com Ar abian Horse Times | 5 | Region

xii

Spotlight


John Rannenberg and Roxann Hart with Rohara Sophia, the Master Breeders Weanling Jackpot Champion at the 2015 AHAF Thanksgiving All Arabian Horse Show in Tampa, FL.

COVER

STORY:

Rohara ... Proud To Call Region 12 Home by Anne Stratton

In the spring of the year, as the Region 12 Championships approach, Roxann Hart is bullish on her southeastern home, its show, and its Spotlight Futurity. It’s not just because she has been a member of 12 since its inception (her husband, Karl, developed the regional concept and served as the region’s director six times). It’s also not because she has high hopes for Rohara’s contenders this year, although that is true too. None of that has ever stopped Hart from expressing her concerns for the future of horses in general and the Arabian breed in particular. It’s just that she has some very solid thoughts about the strength of Region 12. “In 2015, only about 3,200 purebred Arabians were registered,” Hart says. “That’s for the whole United States. And yet, 169 mares were nominated for the Region 12 Spotlight Futurity.”

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COVER STORY

That is 169 horses bred specifically for the show ring, she notes: considering that the 3,200 figure is for Arabians in all walks of life and the 169 represent one goal in one area of the country—that is significant. “The main thing is that the Spotlight program makes people think about breeding, because they have to nominate their mares,” says Hart. “The Region 12 show itself is consistently one of the largest in the country and its biggest classes are the Spotlight classes, which include both halter and performance. The Spotlight breeders have all put money into the program and they intend on showing. We have many, many good breeders, small and large, who have produced national champions.” That enthusiasm is key when you study the Arabian horse’s history in the U.S. In 1985, 30,000 horses were registered, she says, and the west was home to most; since then, even as numbers dropped, the east has narrowed the gap, with the southeast playing a big role. “The main significance of Region 12 is that it is a growth factor for the Arabian horse. We provide a venue for the grassroots breeder and participant. There are very few other areas that have that kind of potential for growth, which is what we need.” That is not all that is important, Hart continues. The caliber of the horses counts as well. “The Region 12 show for me is a springboard to determine the quality of what we have at that time. I use it as a barometer; I want to see my horses in the atmosphere of Region 12 with other good horses. It determines whether mine can go on to higher levels. If you can make it in Region 12, you can probably make it anywhere—many of our halter champions have gone on to be national winners.” Does Hart know what she’s talking about? Over the years, her credibility in the industry has been hard to fault. She has twice been named APAHA Breeder of the Year, twice Arabian Horse Times Readers’ Choice Breeder of the Year, and in 2010, she won USEF’s Ellen Scripps Davis Memorial Breeders’ Award, a coveted trophy that includes

all breeds. Through the years, her commitment to the Region 12 show has remained constant. She has served as its Spotlight vice president, and Rohara’s horses have always been serious competitors, spanning regional championships in all major divisions, from the halter division to the performance ring. Rohara’s head trainer John Rannenberg also is highly credentialed. In February, he was named APAHA’s Halter Handler of the Year (his ninth APAHA award, a list which includes Hall of Fame and Horseman of the Year). He has won national championships in halter and just about every performance division except working western, and his riders have as well. Like Hart, he believes in Region 12’s mission; he currently serves as Vice President of the Spotlight Futurity. “I want to give something back to an industry that has been very good to me,” Rannenberg says of his Futurity role. That means his time, energy, credibility and contacts. “We’re creating a venue for people to be able to purchase breedings to some of the leading Arabian stallions in the world. In an auction, that means sometimes at better prices than they otherwise could afford [which means almost everyone can participate]. And they know they can win serious money at the Spotlight—there is over $181,000 annually available for prize money.” The Futurity offers another promotion for growth as well. “It’s all about the amateur owner showing their horse and feeling like they have a chance,” Rannenberg says. “We want the people who are breeding to have an opportunity to go in the ring, show their horse and have a good time. And they do—it’s written all over their faces.” When it all comes together, that is why Roxann Hart is “all in” for Region 12. Last year at the U.S. Nationals, her faith in the Arabian breeders of the southeast was confirmed when Region 12 won the inaugural Regional Breeding Challenge Cup in halter—and Rohara was named its Halter High Point Breeder. ■

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CP Manifesto (H Mobility H x Afire Charmm) 2016 Scottsdale Champion Country English Pleasure Jr. Horse Ridden by Sharon Blendinger for Kirby Arabians

H Magic Mobility H (H Mobility H x Ellusion of Magic) 2015 Spotlight Futurity Champion & Region 12 Reserve Champion Ridden by Peri Wilson for Dina & Michael Good (ferrara photo)

Hennessey Arabian Horse Partners LLC • Waterford, MI • 352.857.3384 • www.HennesseyArabians.com Multi-Program Nominated Sire • Standing at Trowbridge’s Ltd • 860-354-8926 • www.Trowbridgesltd.com


A Decade in the Spotlight ... The Region 12 Spotlight Futurity by CHLOE HOLMES If you are not already going, showing, or bidding on a breeding in Perry, Georgia, the first week of May, you should be. Region 12 is the largest and most populace of all the Arabian regions, and this show reflects that. Not only does it host some of the best competition in the country, starting off the show season with gusto, it also is the setting for the Region 12 Spotlight Stallion Futurity and Auction. This event, held during the Region 12 Championships, has spent ten years “creating an atmosphere of fun for the handlers, excitement for the owners and recognition of the breeders. It is one of the most innovative programs in the country,” as Frank Hennessy describes it. continued ...

“I have participated in the Region 12 Spotlight program since its inception. The program allows us to procure breedings to significant stallions, and if the resulting foal meets all expectations and more, the possibility of sharing the Spotlight prize money is thrilling. The program is extremely important to the Region 12 Championship show, too, in that it brings a multitude of entries now, in both halter and performance.” – Denni Mack

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The importance of the Region 12 Spotlight Stallion Futurity is multifaceted ... It is a program for Breeders. Implicitly, by increasing marketability of enrolled stallions and their offspring and, directly, because stallion owners receive an Auction Certificate if their stallion’s breeding sells for at least $600; “double the fun” for breeders and owners of nominated stallions. As Frank Chisholm states, “This is a big benefit for the breeder in that he can compete with his foal in Spotlight classes or use the foal’s eligibility to improve its marketability.” The Spotlight program also recognizes its breeders through the Stallion and Breeder Distinction Awards. The Spotlight is “A true program that brings growth to the Arabian horse through participation of the breeders,” says Roxann Hart. It is a program for Owners. Whether purchasing a foal that is sired by an enrolled stallion, or bidding on a breeding directly from the auction, the payouts are impressive. This year will be the Spotlight’s largest projected payout yet of

“We have been impressed by the participation of both stallion owners and exhibitors over the past few years at the Region 12 Spotlight. The Spotlight group does a wonderful job of promoting breeders of some of the Arabian community’s most influential stallions in the world.” ~ Robert North

$181,339.00! It is a program for Halter Enthusiasts. Of the $181,339.00 in projected total payout, approximately $114,232.00 is available for halter. Additionally, Region 12 holds some of the largest and most competitive halter classes of all the regionals. From David Boggs,

“I feel that support for this program, and other similar programs, is essential for encouraging future interest in breeding Arabian horses, and strongly encourage everyone to get involved with the Spotlight Program.” ~ Ted Carson

“Midwest Training Centre has always been and will continue to be a large supporter of Region 12 and now their Spotlight program. The Spotlight adds great value to breeders, the marketplace within our Arabian community and to the horses that we all love.” It is a program for Performance Enthusiasts. Payouts given in the Spotlight performance classes surpass even

those at the national level. Just ask Rob Bick, “The Junior Horse classes in the hunter, western, and English divisions are now starting to be positively affected by Spotlight horses. We are seeing trainers drawn to the Region 12 Show from other areas of the country because of the Spotlight program. The effect of the Spotlight in our training business has been incredible. It is not just a halter program.” He also shared that nearly a third of RBC’s training horses are there specifically to prepare for Spotlight competitions. Additionally, the educational seminar that is sponsored Ar abian Horse Times | 10 | Region

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“The Spotlight Program is the best thing that could possibly have ever happened to encourage breeders and owners.” ~ Rob Bick

by the Spotlight this year is “Nutrition for the Performance Horse.” It is safe to say, that none rival the performance involvement in this program. It is a program for the Exhibitor. The Spotlight Auction this year will be themed, “Cinco de Spotlight,” as Region 12 starts on Cinco de Mayo, the favorite celebration of all taco and tequila lovers! The auction will start at 5:00 p.m. on May 5th, and directly afterwards, the Spotlight will be sponsoring the Exhibitor Party (or should we say, Exhibitor Fiesta!). The band that played last year, The Session Road, was such a great addition to the Spotlight Auction Night Festivities & Exhibitor Party, that they will join the fun again this year! In closing, as the Spotlight program rounds out its first decade, there is no doubt that it is a program for the ages.

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2016 SPOTLIGHT AUCTION YEARLINGS $27,360.00 Colts $27,360.00 Fillies 2016 SPOTLIGHT NON-AUCTION YEARLINGS $18,467 Colts $18,467 Fillies 2016 SPOTLIGHT FUTURITY 2-YEAR OLDS $7,533 Colts $7,533 Geldings $7,533 Fillies 2016 SPOTLIGHT FUTURITY 3 & 4-YEAR OLDS PERFORMANCE CLASSES $15,070 Western Pleasure $15,070 Hunter Pleasure $15,070 English Pleasure

“The efforts of the Spotlight members reveals their commitment to the success of Region 12 as they work closely with them to insure we all stay focused on the beauty and uniqueness of the Arabian horse.” ~ Frank Hennessey

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2016 SPOTLIGHT 5-YEAR OLDS MATURITY PERFORMANCE CLASSES $7,300 Western Pleasure $7,300 Hunter Pleasure $7,300 English Pleasure

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ferrara photo


ferrara photo

Dear Fellow Arabian Horse Enthusiasts, The 10th annual Region XII Spotlight Stallion Auction is fast approaching on May 5th in Perry, Georgia. The entire Spotlight Board of Directors have dedicated their time and efforts to create a memorable event that continues to ensure the possibilities for you to purchase stallion services to some of the world’s leading Arabian sires. Future offspring sired by these nominated stallions will have the opportunity to compete for prestigious titles and annual available payouts of over $181,000.00! In honor of the historic spanish holiday, Cinco de Mayo, we’ve dedicated the theme of the evening to celebrate its history for your enjoyment. The evening’s dinner has been graciously sponsored by Patricia Dempsey of Beloveds Farm, and you’ll also be entertained with live music from the band The Session Road. On May 6th after the morning session, the annual Right Holders meeting will be held in the Patron Lounge in Reeves Arena. We welcome all Right Holders to attend and discuss the future and longevity of the program; your thoughts and ideas are important to the success of the program. May 7th after the morning session, Dr. Marty Adams from Southern States will be giving a talk on nutrition of the performance horse. We welcome all to attend. Lunch provided in the Patron Lounge in Reeves Arena. We welcome you, and your family and friends to join us in celebration of the Arabian horse. Enjoy the fun and festive CINCO De SPOTLIGHT and share in the excitement of breeding and showing these beautiful animals. Sincerely, Charles Moseley Chairman, Spotlight Futurity

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For phone bidding contact Melissa Bradshaw at 843-601-0569

BE

Y TO D REA

BID!

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ATTEND THE SPOTLIGHT FUTURITY ACTIVITIES AT THE 2016 REGION 12 CHAMPIONSHIP SHOW THURSDAY, MAY 5, 2016 ~ 6PM Live Stallion Auction & Cinco de Spotlight in Reeves Arena. FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2016 ~ MORNING SESSION (CLASS 109) Calcutta for Spotlight Futurity Western Pleasure 3-4 Year Olds If you missed the excitement of last year’s Calcutta, be present this year! Please bid on your favorite rider and horse at the beginning of the Live Auction. FRIDAY, MAY 6, 2016 ~ FOLLOWING MORNING SESSION Spotlight Annual Rightholder Meeting in the old patrons lounge in Reeves Arena. SATURDAY, MAY 7, 2016 ~ LUNCH BREAK Dr. Marty Adams from Southern States will be discussing Nutrition for the Performance Horse. Lunch Sponsored by Southern States, Talaria Farms, and the Spotlight Futurity after the morning session in the old patrons lounge in Reeves Arena.

ferrara photo

MAY 7, 2016 ~ SATURDAY NIGHT CLASSES Presentation of Spotlight Sire & Breeder of Distinction Awards

For additional information on any of these events, log on to

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OFFICERS: President ~ Charles Moseley charlesamoseley@gmail.com Vice President ~ John Rannenberg JPRannenberg@aol.com 352-266-6446 Director ~ Allison Mehta-Westley allisonm@admbuys.com 404-409-8904 Director ~ Melissa Bradshaw ncsumaj@aol.com 843-601-0569 Director ~ Ted Carson Ted@TedCarson.com 910-876-7332 Secretary ~ Kenna Burbeck kennakayburbeck@aol.com 678-523-1955 Treasurer ~ Mary Scribner mary@rsscpa.com 352-694-4184

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A Jakarta A Jericho AJ Portofino AJ Thee Luca Always A Jullyen V Apalo Arezzo NL Aria Impresario Baha AA Baskghazi Bellagio RCA Beloved MarcAngelo BF Beloved One NA Bey Ambition Botswana Cadance PA CJ Flash Coltrane SS Conquest BR CSP Grand Caymon DA Prodigy Elite AF Ever After NA Exxalt Fire and Goldd FS Mateo GF Omega Gianni Versailles Grand Comandd H Mobilty H HA Tosckan Sun Jaipur El Perseus (frozen) Kahil Al Shaqab Kanz Albidayer Khaja J Khash PGA Kavalle MI Klint Black KM Bugatti Magnum Psyche Majik Of Marwan

Major Mac V Marajj Marhaabah Marwan Al Magnifficoo Miracle Of Marwan Mission WR ML Mostly Padron Montana Firenze Monticello V OFW Applause Onyx A PA Kid Khan PA Milao Kid PA Phoenix Kid Pavorotto KA Possesion PGA Pstrategy Razcal Bey Redeemer DB RGT Mozart Rohara Crown Prince Rohara Majician SF Sir Real Skoroneek IA Sir Charmed FF Soltire TO Stival Sundance Kid V SW Ovation Tempezst TF Royal Shahbaz Truest Vitorio TO VJ Royal Heir WC Ali Gazal WGA Beamer (frozen) What A Sshame Wortex Kalliste Zakai Zaki Ibn Farid CR Zefyr


Proudly bred & owned by Frank & Sara Chisholm | Sundance Kid V x Kharrea PGA | Multi-Program Nominated Sire For breeding information contact Melissa Bradshaw at 843.346.5874 | palmettoarabians@aol.com | www.PalmettoArabians.com Ar abian Horse Times | 17 | Region

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Marwan Al Shaqab x Majalina by Besson Carol

REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT NOMINATED STALLION BREEDERS SWEEPSTAKES NOMINATED SCID/CA CLEAR Owned Owned by The byMiracle The Miracle MakerMaker GroupGroup Standing Standing with: with: Joe Alberti Joe Alberti 6455 SW 645573SW St. 73 : Ocala, St. : Ocala, Florida Florida 3447634476 610-972-9628 610-972-9628 : chestnut@ptd.net : chestnut@ptd.net www.chestnuthillarabians.com www.chestnuthillarabians.com East Coast East Coast Champion Champion Stallion Stallion AHAFAHAF Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Show Show Champion Champion Stallion Stallion Scottsdale Scottsdale Top Ten TopInternational Ten International and Classic and Classic Stallion Stallion

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Majik of Marwan x WH Esdee

REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT NOMINATED STALLION BREEDERS SWEEPSTAKES NOMINATED SCID/CA/LFS CLEAR Owned Owned by Barbara by Barbara Banoff Banoff Standing Standing with: with: Joe Alberti Joe Alberti 6455 SW 645573SW St. 73 : Ocala, St. : Ocala, Florida Florida 3447634476 610-972-9628 610-972-9628 : chestnut@ptd.net : chestnut@ptd.net www.chestnuthillarabians.com www.chestnuthillarabians.com Region 12 Champion Stallion U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Colt AHAF Thanksgiving Show Champion Stallion Scottsdale Top Ten International and Classic Stallion

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Marwan Al Shaqab x Lily Marlaina by Thee Infidel

REGION 12 SPOTLIGHT NOMINATED STALLION BREEDERS SWEEPSTAKES NOMINATED SCID/CA/LFS CLEAR Owned Owned by Barbara by Barbara Banoff Banoff Standing Standing with: with: Joe Alberti Joe Alberti 6455 SW 645573SW St. 73 : Ocala, St. : Ocala, Florida Florida 3447634476 610-972-9628 610-972-9628 : chestnut@ptd.net : chestnut@ptd.net www.chestnuthillarabians.com www.chestnuthillarabians.com Region 15 Champion Stallion U.S. National Top Ten Stallion Scottsdale Top Ten International and Classic Stallion

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Thee Desperado x HED Caramba by Padrons Psyche


Photo by Riyan

AJ Thee Luca x MD Psylk

ECUADORIAN NATIONAL CHAMPION JR. FILLY

Proudly owned by Manuel & Maria Durini & Family of Quito, Ecuador • Ph #011 593 98-060-6060 • mfdurini@hotmail.com Standing at:

Mike Wilson’s cell 352-267-5550 • Peri Wilson’s cell 407-402-2116 wilsontrainingc@aol.com • www.wilsontrainingcenter.com


FROM

THE

*JULLYEN EL JAMAAL

MAKING A MOVE ... OREGON MOUNTAINS TO THE FLORIDA PALMS

X

GAI SCHARA,

BY

BEY SHAH

D EOR F ARMS ~ AUDE ESPOURTEILLE AND R OYAL A RABIANS ~ TARA BORESEK ARE PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE

A-J AKARTA

WILL BE STANDING AT

R OHARA A RABIANS

FOR THE

2016

BREEDING SEASON

Spotlight Stallion • Scottsdale Signature Stallion • ABHA Futurity Stallion • AHA Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Silver Sire Breeders Stallion • Frozen Semen Available Worldwide

Rohara Arabians

WWW .A-J AKARTA . COM

KARL & ROXANN HART, OWNERS • JOHN RANNENBERG, TRAINER P.O. BOX 110, ORANGE LAKE, FLORIDA 32681 352.591.4661 • 352.266.6445, CELL • ROHARA@WINDSTREAM.NET

WWW ..ROHARA. COM


HALTER ‌

A VIEW FROM THE LEADERS

T

he world of halter is a dynamic force in the show world. While it showcases the beauty of the Arabian at its finest, it is also the subject of heated discussions, both good and bad. Halter represents the finest of the breed and those dedicated to it, whether it be a breeder, owner or trainer. You will find no one more loyal to the breed than these folks, who want nothing but the best for these creatures in their care and will do just about anything for people to understand that. In the following pages, we asked breeders, owners and trainers who are present in this world today, their take on current questions being asked in the halter industry, and showcase those who were leaders in 2015. Ar abian Horse Times | 89 | Volume 46, No. 10


There has been a lot of talk and pressure put on AHA to make things better for the halter community, especially at U.S. Nationals. Do you feel they are making progress on effective change? Joe Alberti: I do feel there is some progress happening but not enough. I feel that the halter horse is still a bit of the red-headed step child. I miss the days of green shavings, spotlights, tuxedos, etc. We need to bring back the drama; the announcer who had a cool saying about the winners, the music matching the winners names … these are things that somehow become forgotten and I think made a huge difference. David Boggs: I understand that there are lines of communication open between members of the halter community and AHA. This is a positive, but I have not seen a status report if any changes have actually been implemented. Ted Carson: I believe that U.S. Nationals made a good first step in improvements last year. We are now talking again to try and make other changes that will take the 2016 U.S. Nationals another step closer to much needed improvements. It is going to take more time than just two years though, to be where this show should be. I feel, once the physical and logistic changes have been made to bring the U.S. Nationals to the best it can be, we still have to nurture the customer of this show to feel good about it as well. Aude Espourteille: I do not believe AHA is making it better for the breeders, trainers and owners of Arabian horses in the halter arena, especially at the U.S. Nationals. First of all, why separate us from the performance classes? If they continue to do so, it would be wise to have the U.S. Nationals for Breeding/Halter classes at a different venue. Tulsa is not the place to honor our U.S. National Championships, but this has been discussed for years ... and we are still sitting in Tulsa. Rodolfo Guzzo: Yes. It is clear that they are trying. Some things are much better. We,

the trainers, are the biggest problem at this point. We need to talk more between us, work together and hold each other accountable for our own actions. When we see something that is wrong or out of line, we should find appropriate ways to communicate it to each other, directly.  Roxann Hart: The physicality of Tulsa caused the splitting of halter and performance arenas. This separation is a problem for cohesiveness. Frank Hennessey: Yes, progress has most certainly been made. There is a lot more work to be done, but it appears to be headed in the right direction. Bob and Dixie North: Yes, AHA made progress at U.S. Nationals last year in that the basic functions of the halters classes worked significantly better than in previous years (i.e. scoring system, schedule of classes, etc.), however, many of the basic problems with the halter classes remain. Overall, the show is still boring and does not have any excitement. The classes are held in a small arena with no one in the stands except the owners of the horses being shown (around 100 people for even the most important classes).   Sandro Pinha: I feel like any effort being made is a positive thing. I did see a change for the better at U.S. Nationals this year, and I applaud everyone involved in this. I do feel, however, that this is more than an AHA problem; it is one for the whole industry, and we as a community should continue to try to improve. Mike Wilson: This is a question that takes a lot of detail and “side-story” to answer properly and fairly for everyone involved, and there is no way to do that here. I’m also not comfortable simply saying yes or no, because that would be far from the correct answer also. I will say, that AHA has been willing to make changes and many have been made. Having said that, I strongly believe that undoing changes that we realize don’t work needs to be made a swift and immediate process. Doing this will ease the pain of the learning curve in the long run, I think! 

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JOE ALBERTI

Chestnuthill Arabians • Ocala, FL

The Arabian horse is known for being versatile, and yet there seems to be an arena for halter and an arena for performance, and both are not exposed to each other at our two major shows, Scottsdale and the U.S. Nationals. What are your thoughts on this? Joe Alberti: I was the one, who in 2014, made it so the halter horses and the performance horses were NOT separate. Then last year we were, and our national champion stallion and mare were pinned in the afternoon, while other performance classes were going on in the Ford Truck Arena. I think this is a travesty; these are the hallmark classes and important for everyone to see and should absolutely be a part of FINALS NIGHT! As a trainer who shows in both halter and performance at Nationals, I feel separating the rings is a big mistake for many reasons and too lengthy to go into here.

DAVID BOGGS

Midwest • Rogers, MN & Scottsdale, AZ

David Boggs: It was very sad, and most Arabian breeders and trainers would like to see the classes be conjoined, especially the finals. Ted Carson: I think that we have divided almost every aspect of the Arabian horse in the show arena. We don’t have many reiners in the English class, or many western horses in the show hack class, or many English horses in western classes. So why do we worry about whether halter horses are in riding classes or vice versa? Aude Espourteille: Scottsdale is such a huge show in numbers of halter horses that I feel it has to keep separation from the performance classes, just for logistical reasons. U.S. Nationals is a different show; it just should not be in Tulsa, period. We used to all be in the same arena with a lot less halter classes. Currently, U.S. Nationals feels like a glorified Class A and or regional show. Do we really have to have so many U.S. National halter classes? 

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Rodolfo Guzzo: This current situation is horrible for my business. I have many clients that have a hard time with the schedules if they participate in both halter and performance. The clients are being forced to make a choice between their performance class and their halter class. Whichever choice they make negatively affects the growth of the other division. I know this is a very difficult thing to fix and I don’t know what the answer is, but as it stands, it is very hard for my customers. Roxann Hart: Yes, at the U.S. Nationals, this is a problem as I stated above. Scottsdale has different venues which have large participation in both halter spectators and performance spectators. Frank Hennessey: There have been many discussions at the ‘Hennessey water cooler’ over this very thing. We are passionate about showing in both halter and performance. It has become increasingly difficult to fully

participate in both disciplines, primarily at the Nationals. When a choice has to be made between watching our halter horse in the Pavilion or our performance horse in the Main Arena at Nationals, we are clearly more drawn to the atmosphere and pace in the main arena. No amount of decorations or prime table placement can sway the overall implication that the halter horse division is “less important” to the powers that be at the Nationals. Scottsdale is the largest Arabian horse show in the world. It is both expected and understood that the show offers something for everyone in every division. We have no issue with that and plan our classes accordingly. There has never been a feeling of “separation” from performance at Scottsdale for us. The U.S. Nationals should not be the largest event, and should not offer so many classes that it’s impossible to have all the divisions showcased in the main arena. It should be the most elite event, with only the best competing. 

Whitney Miles

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HALTER

TED CARSON

Ted Carson at Butler Farms • White Oak, NC

Bob and Dixie North: Since the introduction of “live feeds” at the U.S. Nationals, the only “in person” attendees are the owners, trainers, and handlers/riders. People no longer come to the show to see the horses and competitions in person, they stay home and watch the live feed (much cheaper in both time and dollars). Therefore, the show has to introduce some events or reasons to make “coming to the show” important, more interesting, and exciting. When the performance and halter classes are separated and there is nothing else going on except the hundreds of classes, the audiences for both performance and halter will consist of just those who own or are showing horses. Sandro Pinha: My thoughts are that these shows are extremely large which makes it difficult to combine the two. I would love to see, perhaps, Scottsdale bring the Junior

AUDE ESPOURTEILLE

Deor Farms Arabians • Butte Falls, OR

Champion Finals back to Friday evening like it used to be, and the same for U.S. Nationals, to have the championships at the main arena Friday and Saturday night like it used to be.  Mike Wilson: I think “versatility” is a different kind of versatility any more. In years past, you had individual horses be versatile by showing in many different divisions. Today, we are versatile as a breed in general, having different groups of horses (all being purebred Arabians) showing in different divisions. This has created a logistical problem at our big shows in the sense that there is not enough time to do everything in one ring together. I guess it’s a good problem to have in a way, but we need to still come together from time to time at these big events so we can really showcase our amazing horses and what they can do!

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Whitney Miles

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HALTER

RUDOLFO GUZZO

Guzzo Worldwide • Scottsdale, AZ

How do you feel about the latest press release from the AHA Judges & Stewards Commissioner on Controlled Paddock, in regards to assisting with entrance of in-hand horses into the ring with only short whips and small appendages; prohibiting bags of all types and striking of objects to create noise? Joe Alberti: I think it’s terrible that a few bad apples spoil the bunch. If you don’t like to see horses with their tails flipped on their back snorting, then by all means, please go show Quarter Horses. I thought the way we were able to bag the horses up at the 2015 Nationals was so perfect, and now it’s been taken away. I do feel, however, that the opening of that small area to let the horse and bagger not be on top of one another was a great thing, and hope at least that part will continue for 2016. David Boggs: I guess we’ll have to give it a positive try. Just hoping we don’t take the “show” out of our horse show. Ted Carson: I think in any case, we have to have a defined rule. It’s normal for humans to push every limit and this gives us a point to go back to when things get pushed too far.

ROXANN HART

Rohara Arabians • Orange Lake, FL

Aude Espourteille: I feel this is bit strict; there are stewards to control excessive use of these objects. Just keep it under control. Rodolfo Guzzo: To me, everything in excess is bad. There needs to be a limit and a boundary set, but it needs to be reasonable and must not hinder the excitement of the horse presentations. The issue is not about one bag or two bags. It’s simple, when someone is going too far, pushing the limit and not stopping when they are told, penalize them. Stopping all forms of shagging is an extreme that will hinder the presentation of all the horses and this is not correct. Roxann Hart: I feel this procedure of the controlled paddock is important, but I do not object to the use of plastic bags. Frank Hennessey: I applaud the effort to control possible incidences of abuse in all divisions at the horse shows. I’m not convinced, however, that the length of whips and prohibiting bags is the answer to controlling abuse. Stronger and more immediate disciplinary actions against excessive shanking, shagging or schooling is the only true solution to the problem.

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Bob and Dixie North: These decisions seem to move in the direction of making an Arabian halter class very similar to a Quarter Horse halter class. The thing that makes people interested in the Arabian is it movement, tail carriage, and attitude. Without being able to demonstrate those qualities, then we have just made the Arabian like any other breed. Obliviously, handlers that go to extremes need to be controlled, but the entrance and movement are key factors in it “being an Arabians show.”  Sandro Pinha: My feelings are that we need to keep the noise under control. I think U.S. Nationals and Scottsdale were perfect with one small bag. Mike Wilson: I think the perception of what’s going on in the halter arena right now is a real big issue for AHA. I think the memo about bagging and whips is probably in response to that, trying to get things under control from their perspective. I feel like the real issue related to this topic is the areas in which we put our horses to be warmed up in before entering the ring in the first place. When we practice with the horses at home, we would never have them in such small tight areas with so many restrictions. I think if this gets addressed, it will correct what goes on and how it’s perceived by the public. 

What one thing would you most like to see changed in the halter division? Joe Alberti: I want to see the drama back in the ring; when you walked into Freedom Hall on finals night, whether you knew what was going on or not, you knew this was a BIG DEAL. I don’t feel that is the current situation. As for halter in general, if we are married to the scorecard, then I wish judges would score the horses properly. A club foot, a lame horse, etc., needs to be scored accordingly, even at the Nationals. If a horse has great legs and feet, then by all means, score it HIGH. 10 horses in a class can’t all have the same leg and feet scores. David Boggs: Finals moved to Ford Arena. Ted Carson: I think everything progresses and changes very quickly now. I believe it is important to keep our ears and eyes open to make smart decisions so we keep the people who love our halter and breeding horses happy.  Aude Espourteille: Change the scoring system to comparison for one thing. And why does everything have to be so expensive in regards to the stalls and halter fees, etc.? Rodolfo Guzzo: Get rid of the point system. This needs to be fun and exciting for participants and owners. The point system takes too long and cannot compare to the excitement in the comparative judging system. To be clear, I am not against a point system, but I am very against how it is currently done. It is completely illogical to have the horses compete in a point system at the beginning of the show, then have them judged in a comparative system to determine their ultimate title. 

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HALTER

BOB & DIXIE NORTH North Arabians • Ramona, CA

FRANK HENNESSEY

Hennessey Arabian, LLC • Ocala, FL

Roxann Hart: Go back to comparative judging. The scorecard is a very manipulative system. I do not feel the rules and regulations need to be, or should be changed every year for the halter arena. This is done to “level the playing field,” yet this aspect has not been achieved. The answer is to hire judges that will enforce existing rules on intimidation and proper stance. These judges must not be afraid to place a better horse not handled by perhaps the top handlers. The problem lies not with the exhibitor, but with the judges that encourage, confirm and condone the practices that are not appropriate. Frank Hennessey: The U.S. Nationals has to go back to being a competition for the best of the best. The halter division at Nationals should be confined to one National Champion Stallion, one National Champion Mare, one National Champion Gelding, and the same for Amateur and Half-Arabian. The number of classes offered in various age groups dilutes the titles, complicates the schedule and makes for a less ‘exciting’ presentation of the halter division at what is supposed to be the most important show in the country. This change would

undoubtedly increase the number of entries at Class A and Regional shows. The increased participation in these shows will encourage participation of newcomers and breeders of limited means.   Bob and Dixie North: I think the class procedures need to be more in line with the class procedures used at the Las Vegas World Cup. In that system, the horses’ trot is judged based on entrance and not after the standup. Also, the horses are not kept on the rail for an extended time, but rather they can relax in the warm-up arena.   Sandro Pinha: I think we have seen enough changes in the halter division in the last few years. Mike Wilson: Question 3’s topic with the change my answer referred to. It would make for happy, excited horses and a great show for the spectators!

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HALTER

In North America, halter trainers only attend a few shows a year, yet the performance trainers and halter trainers in Europe and the Middle East attend a good amount of shows. How do we get more halter horses at North American shows? Joe Alberti: We need to create value, value for our geldings, and more cash prizes. Overseas, they have huge prize money and cars as prizes; we need to create a value beyond only the “national champion.” We also need to change the fact that national champion stallions and mares can come back. We need to go back to how we were … once a national champion in a division, you cannot come back. I feel that was the start of the big downward spiral in our halter numbers. We need exhibiters to feel they have a fair shake. I long for the days where we went to a big show and did not know who the winners were before we even watched the class. David Boggs: Create an exciting atmosphere and make the halter arena fun again. Ted Carson: We have a lot of owners and breeders who want to show their horses in arenas where there is good reason and relevance. I think if we produce shows that do this, we could also have more and better shows through the year, here in the U.S. I believe we have not kept up to the needs and interests of our breeders and, therefore, the old style of shows is completely out of date. They will not come back unless we revamp. Aude Espourteille: It is so expensive to go to all of the Class A shows to qualify for Regionals, then go on to U.S. and/or Canadian Nationals ... why on earth do we pay $250/$300 for stalls, and the cost of entry fee of $200+, etc.? In Europe and the Middle East, I do believe the owners are a bit wealthier to show year round. And they have sponsorships that help pay for the shows and great prizes. 

Rodolfo Guzzo: I don’t think that it is possible for us to try and compare our way with Europe and the Middle East. Our countries have different needs and a completely different client base. The number one complaint of our customers in the United States is the cost involved. There is no way to justify the expense of show fees, transportation and travel expenses to U.S. clients. In the Middle East and Europe, the clients want their horses shown at every possible horse show. In the U.S., our clients prefer large titles from fewer shows, rather than small titles from multiple expensive shows. Roxann Hart: The general overall numbers in Europe compared to our larger regional shows and nationals in the United States are still consistently larger than those comparative classes abroad. With only approximately 3,200 purebred Arabians born in 2015, we must do everything possible, such as the Signature and Spotlight programs, to put money back into the hands of the breeders to create growth. These are programs being offered not by AHA, but rather the breeders themselves. These are the types of programs that create the opportunity to increase growth in the Arabian industry. Frank Hennessey: Owners and breeders in North America have very different motives and objectives for showing their halter horses. Each country/region has to cater to the wants and needs of their breeders and owners. Attempting to put the division in a worldwide box is dangerously restrictive to the Arabian horse breed as a whole.

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Bob and Dixie North: In Europe they rate their halter shows A, B or C. Horses that win a few times in a Class C show can no longer show in the Class C show and must move up to the Class B show, etc. This gives horses that are not Class A (i.e. world class contenders) a place to show against other horses of their same quality. Also, people that cannot afford the Class A horses can still breed or purchase horses that can participate and win in the Class B or C shows. In Europe, these Class B and C show are well attended and exciting for everyone. Currently in the U.S., we have about four Class A-type shows, i.e. Scottsdale, Las Vegas World Cup, Breeder Finals, and U.S. Nationals. The Regional halter classes allow the best horses to compete because of qualification requirements for U.S. Nationals. Therefore, there are really very few, if any, shows for the slightly lower quality horses and owners to show. Most of the AHA Class A shows have no, or just token halter classes. Sandro Pinha: If you look in Europe, most of those shows are in different countries and they are all weekend shows with very low costs for the exhibitors and trainers. Most are privately organized and are only halter shows. 

Do you believe the International community has the same economic impact on the halter horse market that it had a few years ago? Joe Alberti: I think it has slowed down some from a buying standpoint, but I feel it still has a huge impact on our current industry. David Boggs: Absolutely. Ted Carson: I think that the halter horse has to be everything—pretty, body, neck, correct and trots like hell. If you have the complete horse, it has a spot everywhere in the world. So have things changed? Yes, they have, but the right horses will always make an impact. So for breeders who need to sell, be smart! Aude Espourteille: The International community has more impact economically for the breeding and halter horse than years ago. They are the majority of our sales of Arabian halter horses in this country.

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HALTER

SANDRO PINHA

Arabians international • Cave Creek, AZ

Rodolfo Guzzo: The International community has, and always will, have an economic impact on the halter market; sometimes for the good and sometimes for the bad. I am feeling more positive about the impact this year than I was last, but it is and always will be a concern of who is and who is not, buying from other countries. Roxann Hart: No, not as much, but certainly of significance. Frank Hennessey: Three years ago, the International community was undoubtedly purchasing more horses for higher dollars than it is today. To answer the question specifically, the economic impact is not the same, but it is very important that breeders worldwide recognize that no matter what, the International community has an economic impact on the halter horse market, good and bad and always will. Bob and Dixie North: No, it is much less now. Five to 10 years ago, many, if not most of

MIKE WILSON

Wilson Training & Bloodstock • Sorrento, FL

the major halter horses were sold to the Middle East or South America. Now, both of these markets are significantly reduced. The Middle East owners now have their own breeding farms based on the high quality horses purchased from the U.S. and other locations. They are producing high quality halter horses and no longer need to focus on our breeding programs. In fact, in many cases they are now major competitors for our U.S. breeders. South America has also reduced their purchases of U.S.-bred horses due to economic issues in their countries.   Sandro Pinha: Absolutely. The halter industry is definitely a worldwide industry. Mike Wilson: Sure it does, the impact is huge! Majority of sales are international for sure. The numbers may not be as big, but the frequency of sales is at least the same, if not better, I think!

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Halter Leaders 2015 North American National Halter Leaders

Includes U.S., Canadian and Youth National Halter Championship Champion and Reserve wins. No Showmanship.

Overall Leading Horses by number of wins

1. 2. 3. 4.

Valldez WS Center Stage DC Benedict Bey Monet TRJ Lady Fadora PA SDR Hot Commodity Truest VSH Dominic 5. All Revvved Up Baske N Fame Beloved One NA Hott Magnum FV Maghnus Z Penchant Vitoria Rose

3 championships, 2 reserves 3 championships, 1 reserve 1 championship, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve

Owner Steve & Darla Miles Herbert & Karen Meites Renae Mendel Ross Danielson Pegasus Arabians Shelley Gomavitz Truest Partners LLC Texie Lowery Pete & Carol Rasmussen Lynne Dimmer Patricia M. Dempsey Trustee Daniel McConaughey Maddy & Jay Winer Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna

Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

1. 2. 3. 4.

Valldez DC Benedict Beloved One NA Lady Fadora PA Bey Monet TRJ Truest 5. Tresor PA

3 championships, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 2 reserves

Owner Steve & Darla Miles Renae Mendel Patricia M. Dempsey Trustee Pegasus Arabians Ross Danielson Truest Partners LLC Pegasus Arabians

Half-Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

1. WS Center Stage 2. SDR Hot Commodity VSH Dominic 3. All Revvved Up Baske N Fame Hott Magnum FV Maghnus Z Penchant Vitoria Rose 4. Alltair Nuttin But Hart

3 championships, 1 reserve 2 championships 2 championships 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 1 championships, 1 reserve 2 reserves 2 reserves

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Owner Herbert & Karen Meites Shelley Gomavitz Texie Lowery Pete & Carol Rasmussen Lynne Dimmer Daniel McConaughey Maddy & Jay Winer Jay and Barbara Krusenstjerna Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna Robyn Sibbald Tshampagne Arabian LLC


HALTER

Arabian Overall Leading Sires

by number of winners

by number of wins

1. Vitorio TO 2. Aria Impresario DA Valentino 3. Baske Afire Da Vinci FM Ever After NA Magnum Psyche

6 4 4 3 3 3 3

1. Vitorio TO 2. Baske Afire Valerio 3. AA Apollo Bey Aria Impresario DA Valentino Ever After NA Magnum Psyche

7 5 5 4 4 4 4 4

Arabian Leading Sires

by number of Arabian winners

by number of Arabian wins

2. Aria Impresario Ever After NA 3. Bey Ambition DA Valentino Da Vinci FM Marwan Al Magnifficoo OFW Magic Wan Trussardi Vitorio TO ZT Marwteyn

3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

by number of Half-Arabian winners

1. Valerio 2. Ever After NA 3. Aria Impresario Besson Carol Bey Ambition Trussardi

5 4 3 3 3 3

by number of Half-Arabian wins

1. Vitorio TO 2. Baske Afire 3. Armani FC DA Valentino Krewe Magnum Psyche Majik of Marwan

4 3 2 2 2 2 2

1. Baske Afire Vitorio TO 2. AA Apollo Bey 3. Magnum Psyche

5 5 4 3

2015 U.S. and Canadian National Leading Halter Trainers

by points (Includes top ten and all classes; Ch. = 10, Res. = 8, TT = 5, 1st = 7, 2nd = 6, TT = 4)

1. Andrew Sellman 2. Jeff Schall 3. Michael Byatt 4. David Boggs 5. Sandro Pinha 6. Ted Carson 7. Rodolfo Guzzo 8. John Rannenberg 9. Alcides Rodrigues 10. Kim Morgan

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235 127 117 110 89 87 83 61 61 60


Halter Leaders Overall Leading Owners

Overall Leading Breeders

by number of winners

by number of winners

1. Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna 2. Michael Byatt Joanne Gunabalan Renae Mendel Steve and Darla Miles John and Cynthia Moore Pegasus Arabians Murray and Shirley Popplewell Psynergy Ent. Developments LLC Stella Bella Arabians Lori Whitt

3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Arabian Leading Owners

5 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Arabian Leading Breeders

by number of winners

1. Michael Byatt Psynergy Ent. Developments LLC Joanne Gunabalan Renae Mendel Steve and Darla Miles Pegasus Arabians Murray and Shirley Popplewell

2 2 2 2 2 2 2

by number of winners

1. Sally Bedeker 2. Battle Hill Farm Gerald Canda Oak Ridge Arabians Pegasus Arabians

3 2 2 2 2

Half-Arabian Leading Breeders

Half-Arabian Leading Owners

by number of winners

by number of winners

1. Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna

1. Sally Bedeker 2. Pegasus Arabians 3. Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna Todd and Glena Weegens 4. Battle Hill Farm Michael Byatt Gerald Canda Live Oak Arabians Oak Ridge Arabians J. Perry and Suzanne Perkins Prestige Farms LLC Rohara Arabians Melissa Subjeck

3

1. Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna Todd and Glena Weegens 2. Sally Bedeker Live Oak Arabians Pegasus Arabians J. Perry and Suzanne Perkins Prestige Farms LLC Rohara Arabians Melissa Subjeck

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3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2


Dedicated Dedicated

TO THE ARABIAN HORSE

EXPLORE ONLINE AT WWW.AHTIMES.COM Magazine Features • Videos • Show Results • AHT Abroad Recent Promotions • Industry News • Contests and More!

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PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

Laura Koch and Bert Sanders The Attraction Of Opposites by Mary Kirkman

To say that Arabian horse owners Laura Koch and Bert Sanders aren’t a team would be like saying the Budweiser Clydesdales are mismatched—but to think that their personalities are alike, or even very similar, would be delusional. They’re opposites, says trainer Jody Strand, who recently showed the couple’s black stallion, Zefyr, to a record three U.S. National Championships in Western Pleasure open. He is echoed by just about everyone else who knows them, and even Koch and Sanders themselves. “When they got married, we all just sat back and thought, ‘Holy smokes, this is going to be fun!’” Strand laughs. “Laura’s pretty reserved, and she tries to [guide] him—but you can’t control Bert anymore than you can control a tornado. They have a ton of fun together, and it’s been entertaining as hell for all of us to watch.” While everyone notes the contrast of what’s on the surface with Koch and Sanders, the truth is that their approach to life is the same—rock solid, down the line. They are rarely boring, and although you wouldn’t call them frenetic, they are seldom idle. With more than 25 years in the breed, Laura has a list of national championships to her credit, and although Bert is new to the game, he’s already notched titles at Scottsdale and national shows. Does it work for opposites to attract? It does here. Ar abian Horse Times | 106 | Volume 46, No. 10


PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

The difference in Laura Koch and Bert Sanders’ styles has been apparent since their childhoods. Laura, who grew up in Michigan, was a horse crazy kid, but family finances didn’t run to lessons and show mounts. Instead, she and her equally horse loving sister, Leslie, were given a series of inexpensive ponies, whom they schooled, improved and sold, until finally they were able to afford Morgans and competition at local events. Early on, the horses led Laura to her career. “I remember in sixth grade, on career day, we were looking through microfiche—they didn’t have computers then—and I saw a listing for [dentists],” she recalls. “And I thought, ‘If I did this, I could afford to have more horses.’ When you’re a kid, what are you going to do? You have to figure it out. So I did.” She earned her undergraduate degree from Michigan State University, graduated from the dental program at the Medical College of Georgia in 1989, and set up her practice in Warner-Robins, an hour and a half south of Atlanta. Bert, meanwhile, was born at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida, the son of a bomber pilot. The youngest child in his family, he was the only boy, and he was, he freely admits, spoiled. When he was 5, the family moved to the Atlanta area and except for years at college, he has lived there ever since. His plan was to follow in his father’s footsteps: graduate from The Citadel and become a military pilot, after which, he figured he’d sign on with a commercial airline. But an aptitude test for pilots revealed a disorder which would cause him to perceive things upside down (“That would be Bert!” Laura cracks), so he went into finance and business. Now he is the vice chairman of Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, a global commercial real estate firm. What makes him so good at what he does? “How about fear of failure?” he counters, and given his ebullient style, at first he sounds like he’s joking. He’s not. “It’s very true. If you’re scared to fail, then you’ll do everything possible not to. You will fail the majority of the time, but when you win, it makes you try that much harder.”

“She was sitting at the bar, wearing a red dress, when I walked in,” he says. “She had her legs crossed, and she cocked her head and looked over at me, and I thought, ‘Wow!’ So, we went and sat down, and she made me feel so comfortable immediately that it was weird.”

It also doesn’t hurt that even in a free-ranging discussion of his life, he is unfailingly responsive and articulate—the kind of personality that quickly connects with others, an asset in any sales venture.

The feeling was mutual, although Laura approached it with a certain reticence. “I really liked him and liked his energy and all the good stuff,” she says. “But I had been single for a long time. We all put our best face forward; you have to take enough time to see what it’s like when it’s not ‘best face forward.’”

“Bert’s a talker,” Laura agrees. “In general, I’m the quiet one and Bert’s hanging off the ceilings. At a party, everybody’s, like, ‘Where’s Bert?’ They know if he’s not there, and it’s not as much fun.”

But as the months passed, their commitment only got stronger. “The biggest thing was that he was game to do anything,” she says, “and I’m all about going and doing.”

The two met six years ago when friends set them up on a blind date. Each had been married before; Laura had been single for 20 years after ending a brief union with a fellow dental student, and Bert had three children.

They have several shared interests, but the one that is front and center is their involvement in Arabian horses—which, given Bert’s complete lack of any equine experience, might have been unexpected in the beginning. The way they made it work was typical: after consideration, Laura set up the situation most likely to acquaint Bert with the fun and satisfaction of showing horses, and Bert joined in with a boatload of enthusiasm.

Bert remembers the moment he first saw her, at Atlanta’s 4th & Swift restaurant, as if he has a high-res photograph in his mind.

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By the time Bert came along, Laura had been in Arabians for nearly two decades. Her first thought when she’d gone into dental practice was ‘now I can have a horse again,’ but Georgia’s equine scene did not offer many Morgans. A Michigan friend in Arabians, Molly Purdy, suggested that she call Michael Byatt, who was then located near Newnan. Pretty soon, Laura was in the ring with halter horses and taking aim on English pleasure. When Byatt left the area, she turned to Vicki Humphrey and launched a career in amateur English pleasure that netted her a pair of national championships. She still has a horse with Humphrey, but a few years ago, her involvement took an unexpected turn into western when her

sister began riding with Jody Strand. It wasn’t long before Laura gave it a whirl; in her first year of showing in the division—and on her first western horse, the Half-Arabian Victoriosa—she won the Canadian National Championship in Western Pleasure AAOTR. At the same show, she owned both the winner and reserve (Victoriosa, with Josh Quintus catch-riding, and Azavachae, with Strand up) in the Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Championship. “I was hooked on western horses,” she says is an understatement. However, it was not the sudden onslaught of titles that was the draw.

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PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

“Western goes so slow that everything is done to the minute detail,” Laura explains. “Being a dentist, I work in a minute space. If everything isn’t perfect, it affects everything else, and I like the challenge of getting it all exactly right (nothing is ever perfect, but as close as you can get it).” None of that, she adds, is to discount English in any way; it is simply a new type of challenge. Learning western has been almost like starting over. She bubbles with laughter at the memory of a show when she thought she finally had it all together, and Strand called out, “You look awesome!” She glowed until he added, in a voice that could have carried to the equator and was certainly a clue for the judges, “You’d look even more awesome if you were on the right lead!” And then along came Bert, ready for anything, and Laura wanted to be sure that he’d enjoy horse shows. The easiest way, she reasoned, was for him to participate, so she targeted halter and acquired the previous year’s U.S. National Champion Futurity Gelding, Psuperstition, for him. (“What’s halter?” he asked when she brought it up. “Don’t worry,” she replied. “You just run around with a horse and everything’s good.”) Their goal was Scottsdale, and Bert began taking lessons from Mike Neal. As he recalls it, they were flying to Arizona that February when he started to worry about his technique. She reassured him, “Honey, this horse is so pretty and so good, if you just don’t fall down, you’ll win.” Okay, he remembers thinking, I get it. But he wasn’t quite counting on how new it all was. “I didn’t know what ‘bagging’ horses was,” he says, “and all these guys are throwing around these bags in front of the horse. And my horse jumps in my lap and steps on my foot, and I thought, ‘Holy s***, that hurt!’ So I run out there and I show this horse and I come in reserve. I was all smiling and everybody said, ‘Scottsdale is like winning the Super Bowl.’ I didn’t understand it then, but I do now. I was hooked.” Next up was the western division, and the following year, with instruction from Jody Strand, Bert earned a top ten at Scottsdale. “He’s really just naturally good with horses,” Laura says, “and it’s fun watching him.” Not that he isn’t still green, though. “He’ll say things like, ‘I’m getting hot’ and go to take his coat off and throw it—while he’s sitting on a horse!” She shakes her head. “It’s the things [new] people never think of …” As the stories roll on, it becomes clear that when Sanders rushes in with the fools and the angels, the Ar abian Horse Times | 109 | Volume 46, No. 10


angels are all on his side. One early trail ride at Vicki Humphrey’s had him radiating confidence until his horse took off with him. “My horse knew he was going back to the barn,” Bert explains. “I’m sliding to the left and I’m sliding to the right, but I’m feeling pretty good about this because I know I can’t come off. My feet are stuck in the stirrups.” When they got back, he had to tell Laura that he couldn’t get out of the saddle because his boots were too big for the stirrups. “She freaked out,” he remembers. “She was saying, ‘Bert, do you understand you could have been killed?” You can hear it in his voice: he took what she said seriously, but it doesn’t slow him down. “You can’t be afraid to go forward,” he says. “You have to step out there and do it. If a horse throws you off and kicks you in the head, you have to get up there and do it again.” Pretty soon Bert was an integral player in Laura’s Arabian commitment. It was he, she notes, who did the deal to purchase Zefyr. And recently, he was her sage voice on the rail. Laura, whose halter career had lapsed over the years, took up handling again when they acquired RD Dynamo. Under Andy Sellman’s direction, she and Dynamo won the 2014 U.S. National Championship in Stallions AAOTH. “He was such a dork in the class,” she laughs. “I’m standing there telling Andy ‘I’m never going to do this again,’ and Bert walked over and said, ‘Um … I think you won.’”

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PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

Koch and Sanders admit that between horses and their professional careers, there isn’t time for much else—but they do manage to cram in an ongoing list of “projects.” Usually that means they find an older residence and refresh (often redesign) its interior, while retaining its original charm. Some of their efforts have succeeded so well that they have appeared in national publications (where, in at least one, a large image of Laura’s horse Peron was prominent in the photographs). A common element in their style is a clean, usually white, background that speaks of serenity and simple elegance. All that white? What about the companion animals that are so common among horse folk—do not have any? “We have a ‘family,’” Laura confirms, a beloved rescue mutt named Bentley. As she speaks, a Roomba® purrs quietly in the background; the floors, at least, require no effort. Sometimes they will go for new construction; their latest effort is in Alys Beach, Fla., and it offers a clue to understanding their business style. They hadn’t really planned on getting involved

there, but when they saw an opportunity, Laura says, it just made sense. And it was too good an investment: for all their just-do-it spirit, they rarely go full speed ahead until they have evaluated the possible downside of the destination. Even in the horses, they consider fallbacks if a particular individual doesn’t work out. If it sounds like a charmed life, perhaps it is. But it has not come pain-free. While Bert may have unleashed a lot of inner laughter in Laura, she has returned the favor. The one person who knows him best, he says, she helped him through some very difficult times. “One thing that I love the most about Laura is her ability to understand life as life is, and not judge,” Bert says. “She’s really good about that; she has been since I met her. She’s a really grounded woman. “If I had met her in my 20s, I probably would not have been interested,” he reflects. “A strong woman? No, I wanted somebody to listen to me. The older that you get, you realize you need your best friend, somebody you enjoy hanging out with, so she’s been the best for me.”

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His gratitude goes beyond their personal bond. In introducing him to Arabians, he observes, she has brought his family joy. They had been somewhat fragmented for the past two decades, since his father’s death, and over the last couple of years they too have come to appreciate Arabians—more significantly, to value spending time together around the horses. Last fall, when Zefyr won his third U.S. National Championship, all three of his children were there to watch, along with his two sisters, assorted nieces, and his mother. And they’ve been to Scottsdale.

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PRESENTING THE PERSONALITIES

Perhaps most importantly for the breed is that in falling in love with Arabians, Bert embraced the whole experience. In Laura’s words, “he got it” about life with horses. “It’s not just about showing,” he says. “It’s about being around the horses. The ones that I have are very gentle and loving animals, whether they are stallions, mares, colts or fillies. When they look you in your eyes and they know that you care about them, and you know that they care about you, it’s just a great connection. You can never get that anywhere but around the horse, and that’s very special to me.” Ask Laura to identify a high point in her life—a best time—and she is silent in thought. And then finally she replies, “I think I’m living the high point right now.” n

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Leaders Of The Times: A Jericho

A Jakarta x Destiny VF, by TF Psymreekhe by Jeff Wallace

“Our entire family had a strong sense the very first time we laid eyes on this stunning newborn colt that he would always be ours. Now aptly named A Jericho, he indeed still is ours.” Breeder and owner, Norma Jean Abel, proudly continues, “When A Jericho was just a yearling, and in the competent hands of master-handler David Boggs, at the 2013 United States National Championship show, these two left the arena engulfed in thunderous applause with A Jericho the newly named U.S. Reserve National Champion Yearling Colt. In this moment, we knew our young son with four beautiful legs, offered us an abundance of great promise—something to believe in—and therefore, buying and leasing mares, as well as purchasing embryos to establish an extended equine family with A Jericho seemed almost effortless

while making such weighty choices that require deep and lasting commitment.” Norma Jean Abel speaks poignantly for her entire family, husband Allan, and their four now-grown children, who fall in love more and more each year with this beautiful and bay Reserve National Champion Arabian stallion. “It was just this past January, during the Farm Tours presentations when we watched our now gallant 4-year-old parade in front of an approving and admiring crowd, that all came full circle in our minds. His birth, his triumphant yearling win and now seeing that his beauty and depth of quality had deepened, we realized, third time’s a charm. On that day at Midwest, alongside our Team Jericho members, we had been following a

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vision based on our passion for one special horse and the gentle nudge each time to carry on.” With the Abel’s whole-hearted belief in Team Midwest, where A Jericho continues his training and management of his stud career, they acknowledge the growing wonders their family is experiencing as they reach out like all successful new breeders to those more established and with deeper roots; their newfound mentors within the Midwest family. The Abel’s are very proud of A Jericho’s young sons and daughters produced so far, such as the stunning 2015 filly Wieza Ariha out of the glorious Wieza Mocy, simply outdoing himself as a young sire. His 2016 foals promise to be just as thrilling, propelling this young sire into the future and the breeding program that surrounds him, straight to the top. ■

Exciting Foals by A Jericho

SULTANAH AL ARJA (x PA Perdita), his first foal, was named Bronze Champion Yearling Filly at both the Kuwait National and International Arabian Horse Championships and Silver Champion at the Kuwait Breeders Show. ***********

Star Of Jericho (A Jericho x Lady Jeanette) 2016 Unanimous Scottsdale Signature Yearling Filly

OUT OF MARES OWNED BY:

Janey Morse, Oak Ridge Arabians—

• STAR OF JERICHO (x Lady Jeanette), 2016 Champion Scottsdale Signature Auction Filly. • WIEZA ARIHA (x Wieza Mocy), 2015 filly. • ANGEL OF JERICHO (x Lady Aria ORA), 2015 filly. • JERICHOS CAJUN LADY (x Louisiana), 2015 filly. • RWISH UPON ASTAR (x Justawish TBA), 2015 colt. • 2016 FILLY (x Athena VF)

Wieza Ariha (A Jericho x *Wieza Mocy)

Angel Of Jericho (A Jericho x Lady Aria ORA)

2016 Filly (A Jericho x Anna Marie BHF)

Rwish Upon Astar (A Jericho x Justawish TBA)

Marino Arabians—

• 2016 FILLY (x Anna Marie BHF) In partnership with Oak Ridge Arabians • 2016 FILLY (x Kharisma M), to arrive in June.

Tom and Kelly Blakemore—

• SHAH OF JERICHO (x Adivah, by Bey Shah), 2016 colt.

Falconcrest Arabians, Ken & Debbie Waite • ESPRIT OF JERICHO (x Gai Daphne), 2015 filly. 2016 Top Ten Scottsdale Signature Filly.

Thank you to everyone who allowed us to lease their wonderful mares.

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From AmAteur to ProFessionAl ... Carrie Cada away the first year I went to U.S. Nationals. She won the saddle seat equitation and she was AMAZING! I knew that was who I wanted to look and ride like!   Is there one horse as a child that sticks out in your mind that made you the rider that you are today? Definitely my first horse. He was not easy, I think I fell off every day. In fact, I wore a two-way radio so that I could tell my dad that once again I had fallen off, and he should come help me get back on.   When in life did you know that you wanted a profession in the Arabian horse industry? Well, I guess when the “amateur police” gave me no other option. At what age did you know you had the horse bug? When I was five, we moved into the country and my parents got me a Shetland/Welsh pony. I would ride her as much as I could. My mom showed me how to lead her up to the straw bales, so that I could jump on and go.   When did you get involved with the Arabian horse? When I was about 10 years old; I would go with my dad’s law partner and his wife to the barn where they kept their horses, El-De Arabians.   What disciplines did you show as a youth rider? My first horse, a 3/4 Arabian and 1/4 Tennessee Walking Horse, was purchased from El-De Arabians. I showed him at the local trailer shows in everything from halter to English, hunter and western! He was the first horse I ever showed at the U.S. Nationals and we earned a top ten in the open Half-Arabian hunter class.   When you were little, who did you dream or idolize about in the Arabian horse industry and hope that you could be just like? Kammie Millagan blew me

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What was your family’s response, when you told them you wanted to make your living training Arabian horses? They were all very supportive, of course. What is the biggest difference between competing in the junior/amateur ranks vs. the professional world? Mistakes are not forgiven, and there is not a lot of room for error. What does a typical day consist of for you in the barn? Working my horses, giving lessons and doing the book work.   What advice would you give someone who is thinking of following in the same path that you have? It’s a lot more work than it is money, but if you love the horses, it is all worth it. What is the biggest teaching method that you were taught as a kid, that you pass onto your students today? Mrs. Nix always taught with positivity; maybe would throw in what needed to be fixed and follow it with what I was doing correctly.

What is the biggest difference that you see in the youth world now vs. when you were competing in it? When I was a kid, youth still showed at the U.S. Nationals, and I had all of 12 classes to choose from. I think in ‘89, Michelle Pease won four national championships—that was unheard of. Now, that is common! I think Youth Nationals has been an incredible addition to our national shows.   Away from the barn, what is a perfect day for you? Sitting on a boat on the lake, hanging out with John, Aidan and our friends.   Is there one show ring moment for you that stands out above the rest? In 1990 I won the Saddle Seat Grand Championship at NSH Final, and Harry Cooper announced my win. He said, “Where you going to college, Carrie Cada?” It still gives me chills. My partner, King of Hearts, was an amazing horse and we had not won the preliminary class, so I was so surprised when he said that! n

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Passionat Passionate

ABOUT THE ARABIAN HORSE

DISCOVER ONLINE AT WWW.AHTIMES.COM Magazine Features • Videos • Show Results • AHT Abroad Recent Promotions • Industry News • Contests and More!

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s e i r o m e M

Strawberry Banks Farm

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Baske Afire February 22, 1999 - December 15, 2015 Ar abian Horse Times | 120 | Volume 46, No. 10


Baske Afire “Greatness Gone Too Soon”

Sadly, Baske Afire (Afire Bey V x Mac Baske) was lost to the Arabian horse community a month after the death of his dam and less than three weeks after the death of his sire. He was the Afire Bey V son most likely to have a chance to equal his father’s unprecedented record as a sire of champions in the breed. With 967 registered offspring, Baske Afire had both the numbers and the combined record and percentages to be competitive with his illustrious sire. “Mac Baske had been bred to Afire Bey V previously and produced Empress of Bask,” recalls Shawn Stachowski. “Jim [Stachowski] wanted to breed her to *El Ghazi, but I convinced him to rebreed her to Afire Bey V for her 1999 foal. Of course, once he was born, there was no doubt that Baske Afire was an absolute phenomenon. He had a neck like a swan, trot, charisma and swagger ... he had it all! He had it and everybody knew it. He was full of himself too.” An outstanding sire is critically important in a pedigree, but it takes a great mare to produce a great breeding stallion. Baske Afire’s dam Mac Baske (Baskevich x AH Meditation, by Meridian) was a great show horse with multiple national wins in English pleasure and pleasure driving. “Mac Baske was a classic Arabian mare,” says Jim Stachowski. “She had that unmistakable *Bask++ look. She was a great mare.”

Jim continues, “People always asked why we didn’t show Baske Afire. Well, there was a lot of interest in breeding to him and after people saw his first foals, his book kept growing every year and he simply couldn’t handle both a show career and breeding a hundred mares a year at the same time, so he went directly to being a sire. “Baske Afire quickly became a recognized breeding sire,” says Jim. “When bred to good Saddlebred mares, he was able to retain the Saddlebred style and elegance, while adding outstanding Arabian type and character. Consequently, he became a sought after sire of Half­ Arabian and purebred horses for both performance and halter. Even as yearlings, his offspring were obviously talented English­type Arabians. There were a great many good reasons to breed to him and people did.” Following his first year at stud in 2001, there were 29 offspring registered with Baske Afire listed as sire. The year he turned five, Baske Afire registered over a hundred foals and from there it took no time at all for Baske Afire offspring to start setting fire to the national Arabian show ring. His initial foal crop was filled with winners. By February 19, 2008, Baske Afire had well over 600 registered foals on the ground. Thirty of his sons and daughters descended on the Scottsdale show that year and were successfully shown in halter and performance. Baske Afire get won seven championships

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at that show, including champion and reserve in the English Pleasure Junior Horse championship. But nothing Scottsdale had to offer could have topped the appearance of the celebrated Baske Afire himself at the Cedar Ridge Arabians auction. There, his subsequent sale for 2.8 million to Barbara Chur and Strawberry Banks Farm virtually stopped the show. “I will never forget purchasing Baske Afire that night,” says Barbara. “It was Neil’s birthday and I was so elated, but kept thinking Neil would kill me for spending so much!” Baske Afire arrived at Strawberry Banks Farm after the breeding season of 2008 where he joined the farm’s famous national champion English sires, A Temptation and Hey Hallelujah++//. Both of Baske Afire’s new

stablemates were impressive matches for him. Hey Hallelujah++// (Huckleberry Bey++ x Hallelujah Bask) had 19 major national awards at the time of his retirement and A Temptation (Tempter x A Love Song) was the breed’s quintessential show horse, a U.S. National Champion in the English Pleasure Junior Horse and Open, as well as the Pleasure Driving Open and Amateur and Reserve Champion Park Horse. “Originally, I just wanted to purchase breedings to Baske Afire,” says Barbara, “but I was so impressed with his young foals and what I was seeing in the show ring and. I knew we needed him to be a part of Strawberry Banks in a big way! I felt that he would bring strength and maturity to our program and be

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a fantastic cross for our Hey Hallelujah++// and A Temptation daughters.” Trainer, Brian Murch, agrees. “Baske Afire as an individual had beauty, strength and charisma. When you look into certain horse’s eyes, there is just something special there. Baske Afire had that ‘look.’ No matter where Baske Afire was on the farm—in his paddock, walking down the shed row, even standing in his stall—he would catch your eye. If you had to pick one that you would want to be riding in a difficult situation, it would be Baske Afire. He always seemed to have something extra.” Brian’s wife, Melanie, was equally impressed with the great horse. “I feel so fortunate to have been involved with Baske Afire,” Melanie says. “One of the greatest Arabian stallions of modern times.”

At the time of his untimely death, at age 15, Baske Afire sired 571 Purebred and 396 Half­Arabian offspring for a total of 967 get. Even more remarkable, he has sired hundreds of champions, among them 45 purebred national and reserve national champions and 63 Half­Arabian national champion and reserve national champion offspring. Between them, these magnificent horses have accumulated 279 national and reserve national championships in English pleasure, country English pleasure, driving, halter, side saddle, hunter pleasure, show hack, native costume and trail. Baske Afire has been in the top of the AHT Leading Sires Listings almost from the beginning. In 2011, 2012, 2014 and 2015, he was the Leading Sire of Combined Halter and Performance for both Purebred

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and Half­Arabians at the U.S. Nationals, and took this same title at the 2013, 2014, and 2015 Canadian National Championships. At the national level, Baske Afire’s leading winning offspring include Baske Is A Genius, She Be Adiva KBS+// and CF Jimmy Neutron. There are many, many great sons and daughters of Baske Afire that have several national and reserve national championships, like HA Toskcan Sun, Carrie Bradshaw, Little Miss Strange and Princess of Baske. When noting Baske Afire’s statistics, it’s good to remember that his very oldest offspring are only 13 this year, and many, if not most, are still showing. “The most exciting thing about Baske Afire’s legacy is his daughters and their potential and ability as broodmares,” says Barbara. “Like many breeders in our industry, we are just beginning to see what they can do

in the breeding barn and it’s very exciting. I think that, like *Bask+, Baske Afire’s long term strength as a sire is going to be found in his daughters. “Baske Afire was the perfect complement to our breeding program. He brought great bone, amazing length of stride, strength, competitiveness and excitement to our lives, our farm and our future foals. Baske Afire, along with A Temptation and Hey Hallelujah++//, completed our ‘Troika.’ We are anxiously watching three yearling colts, each by our three stallions. EMAGIN by Baske Afire out of Emayzing Grace (Hey Hallelujah++// x Ericca), EXACTLY by Hey Hallelujah++// out of Eternally Yours (A Temptation x Ericca) and A TRUE TEMPTATION by A Temptation out of A Blessing (Afire Bey V x Mac Baske, a full sister to Bask Afire).” Barbara reminisces, “A year after we purchased Baske Afire, we took him to Scottsdale to compete in the

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pleasure driving. Many people told me I was crazy to do that, but I did it because he really had not been shown, and what better venue to show him to people than at Scottsdale? Here’s a secret that delights me, I got to drive him before Brian did! What a thrill! It was like riding behind a freight train. He had fantastic strength and power, yet he was responsive and actually easy to drive. I will never forget it.” The trip to Scottsdale for Baske Afire in 2009 was definitely an impressive move. So many people had not seen this extraordinary horse whose offspring were dominating the national Arabian scene. When it came time for the pleasure driving championship, the fairgrounds at WestWorld came alive. He stopped the show once again! “It’s one of the memories of Baske Afire that will live with me forever,” remembers Melanie Murch. “When he started toward the in gate, suddenly people came running, I mean several hundred people from all over the fairgrounds. They came running and crowding into the stands at the Equidome, standing above the seats on the walkway, straining for a look at Baske Afire. It was like a rock star had walked in. Thank you so much, Baske Afire, for the spark and thrill you brought to all of us, just when it was needed the most. May your blood run through many future ‘rock stars’ that continue to inspire all of us. Fly high, friend.” ■

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s n o i l l a t S he t

r u h C a r a b r by Ba

HEY HALLELUJAH++ // (1993-2012)

Strawberry Banks Farm’s splendid grey stallion Hey Hallel ujah ++// sadly departed to greener pasture s. He leaves behind elegant champion sons and daughters and memories of a different era in America’s Arabian show ring. Brian Murch trained He y! From the very beginning and was with the multinational winner through all of his stellar show ring moments and his later years as a breeding stallion. Hey Hallelujah++// is the sire of 26 National winners, 10 National Champions and Reserve National Champions. His offspring have accumulated 153 Nation al show awards at the time of his unexpe cted passing in 2012. “Our lives have been con nected since the beginning of my career,” says Murch. “Hey Hallelujah’s dam, Hallelujah Bask, helped me launch my career as a nationally known perfor mance trainer. I drove Hey a great deal as a young horse. He was a Novem ber foal and we used the cart to build him up and help make him strong. He too k to harness immediately.” A national sensation for nearly a decade, Hey Hallelujah’s++// car eer blossomed in the late 1990’s with mu ltiple Regional championships in English pleasure open and Junior English horse, and continued with great suc cess in pleasure driving open and amateur, halter and combination. At the time of his retirement, he boasted 19 major national and international titles and six National Championships.

“Hey Hallelujah++// wa s a lot of horse,” Brian remembers. “He wa s a handful and a ‘puppy dog.’ He trie d so hard to please and win, that I nee ded to give him a thoughtful warm up to get him to relax and focus. Hey’s first foals arrived when he was five years old. They qui ckly began to show off their talents on the show circuit. Among Heys mo st noted offspring are RO Atlantis, Hey Bey Be, Emannuel, Enchanting Lov e, Emericca, Dheja Vu, QH Especialle ys Echo, QH Tallulah and the great He y Its My Toi, owned by Lissa Tehan and winning in Arabian costume by Bar bara’s granddaughter, Sawyer Teh an. His daughter, Emayzing Gra ce (Ericca) was injured as a three yea r old but is showing herself to be one of Strawberry Banks’ best broodmares!

“Coming to Strawberry Banks was a great opportunity for He y!,” notes Brian. “It gave him the chance to breed some wonderful mares and live a very good life. What will I miss the most about Hey?” Brian muses, “Ev ery morning he was the first face I saw when I opened the barn door and walked in. He was a very ‘human’ horse with great expression and a great hea rt. There were times when I would look at him and almost expect him to say ‘good morning’ back to me. He was a hug e part of my life and I miss him very, very much.”

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ATION A TEM(199P5-T 2016) … “He brought joy to my life g… rin w sho Excitement to the to his get… Amazing athletic ability heart of His beautiful soul was the Strawberry Banks Farm.” —BARBARA CHUR UPON THE OF A TEMPTATION UNEXPECTED DEATH resent a Few Arabian stallions rep than the age more extraordinary line lion, A stal m Strawberry Banks Far bian by Ara ish Pol e Temptation. A pur ki, *Bask) Ton x sk] [Ba c Tempter (Cogna ask x *Elkana, out of A Love Song (*B n mare), A a U.S. National Champio ter brother to Temptation is a three-quar n Mare and pio am the U.S. National Ch Pleasure lish Eng n National Champio f-brother hal a and , cca Eri Junior Horse, ion Allience to multi-national champ To Love Again, and the champion mare ks. His all bred by Strawberry Ban some cases in show career equaled and rs. His esto anc surpassed, that of his n show bia Ara l ntia was the quintesse t, stunning coa ite wh w sno career and his t strut Arabian quality and elegan a favorite of down the rail made him alike. spectators and horsemen ners with He has sired national win Huckleberry V, Bey re Afi daughters of ebey Berry. Bey, Barbary and Huckl ss back on He is also an excellent cro h several wit his own *Bask breeding, ke Afire Bas s. winners from those line for ss cro al ide has proven to be an

pedigree. A Temptation’s “perfect” ing spr off g Some of his winnin pting Tem , less ath are WWW Bre pting Tem on, tati mp tate Fate, HS Jus and the great Tango, Rejoice Rejoice

y proud of Exxpectations. We are ver wonderful our of one , Eternally Yours tion out of the broodmares, by A Tempta great mare Ericca. stories about A Perhaps one of the great ost didn’t exist. alm Temptation is that he “He was one t, tha s Barbara remember o transfer and bry em at s of our first trie an embryo. the vet was not able to find ked and asked As we were talking, I loo like and he said what an embryo looked I continued l. rather like a soccer bal did find what I il unt to move the slide ball and cer soc a looked to me like tion! HE pta Tem A s wa it sure enough THE SINK! ALMOST WENT DOWN he didn’t! How lucky for all of us

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s e i r o m e M

r u h C a r a by Barb

I love all of my horses, but as you know, there are always a few very special ones that steal your heart ...

I am very proud of our breeding program. Actually, the end result is even more exciting than we had imagined. The time frame has been much longer than expected ... as new breeders in the 80’s, we had no idea how long our journey would be, but what a great journey it has been! I am most proud that our horses are not only great athletes (whether they be English, Country, Driving, Hunt, Sport Horse, Endurance, Western or Halter), but also beautiful with great minds! It is astonishing, the versatility we’ve been able to accomplish with our breeding program. One very special trait that we produce is gorgeous HIGH TAIL CARRIAGE! All of us as breeders of the great Arabian horse must not let that be lost! A Temptation is especially strong passing on this gene from his beautiful mother, A Love Song (*Bask x *Elkana).

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A Love Song

Ericca


Baske Afire

Princess of Baske & Lissa

Exxpectations We love showing our horses. We don’t show great numbers, but what we do show is great! My daughter, Lissa, and granddaughter, Sawyer, both ride and will be showing. And I, of course, will continue driving—I just love it!

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s e i r o m e M

s! r e b m e m e r y l i m a F s k n a B y r r e b w a r the St . . . t e g r o f r I’ll neve ning my Monday mor … when I made took half ch hi w l, payrol rounds to pick up pet every had to stop and an hour, since I Baske a little fun with horse and have nd at s wanted my ha Afire. He alway d already eck out who I ha nose level to ch up and ld move my hand visited, so I wou it. When st kept following down and he ju d if I ation, I wondere I visited A Tempt use he something, beca was interrupting s seemed ate, Gus, alway and his stablem gether r morning get to to be having thei at to see l bars. It was ne between the stal l horse so some specia that there are al issy friendships. —M

… knowing Tempter, A Temptation, Hey Hallelujah and Baske Afire. For many years, I’ve had the opportunity to care for each one of them. They each have left special hoof prints and memories in my heart; I will truly never forget them. I will miss these guys forever! —Nicole

all our memory of te ri o v fa ry e driving … my ve rian won th B n he w is . Nationals. stallions ation at U.S ed right pt m Te A h class wit d she hopp as so excite lapped My mom w Brian. They h it w y g g u h their in the b together wit a n re a e th ok on her around forget the lo r in e ev n ll I’ d seen her roses— happiest I ha e th s t’ ha face. T time. a very long . these horses ine love for u n ld e u g o a w I s She ha ssionate .I now, how pa g Arabians Little did I k a ese am zin th r ut o fo b e a b e ould becom good they c w ho w e n k never Lissa your soul. —

... Hey Hallelujah has always been a very special horse to Brian and I. We had been involved in all aspects of him even before he was born. The night of our Open House, I’ll never forget ... Dick Adams and I were on the phone negotia ting Hey’s purchase, when Mr. Chur gave me the final offer written on a stic ky note. I ran inside, got back on the pho ne and they accepted the offer! I was never more happy, knowing that Hey was finally owned by Strawberry Ba nks Farm! —Melanie

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… when I was four years old Gowie won at Nationals wi th A Temptation. W e went back to the sta lls to give him a peppermint….. Gowi e was holding me as I gave it to him and he accidentally bit my finger! —Sawyer

… when A Temptation and I would have our “morning talks.” He always appeared to understand my conversations through his beautiful, soulful eyes. I loved his freckle (as I called it) on his nose—you could spot him immediately! Sweet, wonderful and wise … he had my heart. … when Baske Afire arrived at Strawberry Banks and after he was unloaded and put in his stall, a basket of his “toys” came off the trailer. I was amazed—never thinking horses played with toys! How he loved to toss his ball around in the paddock; what fun it was to watch him thoroughly enjoying himself. —Betsy

… these stallions leaving an impa ct on our hearts, and in this industry. They will live on in the offs pring they have sired and will continue to produce qual ity horses in the Arabian br eed. Each Straw berry Banks’ stallion had unique pers onalities. The “boys” wer e fun to be arou nd…they would guarantee you a smile ever y day. We all had our “f avorites” and I have to admit, Baske A fire was my boy. He was always the high light of my day, a real comedian. When he walked out of his stall, his presence was known. He instan tly grew another 5 feet as if to say “Hey everyone, I’m th e man.” —Court ney


… when I was mowing the pastures and Baske Afire would be out playing with his ball, running and flipping it up into the air.

…whenever someone would give Temptation fresh water he would lap it up like a dog!

ber, when we … and I will always remem . Nationals to U.S the to took A Temptation Legends.” He be inducted into the “Hall of the exhibit hall would spend every day in from anyone soaking up all the attention was around one no en Wh who walked by. the horse to pet him, he would watch his stall! He m fro d fee show on the live exhibit hall at the at be was supposed to occasions, I 9 am each day. On some exhibit hall was late bringing him to the would be and the big overhead doors him through lk wa t jus closed. So, I would n the carpet, the glass ‘people’ doors, dow his special stall. past the vendors and into forget he was Sometimes it was easy to tion was a a “big, bad” stallion. Tempta gold, and an kind horse with a heart of ched the lives extraordinary fellow who tou of all who knew him. —Liz

… when we had Tempter, he was the happiest horse you’ve ever seen…never pinned an ear! Anyone who went to get him from the pasture couldn’t help but laugh, when as you approached the gate, he would run to you screaming. You would think he was wild, but then he’d halt and rub on you until you scratched him ... and then he let you go on your way. …when Hey! was outside, he would chase the cars that came down the driv eway with his ears pinned. Any time he could sho w off, he would. …when we would blanket Ba ske Afire, he could get it off without even undoin g the straps… everytime!

…when you would enter the barn, Temptation was the first horse you’d see … always with eyes bright and happy. During bar n check at night, he always welcomed you in with a soft nicker as you opened the door. —Stac y

al was born and the … when our first fo r foal ... Strawberry mare nickered to he y! Banks began that da ske Afire ... on Neil’s …when I bought Ba have “killed” me! birthday ... he would w Hallelujah Bask … the first time I sa med we would own perform ... never drea y Hallelujah! her beautiful son He called and sa id, “I … the night Tim Shea n as a halter horse!” think Ericca could wi The rest is history! Championship driving … my first National 05 and then my A Temptation in 20 ar driving his son next one was last ye years between Exxpectations. 10 it was worth every championships but minute! —Barb

… each of these three stallions we re unique in their own way; wh at a privilege it wa s to be a part of their lives !

Baske Afire was so spirited and alw ays wanted to show his domina nt personality. He loved to give to me the br ush off when I wo uld go and bring him in from his paddock, as though giving me extra time to admire his extrem e athleticism and presence. As I cursed, he grinne d at me, and got more conf ident. What a magn ificent horse he was.

A Temptation was the epitome of eff ort in all aspects of everyt hing he did, in ever y way, shape and form. H e was by far, the easiest stallion to tra in an d be around—so kind. Hey was the mos t high energy indivi dual, always wanting to show he was “Bad Bad Leroy Brown.” He had a heart as big as Te xas. He loved to go to show s and was always furious when the tra iler lef t without him. —Br ian

Strawberry Banks Farm Barbara Chur, owner | Brian Murch, trainer, cell: 716.983.3099 | Nicole Ferrell, breeding manager 716.652.9346 | East Aurora, New York | info@strawberrybanksfarm.com

www.StrawberryBanksFarm.com

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We k new h e w a s s pe cia l fr om t h e be g i n n i n g !

He exceeded our expectations! BASKE AFIRE An influential sire that will truly be missed. Our condolences to Barbara Chur and the Strawberry Banks Farm family. Joe & Michele Betten Stachowski Farm, Inc • Jim & Peter Stachowski

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CAR RY I N G O N T H E BAS KE AF I R E T RAD I T I O N . . .

Baske Afire x RY Fire Ghazi, by El Ghazi U.S. National Top Ten Arabian English Pleasure Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated • Region 12 Spotlight Stallion Scottsdale Signature Stallion • WCAHA All Star Futurity • AEPA Enrolled Sire

L I M I T E D B R E E D I N G S A VA I L A B L E • B O O K Y O U R M A R E T O D AY !

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S I R E O F C H AM P I O N S . . . W I T H

M

O R E TO COM E !

SUPREME SENSATION SMP (Baskghazi x A Love Supreme) 2015 U.S. National Champion AEPA Arabian Horse Times $100,000 Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with Jim Stachowski

BLOCK BUSTER PF (Baskghazi x Afires Quintina, by Afire Bey V) 2015 U.S. National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Jessica Clinton DeSoto

WE

I N V I T E Y O U T O C O M E V I S I T A N D S E E O U R P R O S P E C T S O F A L L A G E S AVA I L A B L E .

Lenoir City, TN www.SmokyMountainParkArabians.com

Rod & Jacqueline Thompson For Information Call 865-816-2406

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Dear Barb,

I t was a honor for us to be involved

in your purchase of Baske Afire. It is not a night we will ever forget, and we were so proud to share this moment with you. Baske Afire was one in a million. Not only was he an amazing sire, but an amazing horse to be around. All of us at Cedar Ridge are thinking of you. Our thoughts and prayers are with you all. Love, Dick, Lollie and Lara Ames

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Baske Afire 2/22/1999-12/14/2015

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G R E AT N E S S B R E E D S O N G R E AT N E S S . . .

Afire Bey V proved to be the greatest performance sire since the immortal *Bask. In his 25 years of success as a sire, his legacy will forever reign through the outstanding accomplishments of his progeny. We remain deeply saddened by the loss of Baske Afire so soon after the loss of his sire. This dynamic father and son duo will remain in our hearts, and will be forever cherished for the incredible mark they have left in the Arabian community. Dave & Gail Liniger Tim & Marty Shea

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Bel Aire V

Bred by the legendary Sheila Varian … Bel Aire V is one of Baske Afire’s most beautiful and best-producing sons.

National Champion Above Aire V (x Amazing Grace V)

National Champion FS Paparattzi (x Patience V) (Baske Afire x Balquelotta V) Breeders Sweepstakes and AEPA Enrolled Sire CA and SCID Clear • $1,000 LGF Owned by: David C. Matlack, DVM

Standing at: Siemon Stables Ohio • 937-308-8184 www.siemonstables.com

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“Such a tremendous loss to the Arabian horse industry. You will be missed, Baske Afire, but your legacy lives on. Thank you to Vicki, Jesse and Gabe, for breeding and training my Baske Afire superstar, MISSKNOWITALL. I cannot wait to see what our future holds together.” —Laurie

(Baske Afire x I'm Miss New York) W H I S P E R I N G PI N E S A R A BI A N S L au rie Ame s-Hu sband Ar abian Horse Times | 142 | Volume 46, No. 10


Toskcan

4-TIME NATIONAL CHAMPION & RESERVE SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION

HA

Sun+

(Baske Afire x Matoska, by Zodiac Matador)

Harris Arabians and Toskcan Sun will carry on

BASKE AFIRE’S LEGACY

through the bloodlines of our breeding program. Toskcan Sun’s first foals are national winning performance horses.

Baske Afire enhanced Harris’ breeding program by adding all the exceptional qualities that made him one of the industry’s leading sires in English Performance and Halter. We are saddened by his loss and send our condolences to Barbara and the Strawberry Banks Farm Team.

The First AEPA winner and sold in Cedar Ridge sale with Baske Afire.

HA SAHARA AFIRE

(Baske Afire x OCT Tassahara) Bred by: Harris Arabians Owned by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

Baske Afire granddaughter! 2015 Unanimous U.S. National Champion

HA CALIFORNIA SAGE

(HA Toskcan Sun x Colorado Sage) Bred by: Harris Arabians Owned by: Kimberly Jarvis

Standing at Stachowski Farm, Inc. | Jim Stachowski: 330.603.2116 Owned by HA Toskcan Sun LLC | Scott and Michelle Harris and Helen Lacey Reed | Michelle: 951.313.6740

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2 0 1 6

G

S C O T T S D A L E

C

RAND

HAMPION

SENIOR STALLION

UNANIMOUS CHAMPION STALLION 8 & OLDER Ar abian Horse Times | 145 | Volume 46, No. 10


Two-Time World Champion

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2016 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION SENIOR STALLION PRESENTED BY DAVID BOGGS

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M ARWAN A L S HAQAB

X

OFW M ISHAAHL

Owned and Bred by: Al Shaqab – Member of Qatar Foundation S TANDING AT M IDWEST T RAINING A ND B REEDING S TATIONS F ROZEN S EMEN A VAILABLE W ORLD -W IDE

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.org.qa

For breeding information, contact: info@midwestarabian.com David Boggs • 612.328.8312 Nate White • 563.663.7383 Judi Anderson • 612.328.1057

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FACES & PLACES T he “C opa C on f r at en id a d ” A r a bi a n Hor s e Show ... was held on January 23, on the outskirts of the beautiful city of Quito in Ecuador. Hosted by Nathalie Weemaels and Patrick Mormal at their beautiful Hacienda El Rocio, the show gathered Ecuador’s top breeders who brought their horses and their families to the event. Along with them a great number of new breeders were also present thus confirming an increasing interest for our amazing breed all over the country.

Clockwise: City of Quito, Hacienda El Rocio, Judges Angela Ochoa and Richard Adams, and Church of Quito.

International judges, Richard Adams, USA, and Ángela Ochoa, Colombia, both expressed their satisfaction with the overall quality of the 46 horses presented.

“The Breeders Cup in Ecuador was a great surprise. The ACCAE’s amazing work can be defined in three words: dedication, excellence and hospitality. The Hacienda El Rocio is truly a place made for horses. Our hosts turned the place into an ecological paradise for horse related activities. I am truly thankful for all the affection and hospitality we received from breeders Galo Hidalgo and Manuel Kakabadse and their families. My most sincere thanks go to all of them.” —Ángela Ochoa

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“The VENUE ... the HORSES and the PEOPLE ... were BEAUTIFUL—the most beautiful venue I have EVER officiated at! A most sincere thank you to ACCAE President Galo Hidalgo and his entire Board of Directors & Staff, for this great honor bestowed on Angela and myself. “ —Richard Adams

Breeders, Judges and Handlers.

Reserve Champion Mare GR MAGA

Junior Champion Filly MD KEYLA

Champion Senior Stallion SC MUJAREJ

Reserve Champion Filly GH SHAINOA

Endurance Champion 24-48 Months MD ARAMUS

The ACCAE (The Ecuadorian Arabian Horse Association) organizes, with a great deal of dedication, two horse shows per year. The next event will be the National Arabian Horse Show in Quito during the month of June. n

Photos by Pablo Jose Albuja

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AmAteur Spotlight ... Whitney Miles

How long have you been involved with Arabian horses? Since I was 8 years old, which is crazy to think that it has been that long! I have always been an animal lover, and the Arabian horse is a very important part of my life. What disciplines have you and are competing in? Competing for me began in the halter ring. Over the years I have learned a lot with halter and I love it! I competed in country English for about five years; my first horse was one of those great horses that you can do everything with, so I was also privileged with the experience of showing him in side saddle and costume! Now I am currently riding a Half-Arabian English horse. This is our first show season together and I am very excited about it!

I’ve shown him many times in the halter ring, and it is always a great experience—he loves his job and he is awesome to be around! Currently, he is on his way to being a beautiful western horse. I am so excited for this new chapter in his life, and seeing what he can accomplish in another discipline. My second favorite horse is his mother, AW Fortune Ngold; she is a great mare with a great dam, and a great heart. She passed all of her great character on to her son. If there was one horse you could have or own, whom would it be and why? There are so many amazing Arabian horses, how do you choose one?! We have a great selection of mares, such as Alia Psyche, and we breed more or less than ten babies a year, so we have no shortage of horses at our farm. I don’t think I would ever complain, however, if we had Hariry Al Shaqab standing at our farm. He is spectacular and we breed a number of our mares to him!

What is your favorite riding style? I definitely have to say that English is my favorite riding style, but that is the only discipline I have ever competed in so far. If you come from a long line of family involved with the Arabian horse, what does it mean to carry this tradition on? My family and I have been involved with the Arabian horses for 10 years now. Each year we breed an amazing group of mares, and for me, I love to handle what my parents have bred and we raised at our farm. It is very special showing something we foaled out and watch them be successful as they grow up! Who is your favorite horse you have ever owned? That is a tough question, because I love all of the horses that we own. They are all very special to me. I am in the barn almost every day with them. If I had to choose one, it would be Valldez, because he is such an amazing horse. I showed him at the 2015 Youth Nationals and won my first two national championships with him. Ar abian Horse Times | 158 | Volume 46, No. 10


that my school offered called Virtual school. Within the next two and a half years, I completed high school a year early. Before I made the change I would only be in the barn before school to feed horses and after school, so this was a huge change. From then and still to today, I am in the barn just about every single day, spending time with our horses, meeting with the vets, and helping with the ins and outs of running a farm. Also, not having to go to high school every day freed up a lot of time for horse shows and going to my performance trainer for lessons more often! So I was not an ordinary high school girl, actually I was referred to as the “weird horse girl,” but that nickname isn’t a bad one to have, in my mind.

How many horse events do you attend a year? So many, that people from home that aren’t horse show people just say, “Another horse show?! Weren’t you just at one last weekend?” Ten would probably be a good estimate of how many horse shows I attend in a year. What is your favorite horse event and why? Scottsdale! Nothing can beat the beautiful weather in February. I live in Kansas, so it is such a great escape from the cold weather. Along with the great weather, the atmosphere at this show is amazing. It is the first show of the year, everyone is excited to be there, and the quality of horses is really high. I have competed in halter there three years in a row now; this year I showed a signature filly and a signature colt. For the first time, I also competed on my Half-Arabian English horse; it was my first time riding at Scottsdale and I had a great time!

If there is one person you could thank in this world, who would it be and why? You can’t ask me to choose one person. That is completely unfair, because I would have to thank both of my parents. My mom and dad are the reason I get to live the life I do, being so active with the horses. I could not ask for better parents, they support everything I do. They are the two people that put up with my attitude the most and still love me and help me follow my dreams. They have also shaped me into the woman that I am today. There are so many things I can thank those two for. My mom and my dad both are my best friends; they pretty much are the coolest people I know. I don’t know what I would do without them and I can’t thank them enough for all that they do for me. How do you see your involvement in the Arabian horse business 15 years from now? Hopefully, 15 years from now, I am still showing horses and my parents are still breeding halter horses. I love the industry and have made a lot of very great lifelong relationships with people that share the same passion for Arabian horses as I do, so I can’t imagine that I won’t be as involved or even more involved in 15 years! n

Aside from horses, what are some of your favorite hobbies? Horses take up a huge portion of my life, but if I am not in the barn, or at a show, I really enjoy reading. I am a bookworm! I also have taken a large interest in photography. What would be one thing our readers would be surprised to know about you? Halfway through my freshman year of high school, I switched to a program Ar abian Horse Times | 159 | Volume 46, No. 10


Danamyte Explodes To Take Top NATRC Award by Bev Roberts In Sedalia, Colo., on February 21, 2016, Danamyte (Izmunuti x Harims Ellesar, by Shamals Harim), a.k.a. Dana, a bay Arabian mare owned and ridden by Esther Diaguila of Havana, Fla., was named the winner of the North American Trail Ride Conference’s (NATRC) highest award, the 2015 President’s Cup, at the National Convention held February 19-20, 2016 in Reno, NV. The Cup is awarded to the high point horse in the nation. Proudly, Esther says, “Dana is an awesome little mare (only 14.2 h) but with a heart as big as all outdoors. She will go where I ask and do what I ask.”  After purchasing Dana, it was touch and go as to whether or not Esther was even going to keep the filly. Dana was so laid back! As Esther explains, “We’re talking full Arabian here. All the other Arabians I’ve owned were full of fire. Dana accepted all her ground training, saddling and mounted training so calmly, without a fuss. Perfect for competitive trail riding. I love it. She does have her moments and opinions; she is a mare, after all.” In their quest for the Cup, they earned numerous high point awards: Arabian, the Jim Menefee Memorial Overall Combined Horse and Horsemanship, Lightweight Horse, Lightweight Horsemanship, and Lightweight Team in their region. They took home a National Championship and the mare’s 1,000 mile award. “I couldn’t have accomplished all this without the help of my husband, Paul, and my many friends in NATRC. Paul and three others conspired to convince me that Dana and I could do it. We

had a lot of fun, some horrendous rides, and even a few scary moments, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything.” A few of their memorable moments could be short stories in their own right. There was the Biltmore ride where she and Patty Lucas were 45 minutes behind the maximum completion time and galloped 16 miles to catch up. And, there was the time Esther watched in her rear view mirror as a fender and hubcap, torn off the trailer by a blowout, flew through the air at a police car behind them. And some moments were downright funny, like finding dead minnows in a shower stall at a campground. The greatest moment was handing in her number at the last ride knowing Dana had earned the President’s Cup. NATRC competitive trail rides are challenging, educational, and fun. They are open to all breeds and folks from all disciplines. The judges value the horses’ performance and the riders’ horsemanship. Riders are invited to see what they and their horses can achieve. n

 For more information visit, www.natrc.org

Top and left: Danamyte and Esther at the 2015 Virginia Highlands Competitive Trail Ride in Ivanhoe, Va. Photos by Becky Pearman


Saddle Seat Equitation— Achieving

D ream the

Bow ties are straightened. Top hats are shined. White gloves are on. Horses are mounted—a complete picture of the whole is of major importance, for only you, the rider is judged. The gate is opened… It is time to ride better, stronger, and more elegantly than you ever have before, conveying the impression of effective and easy control. Countless hours have been spent honing every detail, practicing every movement. You are at the starting line, waiting for the buzzer, ready to take that first leap. You own your rail work. You conquer your pattern. You come out of the ring, and you can finally breathe. You have just stuck thea landing… That is the Saddle Seat dream, what every rider works for. They don’t hope for a good ride, they ride for a good ride. Blood, sweat, and tears are a reality, but it makes that perfect ride something to be truly prized. And in the midst of all the preparation there is smiles and camaraderie. Every rider this year will be going for the gold, or in this case the roses, and every one of them has had a journey to get there. So we asked the Saddle Seat Equitation riders, trainers, and clothiers their story; how they got there and what is important …

DeRegnaucourt Ltd. riding apparel Ar abian Horse Times | 161 | Volume 46, No.. 10


Gone Are The White Gloves

Lifelong Lessons Of Saddle Seat Equitation by CHLOE HOLMES

I will never forget the first time I watched, Gone with the Wind. The whole movie, I was so conflicted; I was appalled by Scarlett’s wickedness, yet I admired her fortitude. She was Just. So. Fierce. And when it came time for me to get serious about Saddle Seat Equitation, I did not rank fierceness as one of the best tools in my box. So, when I practiced, I would always keep Scarlett in the back of my mind. Instead of an “eye of the tiger” training montage, mine played out in scenes along the lines of, “As God as my witness, I will never miss that diagonal again!” (Or occasionally when my equine partner was being particularly sassy, “Sir, you are no Gentleman!” …though like Scarlett and Rhett, I loved him anyway). As I continued with Saddle Seat, however, I gradually realized that I no longer needed to embody someone else’s strength. I wanted to be better. I wanted to spend hours with no stirrups. I wanted to do patterns until no one else would do them with me. I wanted to ride around bareback until I was so tired that I would eventually just fall right off. I was passionate about Saddle Seat, and because of that, I worked hard to try and be good at it. I didn’t need to envision Scarlett staring down a crowd, I was capable of keeping my chin up and staring down the in-gate myself. There are an infinite number of other qualities that equitation promotes: grace, finesse, persistence, presence, and so many more that are undeniably beneficial to life as an adult. But the most important things I learned were: 1.

The best way to face a challenge is with your shoulders squared and your gaze ahead.

2.

Superficial efforts may get you somewhere, but if that is all you can do, you will not get very far. As Bob Battaglia always said to me (along with a few other things that are maybe too colorful for print), “Equitation is about riding your horse, not just looking pretty.”

3.

A smile can make a world of difference, especially if you try to wear a sincere one every day. So as youth riders, when your parents are telling you to smile from the rail, and you want to roll your eyes and tell them you have more important things to focus on, listen to them. They are pretty much always right. I speak from experience.

I am certainly not the only one that has been positively affected by Saddle Seat, so I asked a few past Equitation riders, “How has Saddle Seat benefitted your life as an adult? “What sets saddle seat apart from the other forms of equitation is that it gives you the opportunity to explore the awesomeness and aggressiveness within yourself,” states Alexis Scott. “It teaches you to bring out your inner beast and use it, and that is extremely beneficial when you exit your youth career and enter the real world!” Jeff Lovejoy shares, “Without question, it is the discipline and high thresholds for pain (mental and physical) that have made me the resilient and hard working person I am today.” Anna Raybourn agrees, “Saddle seat has benefited my adult life through teaching me life lessons early, like hard work and determination will pay off, and mistakes will happen, but it’s more important how you recover and move forward.” Leah Beth Boyd-Golladay reminisces, “I remember not being terribly interested in equitation at first, and my coach

Lyric said something like, ‘Equitation isn’t for everyone; not everyone can do it.’ From that point on, I saw it as a challenge and went all in! For people that continue riding into their adult life, there are so many benefits that come from showing equitation! I think having a riding style that is aesthetically pleasing is the biggest; being able to ride in a way that lets your horse shine. ” It had a positive impact on Emily Maita as well. “In my adult life, I have been the beneficiary of countless lessons learned during my years as an equitation rider, but I would say the greatest gain has been confidence. I believe Coco Chanel said it best, ‘Elegance is when the inside is as beautiful as the outside.’” I wish I could say saddle seat changed my life, but I really cannot, because I do not know what my life would have been like without it. Instead it would be more fitting to say saddle seat made my life, and more importantly, it made me. So when it comes to Saddle Seat Equitation and for all the reason it is so much more than just another discipline … Frankly my dears, I do give a damn. And you should too!

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Saddle Seat Reflections From A Pro:

Quincy DeSpain

If there is one memory that stands out from your equitation career, what would it be and why? One of my greatest memories, was the only time my sister Kingsley and I ever showed in the same class, at the Pro Am in Fort Worth, Tex. Having won the 14-17 Equitation and Kingsley the 13 & Under, we both then competed in the Equitation Championship. I was unanimous champion and she was unanimous reserve champion in a HUGE class. Bob Battaglia and Russ Vento were coaching us both from the rail—a lifetime dream of ours to ride with Battaglia Farms. Although it was not a national title, it was so meaningful for us both and a really proud moment for our parents that we still talk about today. Remembering instances like that, remind me of the lifetime of wonderful experiences I have had in the show ring.

How many hours a week did you dedicate to the sport of Saddle Seat Equitation and what did it consist of? During the years I rode equitation, I trained at home every single day and ran varsity track in high school. I trained my own horses with my mom, Robin DeSpain, and I am so fortunate that I still do that with her today. I kept my equitation horse with Bob Battaglia and would ride with him every weekend. I cannot imagine how many hours that adds up to, but it is far too many to count.

 There is a big mental game that must go into preparing for your patterns, what was one practice you seemed to do that helped you deal with nerves and fear? Visualization. When I was younger, I had problems remembering my patterns. After the rail work, and with a rush of adrenaline, I would get to the middle of my pattern and go totally blank … I would finish the first loop of a figure eight and then stand there, forgetting what I had just done, and I would do the same loop again. In fact, they called me “Wrong Way DeSpain” for quite a while. So to combat those ring nerves, I met with a sports psychologist who taught me the incredible power of visualization. Visualize waking up that day. Visualize getting dressed. Visualize warming up. Visualize ring position. I visualized every step all the way through the class, the pattern, and then I visualized myself winning. I would do that over and over. By the time the gate opened, I had already

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ridden the class twenty times and it was completely second nature. Once I learned how to do this, all of my nerves fell away. It was an invaluable tool that helps me still today.

equitation rider. It takes years for all of these components to align, but when they do, the result is a lifelong skill that will give you what you need to stand tall in the show ring.

What is the biggest change you have seen in Saddle Seat Equitation over the years in the Arabian breed? I have seen a major shift in equitation over the years. There used to be so many trainers across the country who actually specialized in equitation; there were equitation clinics all over the country. Each top equitation barn would have 4-6 riders that were all highly competitive. I think Candy Keller usually had eight equitation riders at a time. The equitation final at Nationals would be the class that even the performance trainers would stop whatever they were doing and go watch. It was insanely competitive, and in that equitation final there would be five or so top riders who were all battling for the title. Everyone watching those classes was hard pressed to pick who was the best. There were even ride-offs back then. Somehow this went away and largely the riders began to look more like nice country pleasure riders without the poise or polish. However, I am seeing a shift back to that time of equitation being the riders’ true focus. More confidence, more ring presence, and more of a drive to be excellent. Equitation helps make good riders become great riders. A rider that comes in the ring with style will always be the one to watch. I hope to see this trend continue.

What is your proudest moment in your equitation career? The last year I showed at Canadian Nationals, I was riding Queen of Harlem. She was an El Ghazi mare, a national champion in halter, gorgeous, sweet, and truly one of the greatest horses I will ever know. We bought her from Walter Mishek as an equitation prospect. Bob Battaglia and I worked together and she became the most incredible equitation horse. At Canadian Nationals that year, I was National Champion in the Half-Arabian Country Pleasure JOTR and JTR, Bob was National Champion in the Open Country, and I was National Champion in the Saddle Seat Equitation 14-17. To come home with four national championships on my dream horse and sharing that experience with Bob, was beyond my wildest dreams. Bob Battaglia was, and still is, my hero. I loved every minute I showed with him, and I loved every minute that I showed equitation.

You have been involved with Juliette Dell’s youth career and she showed Saddle Seat Equitation; what advice did you give her along the way? I’ve known Juliette since she was four years old, and I have watched her grow up to become an amazing rider. Her work ethic is second to none, and that has absolutely brought her to where she is today. It has been one of my greatest joys being there with her all these years. My advice to her and the advice she has even given back to me, is to never ever doubt what you can accomplish. No matter what, you have to believe it can be done. Russ Vento used to be right next to me at the in-gate before every equitation class, and the last thing he would always say to me was, “Believe!” Dedication, practice, ring experience, and confidence in yourself are the tenets of becoming a great

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The Riders

Emma Elgan

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? My neighbor told me about Zukowski Meadowview Farms which was 10 minutes away from my house. I went, took a couple lessons and I’ve been hooked on the breed ever since. I have been competing for eight years now.  How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? Since my horse is five hours away, I go every 2-3 weeks to ride him and a bunch of other horses on the weekends; I ride about 11-12 hours. To stay in shape, I play softball and volleyball and I try to do workouts that strengthen my core and legs. When the weather is nice I like to run.  For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Go out and have fun! Don’t worry about the ribbon or the other competitors. Go out there and show them all you’ve got. If you have a bad ride, that’s okay, try to learn from it. You can’t win everything (even though that’s exactly what we want to do!) and that’s perfectly okay. Every lesson, put in 110% effort and make sure to let your trainer know if something isn’t making sense or you don’t understand. But most importantly, ride because it makes YOU happy. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? You get out what you put in, is what I always say. If you don’t study as hard for an exam, you may not get as high of a grade. If you don’t study the pattern

and pay attention to detail, you could mess up or miss a portion of the pattern.  It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Having fun. It’s not always about the ribbon, the roses and the placings. It’s about making sure your ride was the best one you could give. If you’re going around the ring like a robot and scared, you probably won’t place as high as the others that are smiling and are relaxed. Go out, have fun, smile and ride like you own the ring! 

Raven Gropp

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I was born into it. My mother showed Arabians and it was, that I would as well. My first show was lead line when I was so small they had to stuff diapers into my cowboy hat! How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I spend at least 20-30 hours a week at the barn, depending on my school schedule. I’ve always been involved in sports throughout my school years. Now I work out at home four times a week. 

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For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Riding is like everything else, it just takes time to perfect your skills. You learn something every time you go in the ring. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? I wish all exams came as easy to me as learning patterns. Just remember, if you make a mistake, to keep going and ride through it. Don’t worry about things you can’t change.

It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Pay attention to detail from the top of your hat to the soles of your boots, and everything in between. Ride, don’t pose. If you are really riding, you can ride anything. Riders ride to win, posers wait for further instructions.

Ella Hampton

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? When I was little I wanted to ride. My mom talked to one of my friends in preschool and we found Select Show Horses. We didn’t know how lucky we were to find them. They are just like family. I have competed two years in academy and three of this level.   How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I have lessons two to three times a week. When I’m not riding, I do exercises to build strength.   For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Set a goal and work hard for it, because the more you work for it the closer you are. Also, have fun and remember it’s about the ride, not the prize. Judge each ride, not each ribbon.   How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? I view the pattern as a study guide. In a final exam study guide, you go through the questions; in a pattern, you walk it many times saying the steps and going through the motions.   It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What

is the one detail that you think people forget? The one detail I think people forget is how you ride the horse. Don’t get me wrong, you shouldn’t forget your form, but you also need to ride your horse and have fun. If you ride the horse and are in great form, instead of just sitting there, it is much more impressive.

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Kayla Hipp

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half-Arabians and how many years have you competed? I began riding at a small Arabian farm at the age of 5. I started taking hunt seat lessons on a big Half-Arabian named Eagle. At 7, for Christmas, I was given my first horse. Dicaprio took me to my first blue ribbon and a single second place ribbon in hunt seat equitation before he was diagnosed with chronic laminitis. This was a devastating announcement to the whole family. Two years passed and I started riding at Vicki Humphrey Training Center. This is the barn and family I still call home and I wouldn’t want it any other way. I took some saddle seat lessons and quickly adapted to it, still hoping to continue on my hunter if he recovered. My first saddle seat horse came along, Millady LOA, after my beloved Dicaprio took his final breath on June 8, 2013. Millady carried me to my first, and second National Champion title at 9 and 10 years old and later on to my first major win in equitation at the 2012 Youth Nationals in Walk/Trot Saddle Seat Equitation Finals. We continued to show and win for 3 more years until we parted ways to find new partners. I have been in the industry for years and I see nothing in the near future stopping this. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? Whether it’s training my own recreational horses, tuning up my barrel racing horse, or spending countless hours at the barn working towards my goals in saddle seat, I am on a horse seven days a week for multiple hours a day. I believe any amount of time in the saddle makes you a better rider. When I started acquiring more recreational horses, I took up barrel racing and started my own mare in the rodeo events. While saddle seat and rodeo are two very different disciplines, they have each made me a better rider and I have learned that both disciplines helps with the other. Equitation is a very difficult part of riding and I think that maximum time and effort needs to be put in to be at the top of your game… and the competitions. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? The best advice I can give to anyone is to never point fingers and blame other people for your lack of success. You make yourself better by asking questions, putting in maximum effort and working as hard as you can to achieve your goals. Listen to your trainer, because chances are they know more about it than you do. In order to be successful, you have to be eager to learn and

aggressive towards it. If you don’t want it bad enough, you will never get any further then where you started. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? In preparing for a final, you have to gather your materials, start studying way ahead of time, and know what you’re up against. When I get to a show, one of the first things I do is find out when the pattern will be available and ask when I can get in the arena to practice. Before I even begin practicing, though, I will pick out my points in the arena to where I am going to perform transitions and such. Just like a final, I have my materials gathered, I have worked ahead of time, and I know what I need to work on. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Equitation could for sure be looked at as a beauty pageant. Riders and horses must be in sync and perform to their best ability, all the while making it look natural and like second nature. I believe a lot of things are overlooked in equitation. The biggest being mistakes in patterns. Yes, I think a naughty horse should be taken into consideration to a certain degree, but I also think the rider should perform the pattern ahead of time to work out as many kinks as possible. I think the horse’s look should be toned down from a traditional, flashy look, like you would see in a pleasure class and despite the rider being judged,

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the horse should maintain a good headset and collection. I believe the overall focus should be the rider and their ability to have a correct seat and posture, while still managing to keep their horse collected and set. Little details like suit

colors that match both the horse and rider’s color and skin tone make for a more complete and in-sync look. The Arabian industry has very many well distinguished equitation riders who continue to prove themselves, show after show.

Kelly Hyatt

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I got into showing Arabians because my first trainer had an Arabian that her daughter showed in Saddle Seat. I was interested in trying it out, so my father and my trainer found MK Enya, a purebred Arabian mare who I showed for several years and taught me a lot before leasing her to a younger rider. I have been competing on Arabians for twelve years now, starting at small local shows, before advancing to Youth Nationals, where in my final year as a youth, I took top ten in the 18 & Under Saddle Seat Equitation class.   How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I am currently a sophomore in college at Colorado State University, in Fort Collins. I get lessons every weekend from my trainer Diane Underwood, and spend time volunteering at the stable I ride at. During the week when I am at school, I frequent the gym to keep myself in shape and fit. I try to keep a balanced workout, since riding uses every part of the body. I will focus on cardio and core one day, and legs and arms the next. I also enjoy going on runs with my dog, and doing the annual Bolder Boulder, a 10k race in my city that takes place every May. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? For someone who is just getting into the sport and especially Saddle Seat Equitation, my best advice would be to not get discouraged by criticism. It is very easy to get into a mindset where you think you are not or never will be a good rider. This can happen during or after a hard lesson, or a difficult class at a show. Whatever the reason, you just have to keep practicing. Video tape your lessons and classes and watch them after to improve, ask your trainer to clarify if you do not understand how to do something, take the time to put in the work. You may not see the rewards of your effort for a long time, but

you have to keep going and pushing, from walk-trot classes, all the way to U.S. Nationals, work hard, do your best, and don’t give up. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Patterns can be difficult, depending on your horse and the pattern, but the way I prepare for a pattern is the same. I will read it over a few times then mimic the pattern in my room, at the stalls during a show, wherever. Once I am familiar with it, I will go into the arena and pick out markers that I can use while showing to help me; a crack in the wall, a sign, a post, anything that you can see while riding. I try to choose markers that are higher up so while I am showing so I keep my head up. Once I have my markers picked out, I will walk the pattern on my horse, before starting to practice it. Depending on the horse, I may practice the pattern over ten times or only once or twice before I show. Patterns are an exam. The judges want to see how well

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you know your horse and the pattern. Confidence is key, and the key to confidence is knowledge of you horse and knowledge of the pattern. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant in some regards, there is a separate outfit for equitation that is different than the normal saddle seat attire; a tuxedo, and a top hat. You want to look elegant and natural all in one, as though you and your horse do this on a day-to-day basis. Your physical appearance is important; I see riders wear black

gloves rather than white or not wear a lapel pin or small studs for earrings—even a white bow in the hair can make a difference between getting a top ten or not. And while all those things are helpful, I find the biggest detail that people forget, is attitude. You have to ride in that arena and make the judges think you are the best, through your rail work and pattern. You don’t want to come off as arrogant or stuck up, you just want an air of self-assured confidence that you know you are a good rider and can prove it. And if you happen to make a mistake during the class or pattern, take the time to fix it. The judges would rather see you acknowledge that you made a mistake and correct it, rather than you continuing on and seeming ignorant to it. 

Julia Junker

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? My mom has had horses for as long as I can remember, so I’ve always been around them. I think I actually started showing when I was 6, so about nine years. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I try to ride as much as possible, but with school, it’s very hard to get a lot of riding time in. During the summer, I can go to the barn five days a week, while normally it’s one or two. Other than riding, I play soccer, which allows me to stay active when I’m not able to practice with my horse. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? We all start somewhere, so keep working hard and you’ll become a great rider. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Practicing for a pattern is much easier than studying for an exam. A pattern is just one specific thing you need to memorize, while in an exam, there’s tons of material to remember.

It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? I think a lot of people forget about how important attitude is. I know some riders put on a smile while they show, but I feel like a serious expression is more appropriate for equitation.

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Olivia Lockhart

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I had been taking lessons for two years before my trainer asked if I wanted to show. I started with a couple academy shows then moved to 13 and under. I have now been showing for six years. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I spend about 8-10 hours at the barn during the school year and almost every day during the summer. I cheer for my high school outside of riding, which consists of a lot of conditioning! For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Horseback riding is a really tough sport. Not one rider has a perfect ride every single time. You are working with an animal that takes a whole different type of communication between you two. You just have to be patient. When you have succeeded, it feels a lot better because you worked so hard! How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? When you take an exam, you have to read each question very carefully and solve each question in its entirety. In a pattern, you have to perform

each action to its whole. You have to do each part of the pattern as asked, like when answering a question, so you can get the problem, or pattern, correct. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? I believe the most important detail that most people forget is the little things, like clean tack, clean boots, and pinned back costs.

Sydney Rice

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half Arabians and how many years have you competed? I lived next to Angela Harris Herrin in Utah, a family friend and the daughter of the Saddlebred industry prodigy, Don Harris. She encouraged me to take lessons with horses and Arabians were the most local in Utah. I began riding when I was 8 years old, and I began to compete in Hunter Seat Equitation in 2011. I then found Julie Daniel and began to take up saddle seat lessons, and she made me fall in love with the English division. I began to compete more and really like Saddle Seat Equitation. To this day, Julie teaches me something new every time I ride, and she has made me the dedicated rider I am today.

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How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? Unfortunately, Julie Daniel and I both moved to different states. I now live in Colo. and she currently trains in Scottsdale, Ariz. About every 3 weeks, I travel to Scottsdale to practice and I stay at Julie’s house as if she is my second mother. We wake up bright and early to avoid the Arizona heat and we practice for about five hours, and I ride as many horses as she will let me and get as much time in the saddle as I can. Other than riding, I go to the gym five times a week and run when the weather is nice. I also ride locally at Longview Stables with Kayla Wooters.   For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? For someone new, I would say that the blue ribbon shouldn’t be expected at first. It’s about learning from the experience and using it as motivation to keep working hard. Success takes blood, sweat, and tears, but in the end, the reward is so much more than roses. The unbreakable bond that you can develop with a 1,000 pound animal is the best reward out there, and the success comes with the dedication and passion for the sport. Keep going! How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Although practicing patterns is much more interesting than studying for a test, they do relate in the sense of wanting success! It’s rare when a rider just glances at the pattern and nails it in the ring,

just as much as it is rare for a person to ace a test that they didn’t study for. Practice makes perfect, after all. Practicing patterns puts an image in your head of where your points should be, how to perfect transitions, and even what the perfect pattern should look like. In school, practicing equations and memorizing textbooks can give you an image of what you will need to know for the exam.  It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant-attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that people forget? In saddle seat Equitation there are so many things to remember. Heels down, hands up, back straight, chin up, legs back … the details are endless. The one detail that people tend to forget is the most important one of all: confidence. I know of many beautiful riders who watch the previous national champions go around in the warm up ring, comparing themselves to them and shutting their confidence off because they are afraid they won’t end up with the roses. This usually leads to being nervous, which makes the horse nervous, and then everything goes downhill from there. The most beautiful riders I have watched in equitation go into the ring feeling like they own the class. They smile big and they think, “I’m having the time of my life right now, nothing can stop me!” These are the riders that are most attractive in a class, because they radiate with confidence! Of course, details are important, but the biggest detail should never be forgotten. Confidence is the key to success!

Kendall Rickert

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? My mom and grandma got me involved with showing. They started riding them when they were around my age! I have competed for eight years.  How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I spend about 8 to 10 hours a week at the barn. I wish I could be there all day, every day! I play volleyball in the fall and hockey in the winter, so I’m ready to ride all spring and summer long! For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Don’t

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give up! Riding horses is a very challenging thing to do, it doesn’t come easily. Sometimes it’ll be more challenging than other times, but stick to it and it’ll get better! How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? I’d have to say they’re pretty equivalent! Practicing a pattern requires memorization, precision, a lot of time, and so much more. For patterns, you have to perform it well and show the judges what you and your horse can do. Just like preparing for a final exam in school, you have to study and practice, and then be able to show your teacher what you know and can do.

It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Detail is very important! I think a lot of people forget to look confident and ride with ease. Showing a difficult horse in equitation can be very challenging, but it is important to look confident and appear to be riding with ease, even if you’re having a difficult time. Something as small as having a fake smile or a negative look on your face can be hard to realize that you are doing, but is very noticeable to the judges. I know I struggle keeping a pleasant but confident look on my face when I’m having a difficult time!

Faith Robbins

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half-Arabians and how many years have you competed? I began riding horses when I was 5 years old. Every summer when my family and I would visit our home in Colorado, I would attend a horse camp. I instantly fell in love with horses and desired to do it all year long. My parents sought out a riding facility back home in Indiana, and came across Select Show Horses. I began riding Arabians/Half-Arabians when I was 7 years old and have been showing them for 10 years now.  How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I go out to the barn to ride 3-4 days a week and spend about 10-12 hours at the barn a week. However, during show season I will spend more time out at the barn. Other than riding, I attend spinning classes to stay in shape. It helps strengthen parts of your body that are crucial for riding and it helps with endurance, which is also beneficial towards riding.  For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Equitation is not easy; there are a lot of pieces that go into perfecting your equitation. Therefore, it takes time for everything to fall into place. It is so easy to become discouraged when you can’t seem to get everything right and don’t feel as strong as you think you should be. Be patient, and keep practicing because the more you practice, the stronger you get and before you know it, equitation will become natural to you. 

How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? First, I analyze the pattern and all of its steps, like I would my notes in a subject in school. Then I go over the pattern again and again, to memorize each step, as you would start to memorize notes the more you read over them. Then I picture myself doing the pattern and run through the steps in my head, like I would go through information in my head I need to know for a test. When I go to execute the pattern, for me personally, I clear my head

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and stay calm so that my nerves do not overcome by capability to think and perform everything I need to do to complete a perfect pattern. This is a very similar mindset I have when I am taking a test. I have to stay calm so that I can recall the information I have thoroughly gone over and memorized. 

It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? In equitation it is important to present a polished and finished picture to the judges. One detail helps to present this picture and leave an impression that riders often overlook … having clean tack.

Elaina Roeder

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I had my first lesson when I was three years old. My older sister had been riding for over a year and I knew from the moment I saw her ride that I wanted to ride, too. I showed in my first show at four and competed at my first Youth Nationals when I was six. I received a top ten in Arabian Saddle Seat Equitation. I have shown equitation at Youth Nationals ever since. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I feel my conditioning outside of horses has been a big advantage. I participate in track and field, and last year I was All-State in pole vault. I am team captain of my school’s varsity basketball team, also. I lift weights and do hot yoga to maintain strength and endurance. I ride two days a week during the winter and as much as I can during the show season. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? I would tell someone who is just starting to ride to go out and have fun. Keeping an open mind and listening to your trainer are very important. There are so many great riders and horses and it is a privilege to be a part of such a wonderful industry. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? To be successful, both practicing a pattern and preparing for a final exam in school require months of preparation. The days before

require intense focus. Just as a final exam, when you’re performing a pattern, you and your horse take what you know and do the best you can. You never know what exactly will be on the exam and you never know what exactly will happen in the pattern. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant���attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? It is easy to get caught up in achieving the perfect look, but it is critical that you don’t forget to ride your horse.  That’s what makes Saddle Seat Equitation different from a beauty pageant.

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Makenna Rooker

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half-Arabians and how many years have you competed? Being a trainers-kid, I have grown up around horses my entire life. I began showing when I was about 7 years old. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I typically ride about 4-6 days a week. In order to stay in shape I do a lot of lunge-line lessons. In fact, I primarily ride lesson horses and barely ever ride my show horses. Outside of riding, I like to do yoga to keep myself fit. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? My advice would be to remember that the best riders have failed over and over again. I have missed more leads and diagonals than I ever thought possible, but that is what makes success so rewarding. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Patterns and final exams are similar in the sense that you are putting together everything you have learned along the way. I would say the biggest difference is that with patterns you know what to expect (for the most part). I usually pick points and walk my pattern with my instructor prior to actually practicing on my horse. During this time I mentally plan out what I am going to do at each point.

It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? The detail that I think many people tend to forget is the importance of practice. Saddle Seat Equitation is one of the most competitive classes for junior exhibitors, and the most successful riders are putting in the hours. You can be the prettiest rider in the class, but if you do not have the strength and horsemanship skills, it isn’t going to matter.

Jenna TeKolste

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half-Arabians and how many years have you competed? My involvement with the Arabian horse started with lessons at a Saddlebred barn in Des Moines, IA. We moved to South Dakota and there were no Saddlebred barns up here so we switched to Arabians. I have been riding for 10 years and competing in the Arabian industry for seven.  How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? My horses live several hours away, therefore, it can be difficult to ride on a regular basis. However, when I am able to be at the barn, it is important to get in as many

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rides as possible over several days. Another part of staying in shape for Saddle Seat is being able to ride with my equitation coach at her Saddlebred barn. This gives me an opportunity to ride many different horses. There are many things I do to stay in shape (especially for posting without irons) when I cannot ride every week. At the gym I focus on strengthening my back and inner thighs. I also stay in shape to make sure that when it’s time to go back to work, I am just as healthy as my horses. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? The most important thing to remember if you are just starting out is … the more challenging the horse, the better rider you will turn out to be. It’s okay to get frustrated, but take the frustration and use it as determination for your goals.  How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Practicing a

pattern is similar to preparing for a final in school because you work hard all year long to show off your skills. When you are preparing for a final, you can take practice tests to mimic the more important tests. Patterns are similar because the more you practice tough ones at home, the more prepared you are for your pattern at the show. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? People forget that one of the most important details in Saddle Seat Equitation is ring position—presenting yourself and your horse in the best way possible. It is important to ride the arena to your advantage whether that is at a Class A show or the Nationals. Similarly, this means not crowding the middle of the arena; it is important to give the judges enough room to see you and your horse working together.

Alexa Tiziani

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/ Half-Arabians and how many years have you competed? I got involved in horses when I was a little kid, since my mom showed when she was younger. I have competed for around 8 years now.  How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? Depending on the week, I dedicate 5-6 hours a week. I go to Lifetime Fitness to work out and stay in shape when I am not riding. I also go on runs if it is nice outside!  For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? You may not succeed at first, but don’t give up. If you continue to work hard, put forth the effort and set goals, you will succeed.  How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? I believe practicing a pattern and studying for a test are both very similar. You study every detail and make sure you got all of the aspects and didn’t leave any part out.  It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What

is the one detail that you think people forget? I feel a lot of people forget the basic fact that posing isn’t the entire aspect of equitation. Many things are factored into it, such as you riding and handling your horse. Though looking comfortable and holding your position is important, riding is the biggest part of this class.

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Channing Turner

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I started riding Arabians and Half-Arabians eight years ago at Libby Ferguson Training Center. I had a pony party for my 5th birthday and I fell in love with the horses. I started taking lessons after that, and when I was 8, I started showing academy and then moved on to Walk/Trot. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? During the school year I ride three times every week, but during the summer I ride five or six times a week. Every few months we have a clinic, which helps to prepare us for show season. I go to yoga once every weekend and during the week I run and lift weights. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? My advice to someone so they do not get discouraged, is to remember that you can’t just hop on your horse and expect it to do everything for you. Your horse is your teammate and your friend, not just an animal. If you really love this sport, you should stay with it and work hard with your horse, because eventually that work pays off and all of it is worth it. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Practicing a pattern is pretty similar to preparing for a final. I like to make sure that I

know what my pattern is, just like I need to know what is on the exam. Patterns require a lot of practice and patience, just like it would be learning the material on an exam. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? I think the most important detail that people forget is to have fun. There is a lot of focus on how you look and trying to win, but not on having a good time. People get to shows and their minds go to the ribbon, not the ride. The way my trainer, Libby, describes it to me is, “you can go out there and be boring, or you can go out there and be brilliant.”

Zach White

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? My parents are horse trainers, so I have grown up in the horse business. I started competition in the walk/trot division when I was 6 years old. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? It really depends on the time of year. During the summer months, I ride and work in the barn every day. During the school year, I ride after school or on the weekends when I am not at basketball practice. Basketball season is about 5 months long between camps and practices. I play basketball about 6 days a week, so it keeps me in shape. 

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For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? Focus on your own goals and improvements. Set realistic goals and try to make some type of improvement each time you ride. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Pattern work involves more than just knowing the pattern. It is understanding and preparing

your horse so he is comfortable with the maneuvers you are asking him to do. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important. What is the one detail that you think people forget? Riding saddle seat equitation is more than a beauty pageant; it teaches you horsemanship, the ability to ride correctly, and most importantly, how to work hard and work towards a goal.

Jacquelyn King

How did you get involved with showing Arabians/HalfArabians and how many years have you competed? I got involved with Arabians/Half-Arabians shortly after visiting an Arabian horse show in Dallas. I have competed for the past 8 years. How many hours a week do you dedicate to this sport and other than riding, what do you do to stay in shape? I dedicate at least 30 hours a week to riding. Outside of the barn, I love to stretch and I like to run to stay in shape. For someone who is just starting, what advice would you give them so they don’t get discouraged? I would tell anyone who is just starting out in equitation to always take a deep breath and try to relax. There are so many girls who get on their equitation horses and immediately tense up. It is so important to have fun and enjoy the moment. How would you compare practicing a pattern to preparing for a final exam in school? Everything about equitation is mental. Executing a pattern takes focus, confidence, and memorization just like an exam in school. It has been said that Saddle Seat Equitation is like a beauty pageant—attention to detail is so important.

What is the one detail that you think people forget? One thing about equitation that I think many people forget is that it is a true test of horsemanship. It is not about the mistakes you do or don’t make, it is about how gracefully you recover from them.

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The Trainers

Bob Battaglia

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I became a saddle seat instructor because I started my riding career in that division, won my share of titles when I was starting out, and wanted to pass on the knowledge I received from my teachers. I have instructed many national champion saddle seat riders and never get tired of the challenge it is to horse and rider. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? It really depends on the time of the year. To compete in equitation takes total focus and dedication to the discipline. I like my students to ride at least two time a week and even more during the show season. It is imperative they know their mounts and how far they can push the envelope, especially doing the patterns. This is where a horse and rider can really shine. It is their time alone in the spotlight and a time to show ability, elegance, and total communication with their horse.              Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your student to do to prepare for the sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? Other activities, yes. Anything a student can do to aid themselves is a must. You must be physically fit to maintain poise and mentally fit for the concentration it takes to show you and your horse to your best ability. You must be 110% dedicated to equitation and the presentation. Equitation is not just looking pretty in the saddle, it is the rider influencing the horse’s performance that comes first—horsemanship: confidence in knowing your horse and how he or she will react when pushed to the limit and doing the patterns with that communication with confidence and elegance There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? Not everything in life is fair. Trainers’ children may have the advantage of riding every day and riding many different horses, but I feel any child that has total dedication and

can practice once or twice a week, can also excel and reach the top. Every student needs encouragement, dedication and a work ethic to make it happen for themselves. Don’t worry about the other riders; remember this is your time to shine—“the show must go on.”

How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? I am a strong believer in the need for academy programs. I think every training facility should have a program to bring in more people to the horse industry, regardless of breed affiliation. We as a group need to encourage barns to start these programs no matter how small they may be. We can’t grow the industry without new people coming into it. We need to encourage more who show to have an academy day or a variety of academy classes. Funny how the mind works. I spent last night thinking of how to get more academy programs started and even, listen to this … a Halter Academy Program. Not sure how it would work, but thought it would be a challenge. Maybe a job for all the retired halter geldings? Sorry, I could go on and on about academy programs, because that is how I started. What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Suits that don’t fit properly, are too tight or too loose, or just don’t fit the child; that is the first thing a judge will see. The total look is important; again the presentation. Also, the fit of some hats: some are back too far, or so forward, the child can’t see. Lapel pins or ornaments can be too big to fit on the lapel—this should not be a focal point. Hair buns too big or too small and filled with so much stuff it looks like a garden can be distracting. Less is more. Beyond attire, I want parents, grandparents and friends to remain positive. Don’t push so hard and criticize, unless it is beneficial. Every student that is really dedicated, puts enough pressure on themselves trying to be the best they can be for themselves, as well as trying their best for you, and the least you can do is be is positive.

Kellie Budd

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I started instructing equitation riders 10 years ago. I’ve always enjoyed teaching kids to ride and I believe that equitation builds a fundamentally correct

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rider, so it seemed natural to encourage students to ride and show in the division.  What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and


how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? All of my students ride 2-4 times a week. We do a lot of lunge line lessons, school horse lessons and stop/start lessons. We also work in groups and spend a lot of time practicing patterns.  Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? It is really important for an equitation rider to be fit and strong. I like for my students to participate in at least one activity outside of riding, such as cycling, yoga or Pilates. I have other students that are in school sports, like dance and tennis and that is great as well.  A rider needs to be just as prepared mentally as they are physically. Our greatest job as coaches and instructors is to help them build the skills and strength to genuinely believe in themselves. I like to have all of my students write down their goals at the beginning of each season. This helps to keep perspective and for them to see that every ride can be viewed as a stepping stone to the end goal. The success of any rider, especially an equitation rider; has much to do with their self-confidence and belief in themselves.  There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have

Christy Clements

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I was a saddle seat equitation rider myself. When I aged out, I was asked to come help another instructor’s rider with saddle seat equitation. I loved all aspects of teaching and that rider became a national champion in not only saddle seat, but many other disciplines as well, and I still teach her and her nieces. It’s hard to believe, but I started my career as a trainer and instructor 27 years ago. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? My students ride 2-3 times a week during the school year and then increase that number during the summer. Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? My riders are all fit and athletic. If I had a rider that was having trouble with stamina, I would have them do cardiovascular exercises in order to make them more comfortable while riding.

these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? As long as there is a horse industry, there will always be horse trainers and there will always be horse trainer’s kids. As I see it, there is no secret recipe to success in the sport of saddle seat equitation; it is just hours and hours of practice and hard work. I’ve heard people say that trainer’s kids have a greater opportunity to ride and practice, and my response has always been that I don’t think that privilege is exclusive to those kids. I have had plenty of riders come through my program that I’m sure have ridden just as much as any horse trainer’s kid, and as a result, they have been just as successful.   How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? In my opinion, a lesson program is the single most important thing that a trainer can do to secure a future both for themselves and the Arabian horse industry. Our beginner lesson program is the foundation to the success of our farm. Many of our most accomplished students started in the Riding Academy at Select Show Horses. Creating a lesson program gives trainers the opportunity to create and build their own client base, as well as to bring new people into the industry.  What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Although not an opinion always popular amongst the kids, I am not a fan of sparkle and bling. I prefer an elegant, more traditional style; especially in the equitation arena.

There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? I think it depends on what they are referring to as an advantage. I believe that as long as my riders are mounted properly and work hard, the playing field is usually and hopefully, level.   How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? I think lesson and academy programs are enormously important to our industry. We need to bring new people and their children into the breed. The children in the lesson programs are the future.   What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? This is an easy question to answer; my biggest pet peeve is when people think more is better. Keeping it simple and conservative is so much more, in my eyes.

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Julie Daniel

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I have been riding since I was a little girl, and you could say I was born into it. I rode all disciplines as a child, but my heart has always favored saddle seat. I took lessons with Saddlebred trainers, something I still enjoy doing. I make it a point to continue learning myself, so I can be the best resource for my students. I have been teaching youth riders for the past 25 years. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? We do exercises and lots of no-stirrup lessons on our school horses. Many of our clients live out of state and therefore ride 4-5 times during weekend visits. Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? Believe it or not, I am a firm believer in the thigh master, as a perfect exercise for our equitation riders. I also encourage our riders to do stretching exercises by standing on the edge of stairs and bouncing off their toes. We also watch lots of Saddlebred videos! Regarding mental toughness, my kids listen to their iPods prior to showing, which helps with focus when it’s time to ride.

Vicki Humphrey

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I became an equitation instructor the day Liz Moore’s mother, Cheryl, came to the farm in 1981 and bought Panama Red from us for Liz (then Wright), to show in equitation. Being able to instruct Liz’s daughter, Emily, to her saddle seat national championships for the past ten years was the best déjà vu possible. In between, I have been fortunate to instruct many national champion and reserve saddle seat riders. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? My students spend time on lesson horses to log hours. We work on body position, control, pattern work and no stirrups. Then we spend time on their show horses, making sure they are familiar with each other so that each transition is seamless. Both horse and rider need to be able to respond to each other effectively. For instance, a horse that anticipates cues needs to be ridden differently from a horse that is timid and needs an aggressive cue.

There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? I don’t believe children of trainers or judges have an advantage because of their parent’s profession. What I do believe, is that these children have the edge because of their environment. Most live at training facilities and due to that, they have the opportunity to ride every day and even several times a day. How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Lesson and academy programs are the foundation of our industry. As trainers, these programs provide us with the opportunity to bring new people into our businesses. We all started somewhere and it’s our job to provide that service. In fact, it is critically important. What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Attire that is not tailored properly. Saddle suits don’t have to be the most expensive, but they must fit properly. Correct pant length is critical. Suit, shirt, ties and vests must be laundered and pressed.

Knowing how much and how little pressure is needed to obtain a desired result is the difference between winning and losing. I encourage my riders to practice as often as possible on lesson horses and to ride their show horses enough to know them thoroughly, but at the same time, keeping them fresh and maintaining a show horse attitude. Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? I am a big believer that core strength is the basis for successful riding. It is the foundation for balance, strength and stamina. My riders spend time at the gym with weights, doing sit ups and running on the treadmill to improve endurance between lessons. Mental preparation is equally important. A rider with every skill

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available to them and a stellar horse can be easily outperformed by a rider with confidence and charisma. I can testify to numerous riders who came to me well-schooled in equitation but with no self-esteem. An instructor’s encouragement, enthusiasm and positive reinforcement, can make all the difference in the outcome in the ring.  There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? I am the poster child for raising trainer kids. My children had the advantages and disadvantages of being a trainer’s child. They left school each day and rather than heading home, they were dragged to the barn, doing their homework in the office while their mother finished working, rather than coming home to a mom making a home cooked meal (there was many a evening at McDonalds from a late night at the barn). They had the opportunity to ride daily—a huge advantage. However, they had a horse trainer/mother’s budget for show horses and rode what she could beg, borrow or steal. They showed three-year-olds, difficult horses and borrowed horses. They developed their skills from riding challenging horses, not from learning the feel of a polished and seasoned horse. Yes, trainers’ kids have advantages, but those advantages come at a price. All riders have advantages to build upon and disadvantages to overcome. Riders have different body types that make equitation easy or hard, horses that are suited for equitation or not; distance from their trainer that make hours in the saddle easy or difficult, and so on. As you’ve heard your parents

say, ‘life’s not fair.’ What I find is, that the most successful riders appreciate their advantages and build on them while they overcome the disadvantages with extreme efforts in those areas. No advantage is a shoe-in and no disadvantage is a deal breaker for success. How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? I am a firm believer that lesson programs will insure that there is a future generation of show ring riders. We are challenged by the instant gratification of Xbox technology, Snap Chat and Twitter, that is immediate and takes little effort or talent. It is a new challenge, combined with the struggling economy that makes introducing our youth to the horse world in an affordable fashion paramount. A national academy program will help us grow our industry in a grass roots way. Being able to learn to ride and actually show a horse without owning one, is a great intro into the industry. Our steady decline in registrations and entries at our Class A shows will continue until we take a pro-active approach to increasing our youth division. What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Everyone wants to stand out in the ring. The most successful way to achieve that eye catching something extra, does not come from excessive “bling” and unusual colors and textures. It comes from high quality material in suits that are expertly tailored and well fitted with color combinations that can be exciting, while maintaining the conservative tastefulness that is traditional in the equitation division. Pet peeves are big boutonnieres, badly shaped hats, a gap between jacket sleeves and top of gloves, and dangle earrings. 

Ashton Kiesner

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I began riding saddle seat as a 10 & Under rider, and continued throughout my youth career, winning the 14-17 UPHA and Saddle Seat Equitation at Youth Nationals; eventually taking it all the way to the Saddle Seat World Cup in 2006, where the U.S. won Gold. I knew when I decided to become a trainer, that teaching saddle seat equitation would be a focus of mine. I gave many lessons as a youth rider, but I didn’t officially become an instructor until 2011. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? My lesson students all take a lesson once a week, but I have my show riders take lessons three times a week. I encourage my students to get in the saddle as much as they can, and ride as many seats as they can. Saddle seat isn’t just about one particular style of riding; it’s about horsemanship. There are things you learn in riding

other seats that benefit the saddle seat rider immensely. Riding difficult horses is a benefit as well. If the rider can master their form and function on a difficult lesson horse, then their show horse will be that much easier. Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? Being in good physical shape is important for equitation, but my riders don’t have to go out and train at a gym to be in good shape. Riding itself will do that for them. The more the muscle memory sets in, the easier it becomes for the rider to get a natural position and feel for equitation. The mental aspect of it comes much harder for some riders. Equitation is definitely tough, but it’s more about enjoying the ride and letting your instincts take over.

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There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? There will always be someone who has an “advantage,” whether they be a trainer’s kid, have an amazing horse, won a ton, etc. If my riders want to be better than those riders, then they have to work that much harder. Equitation is not for the faint of heart. To be truly great at it, you have to put in the hours in the saddle to get there. Until the rider makes up their mind that they will devote themselves to it and work to make it happen, they’re at a disadvantage. Passion and dedication is the key. How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Lesson and academy programs

Lyric Laughlin Phillips

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? Passion! I grew up in Iowa on an Arabian breeding/training farm. I’m the youngest of five siblings. I watched them show at Scottsdale, Canadian and U.S Nationals. Took hundreds of saddle seat lessons. I was to “little” to show at the “big” shows, so I started training backyard ponies, and giving riding lessons when I was 12. Not to mention the poor broodmares I tried training with my bailing twine and clothes line contraptions. Their destiny was saddle seat! Though none of those ever made it into the ring, I purchased/traded a few horses that I trained myself that actually won a little bit. When I was 14, I worked for a wonderful horse trainer, Vic Fraley, who had Arabians and Saddlebreds. Sadly, he died when I was still a teen and I inherited some of his clients. I rented stalls at a small farm and eventually rented the entire barn. My first equitation rider to win a national title was 26 years ago when I was 19.   What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? I don’t think it’s the quantity that’s of the most importance. While yes, an equitation rider, especially while still learning how to get the hocks in their hands and correct position, needs to ride as much as they can, the most important thing to me is for them to be self-motivated, think like a horse and get better every ride. A rider needs to transition from the beginning stages of “trying” and have the mental ability to control their body to properly control the horse and get it done. I use lesson horses twice as much as the show horses; until they can ride anything and look good doing it!   Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? Mental preparation is the most important part of success. The perfect ride is

are what feeds the show world. All of my youth riders have come from my lesson program, so without it, I wouldn’t have clients. I think that barns who foster a large lesson program sometimes get the raw end of the deal. In reality, without those programs, there wouldn’t be anyone to buy those nice horses from the big-time trainers! What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Sloppy turn-out is definitely a pet peeve of mine. Your aesthetic is just as much a part of your equitation as your form and your horse are, so it requires care. The rider should always be well put together, in a nice suit that fits properly. Garish colors are also a no-no. I’m all for a little pop of color, but it has to be just right, and it doesn’t always work for everyone!

pretty elusive. It’s how they handle the warm-up arena and every little thing that can quickly be turned into a big thing by the rider, is what is important. I talk to them about visualizing showing at home; keeping an extremely positive attitude and finding their game face. That’s a zone you get into that blocks out everything. They just hear our voices and feel each stride of the horse so they are in control of each step like puppet strings to the horse’s feet. Then they can put on a show! Learn from the not-so-great rides and think forward. Dwelling on the negative is super destructive. What you think about, you bring about! Heels down is a must, also. I’m a big fan of all sorts of exercises to get those heels way down!  There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? First of all, I’m not a fan of any child or parent talking negatively about any other competitor. This is a competition against yourself to have your best ride possible. I don’t think a rider should waste their time or energy thinking about anyone else. With that said, there are obstacles for a trainer’s child to overcome, too. Let’s be honest, horse trainers didn’t pick this job to become millionaires. Often trainers’ kids have to catch ride. Maybe riding a horse 2 or 3 times ever before showing it. They often school their own horses and take few actual riding lessons because mom and dad don’t have time. They have also seen and heard every scary and bad thing that can possibly happen on and around a horse. It’s hard for that alone, to not create an obstacle to overcome. Not to mention there is probably some talent in the genes. Are we really going to expect a trainer to dedicate their life to the sport and everyone else’s children, and then frown on them for wanting the opportunity to share their time and passion with their own child?   How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Academy programs are a huge part of what keeps our sport going. They infuse our industry with riders and horse sales.

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What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? That’s a tough one for me. Yes, a nice properly fitting suit is extremely important—not too many sparkles

Lauren Reeves

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? My mother, Dede Bisch, has been a saddle seat instructor for over 40 years. I guess you could say I was born into the industry and grew to love the saddle seat division. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? In a week, our students will do a variety of different things, depending on what they need to focus on at the time. Some of my favorite activities are working patterns, riding without stirrups, group lessons, and using our Balance Rider© before lessons, which is a tool that helps the kids find their natural seat and balance when they get on the horse. They will ride anywhere from 2-4 times a week.

and check to make sure your shirt collar is not too big—but it’s not all about you, it’s about the horse and you helping them do their job.

what they put in to it. All kids are on an even playing field when they enter the show ring, whether they are a trainer’s child or a client. Being focused and motivated in your lessons, making an effort to ride multiple horses to get you out of your comfort zone, and riding every step with confidence when you are in the saddle, will carry over into the ring and set you apart from the other riders.

Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? We have had our students do a variety of activities in addition to riding to strengthen their muscles and focus their minds. My two favorites are yoga and kick boxing, or strength training at the gym, mostly focusing on their legs and core.

How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Lesson programs and the academy programs are extremely important, as they are a stepping stone to the larger shows. The lesson program gives the student the foundation of how to ride, gets them comfortable in the saddle, and gets them excited about riding saddle seat. The academy programs are great for exposing them to the horse show experience, and lets them know what they can expect when they graduate to the Class A shows. Academy is also helpful from the trainer’s perspective, as we get to see how nerves will affect our students when they go in the ring and if they will remember all they have learned when they are showing.

There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? I would say that any kid that rides saddle seat will get out of it

What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? When the pants are too short on the rider or when they have way too much bling. A little bling in equitation is nice, but overdoing it just draws attention to even the tiniest mistake.

Carmelle Rooker

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? I became an instructor when my husband Shawn and I opened up our training operation in 1988. I showed equation as a youth exhibitor and had great coaches (Dee Lowe and Jim Lowe) who taught me valuable information. Over the years I have trained and coached many national

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champion combinations. I learn more each year and feel the equitation division is one of the toughest in our industry.   What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your


students to practice? I encourage my riders to ride as much as possible. Everyone’s schedules are different, so the amount of time each student can devote to riding each week fluctuates. I have found that even if a rider can’t ride every single week, concentrated riding, consisting of multiple days in a row is equally as beneficial. A typical lesson consists of lunge line lessons on a lesson horse, and then a lesson on their show horse.   Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your students to do to prepare for this sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? Riding and showing equitation is a very physically and mentally challenging sport. Each and every rider must possess a strong sense of self. This is accomplished by being prepared for the division they are exhibiting in. Physically, riders must stay active, either by going to the gym, doing yoga, or participating in another sport. Mentally, when a rider understands how a horse is going to react and understands how to handle situations, their confidence comes quickly. I talk a lot about training and controlling their horse in every lesson. There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone

Lisa Jo White

How did you become an instructor in the Saddle Seat division and how many years have you been an instructor? In the early 1990s before my late husband John and I were married, he had a lot of amateur/youth riders with his business. Though I was working full time at a TV station as a reporter and news anchor, at the end of the day I would end up in the horse barn helping out. Over time I was getting more involved with his training business and started giving lessons to his riders and helped train horses. Eventually John and I started John White Stables. What do you have a typical student do in a week to practice, and how many times a week do you encourage your students to practice? Most of my riders are able to ride 2-3 times a week. They usually will ride their show horses once a week and the lesson horses on the other days. Other than riding, what other activities do you ask your student to do to prepare for the sport, such as aerobic activities and mental preparation? I encourage my riders to participate in school and outside sports. Physical activities such as weights, working out and yoga are all greatly encouraged. There has been a lot said about trainers’ kids having a huge advantage. What would you say to someone that

that may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? This question seems to come up a lot more frequently lately. There is a perception out there that trainers’ kids do have an advantage. I just don’t believe it. The nature of the sport and competition is that everyone is here to compete, learn and grow into a horseman/ horsewoman. If a student rider has the support of their family, and the exhibitor has a passion for horses, the sky’s the limit. Hard work, dedication and a good attitude are the key to success, not who your parents are. How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Lesson and academy programs are extremely important. Kids and adults alike, have to have an entry level place to get started. Each and every barn needs to offer some type of lesson program, where beginners can be introduced to horses.   What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? Too much bling. I am somewhat of a traditionalist. I like a rider’s attire to enhance the horse and rider, not distract from it.  

may have these thoughts about their child having a disadvantage? As an instructor, I have found that the rider and their family who are willing to make the time and commitment to be a top rider are the ones who succeed. When the rider has the passion, the love of horses, and the drive to work hard, their focus is in the right place and they are not thinking about the disadvantages. How important do you think lesson programs and academy programs are? Lesson and academy programs are very important. It presents a great stepping stone for new riders to start competing against riders at a similar level. Academy shows allow riders to get experience and the confidence before they step up to the Class A/Regional/National level. What is your biggest pet peeve when it comes to show ring attire? When too much attention is given to the glitz and glamour of the attire and not to the basic horsemanship the rider needs to present their horse successfully. I believe that the riders who succeed are the ones that understand their horses and work with them through the problems to reach their desired goals.

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Riding Apparel DeRegnaucourt Ltd. Becky DeRegnaucourt

Please describe what the proper fit for a saddle seat suit should be. Proper fit for the equitation division is to be impeccable. However, at DeRegnaucourt Ltd., we take this approach to perfect fit in every division, whether it be pleasure or equitation. The pant should be fit superbly on the leg. This is the biggest flaw that you see, and a judge can’t properly evaluate your leg if he/she is distracted by an ill fit. A pant bottom that tapers to the boot is paramount. Slightly below the heel of the rider’s boot, is where the length of the pant should fall. It should not be too long, or flopping and showing movement. The coat should fit snugly to the body without pulling or appearing uncomfortable. The hem of the coat should not be too long, creating too much fabric flying around, or giving a poor impression of the rider’s length of leg. When it comes to equitation apparel, how do you think an outfit can stand out from the rest? The fit and styling of the garment is, without question, the criteria that stands out in this division. However, read your USEF rule book for equitation; it is very specific what is allowed, and not allowed. Excess of any kind, shows that you are trying too hard, and looks cheap. Large lapel pins/ brooches, or glitzy anything is not “conservative” and not appropriate. Beautiful suiting fabrics, with subtle complementing fabrics for vest/shirt/and tie, are always in style and show off your riding skill to the best advantage. What is your biggest pet peeve you see in Saddle Seat apparel? Coats too long, pants that are sloppy, bright glossy fabrics with stones or embellishments, and accessories that are over the top, are not only in poor taste, but not appropriate in this division. Most important is cleanliness! Show in pants that are not sweat-stained and dirty. Clean and shine your boots, shape and steam your hat, press and fit your suit. These items show that you have respect for your judge by presenting yourself properly. When it comes to accessories, some can overdo; what do you suggest? Again, read your rule book. Doing nothing is better than going too far! Lapel pins or boutonnieres should be small (use the size of a quarter as a guideline, or use none at all). Earrings should be small and not moving (no larger than the lobe). When it comes to hair, less is more. Make a choice: subtle Baby’sBreath, small flowers, or a tasteful bow are all very traditional. You can also use pretty stones that line the side of the bun, or a sparkly barrette in the center back of the bun. Again, it should be simple and classy. Bling ties or tie rings are just unacceptable in this division. Riding Apparel provided by DeRegnaucourt Ltd.

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Frierson’s

Becky Cole Please describe what the proper fit for a saddle seat suit should be. The coat should be comfortable, but on the snug side, and sleeve length conducive to the show ring, as when the arm is in riding position the sleeve length is just past the wrist bone a bit. Jods should be covering the boot in front, breaking slightly, and covering the heel in the back, and should also be on the snug side like the coat, but comfortable. The vest should cover the waistband, as vests are referred to as “waistcoats,” but not so long as to lay on the legs, unless the customer prefers. When it comes to equitation apparel, how do you think an outfit can stand out from the rest? By having the most tasteful and elegant fabric that is conducive to the class they are competing in. As in all classes, the rider should portray confidence. Their trainer should have the horse and rider ready for the show ring. I, as their tailor, will have their outfit put together as far as fit, style, and color, to complete that total winning package. What is your biggest pet peeve you see in Saddle Seat apparel? When the rider overdoes their outfit so much that the judge and the audience do not see any important details that make them stand out from the others. For example, I was watching a western class in which all the riders were very “blinged out” and there was one rider with a plain red shirt. That is the rider who stood out to me, the one with the more understated look. When it comes to accessories, some can overdo; what do you suggest? Keep it simple! Riding Apparel provided by Frierson’s.

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Show Season

Melissa Holmes Please describe what the proper fit for a saddle seat suit should be. Every person has different fitting needs. Our job and goal at Show Season is to address the nuances and needs of every rider’s figure type. Picture perfection is an art we strive to achieve, which mirrors the confidence the rider translates to the show ring. When it comes to equitation apparel, how do you think an outfit can stand out from the rest? The art of equitation is not meant to be judged on being different. If you love your suit and love your look, you will ride with confidence and a confident, well prepared rider will make any suit stand out. What is your biggest pet peeve you see in Saddle Seat apparel? No refinement. Suits not properly tailored which can mean being too big or too tight. There needs to be a balance between the two for a proper drape and each rider’s body type. When it comes to accessories, some can overdo; what do you suggest? Simple elegance. Not to overuse hair and lapel accessories. n Riding Apparel provided by Show Season.

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Pre se n t i n g A K S Fa r m s’ READY TO CONQUER THE 14-18 DIVISION!

Allie Ollil a

AND

The Fire Marshall

Scottsdale Top Ten Saddle Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under 2015 Youth National Top Ten UPHA Arabian Breeds JTR 13 & Under Challenge Cup 2015 Buckeye Sweepstakes Champion Saddle Seat Equitation 13 & Under with Fifty Shades of Grey: 2015 Youth National Top Ten Arabian Saddle Seat Equitation 13 & Under 2015 Buckeye Sweepstakes Champion Arabian Country Pleasure JTR 13 & Under Alexis Scott, Trainer/Instructor 8984 Blue Street Norwalk, IA 50211 515-371-5073

w w w. ak sfarm sl lc .c o m

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S a d d l e Se at Sta r s . . . MAKING THEIR DEBUT IN 13 & UNDER

Elle Browne

AND

Lovem and Leavem

Scottsdale Reserve Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under Scottsdale Top Ten Saddle Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under with CF Coming Up Roses: 2015 Youth National Top Ten UPHA and Saddle Seat Equitation W/T 10 & Under 2015 Buckeye Sweepstakes Top Ten Saddle Seat Equitation W/T 10 & Under

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AKS Farms: Iowa’s Premier Riding School AKS Farms is centered around the idea that horses are good for your soul. Our love affair with the Arabian horse began over 20 years ago, and it grows stronger every day. AKS Farms’ mission is to give everyone the opportunity to experience these animals for themselves, and learn why our passion for Arabians is so strong. Come see what all the fuss is about!

Alexis Scott, Trainer/Instructor 8984 Blue Street Norwalk, IA 50211 515-371-5073

w w w. ak sfarm sl lc .c o m

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SUCCESS DREAM IT. LIVE IT. RIDE IT.

Christy Higman-Clements Training Miami, Florida

|

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Equitation Elegance...

N AT I O N A L

CHAMPIONS

AT

VHTC

Emily Nitz 1988

Jeanne Flohr 1995

Lea Clinton 1995

Lea Clinton 1998

Jessica Clinton 1998

Alaina Blake 2004

Anna Rayborn 2007

Emily Moore 2010

Lindsey Claire Farnie 2009 & 2011

Jenny Lau 2013

Emily Moore 2014

Raven Gropp 2015

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the Tradition Continues in 2016!

Elaina Roeder and Danse All Night Scottsdale Champion Saddle Seat Equitation 15-18

Raven Gropp and SA Rapid Fire Scottsdale First Place Saddle Seat Equitation 15-18

Isabella Templeton & Carrie Bradshaw Scottsdale Champion UPHA Challenge Cup Champion AHA Saddle Seat Medal

Vicki Humphrey, Jessica Clinton DeSoto & Gabe DeSoto • Canton, Georgia ~ 770.335.6194 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com

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Their

Passion

for the

ART OF EQUITATION started years ago ‌

CRA Riding Club St eph a n ie Dav i s son a nd L ea h B et h G ol l ad ay - I n s t ru c t o r s Ly r ic L aug h l i n - c o n s u lta n t

C E DA R R I D GE A R A BI A N S 2 0 3 3 5 S aw m i l l Ro ad , Jord a n , M N 5 53 52 | 9 52 - 49 2 - 6 59 0 w w w.C ed a r- R idge.c om

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and the

TRADITION CARRIES ON!

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Though she be but little, she is

fierce!

– William Shakespeare

Competing in

2016 SADDLE SEAT DIVISIONS 11-13 Proud parents Tony and Michelle Ames Instructed by Leah Beth Golladay, Stephanie Davisson and Lyric Laughlin

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Daniel T raining Center Special

Training ~ Marketing ~ Lessons emphaSiS on Youth, equitation & amateur mountS

Achieve Your Goals. Attain Your Dreams. Reach your highest potential with Daniel Training Center & Apex Riding Academy! Daniel Training Center Julie Daniel, Trainer 801-647-4336 Kasey Moffat, Assistant/Instructor 801-244-7996 Located at Sandspur Ranch 12480 N 93rd Street, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 ww.danieltrainingcenter.com home of apex riding academY Ar abian Horse Times | 201 | Volume 46, No. 10


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SUCCESS IS NO ACCIDENT

I   , , ,     , LOVE     . Join our John White Stable family in 2016.

John W hite Stables

Lisa Jo White • 4319 McCauley Road • Woodstock, Il 60098 • 815-245-2585 cell • E-mail: whitelisajo@aol.com www.JohnWhiteStables.com

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Fearless in the Irons 2016 Saddle Seat Contenders

Bailey Bostwick

Amanda Burns

Taylor Griego

Hazel Fischer

Bisch Training

B isch Training aT L os c edros Scottsdale, Arizona Dede Bisch | 480.250.4616 | DedeBisch@gmail.com | Lauren Reeves | Lauren@bischtraining.com www.bischtraining.com


AHT Abroad

The new worldwide publication focused on the European and Middle Eastern Show and Breeding scene. ISSUE 2 to arrive in June 2016, for distribution at the Menton Show. For further information, please contact: Mr. Jeff Wallace - Jeff@ahtimes.com / +323 5474116 Ms. Mieke Opsteyn - mieke@ahtimes.com / +32 475287165 www.AHTIMES.com Ar abian Horse Times | 205 | Volume 46, No. 10


What You Need To Know About Breeding Horses Today PA RT 1

EMBRYO TR ANSFER by Dr. Mario Zerlotti

With technical advances in modern veterinary medicine, Arabian breeders today have more ways to achieve a healthy foal than ever before. An owner doesn’t have to postpone his top show mare’s career as a mother or retire a standout broodmare due to age, or lose year after year of production because a broodmare has a history of problems. That does not mean that these procedures are simple, however; as in many pursuits, the more you know, the better results you will see. To make that easier for everyone, AHT asked embryo transfer specialist Dr. Mario Zerlotti, of Zerlotti Genetics Ltd., to write a series of articles on breeding techniques for mares who need more than just artificial insemination. In part one, Dr. Zerlotti sets the stage. If you’re new to the game or just want to brush up on your knowledge, here’s where you start. In coming segments, he’ll explore more “exotic,” cutting-edge procedures.

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EMBRYO TRANSFER

For the majority of Arabian mares being bred, the owner only has to select a stallion and, using artificial insemination or natural cover (which we don’t see very often nowadays), inseminate the mare. For others, however, such as show mares or mares who are “problem breeders,” the solution may be embryo transfer.

should be considered. Be aware that while we see mares producing embryos into their mid- to late-20s, that is not very common, and when we start embryo transfer very early, the mare usually will not be productive as late as her mid-20s. So, you might want to think about how long you envision keeping your mare in production.

In my experience, there are several things an owner can do to maximize results when using embryo transfer. What To Know Before Breeding A Show Mare Via ET Because embryo transfer enables owners to enjoy the best of both worlds with their mares (a show and breeding career at the same time), it is common. There are reasons for it beyond just wanting to do everything at once: mares are most productive between 3 and 8 years of age, which also happens to be prime time for show horses. After the age of 8, if the mare hasn’t been bred, she is more likely to be prone to problems. Before an owner decides to use ET on a mare in her early years, however, long term plans for her probably

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Dr. Mario Zerlotti


If your decision is to proceed, choose the best scenario. Typically, mares who are shown and bred at the same time live with their trainers, with the breeding scheduled into their training calendar. The best thing an owner can do in this situation is discuss priorities with the trainer. The trainer’s job is to train and present the horse as successfully as possible, and to achieve the best results in the embryo transfer process usually requires adjusting their routine and possibly the mare’s show schedule. The first difficulty is that a training barn is not the best environment in which to take embryos from the mare. As with humans, mares flourish in a quiet, relaxed atmosphere, with the ability to spend time in the pasture. This is not the case at most training barns. Then also—and this is most critical—when you work a mare, even for the relatively quiet divisions of halter or western, her body temperature rises. After the mare has been bred, the embryos may not survive a high body temperature (research shows that temperatures above 40

degrees centigrade/104 degrees Fahrenheit are difficult for them to endure). Plus, the mares don’t work just one day. They work three or four days out of seven. If those are the circumstances and the veterinarian gets a negative flush, owners often blame the vet—but realistically, there was nothing he or she could have done. For a show mare, short of taking a year off, the best case scenario would be to give her a break from training for 30 to 60 days, during which one or two embryos could be flushed. Then, having done her job, she can return to training. On a strong, healthy mare, even a week can help. When she ovulates, the trainer could stop working her for seven or eight days and then the veterinarian could flush an embryo. After that, assuming viable embryos, she could go back to work. Whether a mare is a strong candidate for breeding or one with limitations, and whether she lives at home, at a training center, or will be sent to a reproduction facility such as ours, the first step should be universal: check the mare’s breeding history and conduct a prebreeding exam.

Chelly Zerlotti photo

A relaxed atmosphere with pasture time is an optimal setting for a mare when reproduction is the goal.

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EMBRYO TRANSFER

Chelly Zerlotti photo

Zerlotti Equine Genetics Ltd.

The Breeding History At Zerlotti Genetics Ltd., we perform about 400 embryo transfers a year. Here is the procedure that starts the process for everyone. Before a mare arrives, we find out her background from her owner, trainer or whoever has managed her. ■ Has she been bred before? ■ Has she successfully carried foals to term? ■ How many foals has she had, and how was she bred (AI or ET, with fresh or frozen semen, or natural cover)? Identify what created the successes. Sometimes we find that mares with doubtful histories have been bred with poor quality semen, which should be taken into account. ■ Have they flushed embryos from her? ■ If she has been bred but has not had a foal, was a culture, cytology, biopsy and/or hormone panel performed? ■ What was the date of her last foal? You want to know how long a mare has been reproductively

active. If she had her last foal two years ago and they have been trying for that length of time, for example, you know you may have a problem. On the other hand, sometimes there are explanations for why she has not foaled that make her a good candidate to embryo transfer. ■ If she showed, what was her schedule? Did she receive hormones or steroids? Some substances interfere with a mare’s estrous cycle, although most hormones commonly used on show mares today have little long term effect on their reproductive capacity when used under a veterinarian’s supervision. ■ Has the mare been put under lights? If you are buying a mare to breed, those also are good questions to ask before purchase. Most breeders buy for the look and the performance, and may not worry about the reproduction tract if the mare is young. For a broodmare, however, this is important. If you send us a problem mare, we need to know what to do to overcome the trouble.

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Pay particular attention to the mare’s body condition. If she is too skinny, her overall metabolic system may be compromised, as well as the condition of her reproductive areas. If she is too fat, it is imperative that you know whether she has simply been fed too much and exercised too little, or if there is disease—Cushings, for example—involved. How fat is “fat”? If you can see a fat crest in the neck and on the back close to the tail bone, as well as around the base of the tail and the base of the mane, she’s too fat. Finally, we ask whether the mare is under lights. This is extremely helpful and something too few owners do. If the owner wants to start early in the year, the mare needs to be put under lights for at least 60 days before the season starts so that she can start cycling regularly at the desired time. This is because the equine species cycles based on the length of the day (the light). When the light is simulated, the pituitary glands start producing the hormones that make the mare cycle. When the amount of light decreases, as it does toward the end of the

calendar year, they shut down. Some of our donor mares go under lights at the beginning of November, because sometimes it can take around 60 days before you get a response in cycling. The Breeding Soundness Exam When mares arrive, we do a regular physical examination, covering body condition, quality of coat, etc. And then we do a physical reproductive examination, in which we search for every problem a mare might have had in carrying or delivering a foal, and for any trouble that might be waiting to happen. For this, we use both palpation and ultrasound. For palpation, you use your hand to feel the condition of the mare’s reproductive tract, and then with ultrasound, you see the image of what you were feeling. When the mare is in heat, you can feel that her uterus is kind of swollen on palpation. After ovulation, you can feel that the cervix has closed, because she has ovulated and is supposed to have been bred, so the cervix closes to protect the embryo site. Overall, it should be good and a little soft, not hard.

Chelly Zerlotti photo

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EMBRYO TRANSFER

Chelly Zerlotti photo

Show conditioning raises a mare’s body temperature, which often can be lethal for semen in the reproductive tract.

When checking a mare, we go first through the caudal reproductive tract: the perineal region, the vulva, clitoris, vestibule and vagina. Then you move into the cranial reproductive tract, through the cervix and into the uterus, with its body in the middle, and farthest away, its left and right horns. At the end of the horns are the mare’s ovaries. In the ovaries, you will feel the follicles by palpating. You can feel the softness of the follicle, the size and how close it is to ovulation. The ultrasound helps precisely measure the follicle and also analyze the edema in the uterus. The Laboratory Exams The last step, if necessary, in the preparatory examinations for broodmares involves tests that are performed in the laboratory: an endometrial (uterine) culture, cytology and biopsy. When we know a mare has a positive health history, the owner has never had problems with breeding and she passes the Breeding Soundness Exam, we don’t do a culture, cytology or biopsy, but that depends on each

mare’s case. But when we know that a mare has a history of problems or of infection, or is an old mare, then after the BSE and depending on what we find, we do all the necessary tests, including a uterine culture. That detects whether a mare has an infection, or a bacteria or fungus in the uterus. This may be a little controversial, because some veterinarians and breeders do a culture and cytology on every mare before they breed. In my opinion, that is not necessary if it is a healthy young mare who has never been bred or has been bred only a couple of times; has good conformation in the reproductive structure; good history; has a good uterus, with no fluids in it; is feeling good and everything is looking fine. On occasion, a mare has had a culture taken that has been contaminated accidentally, which results in a false positive and the mare being treated for a problem she doesn’t have. We typically use a biopsy for problem or older mares to see the extent of their difficulty in the uterus or the endometrium, or to see if they have a fibrosis (and if so,

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how bad?), or to estimate the level of infection. Basically, this is a procedure used most often on mares with a difficult history of reproduction.

certain size of follicle, induce her to ovulate and breed her the next day. It is not critical to be extremely close to the ovulation time when using this type of semen.

The most common problem we find in mares is infection, which sometimes takes a lot of time and effort to correct. Often the trouble has been present for a long time and treated extensively, which complicates a final solution. And sometimes enough damage has been done that it is not entirely correctable, and for the mare to foal, more specialized techniques are required.

With frozen semen, however, the dose is smaller and it is not going to survive very long in the reproductive tract (this is because it has already been stressed in the freezing process). Therefore, the mare has to be bred very close to ovulation. We do that by inducing the mare and then 24 hours later start to monitor how close she is to ovulating, because she is going to ovulate normally between 30 and 40 hours after the shot that induces her. Our timing has to be the best we can make it when we palpate her, because we have to inseminate her as closely as possible to ovulation. In our facility we inseminate the mare right before or no more than two hours after ovulation. That maximizes the chance of ovulation using frozen semen.

This is one reason why it is important for us and for the owner to know the mare’s history. What difficulty has she had, who has treated her and what has been tried? Semen, The Other Half Of The Equation What else do you need to think about when considering using embryo transfer? The stallion, of course. Stallion semen is as varied as the mares it will serve. Not only are some sires more potent, but there are differences in fresh, cooled and frozen semen. Especially if your mare is a problem breeder, you need to take into account the quality of a stallion’s semen as well as his bloodlines. When the semen is fresh or shipped cool, the process of insemination is fairly standard. We get a mare to a

The process used for insemination of frozen semen, called deep horn insemination, is different from what is used for fresh or cooled. It involves placing the semen very close to the ovary, by the end of the horn of the uterus, whereas in regular insemination, the semen simply goes past the cervix and into the body of the uterus.

Ginther OJ, Reproductive Biology of the Mare, Basic and Applies Aspects, 2nd ed. Cross Plains.

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EMBRYO TRANSFER

Chelly Zerlotti photo

For anyone considering using embryo transfer on their mare, the process is available to all. It just requires knowing as much as you can about your mare, making sure she is healthy and breeding sound, and committing her time to the process. It has opened new possibilities commercially and enabled great mares to hold two careers at the same time, but most of all, it has brought mares back into the breed whose contributions once would have been lost to age and infirmity. As little as 35 years ago, embryo transfer was relatively unheard-of in mainstream production. Now, it has opened the door to endless creative possibilities for breeders. â– 

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photo by riyan

61 st ann ual

scottsdale

arabian horse show

By Riyan Rivero Photos by Riyan Rivero & Chloe Holmes

The largest event of its kind, the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show celebrated its 61st Anniversary during the week of February 11-21, 2016. 300,000 people from 50 countries visited, while over 2,200 world-class Arabian and Half-Arabian horses competed for over $2,000,000 in prize money. The annual event takes place each year at WestWorld located in the heart of Scottsdale, Ariz. This year’s near-perfect weather conditions set the stage for the Arabian community’s glimpse of the future. Breeders and spectators alike, shared in the debuts and continuing careers of show horses that represent the breed’s brightest hopes. The following pages will guide you through a photographic tour of the outreach programs, the open barn parties, the thrill of victory, the atmosphere and the spectacular Arabian horses presented at the world’s largest Arabian horse show.

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Scot tsdale 2016

NOBLE SUPREME CRF & Leah Golladay CHAMPION Arabian Country Pl. Open

ROL DIVINE STYLE & Leah Golladay RESERVE CHAMPION Arabian Pl. English Open

AMES INSPIR ATION & Hadley Ames Top Ten Arabian Country Pl. JTR 14 & Under Top Ten Arabian Country Pl. Select Rider 14 & Under

DOUBLE OH SEVENN & Alexa Tiziani CHAMPION Arabian Country Pl. JOTR 14 & Under TOI FABULOUS CRF & John Golladay 2nd Place Half-Arabian English Pl. Gelding SHOCK AND AWE DSF & Lana Trautman Top Ten Saddle Seat Equitation 15-18 Top Ten Half-Arabian Country Pl. 15-18 JTR

NOBLE BEY CRF & Toni Dolby 2nd Place Arabian English Pl. 40 & Over Top Ten Arabian English Pl. AAOTR 19 & Over TIE DYE & Caelen Caspers Top Ten Arabian English Pl. JTR SHES ALL THAT OR A & McKenna Caspers Top Ten Half-Arabian Park ATR

Congratul ations New Owners!

The Lotto family

Tangle Ridge Farm

NOBLE QWEST (IXL Noble Express x Quintara Afire)

ESSENCE OF FIRE SMP (The Renaissance x Escada SCA)

Selling agent KIESNER TRAINING

Selling agent KIESNER TRAINING

on their purchase of

on their purchase of

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Michael and Toni Dolby on their purchase of

NOBLE SUPREME CRF (A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska)


John and Lea h Gol laday John 847- 668-3538 | Lea h 515-520 -760 4 lea h@cedarridgearabians.com Located at Cedar R idge A rabians Jordan, MN | w w w.cedar-ridge.com

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Proudly owned by Gretchen Love Sweepstakes Nominated Sire, Scottsdale Signature Stallion, IA Gold Star Stallion, MN Medallion Stallion, AWPA Enrolled Sire Standing at Strand’s Arabian Stables | Contact Jody Strand at 319.360.5997 | www.StrandsArabians.com | SCID & CA Clear


DA Valentino x Faberge AA, by Magnum Psyche

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61 st an n ual

scottsdale

arabian horse show

chloe holmes

Outreach

chloe holmes

The Scottsdale Show annually offers outreach programs and special free activities that cater to the entire family, including ice cream socials, Paint-A-Pony Ceramic Horse Painting, Behind the Scenes Barn Tours, Meet an Arabian Horse, educational round pen demonstrations and much more! This year’s activities included The Straight Egyptian Horse Seminar sponsored by the Pyramid Society and Markel Insurance; Markel Celebrity Slide Reining Championship; Military Appreciation Day; Military Dog Demonstration; Lisa Seger lns. Dog Costume Class; Art Contest Awards Presentation and March of Dimes Charity Presentation.

chloe holmes

chloe holmes

chloe holmes

chloe holmes

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riyan

riyan

riyan

riyan

chloe holmes

riyan

chloe holmes

chloe holmes

riyan

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riyan


Kissed Kissed Inthe Mist Inthe Mist (Hesa Zee+/ (Hesa x Artymusme) Zee+/ x Artymusme)

2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Arabian Reining ArabianFuturity Reining Classic FuturityChampion Classic Champion (Level 1) (Level 1) and Reserve andChampion Reserve Champion (Level 4) (Level 4)

Lady Muscana+ Lady Muscana+ (Hesa Zee+/ (Hesa x RV Zee+/ Muscana) x RV Muscana) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Top Ten Reining ArabianHorse Reining Championship Horse Championship Bitted Bitted

San Jacinto San Jacinto JullyenJullyen V (Jullyen V El(Jullyen JamaalElx Jamaal Sweet Klassique x Sweet Klassique V) V) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Top Ten Signature Top Ten Signature Stallion Western Stallion Pleasure Western Futurity Pleasure Futurity All Trained Alland Trained Shown andbyShown Gary Ferguson by Gary Ferguson

F I N I SFHI EN DI S SHHE OD WS HHOOWR SHE O S ,R ST EWSO, -TYW R -OO- LY DR -S O L D S & Y E A&R LY IENA GR SL ,I NPGUSR, E PB UR RE D E B &R EHDA & L F -HAARL AF B- AI AR NA B I A N A V A I LAAVBALI EL AFBOLRE SF AOLRE S A L E Ar abian Horse Times | 224 | Volume 46, No. 10


Hesa Ez Hesa Button Ez Button (Hesa Zee+/ (Hesa x Buttonns Zee+/ x Buttonns And Bows) And Bows) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Reserve Champion Arabian Working Arabian Cow Working Horse Cow Horse & Top Ten & ArabianWorking Top Ten ArabianWorking Reined Cow Reined Horse Cow Horse Owned byOwned Sandy by Woerle Sandy Woerle

Built By Built Peppy By Peppy (Little Sorrel (Little Peppy Sorrel x Fae Peppy ZeexPrincess) Fae Zee Princess)

2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Reserve Champion HA Reined HACow Reined Horse Cow & Horse & Top Ten HA Top Working Ten HA Cow Working Horse Cow Horse

EAF Peppylongstocking EAF Peppylongstocking (Little Sorrel (Little Peppy Sorrel x Mis Peppy Suzee) x Mis Suzee) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Top Ten HA Top Working Ten HA Cow Working Horse Cow & Horse & HA Working HA Reined WorkingCow Reined Horse Cow Horse All Trained Alland Trained Shown andbyShown Lance by Scheffel Lance Scheffel

EAF Pepper EAF Pepper (Hesa Zee+/ (Hesa x Marianda) Zee+/ x Marianda) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Top Ten Reining ArabianHorse Reining Horse AATR &AATR AAOTR & AAOTR 60+ 60+

KaceesKacees HiddenHidden AgendaAgenda (Hesa Zee+/ (Hesa x Miss Zee+/Kax Miss Cee Bar) Ka Cee Bar) 2016 Scottsdale 2016 Scottsdale Top Ten Arabian Top Ten Reining ArabianHorse Reining Horse AAOTR AAOTR 60+ Both60+ owned Both byowned Jane McKinnon by Jane McKinnon

EleanorEleanor Hamilton, Hamilton, Owner Owner Rod Matthiesen, Rod Matthiesen, TrainerTrainer Mark Coombs, Mark Coombs, Breeding Breeding Manager Manager

763.767.1381 763.767.1381 1.800.328.9923 1.800.328.9923 www.EleanorsArabianFarm.com www.EleanorsArabianFarm.com Rogers,Rogers, Minnesota Minnesota Ar abian Horse Times | 225 | Volume 46, No. 10


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Parties

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Throughout the week, many distinguished farms presented their top stallions and sale horses both at WestWorld and offsite at their respective Scottsdale farms. A few of the events included in this photographic journey are the AHT Readers’ Choice Awards, the Scottsdale Signature Stallion Auction, Stachowski Farms’ Performance Sale, Sheila Varian Tribute, and open barn parties at Aljassimya, Arabians International, Ted Carson Training, Chestnuthill Arabians, Krichke Training, McDonald Arabians, Rae-Dawn Arabians and Shada, Inc. riyan

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Events

The events and open barn parties offer seasoned breeders a glimpse at the shining stars, the future stars and some of the legendary mares and stallions that represent the best of the breed. These opportunities play a key role in their breeding decisions for the exciting, new season. Newcomers and spectators get a feel of the lifestyle offered to Arabian horse enthusiasts while friends, old and new, are united in their quest to catch up with one another, laugh together and share in one another’s excitement for the beginning of the show and breeding season.

all photos on this page by chloe holmes

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Congratulations Ava Welman 2016 Scottsdale CHAMPION A/HA/AA Short Stirrup Reining JTR 10 & Under

Dunminding Ps and Qs (Hollywood Dun It x Minding Ps And Qs, by Hesa Zee+/)

Thank you Dick Ames. None of this would have been possible without you. —Brian, Kim and Ava Welman

A

Ames Reining Horses

Owned by Dick Ames | 952-492-6590 | w w w. c e d a r - r i d g e . c o m Pro ud pare nts and trained by Br ian & K im Wel man | 612-991-5881 | w w w. br ianwelm an. com

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Kuduro

ctj

vitorio to | faustiana

2015 United States National Champion Reserve Yearling Colt 2016 Unanimous Champion Scottsdale Signature 2 Year Old Colt 2016 Scottsdale Champion 2 Year Old Colt (April - July) Owned by Colton Jacobs | Standing at Midwest Station I Austin Boggs | austin.boggs10@yahoo.com | 612.636.2290

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Competition

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The competition at the Scottsdale show is world-class. Over 2,200 of the world’s finest Arabian and Half-Arabian horses compete for over 2 MILLION dollars in prize money in 950 classes. The true versatility of the Arabian horse is exhibited in a variety of disciplines throughout the 11-day event.

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Camaraderie

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ca路ma路ra路de路rie | noun

A mutual trust and friendship among people who spend a lot of time together.

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Congratulations Kirby Arabian! Arabians! Arabians CP Manifesto

ScottSdale champion arabian country engliSh pleaSure Jr. horSe with Sharon blendinger

“Looking forward to the exciting show career of this young horse!” training by:

owned by: Kirby arabianS llc Sioux FallS, Sd

StachowSKi Farm, inc. Jim & peter StachowSKi

12561 St. rt. 44 • mantua, oh 44255 tel: 330-274-2494 • e-mail: inFo@StachowSKi.com Ar abian Horse Times | 238 | Volume 46, No. 10


Kaayyylylee llee ee

Atkttkikkiinssooonn

KF Lord of the Dance

2016 Scott cottS Sdale champion half-arabian Saddle Seat equitation 14 & under

You Glow Girl

2015 Youth Natio atioN Nal Champio hampioN N half-arabia rabiaN N Saddle Seat equitatio quitatioN N 13 & uNder

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Congratulations Sydney! SF Nitro Shoc

ScottSdale champion half-arabian country engliSh pleaSure aatr choice & elite riderS with Sydney dazzo

reServe champion half-arabian country engliSh pleaSure aatr 19-39

“Thanks to Stachowski Farms for a great show!”

owned by: dazzo equine, llc vicki & Sam dazzo, Jr,. Sydney dazzo albuquerque, new mexico

training by: StachowSki farm, inc. Jim & peter StachowSki

12561 St. rt. 44 • mantua, oh 44255 tel: 330-274-2494 • e-mail: info@StachowSki.com Ar abian Horse Times | 240 | Volume 46, No. 10


Scottsdale’s great ...

for playing in the dirt! LD

Tsunami

Champion arabian reining horse aaoTr 45-59 with KaTie harvey Co-reserve Champion reining horse open with gordon poTTs

Melissa Baus photo

Smoking Gun Champion half-arabian reining horse aaoTr and aaTr 45-59 and reserve Champion half-arabian reining horse non-pro derby with KaTie harvey

With sincere appreciation to Gordon Potts and Tyson Randle for the care you take with both of these horses. Trained by:

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TYSON RANDLE R E I N I N G

H O R S E S


Looking Forward to the 2016 Show Season!

Cool Hand Luke

&

Owned by Emily Shippee

WA

Emily Shippee

Scottsdale Champion

H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 2655 East Highway AA • Springfield, MO 65803 • www.chrishanpark.com Chris Wilson 417.761.2031 • Chris@ChriShanPark.com • Shan Wilson 417.848.3943 • ChriShanP@aol.com


NTC

Rustic Radiance

&

Krystal

McCulloch Scottsdale Top Ten

H/A Country English Pleasure AATR Choice & Elite Riders Owned by Dr. Krystal McCulloch

Congratulations!

Second Sight

&

Shan Wilson

Scottsdale First Place

H/A Country English Pleasure Novice Horse

A Great Start to the 2016 Show Season! 2655 East Highway AA • Springfield, MO 65803 • www.chrishanpark.com Chris Wilson 417.761.2031 • Chris@ChriShanPark.com • Shan Wilson 417.848.3943 • ChriShanP@aol.com


A Winning Combination ...

The Real Slim Shady

&

Heather Rodgers Scottsdale Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under

Scottsdale First Place

Saddle Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under

Youth National Champion UPHA Arabian Breeds JTR 13 & Under

Ferrara photo

Challenge Cup

Owned by Heather Rodgers

2655 East Highway AA • Springfield, MO 65803 • www.chrishanpark.com Chris Wilson 417.761.2031 • Chris@ChriShanPark.com • Shan Wilson 417.848.3943 • ChriShanP@aol.com


! s n o i t a l u t Congra Dick & Lollie Ames congratulate

TONI AND MICHAEL DOLBY on their purchase of

NOBLE SUPREME CRF.

BEST OF LUCK IN THE SHOW RING!

2016 SCOTTSDALE CHAMPION COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE OPEN with Leah Golladay

MULTI-NATIONAL CHAMPION

(A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska) 2008 Purebred Arabian Gelding

Thank you,

JOHN AND LEAH GOLLADAY, agents on the sale of this horse.

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3 HOR SE S … 5 CH A M PIONSHIPS! Thank you, Cynthia, and the whole Burkman Centre team, for an amazing Scottsdale!

Cynthia Burkman and …

ARIYA ENCORE+++//

Champion Hunter Pleasure Open

IIB KISS ME SANROSA

Champion Hunter Pleasure Jr. Horse

Katie Russell and …

ARIYA ENCORE+++//

Champion Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over

LIGHTNING MCQUEEN CRS Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over

IIB KISS ME SANROSA

Champion Hunter Pleasure AATR Elite

O w n e d b y : Jo e a n d K a t i e R u s s e l l | S a n t a Y n e z , C A

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ARHA

REINING

FUTURITY A M AT E U R S

First-Time Exhibitors, Surprise Saddles and Star Spangled Banners by SUE ADAMS

Arabian reining is experiencing noticeable growth in the amateur ranks with a number of new exhibitors showing at the Futurity for the first time this year. Riders from other disciplines are drawn by the enthusiasm and excitement they see around the Wells Fargo Advisors Arena and decide to join fun. And as more people are introduced to reining by friends and family, the thrill of riding reiners brings more people into the ring. Imagine a 2016 competitor who didn’t really ride horses until three years ago and made the Scottsdale event his reining show debut. Meet Dan Swanson of Eugene, Oregon. Dan got very serious about learning to ride and began driving three days a week from Eugene to Diamond B Training in Newberg, with Russ Brown. Although Swanson’s wife, Millie, rides English and hunters, Dan, whom Brown describes as having “a need for speed” was drawn to reiners. Swanson, riding his new Half-Arabian reining horse, Battreez Not Included, placed reserve in the Half-Arabian Rookie Non Pro Derby and third in the Half-Arabian Limited Non Pro Derby. “I’m 64 years old and absolutely hooked,” he states with a big grin. “I am going to ride at the U.S. Nationals and return here next year. This sport is just a good fit for me.”

The Futurity showcased reining professionals as amateurs in other mediums as well. Jim Greendyk of West Coast Training and Horsemanship, Chilliwack, B.C., loves the Futurity. He says three weeks in the desert sun riding reining horses will bring him back for years. Greendyk proved that Arabian reining trainers are as versatile as Arabians themselves. Caught in the warm-up arena singing along with the National anthem, he was quickly appointed the ARHA’s official amateur opening act for finals weekend and delivered stirring renditions of the Star Spangled Banner—on horseback, of course. The ARHA Board well understands that not everyone who competes at the Futurity goes home a winner, a lot of hard work notwithstanding. This year a little surprise was added to the mix to reward that effort. Names of the bottom three competitors from the Level I entries in both Arabian and Half-Arabian exhibitors were placed in a drawing for a saddle from Bob’s Custom Saddles in Scottsdale, Ariz. The winner was James Taylor Jones, from Albuquerque, New Mex., normally an endurance rider, who was showing in reining for the very first time. Now there’s some encouragement to continue riding reiners! n

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SCOTTSDALE JUDGES

Bruce Bates

Divisions judged: Western, Hunter and Youth classes Number of years judging: 30 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? With the great weather like we had this year, people coming from colder regions are just happy to be in the warmth of Arizona. We tend to forget that the show is only a Class A show, but with the number of horses, the quality in all divisions, and the classes offered, there is no comparison. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? The SSS Western Pleasure Maturity Championship was an exceptional class with Vicario winning it. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I have no concerns about the classes I judged; I think the judges’ seminars are addressing the current trends. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? The Sheila Varian tribute was very nice. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I have two Class A shows in Louisiana and Colorado, then Region 13 and on to the Canadian Nationals.

Debby Cain

Divisions judged: Halter ATH, JTH, AOTH Number of years judging: 35 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? There is no show that compares to Scottsdale. The depth of quality and number of horses, great management team, and the large number of spectators from all over the world, all make it the show to attend or judge. On halter panel one, I was able to witness firsthand how the love of Arabians passes down through the generations, and enjoy the expertise of each, presenting the same horses in another age division.   Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? Although the bagging was not allowed, exhibitors are still allowed one assistant in the entrance area with a whip to send them into the arena. Not only does it slow the show down with all the circling in the paddock area, but generally the horses would look better if they just trotted into the arena. 

Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? I was very impressed by the overall quality of the junior exhibition and AOTH classes, and happy to see them move forward to top tens later in the week as well.  

Laura Gault

Divisions judged: Western and Hunter Number of years judging: 12 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? The attendance is unbelievable. It is wonderful to pull in and see the parking lot full and the stands packed. The show committee does a first class job in every way. I saw advertisements on TV several times and also in magazines on my flight. They do a great job of bringing in spectators which is such a positive impact on our industry. Also, the area is beautiful and there are so many great restaurants and beautiful places to see. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? I would have to say both the Western Pleasure Junior Horse and Open. There were so many nice horses I saw throughout the show in both of those classes. I had no idea how the finals would turn out and it was an absolute blast to judge. All of the trainers and horses certainly came to the party and did an awesome job! Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I can’t think of anything that bothered me. Overall, the horses were moving great and showing to their best ability. The quality and performance throughout the show was phenomenal. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? Kornwall never ceases to amaze me with his consistent performances and outstanding attitude. I judged him in several different classes and he always looked happy and never got hot or anticipated. On his victory passes, he just cruised along with a smile on his face! Even if there was a bigger or fancier horse in the class, he always ended up on top with his consistency. It is obvious there is an extreme bond with him and his owner and trainer. You just don’t find many horses like Kornwall. He is special.  Where does your next judging assignment take you to? In the next couple of months I head to Alabama to judge the Alabama All Arabian Show, and then on to Colorado to judge the Colorado Classic Horse Show.

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Terry Johnson

Divisions judged: Youth English and Show Hack Number of years judging: 28 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Without a doubt, the overall quality of the horses and the opportunity to judge exhibitors from all over North America and abroad. It is also a wonderful opportunity to judge with other judges. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? There were many wonderful classes, but I guess the one that comes to mind for me was the Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? It is encouraging to see the horses moving well without loss of quality and type, in all the divisions. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? There were several classes that I really enjoyed judging and numerous trainers that had wonderful horses. Nutcracker Sweet PF is always exciting to watch, and Jim Lowe and Jim Stachowski also showed great horses. It is very difficult to isolate only one or two! Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I am looking forward to judging in Springfield, Ohio, in April, where I will be judging both the main ring and Sport Horse classes.  And in July, I will be judging the Saddle Seat World Cup in Cape Town, South Africa.

Christine Johnston

Division judged: English Number of years judging: 6 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Judging the Scottsdale show was an absolutely wonderful experience! Definitely different from any other show I’ve had the pleasure of judging. The depth of quality as far as horses and horsemanship, is astounding. Not to mention that every discipline is represented at this one show and represented very well. I miss the days of being able to have one show that we can compete in a variety of disciplines and showcase the trait our horses are known for—versatility! The staff and volunteers are incredible and conscious of the smallest of details; I was so impressed by every single person I came in contact with. They appeared so dedicated to making this a great experience for everyone involved.  Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? Several classes stand out in my mind. For example, the Amateur

Country English Pleasure. This class was so very deep in quality; not just a large class with a few great horses, but a large division full of very outstanding horses and several of which I expect will have an incredibly successful show season! Another deep class we got to judge was the Amateur Western Pleasure. I was so impressed by the level of training these horses exhibited. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? The trend that concerns me a bit is the packages some of our English horses are showing in. From hunters to English, we saw quite a few horses exhibiting labored movement. I would much rather be judging a horse with a little less motion but more fluidity in their gaits. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? The moment that stands out for me was the tribute to Shelia Varian. Personally, Shelia and my mom are responsible for me choosing the Arabian as my breed, and her incredible vision has forever changed our breed’s evolution. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? My next judging experience will consist of a few “A” shows before having the honor of judging U.S. Nationals.

Richard Petty

Divisions judged: International Halter and Stallion Halter Number of years judging: First carded as an Arabian horse judge in 1979 What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Since having participated as a judge for the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show several times, I have judged all the divisions offered with the exception of working western and dressage. Whether you are interested in watching or participating in any classes the Arabian breed has to offer, the Scottsdale show has been the epitome of showcasing these beautiful animals for the past 60 years, whether it be in the sales arena or show arena. And truthfully, who wouldn’t want to spend 10 days in the Arizona sun in the month of February? Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I have a tremendous amount of respect for the knowledgeable horsemen and women I served with on both panels. I also have a tremendous amount of respect for the professional and amateur men and women who handled these animals. As we all are aware, the halter classes in recent years have had an unsavory reputation because of the way the horses were treated. It has been my experience in the last few years, both in the United States as well as in Europe and the Middle East, that the horses are being treated with the utmost respect and kindness they deserve. This year’s Scottsdale show was no exception.

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SCOTTSDALE JUDGES

Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? I saw some amazingly beautiful horses, but the horse that captured my heart was the QR Marc son, Equator. I first “met” Equator in 2014 at the Polish Nationals at Janów Podlaski, and then again at the All-Nations Cup in Aachen, Germany in 2015. When he entered the ring for the International Stallion halter class at this year’s Scottsdale show, all I could do was smile and write his number down. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I have shows scheduled throughout the United States and Canada through November. Besides the Arabian division, I have had the opportunity to acquire a judge’s card in 14 other breeds and disciplines. I guess you could say that being invited to look at horses has become my passion—I can’t imagine doing anything else.

Joseph Polo

Division judged: Classic Stallion Halter Number of years judging: About 12 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Scottsdale is one of the best shows to judge. The quality and number of horses and all the amazing activities (sales/auction) make this show the premier in the world. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? Every class is exciting to judge. The level of competition, the talent of the amateurs and professionals create the highest degree for judging. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? My only concern is ... are we breeding for two types of halter horses? Meaning, an international style versus a comparative style? Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? There are always several horses that remain on my mind after judging Scottsdale, so it would be difficult to talk about just one. Regarding the moment … there is no better feeling than judging the championships in Wendell Arena on the last day of the show—very exciting! Where does your next judging assignment take you to? My next judging obligation takes me to the Dubai Arabian Horse Show in March. Having judged Dubai once before, I look forward to judging some of the best horses in the Middle East.

John Rannenberg

Divisions Judged: Mare Halter Open/SSS Number of years judging: 16 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? I’ve been competing at the Scottsdale All Arabian Show since 1979. Never missing a year, 2016 was my first time ever judging it. Without question, in my opinion it’s the best Arabian show in the United States. At a time in our industry where our shows are suffering with low attendance and a lack luster atmosphere, Scottsdale is thriving. With its outstanding facility, huge numbers of entries in all disciplines, and the best horses in the country competing for top honors, it’s a great place to spend time in the sun in a great city that embraces and welcomes you. Showing to a full house with a huge general spectator attendance is exhilarating and thrilling. Scottsdale is a show created to entertain the horse community, as well as the general public, and ultimately promotes the Arabian horse breed. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? There’s actually two classes that will remain embedded in my memory as my favorites. Sunday morning standing in center ring judging the Junior Filly Championship and the Mare Championship was outstanding. We as a judging panel were all in awe of the beauty, quality and horsemanship presented that morning. For me as a judge, it was a moment in time. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I’m happy to say that with my experience judging Scottsdale this year our “perception” has greatly improved. The show committee held a meeting prior to the show and invited all trainers and handlers to attend so as to be informed on showing rules and regulations. I’d like to personally commend the handlers that showed to me, and say that I appreciate and respect their professionalism in which they handled and presented their horses. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? The cool thing is that there were moments all throughout the week! Seeing the depth of quality, as well as the commitment people have made to continue breeding and showing their horses was exciting and reassuring. We’re all aware these are tough times for our country and economy, but the success and participation of the Scottsdale show proves to me that we will survive and grow, and the pride of owning a Arabian horse is still the ultimate natural high! Where does your next judging assignment take you to? My next judging assignment is Youth Nationals in Oklahoma City. I haven’t been back to that facility since Youth Nationals left many years ago and moved to Albuquerque. I’ve heard there’s been tremendous improvements, so I’m excited to see what’s been done. I know this is such an important show to our youth and I’m thrilled and honored to be invited back to judge.

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Margo Shallcross

Division Judged: Trail Number of years judging: This is my 26th year as an Arabian Judge What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Depth of the classes along with the quality of the horses and exhibitors that attend Scottsdale surpasses any other Arabian show in the United States. Nowhere else will I judge over 300 goes in two days of trail classes.

Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I think the team I was working with was consistent, and after I had a chance to read the catalogue, I was happy to realize that Arabians with different bloodlines made it to the top. For me, this is quality and means the breeding programs still have a lot of variety.  Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? I loved the Egyptian stallion Al Ayal AA, he is very classic in type. In the mare section I really liked Honey´s Delight and also Om El Soraya. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I will be in Qatar shortly.

Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? The courses were quick and well designed; so many of the classes had some excellent goes. I enjoyed judging the English Trail and was very pleased at the turnout in these classes. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I would like to see a little more flow between some of the obstacles and not as much hesitation. The one place it stood out was when the horse entered a box and did a complete turn either direction, walked out and over a bridge and walkovers. Many of the exhibitors took a long hesitation after the circle and once they stepped out, they would stop their horse and hesitate before going over the bridge. To really plus up on this type of course, I would prefer a horse that circles and smoothly moves forward over the pole and directly moves forward and over the bridge and walkovers without all the stopping and long pauses between the obstacles. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I am judging several shows across the U.S. for Pintos and Miniatures, but the next major Arabian show I will be judging will be the Youth Nationals in Oklahoma City, Okla.

Marianne Tengstedt

Divisions judged: International Arabians – Egyptian and Egyptian related. Number of years judging: Since 1987  What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? It’s a fantastic event with so many activities for Arabian horses— all activities makes a difference.

Cathy Vecsey

Division judged: English Number of years judging: 6 years   What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? The number of entries, the spectators, the commercial exhibits, the schedule, and the weather for sure! So much nicer than Connecticut in February!  Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? All of the classes were fun, but the Half-Arabian amateur country classes were beautiful!   Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? I wish that the terms “forward” and “speed” were not synonymous. Not every horse looks their best going so hard or fast.   Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? Nothing beats the Friday and Saturday night classes with the full stands. It was an honor to step out into the ring to judge, although Liberty can be a bit stressful (in a good way), since the crowd has no problem voicing their opinion!    Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I got home from judging in South Africa two days before I left for Scottsdale, so February was a great month for me. Next I go to Utah and then Louisiana.  

Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? I loved judging the different categories and the quality was very good all over.

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SCOTTSDALE JUDGES

Lisa Jo White

Richard Wright

Division(s) judged: Mare Halter Open and SSS classes Number of years judging: 19 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? The quality and the number of halter horses that show in Scottsdale.  Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? Overall, the mare halter division was outstanding. The Junior Filly Championship and Senior Mare Championship classes were spectacular. To stand in the arena with so many outstanding mares at one time is truly a privilege. Not only the first place winners, but the second place winners should also receive the same acknowledgment and praise. These are a group of horses that I look forward to following as they continue their success in the show arena. Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? The “bagging issue” has been a concern in previous years. It was brought to the attention of the judges prior to the show that Stewards would be in the warm up arena and regulating the amount of bagging done prior to entering the arena. From my perspective, standing in center ring, I think their effort was successful. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? The retirement of the Senior Champion Mare RH Triana. After she made her victory pass, she stood at the in gate looking back into the arena. For a mare that has won so many top honors and this being her last time being shown, going out as Scottsdale Champion was a moment to remember.

Divisions judged: Amateur Purebred and Half-Arabian Halter Number of years judging: 33 years What separates the Scottsdale show from other shows you have judged? Scottsdale is the perfect storm; location, weather, beginning of the year enthusiasm and a show that is long enough to do some serious horse shopping. In addition, it has consistently been guided to further prominence by people that are not afraid of taking risks. From our first time showing at WestWorld in the mid-eighties when there was just a concrete wall where the outdoor ring is, to now, is a millennial leap. I am so proud of the dedication and resources in our industry in both the halter and the performance areas and while I have judged the best horses in many breed disciplines, our horses and our work are the equal of any. Is there one class that stands out in your mind that you judged? Seeing Jake Boggs show was a very cool moment for me, and I think I will have to step up the dress code when he is around! Are there any current trends or concerns that you have in the classes that you judged? There was more of an emphasis placed on a conservative paddock throughout the show and from my perspective, I did not see any lack of animation with the horses coming in the ring. I would also applaud a number of the top horses which to me, were shown very quietly and yet effectively. I hope there is some understanding that with a horse of truly exceptional quality, a quiet presentation only adds to the impact and drama surrounding the horse. Is there a horse or moment that stands out in your mind more than any other? I love our amateurs showing and being so proud of their horses, but I do want handlers to take into account suitability of the horse’s behavior with regard to the handler’s ability to control or physically move with the horse. Where does your next judging assignment take you to? I was fortunate to judge both Canadian Nationals and the Morgan Grand National last year. I am doing more work with clinics and working the Region 1 show this year. n

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Scottsdale ARABIAN CHAMPIONS 2016

ARABIAN CLASSIC

Senior Stallions

Champion Arabian Classic Senior Stallion KAHIL AL SHAQAB (Marwan Al Shaqab x OFW Mishaahl), shown by David Boggs for owner Al Shaqab - Member Qatar Foundation.

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Reserve Champion Arabian Classic Senior Stallion BARZAN AL SHAHANIA (Stival x NW Siena Psyche), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud.

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INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN BREEDERS CLASSIC

Senior Stallions

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Senior Stallion EQUATOR PASB (QR Marc x Ekliptyka), shown by Glenn Schoukens for owner Michal贸w State Stud Farm.

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Reserve Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Senior Stallion SPITFYRE VF (TF Psymreekhe x Red Flame BRSB), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Mike Steenhart.

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ARABIAN CLASSIC

Junior Colts

Champion Arabian Classic Junior Colt RAJJ Z (Marajj x Loredonna Z), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Sheikh Mohammed Bin Sand Al Qasimi.

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Reserve Champion Arabian Classic Junior Colt BELOVED MARCANGELO BF (QR Marc x Magnums Angel JD), shown by Ted Carson for owner Patricia Dempsey.

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INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN BREEDERS CLASSIC

Junior Colts

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Junior Colt VANGELIS MI (DA Valentino x Always An Angel), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Mulawa Arabian Stud Pty. Ltd.

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Reserve Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Junior Colt JAZZAA ALJASSIMYA (WH Justice x Toscana PGA), shown by Giacomo Capacci for owner Aljassimya Farm.

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Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Egyptian Heritage Senior Male MONTHER AL NASSER (Ansata Hejazi x Aliah Al Nasser), shown by Glenn Schoukens for owner Aljassimya Farm.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Egyptian Heritage Junior Male LARK RCA (Bellagio RCA x Star Of Marajj), shown by Greg Knowles for owner Debra Mitchell.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Straight Egyptian Senior Male AL AYAL AA (Al Ayad x The Vision HG), shown by Giacomo Capacci for owner Ariela Arabians.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Straight Egyptian Junior Male THEE DOMINION (Scapa x Thee Desert Rose), shown by Luis Paniagua for owner Daniel Heithold.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Yearling Colt VERSACES EROS (Versace x Jumeriah Rose SWF), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Versaces Eros Partnership.

Champion Arabian Classic Senior Stallion AAOTH TRUAX (Trussardi x Elle Gazal), shown by James White, owner of Timberidge Family LLP.

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Champion Arabian Classic Junior Colt AAOTH POLIMAR (Polidoro FC x Shalimar MA), shown by owner Rocksanne Pieters.

Champion Breeders Club 2-Year-Old Colt/Gelding ATH VEYRON ORA (Vitorio TO x Luxemere Jizette), shown by Jason Tackett for owner Oak Ridge Arabians.

Champion Breeders Club Yearling Colt/Gelding ATH PREMIER PA (Cadance PA x Irresistable PA), shown by Dean Wikel, owner of Pegasus Arabians.

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ARABIAN CLASSIC

Senior Mares

Champion Arabian Classic Senior Mare RH TRIANA (ROL Intencyty x Sylviah WLF), shown by David Boggs for owner Triana Holdings LLC.

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Reserve Champion Arabian Classic Senior Mare BADIAA AL SHAHANIA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Majalis), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud.

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INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN BREEDERS CLASSIC

Senior Mares

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Senior Mare HONEY’S DELIGHT RB ( JJ Senor Magnum x Honeymoon FHP), shown by David Boggs for owner Masterpiece Arabian Partners LLC.

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Reserve Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Senior Mare OM EL SORAYA (Om El Bellissimo x Om El Sariyana), shown by Giacomo Capacci for owner Aljassimya Farm.

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ARABIAN CLASSIC

Junior Fillies

Reserve Champion Arabian Classic Junior Filly ARIA APHRODITE (Aria Impresario x Honey’s Delight RB), shown by David Boggs for owner Aria Prestige Holding LLC.

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Champion Arabian Classic Junior Filly MYSTIC MAGNOLIA PF (Ever After NA x Mystic Rose BHF), shown by Keith Krichke for owner Jessie Szymanski-Hoag.

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INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN BREEDERS CLASSIC

Junior Fillies

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Junior Filly MD MIRKA (AJ Thee Luca x MD Psylk), shown by Michael Wilson for owner Manuel Durini.

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Reserve Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Junior Filly ELZUNYA MEIA LUA (El Jahez WH x Elle Dorada), shown by Austin Colangelo for owner Al Shahania Stud.

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Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Egyptian Heritage Senior Female HADEEL AL SHAQAB (Ashhal Al Rayyan x Enshoda Al Shaqab), shown by Dagmar Gordiano for owner Al Shaqab - Member Qatar Foundation.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Egyptian Heritage Junior Female MASRI AL MAGNIFFICOO (Marwan Al Magnifficoo x Masri Nijmi), shown by Rodolfo Guzzo for owner Mark Davis.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Straight Egyptian Senior Female MAKEDA DB (Mishaal HP x Jamiil Baarrah), shown by Greg Knowles for owner Virginia Gober.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Straight Egyptian Junior Female SOFIYAA AA (Al Ayal AA x Saniyyah RCA), shown by David Boggs for owner Ariela Arabians.

Champion International Arabian Breeders Classic Yearling Filly CELESTINA INZ (ML Mostly Padron x Serenitee CA), shown by Ted Carson for owner Suzann Vince.

Champion Arabian Classic Senior Mare AAOTH JADORE PA (Magnum Chall HVP x Tresor PA), shown by Dean Wikel, owner of Pegasus Arabians.

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Champion Arabian Classic Junior Filly AAOTH NARADAA (Hariry Al Shaqab x RD Alotta Ambition), shown by owner Renae Mendel.

Champion Breeders Club 2-Year-Old Filly ATH MC JASMARA (SF Sir Real x Ames Jasmine), shown by Kenneth Blake McDonald for owner Abin Adi Arabians.

Champion Breeders Club Yearling Filly ATH SRIRACHA PA (Cadance PA x Perfection PA), shown by Tory Wikel for owner Pegasus Arabians.

Champion Arabian Classic Filly/Mare JTH MC JASMARA (SF Sir Real x Ames Jasmine), shown by Kenneth Blake McDonald for owner Abin Adi Arabians.

Champion Arabian Classic Senior Gelding LLC FABRIZIO (Baahir El Marwan x RD Fabreanna), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Stuart Vesty.

Champion Arabian Classic Junior Gelding VALIK ORA (Vitorio TO x Star Of Justice ORA), shown by Alcides Rodrigues for owner Melissa Subjeck.

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Champion Arabian Classic Gelding AAOTH IDENTITY PA (Magnum Chall HVP x Miss Amerika), shown by Dean Wikel , owner of Pegasus Arabians.

Champion Arabian Classic Gelding JTH VERSAILLES PCF (Pstrategy x Veronica GA), shown by Muskan Sandhu for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Champion Platinum Performance $5,000 Arabian Liberty IMPERIOUS NA (El Chall WR x Promises Psy), shown by Austin Boggs for owner Midwest Station II, Inc.

Champion H/A Classic Senior Mare BENI TG (DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by Dagmar Gordiano for owner Todd Weegens.

Champion H/A Classic Junior Filly DAVINCIS EBONY GA (Da Vinci FM x Ebony By Valentino), shown by Rodolfo Guzzo for owner Perry Perkins.

Champion H/A Classic Mare AAOTH BENI TG (DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by owner Todd Weegens.

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Champion H/A Classic Filly/Mare JTH BENI TG (DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by David Leach for owner Todd Weegens.

Champion H/A Classic Senior Gelding REMEMBER THE NYTE RMA (Vitorio TO x CF Mamies Night Out), shown by Alcides Rodrigues for owner Melissa Subjeck.

Champion H/A Classic Junior Gelding DOM PERIGNON LL (Vitorio TO x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by Gil Valdez Jr. for owner Linda Lane.

Champion H/A Classic Gelding AAOTH REMEMBER THE NYTE RMA (Vitorio TO x CF Mamies Night Out), shown by owner Melissa Subjeck

Champion H/A Classic Gelding JTH DOM PERIGNON LL (Vitorio TO x Rohara Mademoiselle), shown by Tory Wikel for owner Linda Lane.

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Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 4 Years & Over Stallion/Gelding ATH LLC FABRIZIO (Baahir El Marwan x RD Fabreanna), shown by owner Stuart Vesty.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 4 Years & Over Mare ATH PCF CRYSTAL VISION (PCF Vision x MCA Afire Beylee), shown by Shirley Popplewell for owner Murray Popplewell.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Auction Classic 3-Year-Old Stallion/Gelding AOTH ESCAPE WA (Scapa x Sabrina WA), shown by Ed Friesen for owner Laura Friesen.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Auction Classic 3-Year-Old Mare AOTH RD VERSARIA (Aria Impresario x La Bella Versace FR), shown by Shirley Popplewell for owner Murray Popplewell.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 3-Year-Old Stallion ATH MONTANA MARJAN (Montana Firenze x Song Of Marwan AF), shown by Margaux Rodrigues for owner Hussain Mohammed Hamed Alajmi.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 3-Year-Old Mare ATH LADY VITORIO ORA (Vitorio TO x TM Mona Lisa), shown by owner Pamela Halbrook.

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Scottsdale Signature Stallion

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 3-Year-Old Gelding ATH VERSAILLES PCF (Pstrategy x Veronica GA), shown by Daniela Amaral for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 2-Year-Old Colt ATH CTJ KUDURO (Vitorio TO x Faustiana), shown by owner Colton Jacobs.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 2-Year-Old Filly ATH MALAYA NA (Ever After NA x Margarita Psy), shown by Ron Armstrong for owner Robert L. & Dixie L. North Family Trust.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Classic 2-Year-Old Gelding ATH VALIK ORA (Vitorio TO x Star Of Justice ORA), shown by Austin Garrett for owner Melissa Subjeck.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Auction Yearling Colt/ Gelding AOTH DELACROIXX (RD Dynamo x HED Caramba), shown by Jay Krusenstjerna for owner Barbara Sink-Krusenstjerna.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Auction Yearling Filly AOTH FEMME FATALE WA (Couturier x Mariabella WA), shown by Ed Friesen for owner Laura Friesen.

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Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Yearling Colt/Gelding ATH HARJEET MA (Hariry Al Shaqab x Alia Psyche IA), shown by Whitney Miles for owner Steve Miles.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Yearling Filly STAR OF JERICHO (A Jericho x Lady Jeanette), shown by Anthony Marino Jr. for owner Norma-Jean Abel.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian English Pleasure Maturity ATR EYE CANDYE (Baske Afire x Las Veghaz), ridden by Susan Chance for owner CSC Breeders.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian English Pleasure Futurity 3 & 4 Years Old CP ISADORA (ML Afire Dream x CP Isabella), ridden by Joshua Shino for owner Stachowski Farm, Inc.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian Western Pleasure Maturity ATR VICARIO (DA Valentino x Faberge AA), ridden by Jill Lochner for owner Gretchen Love.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity 3 & 4 Years Old DON VINITO (Hi Hello Boy x Vivie En), ridden by Thomas Garland for owner Bruce Miller.

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Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian Hunter Pleasure Maturity ATR KHURB APPEAL (Khadraj NA x Rhapsody In Gold), ridden by Brianna York for owner Katie Walther.

Champion Scottsdale Signature Stallion Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity 3 & 4 Years Old NO GREATER LOVE CB (IA Ambassador x jullyanna), ridden by Cynthia Burkman for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc

Photo by Ashley Lauren

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Champion Arabian English Pleasure HEIRS NOBLE LOVE (Afires Heir x Noble Aphroditie), ridden by Joel Kiesner for owner T. Karlton Jackson.

Champion Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse NOBLES HEIR (Afires Heir x Noble Aphroditie), ridden by Joel Kiesner for owner T. Karlton Jackson.

Champion Arabian English Pleasure AATR 19 & Over ENTOURAGZE (Apollopalooza x DA Atlantique), ridden by Devon Shuster for owner Shuster Arabians LLC.

Champion Arabian English Pleasure JTR 18 & Under DA HEATSTROKE (Afires Heir x DA Fires Magic), ridden by Holland Stevens for owner Remington Monroe Equine LLC.

Champion Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 19 & Over BSA MATADOR (El Ghazi x Mattawine), ridden by owner Jill Nelson.

Champion Arabian English Pleasure JOTR 18 & Under DA HEATSTROKE (Afires Heir x DA Fires Magic), ridden by Holland Stevens for owner Remington Monroe Equine LLC.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure NOBLE SUPREME CRF (A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska), ridden by Leah Beth Golladay for owner Cedar Ridge Farm.

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Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse CP MANIFESTO (H Mobility H x Afire Charmm), ridden by Sharon Blendinger for owner Kirby Arabians LLC.


English Pleasure/ Park

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over BEYBERRIED TREASURE (Hucklebey Berry x MWF Miska), ridden by owner Peggy Weems.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 DIVA AFIRE (Afire Bey V x The Grand Diva), ridden by Lindsay Smith for owner North By Northwest LLC.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider BEYBERRIED TREASURE (Hucklebey Berry x MWF Miska), ridden by owner Peggy Weems.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 AFLASH AFIRE (Afire Bey V x B B Flashdanse), ridden by owner Jennifer Diamond.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over EXTRAORDIN HEIR (Afires Heir x Gwyneth D), ridden by Leslie Doran Sommer, owner of Shamrock Farms LLC.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 19-39 DIVA AFIRE (Afire Bey V x The Grand Diva), ridden by Lindsay Smith for owner North By Northwest LLC.

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Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider KICKSTART MY HART (Mamage x PSI Love U), ridden by owner Megan Lefave.


Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 19 & Over Choice & Elite Ride SA KAPPUCCINO (Bucharest V x SS Wildflower), ridden by Bailey Wikel for owner Pegasus Arabians.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JOTR 15-18 CP RUMOR HAS IT (CP Sequoia x CP Jasmine), ridden by Sarah Esqueda for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JTR 15-18 JR CHIVAS REGAL (VCP Magnifire x JR Colleen), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JTR 15-18 Select Rider HOT PURSUIT PF (Black Daniels x Harghazi Fire CMF), ridden by owner Jenna Neufeld.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JOTR 14 & Under DOUBLE OH SEVENN (Hucklebey Berry x Mahoganyy), ridden by owner Alexa Tiziani.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under HEIRESS TRGR (Afires Heir x Helen Hayes X), ridden by owner Sophie Yih.

Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under Select Rider DRAKO AFIRE (DS Major Afire x BZ Seyyida Liena), ridden by Reece Rasmussen for owner Patricia DeAtley.

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Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure Walk/Trot 10 & Under HS JUSTATEMPTATION (A Temptation x HL Justalusion), ridden by Reagan Vokoun for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion H/A English Pleasure LADY AVA ISABELA (Baske Afire x Captivating Style), ridden by Jonathan Ramsay for owner Helen Lacey Reed.

Champion Arabian Park Horse CSP BARBANCOURT (Mamage x CSP Angelfire), ridden by Shan Wilson for owner Michelle Werts.

Champion H/A English Pleasure Junior Horse PISTACHIO PF (Undulata’s Nutcracker x VTM Pistachia), ridden by Todd Hickerson for owner Roberta Andreotti.

Champion H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 19-39 NUTCRACKER SWEET PF (Undulata’s Nutcracker x Ames Déjà Vu), ridden by Juliette Dell for owner 6D Ranch Ltd.

Champion H/A English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over TCF RIHANNA (Afires Heir x Airvana), ridden by Barbara Rothman for owner River Run Farms LLC.

Champion H/A English Pleasure AATR NUTCRACKER SWEET PF (Undulata’s Nutcracker x Ames Déjà Vu), ridden by Juliette Dell for owner 6D Ranch Ltd.

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Champion H/A English Pleasure JOTR 18 & Under BAYONCE (Black Daniels x Laurel Hill Pennies From Heaven), ridden by Holland Stevens for owner Remington Monroe Equine LLC.

Champion H/A English Pleasure JTR 18 & Under BLAZN TIME (Pension CAHR x Jeweled Spirit), ridden by Raven Gropp for owner Sarah Thomas.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure PHI BETA KAPPAH (Phi Slama Jama x BRA Quintessence), ridden by James Lowe for owner Amazing Horse Woman LLC.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure Junior Horse STRAWBERRY ALARM CLOCK WA (Mariachi WA x If I Was A Rich Girl), ridden by Joshua Shino for owner Remington Monroe Equine LLC.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over ERA THRILLICIOUS (Baske Afire x Koriene), ridden by owner Diane Franklin.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 ADMIRE THE FIRE (Baske Afire x Admirals Lotus Blossom), ridden by Andrew Smith for owner North By Northwest LLC.

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Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 COOL HAND LUKE WA (Mariachi WA x Watchful), ridden by owner Emily Shippee.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over RH GLADIATOR (Mamage x Lakeview’s Savoir Faire), ridden by Krystal McCulloch for owner Amazing Horse Woman LLC.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider MISTER BIGG STUFF (Baske Afire x Rhapsody), ridden by owner Richard Nash.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AATR 19-39 ADMIRE THE FIRE (Baske Afire x Admirals Lotus Blossom), ridden by Andrew Smith for owner North By Northwest LLC.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider CORONA PE (Afires Heir x Urona), ridden by Jennifer Smith for owner Pegasus Arabians.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure AATR Choice & Elite Riders SF NITRO SHOC (SF Specs Shocwave x Doubletrees Lady Of Intrigue), ridden by Sydney Dazzo for owner Dazzo Equine LLC.

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Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JOTR 15-18 MJM HIT MAN (Baske Afire x La Bella Mafia), ridden by owner Falan Alpert.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 15-18 Select Rider PENELOPE KREWSE (Krewe x Sultan’s Final Dawn), ridden by owner Nicole Krueger.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under THE REAL SLIM SHADY (Mamage x Vanity’s Gal), ridden by owner Heather Rodgers.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 15-18 SOMETHING BLUE (Bellagio PR x The Small Town Blues), ridden by Shelby Norris for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JOTR 14 & Under TF STILL SMOKIN (Baske Afire x The Fix), ridden by owner Grace Hertz.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR 14 & Under Select Rider DREAM OF LOVE (Baske Afire x Spartan’s Silk Stockings), ridden by Kayla Rotella for owner Maya Kahwaji.

Champion H/A Country English Pleasure JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under TOI TALENT (Matoi x Feather Talent), ridden by Alexa Gilbert for owner Kelly Gilbert.

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Western Pleasure Champion H/A Park Horse HALSTEADS DEVEN (Ariberry Bey V x Halsteads Devon), ridden by James Lowe for owner Hannah Glaser.

Champion H/A Park Horse ATR REA MY ALLIENCE (Allience x My Diamond Girl), ridden by owner Gregg Shafer.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure DIESEL SMOKE CBA (Sundance Kid V x C A Majia), ridden by Josh Quintus for owner Timberidge Family LLP.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse VICARIO (DA Valentino x Faberge AA), ridden by Jody Strand for owner Gretchen Love.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over LINK TO FAME (Fame VF x Honeicomb), ridden by Brent Gilman for owner Powers and Gilman Partnership.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 KORNWALL (Monogramm x Kawalkada), ridden by owner Susan Copeland.

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Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATOR 19-35 ONYX A (Sundance Kid V x Aliage SSA), ridden by owner Anne Whitaker Keller.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 40 & Over KORNWALL (Monogramm x Kawalkada), ridden by owner Susan Copeland.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider KHADILLAC PGA (Khadraj NA x Gai Fantasha), ridden by Carrie Mcaninch for owner Quadruple B LLC.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 19-39 EE XTREME HEAT (Desert Heat VF x EE Minuet), ridden by owner Laura Smith-Lambert.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider TA OCALA (Kordelas x Oronka), ridden by Kaitlyn Murray for owner Shannon Pullifrone.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 19 & Over Elite Riders SLOW RIDE CCF (El Milenio x Sweeter Nwine V), ridden by Robin Porter, owner of Crescent Creek Farms LLC.

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Champion Arabian Western Pleasure AATR 19 & Over Choice Riders MOSSIMO PGA (Versace x National Enfanta), ridden by owner Deanna Morrison.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JOTR 15-18 CJ PSYNCINATI KID (Padrons Psyche x Peaches N Fame), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JTR 15-18 CJ PSYNCINATI KID (Padrons Psyche x Peaches N Fame), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JOTR 14 & Under CF BLACK BUGATTI NM (Nite Mover x Gazalla), ridden by Wyatt Potts for owner Freewill Farm LLC.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JTR 14 & Under KW SCARLETTS TARA (Wolf x TC Scarlett OHara), ridden by owner Georgina Ramirez.

Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JTR 18yrs & Under Select Rider SYMPLY PSAXON (Psax x Psymply Magic), ridden by owner Carson Adams.

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Champion Arabian Western Pleasure JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under DYLAN SA (TAF Best Berrybey x Fad Sina), ridden by Brylen Beicker for owner Brinley Beicker.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure Open IMA ROCKIN POP STAR (Poco Van Star Two x Weczendela), ridden by Joe Reser for owner Tabitha Bell.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure Junior Horse SOL MAN GP (Lucky Sol Moon x KRA Pandoras Box), ridden by Elizabeth Bentley, owner of II B Farms.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over KHARHARTT PGA (Khadraj NA x Peppys Dainty Queen), ridden by owner Pat Ronyak.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 IMA HEIR TO GOLD (MCA Magnum Gold x SKF Marilyn Monroe), ridden by Robin Overcash Criswell for owner Carol Tatem.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 SPUNN HONEY (Vanilla Zip x Oo-Laa-Laa), ridden by owner Taylor Kyse.

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Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR 40 & Over ALITTLE BEER MONEY (Poco Van Star Two x Mint Jullya V), ridden by owner Kristin Harkins.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR 19-39 BUCKSHOT DUN IT (Were Dun x ABL Antiqua), ridden by Cori Vokoun for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR Choice & Elite Riders DONOVAN PCF ( Jiuliusz De Wiec x Donatella Versace), ridden by owner Sannene Garehime.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider BEONS MIDNIGHT IDOL (Beon Eternety x BD Mia Hermosa), ridden by Tammy Reid for owner Shelby Reid.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider BASKIN IN BAJA (Alada Baskin x My Holiday), ridden by Kellie Drake for owner Drake Farms LLC.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure JOTR 18 & Under LETS GET LODED (LBA Lode Star x Aura Spring), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Ar abian Horse Times | 291 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Western Pleasure JTR 15-18 LETS GET LODED (LBA Lode Star x Aura Spring), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure JTR 14 & Under SHEZA LODED LADY (LBA Lode Star x Aura Spring), ridden by Gianna Gotelli for owner Jamie Leonardini Gotelli.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure JTR 18yrs & Under Select Rider FLASH GORDEN (Unquestionablyhot x SDA Razzle Dazzle), ridden by Quinn Eisenfeld for owner Sue Butler.

Champion H/A Western Pleasure JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under GRACE UNDER FIRE GA (Fire An Ice x Bears Chiquita), ridden by Ping Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure ARIYA ENCORE (Aria Impresario x Airiya), ridden by Cynthia Burkman for owner Russell Family Trust.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse IIB KISS ME SANROSA (San Luis Obispo V x Two B Justkissthis), ridden by Cynthia Burkman for owner Katie Russell.

Ar abian Horse Times | 292 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over ARIYA ENCORE (Aria Impresario x Airiya), ridden by Katie Russell for owner Russell Family Trust.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 FIDENZIO (Enzo x WN Infinity), ridden by owner Jennifer Lavallee.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 C SIR MADRE (Psymadre x C Fahleen), ridden by owner Conley Driediger.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over MEI MOMENT LOA (Meistermind x Kristan Chanel), ridden by owner Heather Williamson.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider FIDENZIO (Enzo x WN Infinity), ridden by Susan Azad for owner Jennifer Lavallee.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 19-39 ROL O WHATA NIGHT (Out Of Cyte x ROL Angel Eyes), ridden by Brianna York for owner Simone Frei.

Ar abian Horse Times | 293 | Volume 46, No. 10

Hunter/Hack


Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider LAKOTA MAC V (Maclintock V x LA Kelila), ridden by Marissa Jensen Hayes for owner Janet Stevenson.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR Elite Riders IIB KISS ME SANROSA (San Luis Obispo V x Two B Justkissthis), ridden by owner Katie Russell.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure AATR Choice Riders TAMAR HURRICANE FORCE (Ptron x Leika), ridden by owner Stephanie Hendrickson.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JOTR 15-18 JUSTIFYABLEE LACE ( Justify x Midnight Lace), ridden by owner Emma Freeland.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JTR 15-18 IM SIRIUS CF (A Noble Cause x PF Sirius), ridden by Sarah Esqueda for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JTR 15-18 Select Rider HMR MUST BE AFLAME (Must Be Afire x Gwynsciena), ridden by Isabella Heath for owner Kathryn Bolinger.

Ar abian Horse Times | 294 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JOTR 14 & Under MOONSTONE BEYS ZECRET (Shah Azim x Mimis Memory), ridden by owner Emily McDowell.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JTR 14 & Under C SIR TYSON (Sir Fames HBV x C Felicity), ridden by Karlyn Connolly for owner Barbara Ann Connolly.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JTR 14 & Under Select Rider KFR FIORENTINO (DA Valentino x Dana Francesca), ridden by Megan Madrid for owner Patricia DeAtley.

Champion Arabian Hunter Pleasure JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under HOPE EXPRESS (IXL Noble Express x Hope Floats), ridden by Savanna Botha for owner Daniel McConaughey.

Champion Arabian English Show Hack SA KAPPUCCINO (Bucharest V x SS Wildflower), ridden by Julie Daniel for owner Pegasus Arabians.

Champion Arabian English Show Hack AATR 19 & Over TWIST OF FAIT (Allience x TR Fait Accompli), ridden by owner Lisa Halpain.

Ar abian Horse Times | 295 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian English Show Hack JTR 18 & Under CALAPALOOZA V (Apollopalooza x Calendar Girl V), ridden by Anna Redmond for owner Wolf Springs Ranches, Inc.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure WD NOBLE LADD (IXL Noble Express x Gifted JG), ridden by Wendy Potts for owner Audrey Zinke.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse JUSTA HEARTTHROB ( Justify x For Goodness Sakes), ridden by Kristi Stewart for owner Paige Suelzle.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over SHE MOVES ME (Majesteit x The Way She Moves), ridden by owner Cynthia Smith.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 GLITTERATI RS (Majesteit x Fasccination), ridden by owner Kristen Meyer.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 JOYRIDE SF (Afire Bey V x Kelly Le Brock), ridden by Caitlin Pigott for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Ar abian Horse Times | 296 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over LIGHTNING MCQUEEN CRS (Mariachi WA x Jasperina), ridden by owner Katie Russell.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR 40 & Over Select Rider TITANIUM VK (Afires Heir x Pilane), ridden by owner Valerie Kline.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR 19-39 BSF SAVANNAH (Ever After NA x Soul Kiss), ridden by Cori Vokoun for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR 19-39 Select Rider TS AFIRE WITHIN (Afire Bey V x My Tabitha), ridden by owner Sarah Brandt.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR Elite Riders VERTUOSO (Versace x Moonrose Delight), ridden by Andrew Smith for owner North By Northwest LLC.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR Choice Riders SHE MOVES ME (Majesteit x The Way She Moves), ridden by owner Cynthia Smith.

Ar abian Horse Times | 297 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JOTR 15-18 SLOTS OF FUN CCF (Vegaz x Ginger’s Dance), ridden by owner Madison Schwanz.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JTR 15-18 GENTLEMANS QUARTERLY (Couturier x BP Lyrica Bey), ridden by Kaylee Markonich for owner Leanna Vandlen.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JTR 15-18 Select Rider SLOTS OF FUN CCF (Vegaz x Ginger’s DaNCE), ridden by owner Madison Schwanz.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JOTR 14 & Under WHATA TINY DANCER (Winterprinz x English Rose RM), ridden by owner Jaeda Isley.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JTR 14 & Under DA BETTY BLOWTORCH (Triften x Callaway’s Light The Way), ridden by owner Jamie Seals.

Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JTR 14 & Under Select Rider BELLA FLEUR (NYN Hisani x Sweet Chariot), ridden by Nina Leonard for owner Patricia DeAtley.

Ar abian Horse Times | 298 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under BSF SAVANNAH (Ever After NA x Soul Kiss), ridden by Reagan Vokoun for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion H/A English Show Hack AATR 19 & Over LADYS MAN WH (Mamage x Lady Larda W), ridden by Lana Weatherdon for owner Dennis Miller.

Champion H/A English Show Hack LADYS MAN WH (Mamage x Lady Larda W), ridden by Todd Ehret for owner Dennis Miller.

Champion H/A English Show Hack JTR 15-18 MR BOOMBASTIC (Clout x LA Quintina), ridden by owner Lauren Aguilera.

Champion Arabian Hunter Hack Over Fences 2ft-2ft6in STEEL CORDELIA (Bremervale Andronicus x Al-Rooh Taghreed), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Norma Jean Filleti.

Champion H/A English Show Hack JTR 14 & Under DREAM OF LOVE (Baske Afire x Spartan’s Silk Stockings), ridden by Kayla Rotella for owner Maya Kahwaji.

Champion Arabian Hunter Hack ATR 2ft-2ft6in MAGICO (Guapo Chico x LC Felicia), ridden by Skye Gragg for owner Roland Lewis.

Ar abian Horse Times | 299 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Hunter Hack Over Fences 2ft-2ft6in MOST ENTRIGUING (OKW Entrigue x Ehrlichkeit), ridden by owner Kristin Hardin.

Champion H/A Hunter Hack Over Fences ATR INTRUDERS NOBELLA (WL Intruder x Bon Voyage), ridden by Skye Gragg for owner Michelle Mahoney.

Champion Arabian Modified Working Hunter ATR SCARLETT JAMAAL BFS (Mazkarade x Juliana El Jamaal BF), ridden by Tyler Hardin for owner Kristin Hardin

Champion H/A Green Working Hunter and Regular Working Hunter MOST ENTRIGUING (OKW Entrigue x Ehrlichkeit), ridden by owner Kristin Hardin. Not pictured —

Champion Arabian Regular Working Hunter SHOWME THE WAY SAF (Showkayce x SS Truce), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Lynn McAlister. Champion Arabian Regular Working Hunter ATR KENLYN FLAIR (Excepzional x Fire Mt Flare), ridden by Laurie Grayson for owner Jane Young. Champion H/A Modif ied Working Hunter PUPPET SHOW (Showgun PGN x Gidget), ridden by Tyler Hardin for owner Kristin Hardin.

Champion Arabian Green Working Hunter STEEL CORDELIA (Bremervale Andronicus x Al-Rooh Taghreed), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Norma Jean Filleti.

Champion H/A Regular Working Hunter ATR INTRUDERS NOBELLA (WL Intruder x Bon Voyage), ridden by Skye Gragg for owner Michelle Mahoney.

Ar abian Horse Times | 300 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Pleasure Driving SD GRACELAND (Vegaz x Empress Of Bask), driven by Jason Krohn for owner Lindsay O’Reilly French.

Champion Arabian Country Pleasure Driving CP TRIPLE SPEC (SF Specs Shocwave x Beaujaleis), driven by Jason Krohn for owner Tres Soles Arabians LLC.

Specialty

Champion Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AOTD CP TRIPLE SPEC (SF Specs Shocwave x Beaujaleis), driven by Stacy McCrary for owner Tres Soles Arabians LLC.

Champion H/A Pleasure Driving HALSTEADS DEVEN (Ariberry Bey V x Halsteads Devon), driven by James Lowe for owner Hannah Glaser.

Champion H/A Country Pleasure Driving PHI BETA KAPPAH (Phi Slama Jama x BRA Quintessence), driven by James Lowe for owner Amazing Horse Woman LLC.

Champion Arabian Mounted Native Costume BEG FOR MERCY (Baske Afire x Mattamercie), ridden by Julie Daniel for owner Stacy Plonte.

Ar abian Horse Times | 301 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Mounted Native Costume AATR 19 & Over BSA MATADOR (El Ghazi x Mattawine), ridden by owner Jill Nelson.

Champion Arabian Mounted Native Costume JTR 18 & Under REACHING FOR STARS ER (AA Apollo Bey x Giovanna ER), ridden by owner Breanna Cisneros.

Champion H/A Mounted Native Costume AATR 19 & Over LJR WILD BILL (A Wild Fire x Toad), ridden by owner Stephanie Downing.

Champion Arabian Ladies Side Saddle English O H TOSKAFIRE (Afire Bey V x Tosk Bey), ridden by Shannon Beethe for owner River Run Farms LLC.

Champion H/A Mounted Native Costume WHOOZAPALOOZA Z (Apollopalooza x Ocean View), ridden by Tyler Irvine for owner Winter Sky Ranch, Inc.

Champion H/A Mounted Native Costume JTR 18 & Under SHEER TROUBLE (Armani FC x Sendrini M), ridden by Tory Wikel for owner Pegasus Arabians.

Champion Arabian Ladies Side Saddle English AATR 19 & Over MAXIM LOA (Millennium LOA x Alladante LOA), ridden by owner Margo Feather Minissian.

Ar abian Horse Times | 302 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Ladies Side Saddle Western GALADRIEL FTF (C A Hermoso x Naudia KHID), ridden by Jaime Smith for owner Tomi Orcutt-Sage.

Champion Arabian Ladies Side Saddle Western AATR 19 & Over TA PRELUDE (Kordelas x Promocja), ridden by Caitlin Pigott for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.

Champion H/A Ladies Side Saddle English DREAM OF LOVE (Baske Afire x Spartan’s Silk Stockings), ridden by Taryn Lundquist for owner Maya Kahwaji.

Champion H/A Ladies Side Saddle Western BUCKSHOT DUN IT (Were Dun x ABL Antiqua), ridden by Elizabeth Bentley for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion Arabian Ladies Side Saddle JTR 18 & Under BEYSTARRS KADANCE (ATA Bey Starr x OFW Dark Dancing), ridden by owner Shahar Lawrence.

Champion H/A Ladies Side Saddle English AATR 19 & Over BLACK PRIMO (Allience x Card Trick), ridden by owner Keeley Bullard.

Champion H/A Ladies Side Saddle Western AATR 19 & Over KHARHARTT PGA (Khadraj NA x Peppys Dainty Queen), ridden by owner Pat Ronyak.

Ar abian Horse Times | 303 | Volume 46, No. 10

Champion H/A Ladies Side Saddle JTR 18 & Under MAMA MIA LOA (Mamage x My Lucky Day), ridden by Sarah Esqueda for owner Highland Pride Arabians, Inc.


Champion Arabian Reining Horse Bitted IM THE REAL DEAL (MHR Muscateal x Kheyarraberribeyv), ridden by Crystal McNutt for owner Audrey Zinke.

Champion Arabian Reining Junior Horse NSPIRING FORTHE TOP (Nobles Top Gun x Nspiring Jazz), ridden by LaRae Fletcher Powell for owner Ingrid Bentzen.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse AAOTR 45-59 LD TSUNAMI (OH Kornerstone x In Bens Image), ridden by Katie Harvey, owner of KGB Texas Marketing/Public Relations, Inc.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse AATR 45-59 HF GENERAL GRANT (Sonseray x Pokhana), ridden by Velvet Hiser for owner Wesley Hiser.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse AAOTR 60 & Over SALTY JOHN (GS Khochise x Shezn Uptown Girl), ridden by owner Gail Genzel.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse AATR 60 & Over VALLEJO BEAUTIFULMOON (Rohara Moon Storm x Vallejo Buckle Up), ridden by Katharyn Hart, owner of Vallejo III Ranch LLC.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse Limit Rider AATR HM PHANDANGO (Poirot x Ballet Girl), ridden by Karstin Hickerson for owner Todd Hickerson.

Ar abian Horse Times | 304 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Reining Futurity Classic ZEE GUNSLINGER (Al-Marah Matt Dillon x Zee Arlene), ridden by Crystal McNutt for owner David Thielman.

Reining

Champion Arabian Reining Horse JTR 15-18 MY MAJEC MOMENT (D A Napitov x Majestic Ancestry), ridden by Trentyn Powell for owner Silver Aspen Ranch.

Champion Arabian Reining Horse JTR 14 & Under VLQ FRIENDLY FIRE (Forelock’s Petja x Polka Jane), ridden by Siena Krueger for owner Maria Danieli Krueger.

Champion H/A Reining Horse AAOTR 60 & Over CUSTOM GALE (Custom Crome x SA Phantom Gale), ridden by owner Joe Betten.

Champion H/A Reining Horse AAOTR and AATR 45-59 SMOKING GUN (Colonels Smoking Gun x SA Phantom Gale), ridden by owner Katie Harvey.

Champion H/A Reining Horse Junior Horse LJ CHEYENNE (Al-Marah Matt Dillon x Mild Beauty), ridden by Troy Heikes for owner Linda Jacobs.

Champion H/A Reining Horse AAOTR and AATR 19-44 DUNIT ON FYRE RA (Brennas Golden Dunit x Fyre In The Skye), ridden by Audrey Hart for owner Vallejo III Ranch LLC.

Ar abian Horse Times | 305 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Reining Horse AATR 60 & Over DUNIT MY WAY RA (Hollywood Dun It x Minding Ps And Qs), ridden by Katharyn Hart, owner of Vallejo III Ranch LLC.

Champion H/A Reining Horse Limit Rider Champion H/A Reining Horse Futurity Non-Pro AATR FEEL THAT FIRE (Im Genuinely RCC ONE TRICK PONY (Abidon x Lil Red Smart x MVA Scarlet Orzel), ridden by Koy Riding Hood), ridden by owner Medora Fralick. Moody for owner Boyd Batterman.

Champion H/A Reining Futurity Classic TS MAE GOSSIP (What It Takes x Janie Mae Gossip), ridden by Andrea Fappani for owner Amanda Brumley.

Champion H/A Reining Horse JTR 15-18 WHOA DAM IT (Okie Paul Quixote x GJ Lady Topaz), ridden by Trentyn Powell for owner Silver Aspen Ranch.

Champion H/A Reining Horse JTR 14 & Under JACKIE O WHIZ ( Jumping Jack Whiz x C-L Rafika), ridden by Tyler Hickerson for owner Todd Hickerson.

Ar abian Horse Times | 306 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion A/HA/AA Freestyle Reining ATR NAVAHO JOE BPF (SH Magnate x Christalena), ridden by Samantha Landsman for owner Silver Aspen Ranch.

Not pictured — Champion Arabian Reining Horse AAOTR and AATR 19-44 TA KHALIL (Algonkwin x TA Khedannaa), ridden by Cori Vokoun for owner Buckshot Farms.

Champion A/HA/AA Short Stirrup Reining JTR 10 & Under DUNMINDING PS AND QS (Hollywood Dun It x Minding Ps And Qs), ridden by Ava Welman for owner Richard Ames.

Champion H/A Reining Horse Open SH KARLOTTA (Buenos Partee Dude x Sage Hill Karla), ridden by Jessica Bein for owner Rosethorn Trust.

Photo by Ashley Lauren

Ar abian Horse Times | 307 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Western Trail WA MIDNIGHT MARQUIS (Midnight Magnum x Mi Black Duchess), ridden by Jim Hitt for owner Kay Wright.

Champion Arabian Western Trail Junior Horse THYME TO DANCE (Baske Thyme SA x GR Khamella), ridden by Jeffrey Wilms for owner Victoria West Granberry.

Champion Arabian Western Trail Horse AOTR JAYDED MOON (Surokhan x Jayda), ridden by Lorraine Prowse for owner Cameron Prowse.

Champion Arabian Western Trail Horse ATR THUNDERBOLT TWC (Aladdinn x Hippika), ridden by owner Suzanne Winans.

Champion Arabian English Trail Horse Open DM ROHARA DON MANUEL (Versace x Echos Patina), ridden by Scott Scheyli for owner Christi Mattson.

Champion H/A Western Trail Horse Open RCC FRIAR TUCK (Cashmere MA x Lil Red Riding Hood), ridden by Jeffrey Wilms for owner Robyn Meyer.

Ar abian Horse Times | 308 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Western Trail Horse Junior Horse Champion H/A Western Trail Horse RCC FRIAR Open W FAANTASTIC SHINE (Faantastiko x TUCK (Cashmere MA x Lil Red Riding Hood), ridden MS Little Sparkler), ridden by Jeffrey Wilms for by owner Robyn Meyer. owner Wilms Family Revocable Trust.

Champion H/A English Trail Horse YELLOWSTOAN (Robby x First Class Bluey), ridden by Michael Damianos for owner Judith Ann North.

Champion H/A Western Trail Horse ATR WIMPYS LITTLE CAT (Wimpys Little Step x Scat Cat), ridden by owner Victoria Roe.

Champion A/HA/AA Trail Horse JTR Walk/Jog 10 & Under KHAARGA ESCOBAR SLIK (Kharga Asal Sukkar x Beckie), ridden by Mckenna Bein for owner Jessica Bein.

Photo by Ashley Lauren

Ar abian Horse Times | 309 | Volume 46, No. 10

Trail


Champion Arabian Working and Reined Cow Horse Open CALLISTA JACARA ( J J Kabask x Amatista), ridden by April Canavan for owner Quinton Willingham.

Champion Arabian Working Cow Horse ATR AL WAJ (Midas VF x Fiona VF), ridden by owner Brandy Martin.

Champion Arabian Limited Reined Cow Horse ATR HM PHANDANGO (Poirot x Ballet Girl), ridden by Karstin Hickerson for owner Todd Hickerson.

Champion H/A Working Cow Horse COCO POLENE (Shahcolate Bey MA x Hema), ridden by Andy Camacho for owner Madelena Camacho-Larkin.

Champion H/A Reined Cow Horse ATR SMART LITTLE ALEX (The Smart Smoke x HF Farena), ridden by Michelle Roberts for owner Carol Roberts.

Champion H/A Limited Reined Cow Horse ATR JSN REIN MAN (Boss Solano x Chuzelle), ridden by owner Carol Roberts.

Ar abian Horse Times | 310 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Arabian Cutting Open HF ZINSON DELRAY (Dreams Ferrari x Zynfandelle), ridden by Dan Manning for owner William Dudley.

Champion Arabian Cutting Non-Pro VG TSATINE (Broadway Tstar x Lads Amelia), ridden by Madelena Camacho-Larkin for owner Wesley Larkin.

Champion Arabian Cutting $5,000 BSJ GOOD TO GO (AM Good Oldboy x Gai Patina), ridden by owner Stacey Turner.

Champion H/A Cutting Open and Non-Pro SMOKIN AMBIANCE (The Smart Smoke x HF Farena), ridden by John Dublin and owner Carol Roberts, up. Not pictured — Champion Arabian Working Cow Horse Junior Horse AULWAYS MYSTICAL (Aulways Magic x Out Of The Myst), ridden by Kim Witty for owner Tracy Oliver. Champion H/A Working Cow Junior Horse RCC AVA GARDNER (Abidon x RCC Aplayboychic), ridden by Morgen Weatherly for owner Jim Hitt. Champion H/A Working Cow Horse ATR VALLEJO REATAMOON (Rohara Moon Storm x Gay Playnic), ridden by Katharyn Hart, owner of Vallejo III Ranch LLC.

Champion H/A Cutting $5,000 WILL HE BOOGY (Faantastiko x Sterlings Gold Lace), ridden by owner Robyn Meyer.

Champion H/A Reined Cow Horse WIMPYS LITTLE CAT (Wimpys Little Step x Scat Cat), ridden by Jessica Bein for owner Victoria Roe.

Ar abian Horse Times | 311 | Volume 46, No. 10

Working Western


Not pictured — Champion Arabian Jumper ATR 3ft-3ft 3in AM ZIPY SHARP SHOOTER (AM Power Raid x AM Zippy Handsom), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Mark Miller.

Champion Arabian Jumper 3ft3in-3ft6in HOPE SPRINGS ETERNAL (Allience x Pajarito Esprit), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Lynn McAlister.

Champion HA/AA Jumper ATR 3ft-3ft 3in MBE VERSACE (Eld Willy Bob x Jemini Christmas), ridden by owner Kelley Long.

Champion H/A Jumper 3ft 3in-3ft 6in ABILITY (MHR Nobility x Nikita), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Nancy Shafer.

Champion Scottsdale Gamblers Choice A/HA/AA Jumper ABILITY (MHR Nobility x Nikita), ridden by Kristin Hardin for owner Nancy Shafer.

Ar abian Horse Times | 312 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion UPHA Arabian Breeds Challenge Cup JTR 17 & Under ISABELLA TEMPLETON with Carrie Bradshaw (Baske Afire x I’m Miss New York), owned by Vicki Humphrey.

Champion Showmanship AATH 40 & Over MICHELLE PEASEPAULSEN, owner of BSF Starbuck (Were Dun x Escada MF).

Champion UPHA Arabian Breeds Challenge Cup Walk/Trot JTR 10 & Under LELA HASLUP with Sir Lancelott (Galahad x Abha Insolita), owned by Scottsdale Equestrian Academy.

Champion Showmanship AATH 19-39 LAURA SMITH-LAMBERT, owner of EE Xtreme Heat (Desert Heat VF x EE Minuet).

Champion Showmanship JTH 15-18 MEGAN REYES with Khaarga Escobar Slik (Kharga Asal Sukkar x Beckie), owned by Jessica Bein.

Jumper/UPHA/ Showmanship

Champion Showmanship JTH 11-14 DANELLE GALLOWAY with Queen Of Hearts LA (Ole Patche Rock x Hearts Desyre), owned by Devin Galloway.

Champion Showmanship JTH 10 & Under MCKENNA BEIN with Khaarga Escobar Slik (Kharga Asal Sukkar x Beckie), owned by Jessica Bein.

Ar abian Horse Times | 313 | Volume 46, No. 10


Not pictured — Champion Western Horsemanship AATR 50 & Over MARY SCHNELLMAN, owner of Rousseau KF (NYN Hisani x Bint Beau Ket).

Champion Western Horsemanship AATR 19-49 DIANE COMEAU, owner of SH Cool Dude (Buenos Partee Dude x Noble Duchess).

Champion Western Horsemanship JTR 15-18 AMANDA BURNS with All Maxed Out RA (HH Maxemus x Marliera), owned by Cotton McNutt.

Champion Western Horsemanship JTR 14 & Under SIENA KRUEGER with VLQ Friendly Fire (Forelock’s Petja x Polka Jane), owned by Maria Danieli Krueger.

Champion Saddle Seat Equitation AATR 19 & Over MICHELLE PEASE-PAULSEN with Matzeratti (Zodiac Matador x Slumbersilks), owned by Silver Aspen Ranch.

Champion Saddle Seat Equitation JTR 15-18 (AHAA Scholarship) ELAINA ROEDER, owner of Danse All Night (Baske Afire x Danse Brilliant).

Champion Saddle Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under (AHAA Scholarship) KAYLEE ATKINSON, owner of KF Lord Of The Dance (KF Mark’s Majesty x River Dance NA).

Ar abian Horse Times | 314 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion Saddle Seat Equitation JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under ALEXA GILBERT with Toi Talent (Matoi x Feather Talent), owned by Kelly Gilbert.

Champion Arabian Western Seat Equitation JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under BRYLEN BEICKER with Dylan SA (TAF Best Berrybey x Fad Sina), owned by Brinley Beicker.

Champion H/A Western Seat Equitation JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under LELA HASLUP with Gold Country (Robby x Crystal), owned by Scottsdale Equestrian Academy.

Champion Hunter Seat Equitation JTR 15-18 (AHAA Scholarship) RAVEN GROPP, owner of Daencin Inthedark (Daen x KA Narya).

Horsemanship/ Equitation

Champion Hunter Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under (AHAA Scholarship) GRACE HERTZ, owner of Nobles Angel (IXL Noble Express x Afires Expose).

Champion Arabian Hunter Seat Equitation JTR Walk/Trot 10 & Under HALLE POTTS with Memory Maker HPF (SJ Mikhail x Afire Lily), owned by Freewill Farm LLC.

Ar abian Horse Times | 315 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Hunter Seat Equitation JTR Walk/Trot 10 Champion Reining Seat Equitation AATR & Under BIANCA MASSMAN, owner of Celebrity Cyting 19 & Over MICHELE BLACKWELL BETTEN with Were Dun Miss Kitty (Were FBF (Cytosk x Sunday Grandgenette). Dun x BSF Fiona), owned by Joe Betten.

Champion Reining Seat Equitation JTR 14 & Under SIENA KRUEGER with VLQ Friendly Fire (Forelock’s Petja x Polka Jane), owned by Maria Danieli Krueger.

Champion AHA Hunter Seat Not To Jump Medal JTR 14 & Under GRACE STIMSON with Twisted Cyster (Cytosk x Callaway’s Blue Sky), owned by GS Holdings LLC.

Champion Reining Seat Equitation JTR 15-18 AMANDA BURNS, owner of Easy Dun It (Walla Walla Dun It x Basyna).

Champion AHA Hunter Seat Over Obstacles Medal JTR 18 & Under PARIS MAHONEY with Intruders Nobella (WL Intruder x Bon Voyage), owned by Michelle Mahoney.

—Not pictured — Champion Dressage Training Level Test 3 CAMERA SHY (Shy Gayfeen x Canadian Red Rose), ridden by Shea Johnson for owner Mesoam LLC and Carlos Chavez.

Champion Dressage Second Level ATR Test 3 NAVAGATORS ORION (Bins Navigator x Elegant Lady), ridden by owner Jordan Baker Roberts.

Champion Dressage Training Level ATR Test 3 CAMERA SHY (Shy Gayfeen x Canadian Red Rose), ridden by Maya Isabela Chavez for owner Mesoam LLC and Carlos Chavez.

Champion Dressage Third Level Test 3 DEBONNAIR KNIGHT LR (Knight Invader x Bint Debonnette), ridden by Megan Sibiga for owner Anne Hansen.

Champion Dressage First Level Test 3 WP AULSOVAIN (Aul Magic x Aurieba), ridden by Megan O’Brien for owner Robert Lapso.

Champion Dressage Third Level ATR Test 3 LJS SUBLIME (Scimitar x BA Aprils Folly), ridden by owner Amy Ayres.

Champion Dressage First Level ATR Test 3 ZULU LOA (Musik Man x Masquerade), ridden by Karoline Lewis for owner Kathryn Lewis.

Champion Dressage Fourth Level Test 3 PFLICKAA (HF Mister Chips x Psynderella FA), ridden by Shari PattersonBlaylock for owner Anne Allison.

Champion Dressage Second Level Test 3 AUR MYSTIC ILLUSION (Aur Mystic x Aleeiaha), ridden by Amy Miller for owner Ed Dodd.

Ar abian Horse Times | 316 | Volume 46, No. 10


Champion H/A Sport Horse Under Saddle ARISTOCRAT CD (Aleros x Leonora), ridden by Amy Miller for owner Jan Roeder.

Champion H/A Sport Horse Under Saddle Junior Horse SOLEYNA (Allionce x Soleya), ridden by Todd Ehret for owner Lorna Harron.

Champion H/A Sport Horse Under Saddle AATR MBE VERSACE (Eld Willy Bob x Jemini Christmas), ridden by owner Kelley Long.

Champion H/A Sport Horse Under Saddle JTR 18 & Under and In-Hand Hunter Type Gelding MARC MY WORDS (Monarch V x Dudes Crystollace), ridden by owner Freyja Coe. —Not pictured —

Champion Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle AUR MYSTIC ILLUSION (Aur Mystic x Aleeiaha), ridden by Amy Miller for owner Ed Dodd. Champion Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle Junior Horse AM DESIGNING STAR (AM Good Oldboy x AM Shining Sword), ridden by owner Trish Nelson. Champion Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle AATR DM VIVID KHEMISTRY (Khemberry Bey V x GT Vixen), ridden by owner Maren Cochran.. Champion Arabian Sport Horse Under Saddle JTR 18 & Under RAIN CHANCE (Ptron x Bara Regina), ridden by Maya Isabela Chavez for owner Diane Avery. Champion A/HA/AA Sport Horse Under Saddle JTR Walk/ Trot 10 & Under DG SUPERIOR BEY (RS Supreme Bey x Orof ina), ridden by Jezel Malta for owner Stephanie West. Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Hunter Type Stallion AO BREEZE (Aclsic Raff x Mosha Khaitlyn), shown by Ryan Moore for owner Morgan Moore Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Hunter Type Mare OSO SERENIT Y (Bremervale Andronicus x AM Dream Sernade), shown by Kathryn Doyle for owner Linda Mars.

Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Hunter Type Gelding AL-MARAH AENEAS RUMBA (Bremervale Andronicus x Al Marah Casba Choice), shown by Jackie Alkin for owner The Schoettker Family Trust. Champion H/A Sport Horse In-Hand Hunter Type Mare MOXBERRY BEY (Khemberry Bey V x Simply Moxie), shown by Scott Scheyli for owner Molly Madden. Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type Stallion AULWAYS MAGIC (Aul Magic x Aur Silver Myst), shown by Tony Jackson for owner Tracy Oliver. Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type Mare BOOTS N BOYS LOA (LC Arlington x Gold Club LOA), shown by owner Trish Nelson. Champion Arabian Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type Gelding AM VICTORY PARADE (AM Power Raid x Amlightening Raid) shown by owner Paula Nelson. Champion H/A Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type Mare INTRUDERS NOBELLA (WL Intruder x Bon Voyage), shown by owner Michelle Mahoney. Champion H/A Sport Horse In-Hand Dressage Type Gelding DEBONNAIR KNIGHT LR (Knight Invader x Bint Debonnette), shown by Bob Bennett Jr for owner Anne Hansen.

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Sport Horse/ Dressage


Lisa with Desperados Princess.

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A TOUCH OF STYLE

A TOUCH OF ST YLE Lisa Abraham How long have you been associated with the Arabian horse industry? Not very long. I purchased my first mare in 2006, a Straight Egyptian Makhsous daughter, and spent the first couple of years almost exclusively dedicating myself to learning how to care for horses. Although most of my time was spent in the barn, I used every other moment to learn bloodlines, breeding and the business of Arabian horses. I did also attend a very small number of shows and events. Your first passion was photography? Years previous, when film was the medium, I did some photography professionally. However, it was very stressful for me as I didn’t have enough confidence in my skill level. Also, one by one, all of my favorite film products were being discontinued due to the growing digital technology. So for several years, I put my camera down as I couldn’t justify the cost of improving and I was not comfortable learning an entirely new technology. However, after I purchased my mare, I quickly learned the importance of imagery for both record keeping and marketing. I felt I had to be able to do this for myself.

very fortunate to have friends who would evaluate my work and offer honest criticism. However, the most difficult learning curve was how to correctly portray an Arabian horse. More than anything else though, I credit my skill level to working as a show photographer in more local and regional venues. These can be incredibly difficult working environments and to get marketable images, one has to absolutely understand his or her camera. Not only do these shows often take place in dark, poorly lit arenas,

Where did you go to school or how did you learn your craft? I have always loved photography and was initially self-taught using fully manual cameras. However, in my final year of college I had free credits to use how I wished. So I took several photography classes which filled in some important learning gaps and also gave me experience in dark rooms. In addition, I dedicated enormous efforts to practice. When I decided to tackle digital photography, I spent a lot of time learning the technology by photographing everything I could, mostly animals and farm settings. I would take hundreds of shots and then immediately study my work to see how I could improve. The nice thing about digital is that one can self-correct in a short period of time. Due to this, I was able to make up for time lost and actually surpass my previous skill level from a technical perspective. Also, I was

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2015 Arabian Breeders World Cup.


photo by Kaia Larson

sometimes even with dark footing, but the horses are also of a varied quality and condition, making it a challenge to portray them favorably. Furthermore, the work can involve long, back breaking hours and uncomfortable temperatures. I give a lot of credit to “learning the ropes” to these show environments.

At the 2015 Egyptian Event with Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani and Santi Fornieles of Al Rayyan.

When you photograph an advertising campaign for a client, what is the most important aspect that you take into consideration? The most important aspect of doing anything for a client is understanding exactly what the client wants and maintaining objectivity. In the most academic sense, there is both good and bad marketing. “Good” would refer to anything within the parameters of the accepted principles of marketing and advertising. Although innovations are always surfacing, the basic principles remain the same. While “bad” could refer to many things such as inappropriate or poor quality imagery and/ or lack of promotional focus or continuity. But within the realm of “good,” there is an even larger consideration—personal preference. I am very comfortable advising in the principles of marketing and advertising, but where personal preference in concerned, I listen more than I speak.

photo by Cookie Serleric 2015

Teaching in a photography seminar with Polly Knoll, Randi Clark and Jenni Ogden, at the 2013 Egyptian Event.

What photographs have you taken in the Arabian horse industry that you are most proud of ? Honestly, I am most proud of the work I have done with my own horses as I feel the love I have for them comes through. Certainly, shooting one’s own horses is extremely difficult and I’m not always objective with the images, but when I get a shot that reveals my deep feelings—that is when my heart feels rewarded.

With Nofal Kahook of NK Arabians at the 2015 World Championships.

Where do you get your inspiration from? I am inspired by the Arabian horse. Of course, they are exquisitely beautiful, but I’m also inspired by their ability to think and make choices, their enormous hearts and their capacity to love. Have you been involved with various different aspects of the Arabian horse industry? Please share your road of travel through it. Traveling a road is a perfect description of my experience in the Arabian horse world. I started out by falling in love with a mare, with no other intention than to share my life with her. As mentioned earlier, my initial goals were limited to learning horse care. However, from the very beginning, I have been fortunate to have had incredibly generous mentors along the

2015 All Nations Cup.

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A TOUCH OF STYLE

way. Of course, I worked hard, but with every step forward I took, someone would surface to lead me along. I credit many of my first important opportunities to Anna Bishop, the Executive Director of The Pyramid Society, and to The Pyramid Society itself. Much of my early work was done at the Egyptian Event. One year, after donating my photos to The Pyramid Society, I received a hand written letter from Anna thanking me for attending and offering my photos—I was completely overwhelmed. From that show of kindness, I was motivated to work even harder. Then in 2010, while in Paris at the World Championships, Anna asked me to write the show coverage for The Pyramid Society. I said yes, but as I hadn’t written a word in twenty years— needless to say, I panicked on the inside. But this was my fortunate beginning as a writer and it has far overshadowed my work as a photographer. Although I began by freelancing for several publications around the world, my real media work began with The Arabian Horse Journal, a publication out of Italy. There I learned about how media works and found a place in the industry that

Tom Oben’s emotional response to Morion’s Gold win at the 2015 World Championship.

I enjoyed. This magazine was very generous with me and through my work for them, many other opportunities surfaced. For the past year I have been working with Arabhorse.com, who is now owned by the Arabian Horse World, and am very happy with my position. Do you enjoy writing? Immensely. Although the process can be incredibly difficult and demanding, I enjoy every part of it. I love observing and mentally collecting data; I love talking to people and getting perspectives; I love the process of actually composing words and organizing text like a puzzle; and I love when it all comes together to tell a complete story. But most of all, I love it when someone shares with me that something I wrote touched them or in some way motivated them— then all of the hard work is worth it and I am motivated to push further ahead.

A special moment captured among friends. Michael Byatt and Sheikh Hamad bin Ali Al Thani with the 2015 Egyptian Event Gold Champion Filly Nawaal Al Rayyan.

What is your favorite part of what you do? I enjoy anything that engages my heart. I have had so many wonderful experiences and have met so many special people and this touches on all levels of the industry. At an upper level, I think my best show experience was this past World Championship. Originally I was not scheduled to go, but at the

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Photos taken by Lisa: Top: 2013 Arabian Breeders World Cup Gold Champion Mare Nadjah Al Zobair. Bottom: Hariry Al Shaqab at the 2015 World Championship. The judges were such a critical element to the story of this show.

last minute my dear friend, Luciana Fasano of Fazenda Floresta, asked me to join her and offered to sponsor my coverage. This was a blessing as I felt supporting Paris at this time was critical. As it turned out, the show itself was incredible. I have covered many high end shows, but this one was different. It was an amazing experience to be so close to so many of our world’s top horses, while standing next to owners who could barely breathe as they watched their horses compete, and several of our most experienced and competent judges struggled to score with so few variances. I have never experienced the heart that was present at that show and I feel that my coverage of it was my most important work. I had another experience, from a much different environment, which is also every bit

as sentimental to me. Years ago I was asked to photograph an Arabian fun show. It drew in the local community who were there to enjoy competing with their horses, many of whom were pulled right out of the fields—and many of the owners were dressed this way too. In a senior mare halter class, an older woman very proudly walked into the arena with her perfectly clean, heavily flea bitten, 20-year-old mare. The mare was wearing a brand new, neon pink neoprene halter, which perfectly matched her owner’s clothing. I will never forget how proud this woman was to show her mare and how the love she had for her literally filled the arena. I was so touched by what I felt, that I had tears coming out of my eyes while I was shooting (thank God for auto focus). I have had some amazing opportunities in this business, and this one was one of them.

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A TOUCH OF STYLE

NK Nizzam (NK Hafid Jamil x Nadirah), 2013 colt, owned by Dr. Hans Nagel, Katharinenhof Stud, Germany.

What has the Arabian horse industry provided for you? First, it has provided me with an outlet for the passion I have for these horses. I love this horse with every ounce of my being and am very grateful to be able to make contributions at such an influential level. Second, but not less important, it has provided me with a global community of individuals who are bound together by the same passion. How do you like to spend your time away from work? Really, I am a work alcoholic, so time away from work just means I have more time to work. I love what I do and would rather be doing it as opposed to getting away from it. Other than this, I enjoy quiet private time with my animals and a very small group of friends. I enjoy being

in nature such as in the woods and/or anywhere near water and far away from chaos. If you could describe yourself in one word, what would it be? Resilient. Where do you see yourself in five years? I am just as interested in this question. From the very beginning, I learned to do everything that was asked of me, to not set my mind on anything and be open to everything. This perspective has served me well as I have been able to navigate through a very competitive field and find a unique niche for myself. However, my only goal is to be happy—so wherever I am or whatever I’m doing, I just hope that it allows me to be productive and makes me happy. n

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Beginnings: Part I The Arabian Horse Role In Riding School Programs

photo by Alicia Ward

photo by Alicia Ward

by Catherine Cole-Ferandelli

T

his editorial is the first of several featuring Arabian horse training barns who include riding lesson programs for beginners in their curriculum. The story has been told time and time again of the ‘aha!’ moment when we realize our passion for the Arabian horse—its kindness, love of humans, ever willing work ethic and stunning beauty. Still, our breed numbers have diminished and those involved in the breed are fewer. With these facts in mind, we are interviewing trainers who seek to change this trend via grassroots efforts. By offering riding lesson programs targeted to the general public, these training barns bring in new folks, new blood and a fresh new viewpoint to the Arabian horse industry. Our goal is to raise awareness of this increasing trend among all levels of successful Arabian training barns, and our hope is to see this trend continue to blossom and grow. By doing so, our Arabian horses can enjoy the love of many more two legged friends. Many horses too, can also realize a new job—that of a lesson horse and thus an equine teacher.

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Atlanta Riding Club: Vicki Humphrey Training Center

Canton, Georgia

Vicki Humphrey, an institution unto her own in the Arabian horse world, has enjoyed literally hundreds of national champion titles and accolades. With typically around one hundred horses in full time training, Vicki realized early on she needed a grass roots riding lesson program to proactively raise awareness of her business. Vicki candidly states, “Every single training barn in the Arabian horse industry needs an Academy riding program that appeals to the general public. It is a statistical fact that the Arabian horse breeding numbers continue to be low. We will be a dying industry without adding new people to our world.” Beginning in the early 1990s, Vicki realized this and created the Atlanta Riding Club. Hiring Cindy Murch, for over a d ecade the Atlanta Riding School has offered summer riding

camps, multiple group lessons, and plenty of folks who went on from these beginnings to purchase Arabian horses and ‘graduate’ to the Arabian horse show circuit. Vicki recalls, “We had one amazing year when fifteen of our riding school students moved on to purchasing show horses from us and showing through our training barn. This confirmed our belief of offering a beginning rider academy program for youth and adult riders alike.” Vicki goes on to confess, “After several years of success, Cindy Murch moved on from our Atlanta Riding Club. At the time, our training barn was full to the brim. This and the challenge of replacing Cindy with an equally worthy head instructor put our riding school on the back burner. It took us some time to find Cindy’s replacement.” The Atlanta Riding Club recently hired William Woods University graduate Mallory Deboll who is actively bringing

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the Club up to its former numbers. Vicki describes the curriculum, “We have every level of rider at every age. We offer group lessons of five which range from walk only to full walk/trot and canter sessions. We teach saddle seat, hunter, flat and western pleasure disciplines. Currently, the Atlanta Riding Club is running about one hundred twenty five lessons per week.” Vicki continues, “How do we raise awareness? We do ‘Group-on’ specials and a bit of advertising, but most of our business is through word of mouth. Parents bring their children and immediately embrace the positive responsibilities and discipline our riding academy teaches. Being out in the fresh air with others and bonding with our friendly Arabian lesson horses quickly becomes a part of their upbringing. Adults also welcome this change from their daily lives. So many adults have a lifelong dream of learning how to ride a horse. Only in later years do they have the time and economic ability to see this through. Atlanta Riding Club welcomes all ages at all levels and abilities.” Atlanta Riding Club graduates many of its students to buying a horse and moving on to the world of Arabian horse competition. Still, Vicki has another goal for the Arabian horse industry and Atlanta Riding Club, “I would like to see our industry develop and cultivate a national Academy show circuit. The Saddlebred people have developed an Academy show circuit with lesson horses resulting in success with bringing new people to their breed at all levels. Many Arabian training barns are realizing the need to embrace grass roots efforts and now have structured riding lesson programs. We can rally as an industry—bring in new faces and give many kind Arabian horses a new job, that of a loving lesson horse. I suspect some trainers hesitate to take on a lesson program by believing it is unprofitable. Our lesson program was and is profitable. We’re able to cover expenses for horse care and payroll, and still have a profit at the end of the day.” Atlanta Riding Club: Vicki Humphrey Training Center. Located 45 minutes north of Atlanta city center. (770) 740-8432, www.vickihumphreytrainingcenter.com

Scottsdale Riding Club At Bar A Ranch: Alicia Ward, Instructor

Scottsdale, Arizona

Alicia Ward has been involved in the Arabian horse industry for well over 25 years, having worked with multiple trainers, including Dede Bisch, Jessica Bein and the old Sandspur Arabians. Long an advocate for healthy living and wellbeing by creating community, Alicia established the Scottsdale Riding Club in 2008. Now housed at Bar A Ranch in North Scottsdale, Alicia describes her program, “Scottsdale Riding Club is a learning environment, more so than a competitive environment. While we have members who own their horses and go on to competition, our goal is that of a community with a beginning but no ending. Our Club advocates personal growth through our Arabian horses while enjoying interacting with others who appreciate the same. Arabian horses are so accessible in their kindness and ability to bond with people— they are a natural for grass roots entry. We believe in organic exposure, healthy physical exercise and confidence building by engaging horse and rider in a friendly community. “Scottsdale Riding Club is made up of all ages. We offer private and group riding lessons that teach based on individuality rather than age group. Our first riding lesson for every potential member is always private and always free of charge. We believe in beginning with the fundamentals of horse care, everything from grooming and cleaning tack, to

photo by Alicia Ward

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photo by Alicia Ward

photo by Alicia Ward

photo by Alicia Ward

basic riding skills including developing a horse/human relationship with experienced Arabian lesson horses. While we have created a small community within the larger Arabian horse community here in Scottsdale, our focus is on the individual student. Beginners especially bring a fresh mind to the physical and mental wellbeing experience of caring and loving our horses.”

Scottsdale Riding Club includes twenty privately owned client horses, all of which came up through their lesson program. Four lesson horses provide instruction to clients either new or not able to invest in a horse of their own. A lighted, covered arena, premium stabling and a friendly staff keep a comfortable family oriented setting for this stable all year long. Alicia laughs, “We are located in a beautiful setting. Many first timers arrive and are amazed as we appear to be a ‘fancy horse show barn.’ While we have that setting, we utilize it to create a club-like setting. Many of our group are ‘week end’ warriors. That is, they want their horses to have fulltime care during the week so they can visit them and do their thing with us on the weekend. We have activities all weekend long.” Scottsdale Riding Club encourages a full physical and mental experience. Alicia expands, “My daughter, Madi Cocuzza, teaches the younger riders, and we also offer Yoga for riders and a unique program we call Equifit. Equifit is designed to instruct riders in exercises that improve body awareness, strength, symmetry and flexibility.” Scottsdale Riding Club also engages in local activities including the popular ‘Meet An Arabian Horse’ exhibit at the February Scottsdale show. Marketed primarily via word of mouth, Scottsdale Riding Club enjoys a full to capacity success based on the inimitable partnering of the Arabian horse and human. Scottsdale Riding Club: Alicia Ward, Instructor and Owner. Located in North Scottsdale. (480) 201-7039, www.scottsdaleridingclub.com n

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photo by Alicia Ward


In Memoriam AM Liberty Parade++++// (2000-2016) Much like her entrance into the world, AM Liberty Parade’s (AM Friars Moon x Amlightening Raid, by AM Gypsy Vision) departure was a surprise to those around her. The product of a Half-Arabian “gelding” being turned out with a band of Arabian mares, “Libby” was a surprise that turned into a Legion of Excellence recipient. Quintessentially Arabian, Libby was equal parts beautiful, versatile, kind, and loyal. Winning in classes ranging from Sport Horse In-Hand to Trail and Western and Hunter Pleasure, Libby made the dreams of many children come true, not only by carrying them to their first National or Regional titles, but by showing them what true love and commitment was. She was truly a once-in-a-lifetime horse whose memory will be forever cherished by those who love her, but especially by her little girl, Emma.

Georgio AF (1999-2015) Georgio AF (Versace x Fortunes Ciara), owned by Rick, Tammy and Danielle Anderson of Summerfield Farm, was laid to rest. He was a twotime National Top Ten Stallion, but his greatest accomplishment was that of a sire. His first foal crop produced two national champions. Out of his 112 foals born so far, 41 have been shown to date, garnering five national championships, five reserve national championships, 40 national top tens, 48 regional championships, 102 regional top fives, seven Scottsdale champions, and 48 Scottsdale top tens. Seven of his foals have been exported to other countries, including one British National Champion. His foals garnered these accomplishments in both the halter and performance divisions. He was known for producing type and was always a great gentleman in the barn and the breeding shed. We will miss his producing ability, but more so, we will miss a dear old friend.

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In Memoriam Alexander Ponomarev (1940-2016) – A Farewell In February, the Arabian horse community lost one of its great ambassadors, Alexander Ponomarev, former director of the famous Tersk Stud in Russia. The Arabian community is indebted to Ponomarev for his breeding of: *Muscat, Menes, *Marsianin, *Pesniar, *Pesenka, *Narada, *Nariadni, Kubinec and *Prichal, among so many others. His impact was so great, that the famous stallion *Ponomarev was named in his honor by his breeders, the LaCroix Family of Lasma. “I met him in 1975 when I went to Russia with Howie Kale. He was a delightful, handsome man, who created a dynasty of Arabian horses that were extraordinarily beautiful and who were also athletic on the racetrack ... hence, where I met *Pesenka and many others! Mr. Ponomarev was an artist, and created masterpieces of the Arabian horse which to this day I cherish!” —Aude Espourteille The breeding at Tersk was not properly revealed to the Western world until the middle of the seventies, when Dr. Howard F. Kale gave himself the task of translating a copy of the Russian studbook that he had found in a library in London. After doing so and despite all the political tension around the cold war, the Kale family embarked on a discovery journey to the Soviet Union. On the other side of the iron curtain they found Aleksander Ponomarev, the head director of the Tersk Stud at the time (he was the stud’s director from 1971 until the year 2002). This magical bond later led to the recognition of the Russian Studbook by WAHO in 1978. It also made the importation of the great *Muscat possible to the USA, after years of negotiation with the Russian Ministry of Agriculture. In addition to the Kales, Ponomarev also courted the likes of Bob Stratmore, Dr. Hammer and Gene LaCroix, Jr., and because of his desire to share the Tersk program with the West, Ponomarev is behind Russian Sunday at Scottsdale in 1980, when *Pristan and *Muscat were the champions. In fact, the commanding presence and regal quality of *Muscat proved to be the ultimate endorsement required by the world in order to recognize the Tersk bred Arabian horses as of superior quality once and for all. “Sasha was the mastermind who guided Tersk through its finest years. He was both colleague and friend; and we shared many great years and many great horses. He will be missed.” —Howard Kale Jr. Thanks in great measure to the genius of Alexander Ponomarev who inspired so many important breeders all over the world to become part of the extraordinary heritage started so long ago in a blessed land in the Caucasus known by the name of Tersk, their horses then became famous in Europe, the Middle East, South America, Australia and in the U.S.

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Calendar Of Events REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS April 25-May 1, 2016, Region 7 Championships, Scottsdale, Arizona. www.aha7.org May 2-7, 2016, Region 12 Championships, Perry, Georgia. www.aharegion12.com May 19-22, 2016, Region 1 Championships, Del Mar, California. www.aharegionone.org June 1-4, 2016, Region 9 Championships, Fort Worth, Texas. www.region9aha.org June 8-11, 2016, Region 8 Championships, Denver, Colorado. www.aharegion8.org June 9-12, 2016, Region 10 Championships, St. Paul, Minnesota. www.region10arabians.com June 21-25, 2016, Region 4 Championships, Nampa, Idaho. www.aharegioniv.com June 21-26, 2016, Region 2 Championships, Santa Barbara, California. www.ahareg2.org June 22-26, 2016, Region 13 Championships, Springfield, Ohio. www.region13.net June 30-July 2, 2016, Region 6 Championships, Douglas, Wyoming. www.aharegion6.com June 30-July 3, 2016, Region 14 Championships, Lexington, Kentucky. www.aha14.com July 8-9, 2016, Region 18 Championship, London, Ontario, Canada. www.region18.on.ca July 6-10, 2016, Region 5 Championships, Monroe, Washington. www.regionv.com

July 6-10, 2016, Region 15 Championships, Lexington, Virginia. www.region15.com July 7-10, 2016, Region 11 Championships, Springfield, Illinois. www.aha11.org July 13-16, 2016, Region 3 Championships, Rancho Murieta, California. www.arabianhorses3.org July 20-23, 2016, Region 16 Championships, Syracuse, New York. www.region16.org July 25-30, 2016, Region 17 Championships, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. www.region17.com

SHOWS

April 14-17, 2016, Arabian Breeders World Cup, Las Vegas, Nevada. www.arabianbreedersworldcup.com May 26-29, 2016, Ohio Buckeye Sweepstakes, Columbus, Ohio. www.buckeyesweepstakes.com June 7-11, 2016, Egyptian Event, Lexington, Kentucky. www.pyramidsociety.org September 3-5, 2016, Iowa Gold Star Futurity, Des Moines, Iowa. www.iowaarabianhorseassociation.com September 15-17, 2016, NSH Finals, Springfield, Illinois. www.nshregistry.org September 21, 2016, Arabian Open at the Rolex Central Park Show, New York City, New York. cphs.coth.com/

September 29-October 2, 2016, Arabian National Breeder Finals and Silver Sire Futurity, Scottsdale, Arizona. www.scottsdaleshow.com September 30-October 2, 2016, Minnesota Fall Festival, St. Paul, Minnesota. www.medallionstallion.com

NATIONAL EVENTS

www.arabianhorses.org July 23-30, 2016, Youth Nationals, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. August 14-20, 2016, Canadian Nationals, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. September 21-25, 2016, Sport Horse Nationals, Nampa, Idaho. October 21-29, 2016, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

INTERNATIONAL EVENTS

November 26-December 4, 2016, Salon du Cheval World Championships, Paris, France. en.salon-cheval.com *Go to www.arabianessence.com or www.ecaho.org for additional international shows and information. Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates and more. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. E-mail notices to: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

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Estate & Asset PLanning Living Wills TrUST & ESTATE PLAN WILLS & TRUSTS INVENTORY OF ASSETS

At Resnick & Louis, we work hard to protect you at every stage of life’s journey and to protect your loved ones and the legacy after you are gone. We provide the tools and structures you need to preserve your family’s wealth and maximize tax benefits. No matter how complex the estate planning process may be, our experienced team of attorneys will work to help you clearly organize your estate so you are prepared and your loved ones are cared for.

CALL US TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION (602) 456-6776 WWW.RLATTORNEYS.COM

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Cost effective, efficient & successful advertising.

Take advantage of a horse-crazy captive audience you will get when you advertise on the live streams of today’s most watched horse shows. Reach the thousands who love horses and are interested in what you have to offer.

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April 25 ~ May 1

May 2 ~ May 7

May 19 ~ May 22

May 26 ~ May 29

June 1 ~ June 4

June 9 ~ June 12

June 7 ~ June 11

July 23 ~ July 30

September 21 ~ September 25

June 21 ~ June 25

June 24 ~ June 26

June 30 ~ July 3

August 14 ~ August 20

July 6 ~ July 10

July 20 ~ July 23

October 21 ~ October 29

July 6 ~ July 10

September 15 ~ September 17

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July 13 ~ July 16

September 30 ~ October 2


LOOKING AHE AD M AY 2 016

INTRODUCING Contact us for information on advertising in the new AHT worldwide publication focused on the European and Middle Eastern show circuit.

World Cup Show Coverage

Region 7

Arabians of Southeast Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

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LOOKING AHE AD J U N E 2016

Youth Nationals Preview

2016 Theme

Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

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In Print • Online • In Touch

COMES TO THE TABLE...

YOUR EQUINE MARKETING SOURCE FOR OVER 40 YEARS! MAGAZINE BOOKS BROCHURES BANNERS CUSTOM PRINTING DIGITAL PROMOTION E-MAIL MARKETING FACEBOOK WEBSITE DESIGN PLUS MUCH MORE! Cutting edge design, award winning print quality and

in-depth editorial content from across the globe.

Contact us and take the first step to global recognition for you and your horses. 1-800-248-4637

Tony Bergren - tonyb@ahtimes.com - 231-286-6085 Lara Ames - lara@ahtimes.com - 612-210-1592 Jeff Wallace - jeff@ahtimes.com - 323-547-4116

www.ahtimes.com

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Index Of Advertisers A

M

Abel Family, The .............................................................................................8, 9 Agricon Logistic Horse Transport ..........................................................151-155 AHA of AZ-Scottsdale Signature Stallions.................................................... 58 AHA of AZ-The Breeders Club ...................................................................... 59 AHT Boutique................................................................................................. 330 AHTimes.com ......................................................................................... 105, 118 AKS Farm .................................................................................................190-192 Al Shaqab .................................................................................................144-149 Albidayer Stud ............................................................................................. 10, 11 Aljassimya Farm...........................................................................................12, 13 Ames Reining Horses...................................................................................... 232 Arabian Breeders World Cup ........................................................................... 53 Arabian English Performance Association ...................................................... 54 Arabian Horse Global .............................................................................334, 335 Argent Farms .............................................................................................2, 3, 16 Atkinson, Kaylee.............................................................................................. 239

Maroon Fire Arabians ................................................................ 32, 33, 140, 331 Matlack DVM, David ..................................................................................... 141 McCulloch, Krystal .........................................................................................243 Medallion Stallion .......................................................................................56, 57 Midwest Station I ............................................................................................ 233 Midwest ............................................................................................ 8, 9, 144-149 Milestone Arabians.......................................................................................... BC Minnesota Arabian Horse Breeders ...........................................................56, 57

B Beloveds Farm .............................................................................................IFC, 1 Betten, Joe & Michelle ............................................................................134, 135 Bisch Training..................................................................................................204 Brian Welman Training Center...................................................................... 232 Burkman Centre ..............................................................................................246

C Cedar Ridge Arabians ...... 38, 39, 138, 139, 198-200, 216, 217, 245, 340, IBC Chavez Family, The.........................................................................................230 Chestnuthill Arabians .................................................... 18-23Spotlight (80-85) Chrishan Park Arabians .......................................................................... 242-244 Christy Higman-Clements Training.............................................................. 193 Church Hill Arabians...................................................................................... 330 Criadero Gajualo.......................................................................................... 40-43

D Daniel Training Center ...................................................................................201 Dazzo Equine LLC.........................................................................................240 Deor Farms......................................................................................................... 88 Dreymbay Farm ............................................................................5Spotlight (67) Durini, Manuel & Maria .....................................................24Spotlight (86), 87

E Eleanor’s Arabians ...................................................................................224, 225

F Frierson Atkinson ............................................................................................ 331

G Golladay Training.................................................................................... 216, 217

H Harris Arabians................................................................................................ 143 Hegg, Mrs. Mickey ......................................................................................... 331 Hennessey Arabian Horse Partners LLC ...................................8Spotlight (70) Hickerson Arabian Show Horses ................................................................... 231

J John White Stables ..........................................................................................203

K KGB Texas Communications ......................................................................... 241 Kirby Arabians, LLC ......................................................................................238

L Lesley Farms .................................................................................4Spotlight (66) Love, Gretchen ........................................................................................ 218, 219

N North Arabians ...................................................................2-3Spotlight (64, 65)

P Palmetto Arabians ...................................................................... 17Spotlight (79) Pay-Jay Arabians .............................................................................................. 331

R R.O. Lervick Arabians .................................................................................... 331 RBC Show Horses........................................................................5Spotlight (67) Region 12 Spotlight Futurity .......................................... 12-16Spotlight (74-78) Resnick & Louis Attorneys At Law ............................................................... 333 Rick Gault Training ....................................................................................36, 37 Robbins, Mike & Lori.....................................................................................202 Rodgers, Heather .............................................................................................244 Rohara Arabians ................................................................................................ 61 Rooker Training....................................................................................... 197, 221 Royal Arabians ........................................... FC, 17, 18, 1-8Royal (19-26), 27, 28 Russell, Katie & Joe .........................................................................................246

S Saint Petersbourgh International Cup................................................................ 5 Select Show Horses..................................................................................189, 202 Seraphim Arabians ......................................................... 20-23Spotlight (82-85) Shada, Inc............................................................................................................. 7 Shea Stables ................................................................................. 32, 33, 140, 331 Shippee, Emily .................................................................................................242 Show Season..................................................................................................... 196 Shuster Farms...........................................................................................220, 221 Siemon Stables ................................................................................................. 141 Silver Sire ........................................................................................................... 60 Smoky Mountain Park Arabians ............................................................136, 137 Stachowski Farm, Inc. .............................................................134, 135, 238-240 Stigler Stud........................................................................................................... 5 Stonegate Arabians, LLC ...............................................................................2, 3 Strand’s Arabians Stables ........................................................................ 218, 219 Strawberry Banks Farm........................................................................... 119, 133

T Ted Carson Training Center .................................... IFC, 1, 62, 1Spotlight (63) The Brass Ring ................................................................................................ 241 The Halter Futurity ........................................................................................... 55 The Hat Lady .................................................................................................. 331 The Miracle Maker Group ............................................ 18-19Spotlight (80, 81) Trotwood Farm ............................................................................................34, 35 Trowbridge’s Ltd. .........................................................................8Spotlight (70) Tutto Arabi....................................................................................................... 150 Tyson Randle Performance ............................................................................. 241

V Van Dyke, Les & Diane ...................................................................................... 7 Varian Arabians ................................................................................................. 29 Vicki Humphrey Training Center .......................................................... 194, 195

W Whispering Pines Arabians ............................................................................ 142 Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc...................................................................... 331 Wilson Training & Bloodstock ...........................................24Spotlight (86), 87

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2016 Memories


The Greatest Show on the Earth

www.Cedar-Ridge.com


OVERALL LEADING 2015 NORTH AMERICAN N AT I O N A L H A LT E R W I N N E R

VALLDEZ

+/

Valerio x AW Fortune NGold 2012 Chestnut Gelding

Starting his PERFORMANCE CAREER with Liz Bentley of IIB Farms

Over $130,000 Lifetime Earnings! MILESTONE ARABIANS Steve and Darla Miles | Basehor, KS 816-769-7172 | darlam@milesexcavating.com W W W. M I L E S T O N E A R A B I A N S . C O M

2015 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Jr. Gelding 2015 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Futurity Gelding 2015 Canadian National Champion Arabian Futurity Gelding 2015 Youth National Champion Arabian Gelding JOTH and JTH 18 & Under 2014 U.S. National Champion Arabian 2-Year-Old Gelding 2014 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Gelding 1-3 Years 2014 Canadian National Reserve Champion Arabian 2-Year-Old Jackpot Gelding 2014 Scottsdale Signature Unanimous Champion Arabian 2-Year-Old Gelding 2013 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Yearling Gelding 2013 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Gelding 1-3 Years 2013 Canadian National Champion Arabian Yearling Colt/Gelding Plus many more Regional and Futurity wins!


Vol 46 No10 - Arabian Horse Times