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Volume 44, No. 4 AA $7.50


UNITED STATES

• AllezAndrA AlbidAyer (SF Veraz X DA Elegantra) Owned by: Sheikh Mohammed Bin Saud Al Qasimi Arabian Yearling Filly Halter • ConviCtion CA (SF Veraz X Denalia) Owned by: Kentley & W. Kent Dean Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity Arabian Futurity Gelding Halter • KApriCious v (Audacious PS X Kashmir NA) Owned by: Joelle & Robert J Wright Jr. Arabian Two-Year-Old Filly Halter • KowetA CAll Me MAjor (DS Major Afire X Call Me Callie) Owned by: Denni K. Mack Half-Arabian Yearling Colt/Gelding Halter


CHAMPIONSHIP

• Kryptonite tdF (ML Mostly Padron X TDF Carolina Peach) Owned by: W. Kent Dean Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR 19-35 Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Maturity Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse • MAgniFiCo zF (Magnum Psyche X The Sweet Rose) Owned by: Michelle Amrick Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity Half-Arabian Three-Year Old Gelding Halter Half-Arabian Futurity Gelding Halter Half-Arabian S/H Gelding Halter AAOTH • rAsiKA (Aria Impresario X Marrissah) Owned by: Neverland Arabians LLC Arabian 3 Year Old Filly Halter Arabian Futurity Filly Halter

• stephAnoso bFA (Stival X Oso Enessa) Owned by: Brandi Carson Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse

Presented by:

• tF sAlsA royAle (TF Royal Shahbaz X Sweet Stella V) Owned by: Curtis Westley & Allison Mehta Arabian Yearling Colt Halter • verMAAl (SF Veraz X TA Palatine) Owned by: Frances T. Butler Arabian Yearling Gelding Halter • vesper bFA (SF Veraz X PSYX Aprilove H) Owned by: Jack D. Curlee Arabian Hunter Pleasure Futurity

Contact Us: Call or Text: 910-876-7332 www.tedcarson.com


Wishing everyone competing at

U.S. Nationals the best of luck! Life is good and has been enjoyable at Cedar Ridge with the many young visitors.

We look forward to seeing you all at U.S. Nationals on Stallion Row. Stop by the CRA stalls and say “Hi!” See you all soon! —Dick and TA Mozart

2AA | A R A bi A N HoR Se T i MeS


2013 Fillies by TA Mozart x Nspiring Jazz

The Reining King Lifetime Earnings: $53,589+

Highest ARHA Scoring Arabian at Scottsdale Futurity Ever

Kordelas TA MozArT

Monogramm Kabala

2007 Chestnut Stallion

Marieta

A

Arbil Miranda

Negatraz

*Monogramma Palas

Kometa Banat Arba

El Paso Mitra

Iowa Gold Star Stallion ★ Minnesota Medallion Stallion

TA Mozart Futurity Starts 2016! For breedings, contact: Mike Brennan, Breeding Manager 952-492-6590 • www.cedar-ridge.com Trained by: John O’Hara

Ames Reining Horses

Volume 44, No. 4 | 3AA


Master Jullyen V Cover Story by MARY KIRKMAN

4AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


In all probability, when Dave and Terri May purchased Master Jullyen V one day before he was named 2010 Scottsdale Signature Champion Yearling Colt over 95 others, everyone just figured they were selecting a great stallion halter prospect. But the truth was, they were adding to their Arabian horse family. The Mays already owned two of his full sisters—Morning Glory V, a Scottsdale Signature reserve champion and U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Filly, and Mikayla Jullyen V, a regional reserve champion in halter and rising star in western pleasure—so they knew they were buying a well-credentialed horse. But the future was open for the colt. It would take Master himself to let them know that he too should get a crack at top-flight competition. Following his victory, Master Jullyen, who is by Jullyen El Jamaal and out of the Audacious PS daughter Misti Morn V, was sent to Dan and Judy Lynch’s farm in Cross Plains, Wis., to grow up. A stunning 15.1 hands as a yearling, he needed careful handling to fill out his leggy elegance without too much stress on precocious bones and joints. Dan Lynch oversaw a program that emphasized nutrition and exercise, and sent the colt out with other youngsters to learn equine social skills. “I kept an extremely close eye on his growth and his nutritional needs,” Lynch recalls. “We kept a balance of his being a horse, and yet having some light conditioning as we went along. He’s super intelligent, and he is a very understanding horse.” Lynch also noticed that the colt developed the swashbuckling charm that translates into show ring presence. “Master knows he’s got something special,” he smiles. “He gives you those looks, you know, like ‘Am I cool or what?’” That was the inspiration for his name, says breeder Sheila Varian. “He’s always had a masterful aura,” she notes. “He’s very imposing, in a gentle way.” Finally, in the spring of 2013, when he was 4, Master was pronounced ready and sent off to trainer Keith Krichke, who found him to have “a very willing attitude.” “He’s new, fresh and exciting,” says Krichke. “He’s got a lot of eye appeal. When I showed him at Region 14, it was noticeable that people wanted to look at him. He’s very long necked and elegant, and he’s very charismatic.” The judges agreed, and selected Master Jullyen V Region 14 Champion Stallion. That is not going to be all, Judy Lynch predicts. “I fully expect him to get even better down the road,” she says. “His two full sisters have really bloomed as 5- and 6-year-olds.” For the Mays, the Region 14 win was particularly sweet, but not just because they won. “Master was having a grand old time out there,” Dave May reports. To his family, that is important. So, it is now all systems go for Master Jullyen V to step up to the U.S. Nationals. He gets the opportunity, says May, because he deserves it; his place in the hearts—and the future—of his family is already assured. Dave and Terri May see their involvement in Arabians as long term; Terri, a casual rider, runs Lone Tree Farm, their 130-acre boarding facility in Oconomowoc, Wisconsin, and one of their daughters, Megan, rides endurance horses. When Dave’s retirement next spring allows them to spend part of their time at Balsam Mountain Preserve in North Carolina, some of their Arabians will go with them. But in the meantime, there is Master’s luminous career to enjoy. They have just one cardinal rule: the welfare of their horses comes first. “That’s what they’re all about,” nods Dan Lynch. “It’s not just winning a blue ribbon. It’s the horse that they have in mind.” And right now, the horse they have in mind is making a lot of people smile. “Master has a unique look,” Keith Krichke says. “His whole demeanor is just exotic looking. He has a lot of quality; he’s definitely one to reckon with.”

Volume 44, No. 4 | 5AA


www.villadelcavallo.com

Comfortably nestled at the base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the “Home of the Horse” exists as a sanctuary of peace and relaxation. Presenting the chance to immerse oneself in the luxurious privacy of a mountain-view home with spacious and accommodating areas for friends, both human and equine, Villa Del Cavallo also enjoys the benefits of all that Lake Tahoe has to offer: skiing, golf, restaurants, equitrekking, boating, fishing and more—venues that people from all over the world come to experience. A four seasons resort on its own, Villa Del Cavallo is available for purchase by the discerning horse lover.

AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE

call: 1-915-667-1503

~

email: agent@villadelcavallo.com

YOUR PERSONAL FOUR SEASONS RESORT 6AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Keith & Maureen Krichke • 11695 Sprinkle Rd, Vicksburg, MI 49097 Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 • Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 • Fax: 269.649.3541 • e-mail: info@krichke.com • www.krichke.com


2013 U.S. NatioNal 3-Year-old MareS & FUtUritY FillieS

RegIon 13 UnanIMoUS ChaMpIon MaRe Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

2012 SCottSdale InteRnatIonal ChaMpIon 2-YeaR-old FIllY Marajj x alada Mistique, by alada Baskin proudly bred & owned by Bruce Morgan


suzanne photo

2013 U.S. NatioNal 4-Year-old StallioNS with Keith KrichKe

Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

RegIon 14 ChaMpIon StallIon *Jullyen el Jamaal x Misti Morn V, by audacious pS proudly owned by david & teresa May


2013 U.S. NatioNal 2-Year-old FillieS with Keith KrichKe

Beijing BhF x engellina, by enzo proudly owned by Jan & Warren Fertig Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

For consideration of the serious showman or breeder.


2013 U.S. NatioNal YearliNg FillieS with Keith KrichKe

2013 laS VegaS WoRld CUp YeaRlIng ClaSS WInneR

Shael dream desert x BK tamina, by armani FC Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly bred & owned by Freeland Farms llC pam Jump, Manager: 260.341.4047 www.FreelandFarms.com


2013 U.S. NatioNal FUtUritY FillieS with Keith KrichKe

Beijing BhF x Mystic Rose BhF, by padrons psyche proudly bred & owned by Whiterock Ranch llC Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com


2013 U.S. NatioNal FUtUritY coltS with Keith KrichKe

U.S. natIonal top ten YeaRlIng Colt SCottSdale ReSeRVe ChaMpIon 2-YeaR-old Colt

Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

da Valentino x Sol natique, by Solstice

proudly bred & owned by Thirteen oaks arabians, ed & Maureen horton 423.323.4905 (farm) • 423.677.3301 (mobile) toarabians@aol.com • www.thirteenoaks.com


2013 U.S. NatioNal MareS aoth with Sarah MediNa

2013 RegIon 13 ChaMpIon MaRe aoth

denali BhF x Vh Starlight, by Solstice Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly bred & owned by Sharon day


2013 U.S. NatioNal geldiNgS with Keith KrichKe

2012 RegIon 13 ChaMpIon geldIng open

denali BhF x Vh Starlight, by Solstice Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly bred & owned by Sharon day


2013 U.S. NatioNal MareS aotH witH JeSSie SzyMaNSki

U.S. NatioNal ReSeRve ChaMpioN MaRe 6-7 YeaRS old

padrons psyche x Nv ali Bey, by ali Jamaal Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly owned by Jessie Szymanski


2013 U.S. NatioNal yearliNg coltS witH keitH kricHke

2013 RegioN 13 ChaMpioN YeaRliNg Colt

Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

eden C x desiree BhF, by denaili BhF

proudly bred & owned by Jessie Szymanski


iNtrodUciNg ...

Brixx ia x Suzanna Mpa, by versace

Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly bred & owned by heartland arabians, Joe & Kathy Monroe 4551 e. 500 South, greenfield, iN 46140 317.383.7513 developed and presented by Keith & Maureen Krichke


2013 U.S. NatioNal 8 & over MareS witH keitH kricHke

MUlti-NatioNal ChaMpioN Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

versace x Fortune in gold, by Wind Fortune proudly owned by Suzanne acevedo


2013 U.S. NatioNal 5-year-old geldiNgS witH MaUreeN kricHke

RegioN 13 ChaMpioN geldiNg

Falcon BhF x BhF anna tevkah, by Bey Shah Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 www.krichke.com

proudly owned by Keith & Maureen Krichke


dakar el Jamaal x gaiesha, by Bey Shah

CaNadiaN NatioNal top teN RegioN 10 ReSeRve ChaMpioN

2013 U.S. NatioNal weSterN PleaSUre aaotr 36 - 54 witH tracy lyNcH

Skips Cream Supreme x Blackberry Blaze, by autumn Blaze v

2013 RegioNS 10 & 11 ReSeRve ChaMpioN CaNadiaN NatioNal top teN

proudly ownd by tracy lynch trained by dan lynch Cross plains, Wi


Keith & Maureen Krichke • 11695 Sprinkle Rd, Vicksburg, MI 49097 Keith Cell: 269.217.5530 • Maureen Cell: 269.217.1130 e-mail: info@krichke.com • www.krichke.com

Beijing BHF x Franchesca BHF

2010 Grey araBian Filly

an exquisite product of the legendary Battle Hill Farm breeding program, this filly has beauty that lives up to her name. She is entered in this year’s national futurity championships and will continue her career successfully in the show ring and/or breeding barn.

eden c x Broken Promises PGa

2012 cHeStnUt araBian Filly

This filly has tons of presence and wow factor. She is out of the beautiful reserve national champion *khadraj daughter, Broken Promises PGa and shows the same promise! She is a winner and will win for you.

Majesteit x GF Scorpia

2008 Black HalF-araBian GeldinG

This is a national caliber show horse with tons of game for the amateur. He was champion H/a Gelding at region 13 and will show at U.S. nationals in the saddle/pleasure type division. He is a great country english pleasure prospect.

denali BHF x Felisha BHF

2007 Grey araBian Mare

Out of a multi-national champion Falcon BHF daughter, this mare is a breeder’s dream. She was top ten in both the U.S. and canadian national Futurities and will be a huge asset to any showman or breeding program.


R.O . Lervick Arabians’

U.S. National Contenders ROL

In The Fastlane

Half-arabian eldinG Gs futurity Geldin Half-arabian Country Pleasure futurity

ROL

Windsong

arabian futurity fillies arabian Junior fillies

Cylippin And Cylidin Half-arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse

ROL

Pure Asset

arabian enGlis lisH H Pleasure Junior Horse All AvAilAble For PurchAse Owned by: R . O. L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s Roger & Linda Lervick, owners • Dennis Wigren, trainer Stanwood, Washington • 800-669-2745 • cell 360-202-5934 www.ROLervickArabians.com • R . O. L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s cytosk@whidbey.net • www.ROLervickArabians.com

Volume 44, No. 4 | 23AA


Kohlminer

++++//

7 Time National Champion

Half-Arabian Show Hack AAOTR with Debbie Smith

Half-Arabian Ladies Side Saddle English AAOTR with Debbie Smith

Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with Dennis Wigren

Owned by: Ken & Debbie Smith, Cataldo, ID rabbithollowprims@gmail.com R . O. L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s • www.ROLervickArabians.com

24AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Gladiator

RH

3 Time National Champion Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure with Dennis Wigren

Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with Dennis Wigren

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Debbie Smith

Half-Arabian Ladies Side Saddle English with Debbie Smith

Owned by: Ken & Debbie Smith, Cataldo, ID rabbithollowprims@gmail.com

www.ROLervickArabians.com • R . O.

L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s

Volume 44, No. 4 | 25AA


Red Velvet

ROL

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR with Jenn Anderson

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Dennis Wigren

Owned by: Jamal & Jennifer Anderson, Maple Valley, WA e-mail: Jenn.Anderson@stream.com R . O. L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s • www.ROLervickArabians.com

26AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Fire Lily

ROL

2 Time National Champion

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Judy Mittenthal

Arabian English Pleasure with Dennis Wigren

Owned by: John & Judy Mittenthal, Sammamish, WA e-mail: mittenthalarabians@msn.com

www.ROLervickArabians.com • R . O.

L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s

Volume 44, No. 4 | 27AA


28AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 44, No. 4 | 29AA


Ronde Vu

4-Time National Champion Arabian Park Horse

Competing at U.S. nationalS in

arabian park with matt Siemon and

park aaotr with gregg Shafer 2013 Canadian National Champion Park Horse 2013 Scottsdale Champion Park Horse

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

Mamage x Ames Deja Vu 30AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


My Allience

6-Time National Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse

REA

Allience x My Diamond Girl

2013 Canadian National Champion Half-Arabian Park Open and AOTR 2013 Scottsdale and Buckeye Champion Half-Arabian Park AOTR

Competing at U.S. nationalS in Half-arabian park witH matt Siemon and park aaotr witH gregg SHafer

Owned by Shafer Arabians • Nancy Shafer, Gregg & Lotta Shafer West Farmington, Ohio Volume 44, No. 4 | 31AA


SF OOpS IdIdIt AgAIn

Hey Bey Be++//

Showing at U.S. Nationals in Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Matthew Siemon

Showing at U.S. Nationals in Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Driving with Matthew Siemon Half-Arabian Country Pleasure AAOTR and Native Costume AAOTR with Deborah Baker Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Select AATR with Tammie Dawson

Owned by Renee Booher & Miranda Bennett Randolph, Ohio

Owned by Deborah Baker Dublin, Ohio

dA trIpOLLI Showing at U.S. Nationals in Arabian Country Pleasure Open and Open Costume with Luke Siemon Arabian Country Pleasure Select with Tammie Dawson Owned by Brian McKee McConnelsville, Pennsylvania Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

32AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

HIpS dOnt LIe+ Showing at U.S. Nationals in Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Janet Snyder Also, watch for ‌ JuSt AnOtHer FIre Arabian Engish Pleasure Junior Horse with Matthew Siemon Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over and AAOTR Maturity with Janet Snyder Owned by Janet Snyder Freeport, Pennsylvania


Midwest


JJ LA

8 Baronesa

2012 United StateS national Champion 4-5 Year-old mare 2012 SCottSdale UnanimoUS Grand Champion mare


2013 United States Nationals Contender 4-5 Year-Old Mare with David Boggs


Elegance 8


JJ La Baronesa Magnum Psyche x NV Angelica ~ 10/14/08

JJ Baron Of Gazal Gazal al Shaqab x JJ La Baronesa

Haras Mayed ~ Fernando & Joaquin de santibanes ~ buenos aires, argentina www.HarasMayed.coM

www.MidwestArabian.com


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The The

Power of a Dream Power of a Team

Horses, Heritage, Happiness.

A lifelong passion for internationally acclaimed horseman, David Boggs, and his greatest joy is sharing that passion with his family and friends.

Contributing Writer, BETH ELLEN HUNZIKER

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 3


“The Arabian horse has enriched my life in countless ways, most significantly, through my family,” says Boggs. “My father and mother shared their love of the horses with my siblings and me, and now I am able to share that same love with my own family. Terry Anne and I are fortunate that our children, twin daughters Lyndsey and Courtney, daughter, Emma, and our son Jake, all enjoy the horses. The special friends and the wonderful people we have met, the beautiful places we have visited and the exciting adventures we have had, all treasures because of the Arabian horse. Words cannot describe how God has blessed us. We want to share that with others.”

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David Boggs’ heartfelt desire has become his life’s work. Over the past 30 years, he has traveled the world from Warsaw, Poland, to Pewaukee, Wisc., from Dubai City, Dubai, to Des Moines, Iowa, from Sao Paulo, Brazil, to Santa Ynez, Calif. David has visited every continent where Arabian horses live. Along the way, he has met members of royal families, rulers of nations, aristocrats, titans of industry, movie stars, and rock stars. However, his favorite people are those who love the Arabian horse—breeders, trainers, grooms, those who own Arabian horses and those who dream of the possibility, especially the children.

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 5


David’s passion for the Arabian horse is the key to the success of Midwest’s Training and Breeding Stations. His passion created his vision, it provides his energy, and it sustains his commitment to search out and find, acquire, transform, and showcase the crème de la crème of the breed. Thirty years of experience has trained David’s eye to see the potential in a horse that others seem to miss. His ability to see beyond the immediate, and visualize the possibility, is not a skill. It is a gift.

*Padron

“In our search for truly great Arabian horses, we keep an open mind,” continues Boggs. “When a small breeder comes to us and tells me they have a superstar, I listen. Many of the most influential horses in history are the result of small breeders’ programs. I believe these dedicated people are the backbone of our industry. I totally appreciate their commitment and respect the importance of their contributions. There is an indescribable thrill when I see a special horse that comes from a small breeder.

*Pogrom

I can see their pride in their accomplishment―it’s very rewarding! “Generally, if I see a horse that really impresses me, I am confident that I can find a buyer for it. For me, finding a diamond in the rough is often the most exciting opportunity. Taking a horse with unrealized potential and developing it into a show ring superstar is a fantastic experience.” People everywhere want to be associated with excellence, and in the Arabian horse industry, the pinnacle of excellence is found at Midwest. Strolling along the pristine aisles and looking into the sunlit

Magnum Psyche 6 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


stables is like walking into Tiffany’s. Each filly and colt, each mare and stallion, are gems among the breed. Access to great horses like these creates a market and attracts buyers from around the world. Midwest is synonymous with the highest levels of show ring and marketing success in the Arabian horse industry. Following the well-documented success of the stallion Padron, and his son Padrons Psyche, came the next generation of greatness―the incomparable, Magnum Psyche. Proudly owned by the father and son team of Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes, they possess the desire, the dedication, and the ability to provide every opportunity for Magnum Psyche to achieve all that is possible. It is, a perfect match. Magnum Psyche proved his show ring potential with his stunning physical excellence and earned five national championship titles in halter. However, his greatest achievements take place in the breeding barn. Magnum Psyche’s amazing ability to sire offspring of exceptional beauty and in his likeness earn him a ranking among the Arabian Horse Data Source’s Top Leading Sires of the World. At this time, Magnum Psyche exceeds both his sire, Padrons Psyche, and his grandsire, *Padron, on this list of Leading Sires of the World. Magnum continues to inspire breeders as his sons and daughters are now establishing new generations of champions at Midwest and around the globe. “The horses come first at Midwest,” says David Boggs. “After all, they are the reason this business

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 7


Magnum Psyche 8 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


is possible. We strive to provide the absolute best care for them, and the most comprehensive services, the most positive experience, and the most fun possible for our clients.� Often when David travels, he includes family and friends so they can share in the fun of meeting other breeders, experiencing the culture of different countries, and the excitement of discovering amazing new horses.

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 9


Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 11


IN SEARCH OF EXCELLENCE In 2011, David and a group of friends travelled to Europe to attend the Salon du Cheval in Paris. Among the horses showing, he saw an exquisite bay colt that mesmerized him. David knew nothing about the colt, his breeders, or his pedigree. Faith alone drew him to the young horse. After the class, David followed the colt back to the stalls. He instantly recognized the colt’s breeder―Dr. Marek Trela, the Director of Janów Podlaski. David asked if the young colt, named Pogrom, was available for purchase―he was not. Then David inquired about a possible lease. Dr. Trela said they might

12 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


consider a lease the following year, after the 2012 Polish Nationals. David waited patiently and never forgot the exotic bay colt. Soon after the Polish Nationals, David spoke to Director Trela and this time they agreed to a two-year lease. Soon after, Pogrom arrived in Minnesota and joined the super star stallions standing at Midwest. Pogrom’s American show ring debut came at the 2013 Scottsdale Horse Show―the largest Arabian horse show in the world. He won his class unanimously. He went on to win the Scottsdale Senior Stallion Championship and the title of Scottsdale Supreme Halter Champion. Director Trela was there to witness Pogrom’s soaring victory. Two months later, Pogrom was presented at the Arabian Horse Breeders World Cup in Las Vegas, reunited with his friend and original handler Pawel Kozikowski. Once again, Pogrom won his class for Four-Year-Old Stallions and he was ultimately named the Gold Champion Senior Stallion. Isabella Zawadska has an undaunted spirit―she travelled all the way from Poland, unaided, despite her physical challenges, to accept her AHBA Ambassador’s Award for her outstanding contributions made to the Arabian horse. Isabella was there with tears in her lovely blue eyes to see Pogrom receive his honors. They both received a standing ovation!

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 13


In the midst of all the show ring success, Pogrom was creating more excitement as his first foals arrived―they are spectacular! Show ring success is about receiving public acclaim. Breeding is about giving something positive back to the breed and contributing to the future. There is no doubt that Pogrom is on his way to becoming one of the most important sires of his generation. Next on Pogrom’s agenda, this October he will go to Tulsa, Oklahoma, where he will compete for the title and honors of U.S. National Champion Stallion. The strong bonds David Boggs made with Polish breeders inspired a trip to their Arabian Horse Festival in August of this year. It was a first time visit for most of the group who made the trip. But for David, it was more like a reunion to see special people and places again after such a long absence. Although it was the trip of a lifetime for the Midwest clients, for Janey Morse of Oak Ridge Arabians, owner of the multi-national champion and superstar young sire Vitorio TO, it meant even more. Vitorio was used for the first time in Poland during the 2012 breeding season by means of frozen semen. He sired three foals at Michalów and one at Bialka. According to Michalów Director, Jerzy Bialobok, the Vitorio foals consistently showed upright, well set necks, large eyes, and an abundance of type. With this success―even from such a limited use―Director Bialobok thought about the possibility of bringing Vitorio to Poland.

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An agreement was made and it was decided Vitorio would stand at

Vitorio TO

Michalów State Stud for the 2014 and 2015 breeding season. This marks the first time a U.S. stallion will stand at Michalów since the great sire Monogramm. It’s a honor to have Vitorio stand at Michalów State Stud. It is also a great opportunity for Michalów to bring in an outcross stallion for their treasured mares.

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 15


In 1997, David met Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes, of Haras Mayed in Argentina, when they visited his farm in Scottsdale, Ariz. At the time, David had a beautiful young chestnut colt―Magnum Psyche―a son of Padrons Psyche and a grandson of the legendary sire Padron. The chance meeting would change their lives and shape the future of the Arabian horse breed. Together, David, Fernando, and Joaquin created every opportunity for Magnum Psyche to fulfill his destiny and become not only a record holding international champion stallion, but the Leading Living Arabian Stallion in the World. Magnum Psyche is more than just another stallion, and Fernando and Joaquin de Santibanes are more than friends―they are family.

16 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


David deeply respects the breeders of South America and their contributions to the breed. His dear friend, Lady Gina Pelham, of Haras Catalina in Argentina, has been breeding beautiful champions for more than 20 years. David visits whenever he can to see the offspring of her beautiful stallion, Legacy of Fame. Brazilian breeder, Luciana Fasano of Fazenda Floresta, owns some of the top show stallions in the world. Luciana loves the excitement of competition and she recently sent her young stallion LLC Fasario, a son of National Champion Stallion Aria Impresario and National Champion RD Fabreanna, to Midwest. Fasario will be presented by David at the U.S. Nationals and will compete in Futurity Stallions. Fasario is a Scottsdale Champion and he is the 2012 Brazilian National Champion Junior Stallion with Rinaldo Longuini. Whether you are a small breeder with one precious mare or a large breeder with several mares, every breeding decision is important. That’s why Midwest is so selective about the stallions he represents and who stand at his farm. Among the most noteworthy young stallions is the international champion Faraa Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x GW Natorious Star). Fernando de Santibanes of Haras Mayed leased Faraa Al Shaqab from his breeder/owner, Al Shaqab Stud in Qatar, for their mares, including their Magnum Psyche daughters. The results were phenomenal! Faraa has consistently produced wonderful foals including several exquisite fillies out of Magnum daughters, and one exceptionally fine filly, JJ Argentina, who is out of the Versace daughter, Diva Girl. Faraa al Shaqab is a fantastic young sire that breeders everywhere should learn about and consider for their mares.

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 17


One of the most brilliant stars ever to stand at Midwest is the amazing young stallion Hariry Al Shaqab (Marwan Al Shaqab x White Silkk). Hariry Al Shaqab was also bred by and is owned by Al Shaqab Stud. Hariry quickly earned international recognition for his extreme type and quality. In 2012, he was named U.S. National Champion Two-Year-Old Colt, U.S. National Champion Junior Colt, and Scottsdale Arabian Champion Colt. Hariry’s beauty and conformation caught David’s attention. After researching his pedigree, David was convinced Hariry could be a fantastic cross on the daughters of Magnum Psyche, DA Valentino, and Vitorio TO. Plans for Hariry Al Shaqab include competing at the 2013 U.S. National Arabian Championships.

Hariry Al Shaqab

18 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


In April of 2013, while attending the Arabian Horse Breeders World Cup in Las Vegas, David viewed among the fantastic stallions competing, a long-time favorite―Baahir El Marwan (Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea). Baahir was in full bloom. There was no denying his extreme type and quality. The judges award Baahir the title of Breeders World Cup Silver Champion Senior Stallion, but not before David made an offer to Baahir’s owners, The Baahir Group, and purchased the stallion for his client, Mr. Bassam Al Saqran, of Al Saqran Stud in the U.A.E. Midwest is thrilled to welcome a stallion of Baahir El Marwan’s stature and breeding potential to the Midwest roster of champions and leading sires. Plans for Baahir included a first appearance at the Arabian Celebration Show in Louisville, Kentucky. Then, onto Scottsdale for the All Arabian Show and a busy breeding season in 2014. As October draws near, David and the staff at Midwest prepare for the U.S. National Championships. They are looking forward to presenting their star-studded show string. David is especially excited to be reunited with one of the most successful stallions of all time. Once again, he will be on the lead of the great show horse, LD Pistal. It will be a bittersweet reunion as LD Pistal was recently purchased by a breeder in Israel and will soon make his way to his new home— hopefully with yet another gleaming national championship trophy! Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 19


Baahir El Marwan 20 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Kids & horses

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 21


22 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Family & Friends

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 23


24 MIDWEST | A r a bi a n Hor se T i mes


Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 25


26 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Midwest Excellence

"... I firmly believe that any man's finest hours— his greatest fulfillment of all that he holds dear—is that moment when he has worked his heart out in good cause and lies exhausted on the field of battle—victorious." "The spirit, the will to win and the will to excel— these are the things what will endure and these are the qualities that are so much more important than any of the events themselves." "They call it coaching but it is teaching. You do not just tell them ... you show them the reasons." "After all the cheers have died down and the stadium is empty, after the headlines have been written, and after you are back in the quiet of your room and the championship ring has been placed on the dresser and after all the pomp and fanfare have faded, the enduring thing that is left is the dedication to doing with our lives the very best we can to make the world a better place in which to live." —Vince Lombardi Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 27


28 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

To Poland with Love ...


5-Time National Champion T h e I n s p I r aT I o n T o M a k e DreaMs realITy

With great P ride, Honor and Enthusiasm,

Midwest and Oak Ridge Arabians announce that *Vitorio TO is going to Poland! The world renowned Michalow Stud will be home to Vitorio for the next two years. Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 29


Joins Forces with Poland

30 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Oak Ridge aRabians Janey Morse, Don Morse III and in eternal remembrance, Don Morse II info@oakridgearabians.com www.oakrIDgearabIans.coM

MichalOw stud 48.41.356.54.05 ~ office@michalow.arabians.pl www.MIchalow.arabIans.pl

Midwest tRaining & bReeding statiOns David boggs 612.328.8312 • midwest@sbwireless.net nate white 563.663.7383 ~ natemidwest@sbwireless.net www.MIDwestarabIan.coM

www.vitorioto.com

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 31


The Power of History, the Result of Dedication. "Maybe he was more than what I hoped f o r, m a y b e h e was what I was dreaming of."

Dr. Marek Trela Director of Janow Podlaski State Stud, who planned the breeding of *Pogrom.

QR Marc x Petla ~ 4/30/09

www.MidwestArabian.com 32 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2013 ScottSdale UnanimoUS champion 4-Year-old Stallion 2013 ScottSdale UnanimoUS Grand champion Senior Stallion 2013 ScottSdale SUpreme champion halter horSe 2013 laS VeGaS arabian breederS World cUp Gold SUpreme champion Stallion

On lease tO DaviD & terry anne BOggs Jeff & anDrea slOan

BreD By staDnina KOni Jan贸w PODlasKi, POlanD

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 33


34 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Proudly presented by David Boggs in Tulsa. Competing for the title of United States National Champion Senior Stallion.

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 35


Pistal

There's

no dispuTing The record

he is The leader. 6-Time naTional champion

LD

www.MidwestArabian.com 36 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

...


returning

to

tuLsa in senior staLLion witH david Boggs

HaLter

Haras Los PaLmares ~ Punta deL este, uruguay www.HarasLosPaLmares.com.uy Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 37


Haras Los PaLmares ~ Punta deL este, uruguay www.HarasLosPaLmares.com.uy 38 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


LD

Magnum Psyche x Halana ~ 5/20/00

Pistal

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 39


A

R

nnouncing

His

eturn


U N I T E D S TAT E S N AT I O N A L S C O N T E N D E R ARABIAN 3-YEAR-OLD C O LT W I T H D AV I D B O G G S


National

Champion


Gazal Al Shaqab Marwan Al Shaqab Little Liza Fame

Dakar El Jamaal White Silkk KH First Prize

Anaza El Farid Kajora Fame VF Katahza *Ali Jamaal *Sonoma Lady Echo Magnifficoo Sweet Srrender

Owned and Bred By al ShaqaB MeMBer Of qatar fOundatiOn www.alShaqaB.cOM pSeterra@qf.prg.qa

www.MidwestArabian.com


Gold Champion Baahir

Salutes his Ladies in Waiting and thanks the breeders and owners of these legendary mares now bred to Baahir for 2014.

Ivory Lavita El Bella

Versace x Ivory Kometa

Luxemere Jizette

KM Bugatti x TA Jihana Bey

www.MidwestArabian.com 46 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Palitrah

Justify x Bint Bey Shah

Bint Bey Shah Bey Shah x Musks Angel Eyes

Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea ~ 2/20/08

Al SAqrAn Stud ~ united ArAb emirAteS Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 47


Vegas a rabian

DPA EF Kingston x Angelina DPA ~ 4/19/07

S cottSdale c hampion b reederS W orld c up c hampion r egional c hampion

United States Nationals 4 - 5 Ye a r O l d S t a l l i o n w i t h M i d w e s t www.MidwestArabian.com 48 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Sire of National and Scottsdale Champions

Al SAqrAn Stud ~ united ArAb emirAteS Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 49


National Champion

Marwan Al Shaqab x GW Natorious Star ~ 5/21/07

50 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


JJ Argentina (Faraa Al Shaqab x Diva Girl, by Versace)

For breeding inFormation,contact: david boggs • 612.328.8312 nate White • 563.663.7383 Judi anderson • 612.328.1057

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.prg.qa

B reeding i ncentives A vAilABle

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 51


Sultan

ORA

Vegas DPA x Raherra ~ 4/10/11

ScottSdale champion Yearling auction colt united StateS national reServe champion Junior colt canadian national champion Yearling colt iowa gold Star champion Yearling & two-Year-old colt arabian celebration Junior champion colt

www.MidwestArabian.com 52 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2013 United States Nationals 2 - Ye a r- O l d C o l t w i t h D a v i d B o g g s

Haras Los PaLmares ~ Punta deL este, uruguay www.HarasLosPaLmares.com.uy Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 53


Fasario

National Champion

LLC

Aria Impresario x RD Fabreanna ~ 3/27/10

United States Nationals Futurity Colt with David Boggs

www.MidwestArabian.com 54 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


The Eagle Has Landed!

Fazenda Floresta • Itu, BrazIl • www.FazendaFlorestaaraBIans.com Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 55


Kharisma

M

DA Valentino x Kharmel BR ~ 4/17/10

S cottSdale c hampion • R egional c hampion

i owa g old S taR c hampion • a Rabian c elebRation c hampion 3-Y eaR -o ld F illY

United States Nationals Futurity Filly with Midwest

www.MidwestArabian.com 56 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Marino arabians ~ anthony, Denise, brittany & aJ Marino ~ birMinghaM, alabaMa

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 57


Wieza Mocy

www.MidwestArabian.com 58 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

With Love, Respect and Admiration, We welcome her to the United States!

To b e p r e s e n t e d in the United States by David Boggs


E

The

x q u i s i t e To w e r o f P o w e r

p oLiSh n ationaL c haMpion e uropean n ationaL c haMpion w orLd c haMpion - p ariS

QR Marc x Wieza Marzen, by Ekstern ~ 2010

bred and owned by:

Michałów Stud ~ LeaSed by: oak ridge arabianS ~ Freeport, iLLinoiS www.oakridgearabianS.coM Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 59


A-Jericho


uniteD StAteS nAtionAlS YeArling colt with DAviD boggS

2013 ... A SpectAculAr Debut 2013 ScottSdale champion Signature Yearling colt 2013 aBWc Silver Supreme champion Yearling colt 2013 aBWc gold champion FuturitY Yearling colt


A-Jericho

A-Jakarta x Destiny VF

Owned by The Abel FAmily lAcOmbe, AlberTA, cAnAdA TrAined by: TArA bOresek Tel : 602-509-8228 Or 541-865-9302 www . deOrFArmsArAbiAns . cOm

www.MidwestArabian.com


Luxemere Jizette KM Bugatti x TA Jihana Bey ~ 7/8/09

2012 U nited S tateS n ational C hampion J Unior F illy 2012 C anadian n ational C hampion F UtUrity F illy 2013 a rabian C elebration G rand C hampion m are 2013 r eGion 14 C hampion m are

Marino arabians ~ anthony, Denise, brittany anD aJ Marino ~ birMinghaM, alabaMa oak riDge arabians ~ Freeport, illinois ~www.oakriDgearabians.coM

Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 65


Seraphina

ER

Bey Jullyen x Pretty Tricky ~ 4/5/07

A rAbiAn b reeder F inAls C hAmpion AoTh i owA G old s TAr C hAmpion AoTh

United States Nationals Mare Halter AAOTH with Pam Bauerlein www.MidwestArabian.com 66 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Halbrook arabians ~ Pam Halbrook and Pam bauerlein ~ Tucson, arizona

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 67


www.MidwestArabian.com 68 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Adhaba al Shaqab

Marwan Al Shaqab x GW Natorious Star ~ 2/11/06


Midwest Welcomes the Elegance of the Beautiful Mare-*Adhaba Al Shaqab A rAbiAn C elebrAtion C hAmpion 6-8 Y eAr -o ld m Are A rAbiAn C elebrAtion r eserve G rAnd C hAmpion m Are

owned and bred by al shaqab member of qatar foundation

oggs Š

Lyndsey B

www.alshaqab.com pseterra@qf.prg.qa

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 69


www.MidwestArabian.com 70 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Donna Molta Bella SRA

DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna ~ 3/09/12

R egion 14 U nanimoUs C hampion Y eaRling s weepstakes F illY U nited s tates n ational C ontendeR

Stone Ridge ARAbiAnS ~ dAn And MAuReen gRoSSMAn ~ blooMington, indiAnA

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 71


Chantilly Lace ORA

Vitorio TO x Raherra ~ 1/26/12

United States Nationals Ye a r l i n g F i l l y with Midwest

2013 A rAbiAn H orse C elebrAtion U nAnimoUs C HAmpion Y eArling F illY And J Unior F illY 2013 i owA g old s tAr U nAnimoUs C HAmpion A UCtion F illY 2013 l As V egAs w orld C Up r eserVe C HAmpion A UCtion F illY 2013 s CottsdAle s ignAtUre s tAllion r eserVe C HAmpion A UCtion F illY

www.MidwestArabian.com 72 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Oak Ridge aRabians FReepORt, illinOis www.OakRidgeaRabians.cOm


Visionetta

PCF

PCF Vision x Majoretta ~ 6/4/11

United States Nationals 2 - Ye a r- O l d F i l l y w i t h M i d w e s t 2013 R egion 14 U nanimoUs C hampion 2-Y eaR -o ld F illY 2013 a Rabian h oRse C elebRation C hampion 2-Y eaR -o ld F illY 2012 b ReedeR F inals C hampion 2-Y eaR -o ld F illY Haras La CataLina ~ Lady GeorGina PeLHam Buenos aires, arGentina

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 73


Mi Grand Valentino DA Valentino x GA Mi Grandlady 5/16/10

United States Nationals Futurity Colt with Midwest

R egion 14 U nanimoUs C hampion Y eaRling C olt i owa g old s taR U nanimoUs C hampion Y eaRling C olt s Cottdale s ignatURe s tallion C hampion Y eaRling C olt s Cottsdale s ignatURe C hampion 2-Y eaR -o ld C olt

Grand arabian Farm ~ Linda mehney ~ 616-490-3926 ~ Gaarab@ix.netcom.com Grand rapids, mi ~ www.Grandarabian.com

www.MidwestArabian.com 74 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Vitoria

LM

Vitorio TO x LM Olivia ~ 4/21/11

R egion 13 U nanimoUs champion 2-Y eaR -o ld F illY 2013 g old s taR F UtURitY R eseRve c hampion 2-Y eaR -o ld F illY

Oak Ridge aRabians ~ FReepORt, illinOis ~ www.OakRidgeaRabians.cOm

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 75


Princess Stivalia

LD

Stival x Queen Adiamonds ~ 4/19/10

In

foal to

5-t Ime n atIonal C hampIon V ItorIo to, D ue

early

United States Nationals Futurity Filly with Midwest Les and diane Van dyke ~ ChandLer, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com 76 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

2014.


Victorious

LD

DA Valentino x Queen Adiamonds ~ 3/28/09

U nited S tateS R eSeRve n ational C hampion 3-Y eaR -o ld C olt i owa G old S taR C hampion 3-Y eaR -o ld C olt R eGion 14 U nanimoUS C hampion Y eaRlinG C olt

United States Nationals Contender with Midwest Les and diane Van dyke ~ ChandLer, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 77


Bandit

SRA

DA Valentino x LL Albufera ~ 5/9/10

United States Nationals Futurity Colt with Midwest 2013 A rAbiAn C elebrAtion C hAmpion 3-Y eAr -o ld C olt Stone Ridge ARAbiAnS ~ dAn And MAuReen gRoSSMAn ~ blooMington, indiAnA

www.MidwestArabian.com 78 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Taipei

S pectacular

MTC PCF Vision x Vivatious ~ 3/12/12

Debut!

2013 A rAbiAn C elebrAtion C hAmpion Y eArling C olt DaviD anD Terry anne Boggs ~ rogers, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 79


Spartacus

RA

Da Vinci FM x WH Julliet ~ 5/29/11

2012 R egion 14 C hampion Y eaRling C olt 2012 a Rabian h oRse C elebRation U nanimoUs C hampion J UnioR C olt 2012 a Rabian b ReedeR F inals C hampion J UnioR C olt 2012 i owa g old s taR C hampion Y eaRling C olt

Limited breedings available through Midwest

www.MidwestArabian.com 80 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


The Vasconcelos Family ~ Brazil

Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 81


Aliethya

Magnum Psyche x JR Burmagny ~ 7/7/10

Canadian national ReseRve Champion 2-YeaR-old FillY iowa Gold staR Champion 2-YeaR-old FillY DAviD AnD Terry Anne Boggs ~ rogers, mn

Honey Luv

DA Valentino x Momentica SD ~ 5/08/11

Dick Ames ~ JorDAn, mn

www.MidwestArabian.com 82 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Shes All That

ORA

Afires Heir x She Be Adiva KBS

United States Nationals Half-Arabian English Pleasure Futurity with Cedar Ridge Arabians DaviD anD Terry anne Boggs ~ rogers, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 83


Beni

TG

DA Valentino x Rohara Mademoiselle ~ 1/19/11

United StateS national Champion Canadian national Champion SCottSdale SUpreme Champion half-arabian iowa Gold Star Champion

United States Nationals Half-Arabian 2 - Ye a r- O l d F i l l y w i t h M i d w e s t Todd and Glena WeeGens ~ FreeporT, Il

www.MidwestArabian.com 84 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


O

ffering the

Iowa Gold Star and Minnesota Medallion Champion

Ye a r l i n g F i l l y

Truli Precious

Trussardi x Bella Satinata, by Versace ~ 4/25/12

I owa G old S tar F uturIty C hampIon y earlInG F Illy m InneSota m edallIon C hampIon y earlInG F Illy Brookhill ArABiAns ~ DeAn Meier ~ WAukeshA, Wi ~ WWW.BrookhillArABiAns.coM

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 85


Vitoria Beckham

Vitorio TO x Legacys American Rose 5/19/12

2013 Iowa Gold Star reServe ChampIon a uCtIon FIlly Jeff frahm ~ Springfield, mO

www.MidwestArabian.com 86 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Magnum Storm DC

Magnum Psyche x Rohara Eclipse ~ 2/5/05

2013 ArAbiAn CelebrAtion CHAmpion 6-8 YeAr old G eldinG

2012 & 2011 U.S. nAtionAl CHAmpion G eldinG And AdUlt 4 & over 2010 & 2011 SCottSdAle CHAmpion GeldinG

United States Nationals Gelding with Midwest

The Godfather

ORA

Vitorio TO x SH Sebella ~ 4/18/11

2012 U.S. nAtionAl CHAmpion HAlf-ArAbiAn Y eArlinG Colt /G eldinG 2013 Gold StAr fUtUritY CHAmpion H Alf-ArAbiAn 2-YeAr-old Colt

United States Nationals Half-Arabian Colt with Midwest

RichaRd and Justine GoodRow ~ ManchesteR, nh

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 87


Victoria Principal Vitorio TO

M

x Diamond Of Versace 6/14/11

C anadian n ational R eseRve C hampion Y eaRling F illY l as v egas W oRld C up C hampion Y eaRling F illY

s Cottsdale s ignatuRe s tallion C hampion Y eaRling F illY

Arabella

M

WH Justice x Bella Valentina FA 2013 Bay Filly

Marino arabians ~ anthony, Denise, brittany anD aJ Marino birMinghaM, alabaMa

www.MidwestArabian.com 88 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


A

Romanticaa

Magnum Psyche x ML Cerra Rose ~ 4/26/06

s ells bred to the sensational hariry al shaqab.

rare jewel , an exquisite grey daughter of magnum

P syche .

Misheks ArAbiAns ~ WAlter Mishek ~ WAsecA, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 89


*LC

Shekhah

Legacy Of Fame × La Macarena HDM

La Macarena LC

Imperatore

Legacy Of Fame × La Macarena HDM

HDM

I

Abakan x Ytadella 'F' ~ 5/31/08

mported beauty

Haras La CataLina ~ Lady GeorGina PeLHam Buenos aires, arGentina

www.MidwestArabian.com 90 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Alotta Ambition

RD

I

Bey Ambition x HL Infactuation ~ 3/19/10

S cottSdale S ignature S tallion r eServe c Hampion Y earling a uction F illY

n Foal to

n ational c Hampion *H arirY a l S Haqab

Halbrook arabians ~ Pam Halbrook ~ Tucson, aZ

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 91


T he

breeding of Arabian horses no greater privilege, than the

Sahiba

2014 Iowa Gold Star Auction Filly Entry

SA

Victorious LD x Love Chimes LD ~ 4/25/13 Dr. Balpal SanDhu

www.MidwestArabian.com 92 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


a f f o r d s n o g r e a t e r r e s p o n s i b i l i t y, raising of the next generation.

Sultress

2014 Scottsdale Signature Auction Entry

ORA

Vegas DPA x Raherra ~ 2/13/13

F ull

sister to

N atioNal C hampioN s ultaN ora

Haras Los PaLmares ~ Punta deL este, uruguay www.HarasLosPaLmares.com.uy

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, no. 4 | MIDWEST 93


Poetica

MA

I ncomparable

*Pogrom x Romanticaa ~ 2/5/13

Filly

S ired by S cottSdale S upreme c hampion *p ogrom and r omanticaa iS Sired by W orldWide c hampion and l eading S ire m agnum p Syche Misheks ArAbiAns ~ WAlter Mishek ~ WAsecA, Mn

www.MidwestArabian.com 94 MIDWEST | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Index Of Midwest Advertisers

A Abel Family, The

60-64

Al Saqran Stud

46-49

Al Shaqab

40-45, 50, 51, 68, 69

Ames, Dick

82

B Boggs, David and Terry Anne

79, 82, 83

Brookhill Arabians

85

F Fazenda Floresta

54, 55

Frahm, Jeff

86

G Goodrow, Richard and Justine

87

Grand Arabian Farm

74

H Halbrook Arabians

66, 67, 91

Haras La Catalina Haras Las Palmares

73, 90 36-39, 52, 53, 93

Haras Mayed

IFC-1

J Janow Podlaski

32-35

M Marino Arabians

56, 57, 65, 88

Michalow Stud

58, 59

Misheks Arabians

89, 94

O Oak Ridge Arabians

28-31, 58, 59, 65, 72, 75

S Sandhu, Dr Balpal

92

Sloan, Jeff and Andrea Stone Ridge Arabians

32-35 70, 71, 78

V Van Dyke, Les and Diane

76, 77

Vasconcelos Family, The

80, 81

W Weegens, Todd and Glena

84

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 44, No. 4 | Midwest 95


Thank you ... Team Midwest

A Special Thank You to the very talented and dedicated ...

Judi Anderson, Courtney Boggs, Lyndsey Boggs, Emma Boggs, Bev Brouillard, Andy Carroll, Jose Dominguez, Dagmar Gordiano, Rinaldo Longuini, Pat McGinnis, Frank Morisset, Sammy & Maria Ojeda, Alcides and Margaux Rodrigues, Haley Stark, Nate White and Dr. Darrell Zehr. We appreciate all that you do; all your hard work, and the kindness and respect that you show to each orher, each client, and most importantly, the horses of Midwest. We are blessed to know all of you. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts!

—David & Terry Anne


David, Terry Anne, Courtney, Lyndsey, Emma and Jake Boggs


Midwest Training & Breeding Stations Elk River, Minnesota ~ Scottsdale, Arizona David Boggs, cell: 612-328-8312 ~ midwest@sbwireless.net Terry Anne Boggs, cell: 612-328-8314 ~ tba92@aol.com Nate White, cell: 563-663-7383 ~ natemidwest@sbwireless.net Judi Anderson, cell: 612-328-1057 ~ judimidwest@sbwireless.net

www.MidwestArabian.com


Yo u A r e I n v i t e d . . .

Book Signing at Arabian Horse Times Booth

Join Dan and Maureen Grossman, Stone Ridge Arabians

Thursday, October 24, 2013 Following Morning Classes at U.S. Nationals.

$19.95 U.S. +$5.50

plus shipping

Canada +$15.00

International +$20.00

Order online at: www.ahtimes.com or call 800-248-4637 Volume 44, No. 4 | 135AA


Rob Bick & Caralyn Schroter Travis Andrews, Assistant Trainer 2379 Creechs Mill Road, Smithfield, NC 27577 tel: 919.202.8384 • info@rbcshowhorses.com www.rbcshowhorses.com

136AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Arabian Western Pleasure

AAOTR 36-54 with Nan Harley Open with Rob Bick

Khadraj NA+++/ x RA Po Okela, by Fame VF

2013 Region 12 Reserve Champion Western Pleasure AAOTR 2013 Region 9 Champion Western Pleasure AAOTR 19-54 2013 Region 9 Reserve Champion Western Pleasure AATR

Multi-Program Nominated Sire • Standing at RBC Show Horses • 919.202.8384 For breeding information contact owner Nan Harley at 770.252.2705 or nan_harley@yahoo.com

Volume 44, No. 4 | 137AA


Arabian English Pleasure

Open with Rob Bick

AA Apollo Bey x TF Magical Witch, by MHR Nobility

2013 Region 15 Top Five English Pleasure 2012 Region 14 Champion Park 2012 Region 12 Reserve Champion Park 2012 U.S. National Top Ten Park

Multi-Program Nominated Sire • Standing at RBC Show Horses • 919.202.8384 Owner Nola Gedeon, Lakeland, FL 138AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Arabian Ladies Side Saddle Western

Open with Caralyn Schroter

For your consideration

ML Mostly Padron x LA Femmefatale DF

2013 Region 15 Reserve Champion Western Pleasure 2013 Region 15 Champion Ladies Side Saddle Western 2013 Region 12 Champion Ladies Side Saddle Western

For Your Consideration

Multi-Program Nominated Sire • Standing at RBC Show Horses • 919.202.8384 Owner Teresa Craig, Gibsonville, NC

Volume 44, No. 4 | 139AA


Half-Arabian English Pleasure

Open with Rob Bick AAOTR with Laura Witter

Optimist x Wymsical, by Barbary

2013 East Coast Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure 2013 Region 9 Top Five Half-Arabian English Pleasure

Owner Live Oak Arabians, Baton Rouge, LA www.LiveOakArabians.com 140AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Purebred Western Pleasure

AATR Select with Laura Witter

Sundance Kid V x Verginia, by Versace

2013 East Coast Champion Western Pleasure Select Rider 2013 East Coast Champion Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2013 Region 12 Reserve Champion Spotlight Western Pleasure 2012 Region 12 Champion Spotlight Western Pleasure Junior Horse

Owner Live Oak Arabians, Baton Rouge, LA www.LiveOakArabians.com

Volume 44, No. 4 | 141AA


Arabian Hunter Pleasure +/

AAOTR 55 & Over with Jeanne Black Open with Rob Bick Versace x Lost-N-Found 2012 Canadian National Champion Hunter Pleasure 2013 Region 12 Reserve Champion Open

ferrara

2013 Region 15 Top Five AAOTR & AATR 40 & Over

janson

Owner Jeanne Black Charleston, SC

Arabian Country English Pleasure +/

AAOTR 19-35 with Rachel Pest Country Pleasure Driving with Rob Bick Millennium LOA x DA Dutchess 2013 Region 12 & 15 Unanimous Champion AA0TR 2013 Region 12 & 15 Reserve Champion AATR 2013 Region 15 Champion CP Driving 2013 Region 12 Reserve Champion CP Driving

142AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

ferrara

Owners David & Angel Pest, Suffolk, VA


Arabian English Show Hack Open with Rob Bick Arabian Mounted Native Costume +/

AAOTR with Kim Butler Open with Rob Bick

Bucharest Bucharest V x Allurience CG V x Allurience CG

2013 Region 15 & 12 Champion Show Hack 2013 Region 15 Reserve Champion Mounted Native Costume 2013 Region 12 Champion Mounted Native Costume 2013 Region 15 Reserve Champion Mounted Native Costume ATR

Owners Jim Blevins & Kim Butler, South Chesterfield, VA

Volume 44, No. 4 | 143AA


Challs Renegade (Magnum Chall HVP x Ruffianne) 2009 Chestnut Arabian Stallion A super western pleasure junior horse with the utmost quality, Renegade is a standout in the western and halter show ring.

Mosaic BFA (ML Mostly Padron x La Femmefatale DF) 2004 Bay Arabian Stallion 2013 Region 15 Champion Western Pleasure Open and Ladies Side Saddle. 2013 Region 12 Champion Ladies Western Side Saddle. Incredible western horse that will be a sure trip to the winners circle. Mosaic is suitable for any age rider.

LC Arlington (Regal Actor JP x Bey Shahs Lady) 2005 Bay Arabian Stallion A tall, handsome stallion with a wonderful disposition; He currently is in training for the hunter pleasure division.

Rob Bick & Caralyn Schroter • tel: 919.202.8384 • info@rbcshowhorses.com Come by our stalls at any show and check for updated offerings on www.rbcshowhorses.com 144AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


u.s.

NatioNal

Contenders 6620 320th Street East, Eatonville, WA 98328 253-875-5033 - Office | 253-495-3450 - Beth | 253-224-4073 - Mike

www.WhelihanArabianFarms.com

Volume 44, No. 4 | 145AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a eNglisH Pleasure aaotr 40 & over witH diaNe FraNkliN

ERA

Thrillicious

Baske Afire x Koriene

Owned by: Diane Franklin | Bellevue, Washington 146AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a CouNtry eNglisH Pleasure aaotr 55 & over witH diaNe FraNkliN

SF

Beyond the Glory

Cologne x Admirals Supreme Glory

Owned by: Diane Franklin | Bellevue, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 147AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN eNglish Pleasure aaotr Maturity aNd arabiaN eNglish Pleasure aaotr 40 & over with diaNe FraNkliN

In The Heir Tonight

Afires Heir x Ames Jasmine

Owned by: Diane Franklin | Bellevue, Washington 148AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN CouNtry eNglish Pleasure aaotr 55 & over with diaNe FraNkliN

Rascal SA Thyme

(Pryme Thyme x Chance To Dazzle

Owned by: Diane Franklin | Bellevue, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 149AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN CouNtry eNglish Pleasure aaotr 36-54 aNd arabiaN CouNtry eNglish Pleasure aaotr Maturity with beth whelihaN

Steely Dan

CP

Baske Afire x Misty Danser

Owned by: Whelihan Arabian Farms, LLC | Eatonville, Washington 150AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a HuNter Pleasure aaotr 36-54 witH BetH wHeliHaN

Bombey

CC

The Arssonist x Gypsy Bey Genie

Owned by: Whelihan Arabian Farms, LLC | Eatonville, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 151AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a eNglisH Pleasure aaotr Maturity aNd H/a eNglisH Pleasure aaotr 40 & over witH toM HaNseN

Hes So Fine

Pension CAHR x Misunderstood

Owned by: Tom and Leola Hansen | Redmond, Washington 152AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a CouNtry eNglisH Pleasure aaotr 55 & 0ver witH deb Haug

Jumping Jack BF Flash

MHR Nobility x Movie Maker

Owned by: Deb and Eric Haug | Seattle, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 153AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN CouNtry eNglish Pleasure aaotr 55 & over with deb haug

Heirabaska

Pension CAHR x Cinzia

Owned by: Deb and Eric Haug | Seattle, Washington 154AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN CouNtry Pleasure JuNior Horse witH MiCHael wHeliHaN arabiaN CouNtry eNglisH Pleasure aaotr Maturity witH deb Haug

SKF

Showgirl

Vegaz x Starr Llight

Owned by: Deb and Eric Haug | Seattle, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 155AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ arabiaN eNglish Pleasure aaotr 40 & over with deb haug

SV

Starlite

Aploz x Firelite DGL

Owned by: Deb and Eric Haug | Seattle, Washington 156AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a eNglisH Pleasure aaotr Maturity witH deb Haug

Blazn Star

Pension CAHR x Jeweled Spirit

Owned by: Deb and Eric Haug | Seattle, Washington Volume 44, No. 4 | 157AA


NatioNal CoNteNder ~ H/a CouNtry eNglisH Pleasure oPeN witH MiCHael wHeliHaN

Ludicris

Baske Afire x Precisely Poppy

Owned by: Wayne and Donna McArthur | Saanichton, British Columbia, Canada 158AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2013

Amateur Snapshots

2013

Amateur Snapshots Profiles continued from 221A

Volume 44, No. 4 | 159AA


Amateur Snapshots

Alayna Mala

Name: Farm Affiliation: Adandy

Farms

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I feel the current age breakdown is fair. Each age group has an equal opportunity to compete at each level before moving into the next. My best suggestion would be to leave the current breakdown as is for a few years. What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? Because we have great show managers and they have done a fabulous job with the schedules, there is more time for everyone to come together. Region 12 did a great job bringing everyone together during the spotlight stallion auction. Region 15 had a large participating crowd the evening of the barn parties and the AHDF auction. They were all great opportunities to get together with fellow horsemen and exhibitors. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Let them! Exhibitors need their coaches. They look for their coaches and trainers along the rail when they are in the ring. Riders need little tips from their coaches to assist them with their success in the ring. Words of encouragement keep their confidence levels at the highest point.

all throughout my life. I have always set goals for myself that relate to my passion for the Arabian horse. Arabians have given me a level of education, dedication and not found elsewhere. I live and breathe Arabian horses! I could not see myself doing anything else!

How have Arabians affected your life? I don’t even know where to start! They have affected my life tremendously; they became a passion of mine when I was just 7 years old. I finished my high school career in 3 years, in order to be with my horses on a day to day basis. They have given me so many opportunities and have helped me achieve some of my life long dreams, and they will continue to help me make more dreams come true. I’ve been taught to set goals

What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Have fun! The countless hours, the hard work, and sweat and tears that goes into the process of showing is necessary, however, I show Arabians because I love the breed. If you’re not having fun and enjoying yourself, then it’s not worth doing. “…What we do is only worthwhile if it is done in a spirit of joy and adventure, for ourselves and for our horses.” –Dancing with Horses

Robin Manfield

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Powell Training Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think the number 160AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Center

of competitors in each division would be more evenly balanced if the breakdowns were: 18-36, 37-49, and 50+.


Amateur Snapshots Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Ear wigs! What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Watch were I am going and stay out of traffic.  How did you get into Arabians? A friend of the family bred Arabians. Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode?  I began showing in 4-H when I was 7. My first horse was actually a $35 pony named Topsey Ann. Let’s just say that she lived up to her name!

Name:

Lester Martin

Farm name: L&B

Farms Trainer Affiliation: Blake Krohn and Jason Krohn—Oak Haven Arabians Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think we have a very good assortment of sections and breakdowns for amateur riders. The select division is great for individuals who have not won on a national level, while the age breakdowns allow for us older riders to not have to compete against those 19 year olds in great shape. I love my 40 and over peers; when the lineup is called for, we are more than ready for our oxygen therapy in center ring. I would not understand any further adjustment in the process, but am always open to suggestions. What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? I would like to see more assortment of amateur owner classes on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights during the final weekend of U.S. Nationals. I think we develop camaraderie through watching and cheering one another along in the ring. I also enjoy the social events established for U.S. Nationals and other shows. The Wine Walk allows us to mingle and get to know one another in a relaxed environment; the new AHDF Sale offering on Wednesday night seems to be yet another attempt to meet new people in a social environment, along with the red carpet event on Saturday night. But, my favorite event last year and hopefully this year, would be the Stachowski

Party on Saturday night. It is a time when the show is over, the stress level is non-existent, and people are ready to meet new people, relax and let their guard down. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Establishing rules in this area would be very hard to enforce. I know in tennis, there is no Volume 44, No. 4 | 161AA


Amateur Snapshots coaching from the player’s box, but enforcement of this rule, even on the largest of stages at Grand Slams, is very subjective. I like the quiet fashion in which the Arabian breed, relative to the Saddlebred shows, coaches people in the ring. I think we need to support everyone in the ring. I find it endearing that trainers at larger shows place friends, clients, and associates on the rail to make sure they are competing at a level with the rest of the class. This shows us we all need help. We are showing animals, not vehicles. The result of action can create multiple reactions and assistance is helpful, as long as it does not prevent others from competing at the highest of levels. I recently showed a horse for the first time in San Antonio, and Dana Weddle, a trainer I had never met, helped me with coaching over the rail, unsolicited. It was a moment I will never forget and has allowed me to meet a new friend.

Name:

What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Breathe, just breathe. I need to focus on riding each step to the best of my ability with that horse at that time. This is time to both compete and have fun. I cannot control anything other than myself and the horse. I have to let everything else go and control what I can control. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My uncle is my biggest fan, next to Brian Galbraith my husband and partner in crime with the Arabian horse. My uncle introduced me to the Arabian horse years ago. He taught me to ride and took me to many backyard shows, out of a little two horse trailer. He taught me to appreciate the spirit of the Arabian horse, the passion in each and every horse, and the respect we must show each and every one of them. I need to send him a bill for the money I have invested in my horse habit!

Ellen McGee with son, Cameron Trainer Affiliation: Tish

Kondas—Showtime Training Center

How have Arabians affected your life? I suffer from panic disorder. Arabians changed my life in 1985 when I bought Andrefix CC, a purebred yearling colt with a heart of gold, from Carl George, a family friend and Arabian breeder. I gathered up the nerve to go see some of the horses he had bred and bonded with “Andi.” Andi gave me wings and opened the door to local and Class A shows in Florida. In 1996 I bought my first mare, a Half-Arabian park mare named Puttingontheritz who produced several U.S. national top ten futurity babies for me. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring?  Don’t worry about who else is in the class or what people might think, focus on your communication with your horse and the rest will come. You may not win the class, but you may have had your best ride ever with your horse, and that is a win/win!  Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My son Cameron has grown up with a love of Arabians. He has just started showing this year with his HalfArabian saddle pleasure halter gelding Fortune in Brass DN. Cameron’s first time ever showing was this year’s Region 12 AOTH, and they came home unanimous champion and are headed to Tulsa for Cameron’s second time in a show ring.  

162AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Who was the first show horse you ever rode? Andrefix CC.


Amateur Snapshots

Name:

Sarah Day Medina

Farm: Eagle Ridge Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Krichke Training Center

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? As an amateur, it is comforting to have your trainer helping from the rail. It is an amateur’s choice whether or not they are affiliated with a trainer. When your horse is away at a training facility, you lose the advantage of schooling every day. We put a lot of time into traveling for lessons to prepare for a show, so it is nice to have coaching on the rail. Showing is expensive and we want to do our best and represent our beautiful animals in the best way possible. Schooling on the rail when you are two or three horses out seems to work fine to me. How have Arabians affected your life? Arabians have the best personalities! They affect our life in so many ways. They make us laugh with their squirrely antics and playfulness; they make us cry when they are sad or don’t feel well; they make us mad when they are stubborn and their loyalty knows no bounds. There is nothing in the world like watching our proud, beautiful animals prancing into the arena so full of life and excitement! What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Have fun with these beautiful creatures, above all else. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My parents are our farm, and they are very involved with all the horses. They are extremely supportive of me showing amateur halter and my mother has bred some fantastic animals that I am very fortunate to be able to show. My 2-year-old daughter, Hannah, and my 6-yearold daughter, Isabel, come to all the shows with us. My Name:

13-year-old daughter, Lorel, has a favorite mare in the barn that she loves to visit with and my husband holds down the fort while we are away and enjoys golfing while at the show in Scottsdale. Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? The first horse I ever showed halter was LC Debonair Prince (Padrons Psyche x WN Mona Lisa) in Scottsdale about 14 years ago. I was a nervous wreck because the arena is so big and there were so many people there. He was fantastic to show and I have been hooked ever since! He was my first Arabian and will always be one of my favorites.

Renae Mendel Farm: Gemini

Ranch Trainer Affiliation: Argent Farms and Arabians International Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think the amateur classes should be more in line with the open classes in halter! It

would give amateurs more opportunities to win; therefore, they will want to continue to show their horses. I have two show geldings and under the current U.S. Nationals system, I am only allowed to show one because it is 2 & Volume 44, No. 4 | 163AA


Amateur Snapshots older lumped into one class. In Scottsdale with their aged halter classes, an amateur can show more than one horse and be judged against horses closer to its age. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I think it’ s a big help to have your trainer on the rail coaching you. As exhibitors, we spend a lot of money having our horses trained and cared for, and the extra help on the rail is encouraging and very helpful! What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Have a good time and stay calm! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My husband, Duke Mendel, and I are both breeders and stallion owners. His 13-year-old daughter, Rylee, has a national show horse that she owns and rides and my son Gavin is my biggest fan! How did you get into Arabians? My husband bought me my first Arabian as a birthday present on my 23rd birthday!

Name:

Trainer Affiliation: Josh

Laura Metzger

and Jennifer Quintus—Colonial Wood Training Center

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? As we have been discussing on the “Promoting Positive Change for the Arabian Breed,” on Facebook©, the biggest timesaver would be the scoring of the classes at any of our shows with multiple judges. It can take several minutes to get the scores tabulated and verified—sometimes as much as 5-10 minutes—and this delay not only slows down the show, it takes the excitement level way down. Speeding up this process would go a long way to making the shows more efficient and fun, leaving a lot of time for other things. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Just because someone is being coached over the rail doesn’t mean that the rider will: 1.) hear the instruction, 2.) heed the instruction, 3.) not make the same mistake again! You still have to process everything you hear and make it happen, so I don’t have a problem with it. As I have made my way around the ring at nationals, I am amazed at how similar the advice/ 164AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Amateur Snapshots coaching is to nearly every rider from every coach around the ring! They could almost make a tape and play it over the speakers and have the same effect! How have Arabians affected your life? My horse and dogs have always been the reason I can get through the day. Arabians are so beautiful and responsive to your moods; they just bring a smile to my face! I can’t imagine life without them!   What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Take your time, do it right the first time. Allow

your horse to relax and bring out the best in both of your performances. Just because you make a mistake doesn’t mean you quit riding—you have to erase that from your mind and keep doing the best you can, and let the judge/ judges sort it out!   Who was the first show horse you ever rode? My first show horse was MS Myranda, a Half-Arabian mare who was supposed to be just a horse to play around with, then was going to be a hunter, but turned out to be an English horse! 

Megan Monette

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Gordon

Potts—The Brass Ring and Silvio Domingues

How have Arabians affected your life? I played soccer, danced, and was in gymnastics when I started riding, and that horse fever we all feel kicked in! Arabians kept me out of trouble in middle and high school, by giving me something to do after school and on the weekends— something to strive for beyond school and work. Friends tend to come and go, but my horse is always there for me. I love my sport and I wouldn’t have changed anything for the world. I feel like Arabians have made me look above and beyond this exact moment. A lot of young people are only living in the here and now, but it is also important to look forward to your future. Having to practice and then show has taught me that if you don’t practice, you can’t go in with the confidence to do well. It takes a lot of work, blood, and sweat, to be as competitive as needed to be successful in the show ring. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? That this is supposed to be fun and to breathe. Sometimes it is easy to get wrapped up in the competition aspect of showing. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My mom is involved in that she is the perfect show mom. She has only been on a horse once, but she loves them just as much as I do. She is an honorary member in my book. How did you get into Arabians? My 10-year-old self was at the Make-a-Wish Gala in Dallas, with my parents 12 years ago. I was in a red dress, had my mother’s lipstick on, and of course, sparkly high heels. My dad was busy talking

to someone at our table while the live auction was going on in the background. I saw a photo of a horse; let me note, the only horse I had ever really seen other than the cartoon ones on TV. The photo was of a yearling stallion by Magnum Psyche. I ended up going to my dad and begging for him to bid; why? I have no idea honestly. In the end, we bought the horse from the auction. We ended up at Bill Harwood’s stables in Frisco, Tex., where I started Volume 44, No. 4 | 165AA


Amateur Snapshots taking lessons on Cosage, an old flea bitten spotted horse. Bill talked my parents into buying my first real show horse, Fantasy Afire, when I was only eleven. The rest is history!

Name:

Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? Mocata. He was a little bay hunter horse with a pink nose and three white socks. He took me to my first show and got me my first blue ribbon!

Cynthia Moore

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? As amateurs, we really appreciate the coaching at the rail. As a handler with not much experience, it would be difficult to know if your horse is being presented in the proper manner. As a rider, it’s very important to know what the trainer wants you to watch for, particularly traffic. Sometimes novice riders concentrate on the ears and forget about the traffic around them How have Arabians affected your life? Since we have owned Arabians for 34 years, they are a big part of our lives. Our children grew up showing and taking care of them. What has been a real joy these past few years has been the successes we have had in breeding. We have planned the breeding, cared for the mares, delivered the babies, and then taught the youngsters. It has been a real thrill after all of these years, to have Enzia FMA win at Scottsdale, the Buckeye, and Canadian and U.S. Nationals. It’s a high money can’t buy! It was equally thrilling to watch Ensync FMA win at 2013 Scottsdale and Region 14. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? For me, it’s to listen to what’s being asked by the trainer and the announcer. I get so involved in thinking that I forget to listen. How did you get into Arabians? We had friends who took us to the Jack Tone Ranch in California. Their horses were beautiful and exciting to watch. My husband, John, fell in love with the beauty of the Arabian horses at that moment and went on a quest to find one. At the ranch we

Profiles continue on 178AA

166AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

were treated like royalty, even though we could not have afforded one of their horses at that time. Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? NW Romance, a Padron daughter out of a GG Samir daughter. She was a beautiful gray western pleasure horse. I showed her at the Fair in Abilene, Tex., and we won the western pleasure championship. She was such a wonderful horse. Interestingly, Enzia has both Padron and Samir in her pedigree.


It's not  just  Tulsa  Time  ... it's  Showtime!

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Volume 44, No. 4 | 167AA


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168AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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Afires Heir x Matally

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H/A PARK AAOTR WITH COLLEEN BOYLAN COOPER H/A PARK WITH TISH KONDAS

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170AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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172AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 WITH ELIZABETH TYLER ARABIAN COUNTRY PLEASURE DRIVING WITH TISH KONDAS

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Amateur Snapshots Profiles continued from 166AA

Cheryl J. Nelson

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Zac

and Lisa Powell— Powell Training Center

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Any rules that are made need to be enforceable. How would that be accomplished? Would friends or family members be allowed to make comments, but trainers would not? What would the consequences be? I think a lot of time and energy might be spent on this issue, and would not be enforceable. I do not have a problem with quiet, respectful coaching, however, I have witnessed, and do have a problem with loud unprofessional coaching from over the rail, or several rows up, that is belittling to the rider, and should be an embarrassment for those that do it. Unfortunately, I think that there will always be people present that do it, and that there is little that can be done about it. How have Arabians affected your life? The desire to learn more about horses and to become a better rider has been the motivating force that caused me to take part in all kinds of horse related activities. These activities have provided me with opportunities to meet a wide range of interesting people. A fair number of these people are well known in the Arabian horse industry, and have a wealth of knowledge and exceptional riding skills. Others are not well known, do not have exceptional knowledge or riding skills, but have exceptional relationships with horses. Regardless of popularity or social status, their insight has been inspirational. Keeping an open mind to new things, realizing that one way is not the only way, and that the right thing is seldom the easy thing, applies not only to our relationship with horses, but also to relationships in general.

Is there anyone else in your family that is involved with the Arabian horse? My husband, by default, has become involved with the Arabian horse. He and I spend a tremendous amount of time together, and I have four Arabian horses. I spend a lot of time doing horse things, and as a result, he spends a lot of time doing horse things. He does not ride, his passion is sailing, but he has gone to every show that I have gone to. He has worked the in gate and out gate, loaded horses, unloaded horses, loaded the trailer, unloaded the trailer, he has raised money for the industry, spent money in the industry, and together, we have met a lot of really nice people and made some very close friends.

What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To trust my horse, have confidence, and let him do his job. Keep my elbows in, relax my arms, keep my heels down, keep weight in my stirrups, look ahead, keep my head up, sit softly, just go with the horse, be conscious of what is happening around me and look for a better position, do what you have been taught, the show ring is not the place to try “new things”, and relax and have fun!

How did you get into Arabians? I had a backyard pleasure horse as a child, and rode a limited amount as an adult, but have always loved horses. It was only after I was married, raised 3 children, and completed a degree in Applied Science RN, that I decided to pursue a more academic understanding of horses. I enrolled in the Michigan State University Horse Management Program as a 40+ year old student and fell in love with the Arabian horse.

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Amateur Snapshots

Meg Owings

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Gordon

Potts—The Brass Ring

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Coaching over the rail is great! Living in Tennessee, Walking Horses are a big business, and they let their amateurs wear ear pieces so that their trainers can coach them through the entire class. How have Arabians affected your life? I have been able to travel to places I would never have gone and meet some amazing people! What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Sit back and squeeze. How did you get into Arabians? My parents Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? Jonhenri+/, my sister’s western pleasure show horse, trained by Jim Fisher of Dixieland Arabian Stud.

Trainer Affiliation: Jim

Name:

Michelle Pease-Paulsen

Lowe and Kimberly Verhague—Lowe Show Horse Center, LaRae Fletcher Powell and Cheryl Fletcher—Silver Aspen Ranch

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? Overall, I feel that they are correct and fair. Each year some divisions have more entries than others, but in the end, they equal themselves out. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? There are several, but the most important is, “never quit riding,” even if you make a mistake. You do not know what the judges saw, so keep riding like nothing ever happened. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My parents. If it were not for them, I would not be able to show like I do. It is really a family affair; I do not think they have ever missed a major show. As my parents get older, I cherish our time together and it is emotional to see them so happy when I win. Volume 44, No. 4 | 179AA


Amateur Snapshots How did you get into Arabians? I originally started riding when I was 7 years old, on the trail ride horses at Roach Harbor in the San Juan Islands in Washington state. We would spend the summers there and I looked forward to going so I could ride. I remember asking if I could groom some of the horses in trade to ride one of the ponies once a week. At this time, my father was training for a marathon, so he would run and I would ride the pony alongside him which was very memorable. I was hooked and would continue to ask to go riding more and more. Eventually the years of nagging and saying things like, “If I had a horse, I would not be asking you to take me here or there,” my folks finally gave in. It really was by chance that we purchased an Arabian. A friend of my father said there was an Arabian at the barn where he had his horse and he was for sale. So we

purchased the little bay Arabian gelding and the rest is history. We bought him when I was 10, so, I have been showing for roughly 28 years. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? My first Arabian show horse was a little bay gelding named Jahani Gamilia who I showed in western pleasure in 1985 at the age of 10. I have several fond memories of this horse. First of all would be my two color matching outfits—red for equitation and lavender for pleasure; the tops had a bit of lace on them— they were so cute. I look at pictures and cannot believe I used to be so young. I also remember showing at the Daffodil show in the open western pleasure geldings class—I was 6 out of 18. I still have that green ribbon in my scrapbook. He was a great first show horse.

Renee Pelzman

Name: Farm: Holly Hill Farms, LLC Trainer Affiliation: David and Lorrie Mikosz—Mikosz

Show Horses

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think the current breakdowns are fine. The reality is that the younger amateurs have certain physical advantages that allow them to show greener horses that can get unruly and the older riders can usually afford horses that are easier to ride. The younger set can be a bit cut-throat, which is an unfortunate byproduct of the intensely competitive classes at Youth Nationals and lack of consequences imposed for unsportsmanlike conduct, and it isn’t right to inflict that on older exhibitors. Hopefully, by the time they have more years under their belts, the younger ones will realize the positive value of showing off their own mount rather than trying to interfere with someone else’s ride.    Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Any amateur who works with a trainer expects him or her to be there at the rail. It’s part of what we pay for. Any trainer who isn’t there for the client is doing them a disservice, especially if the rider is inexperienced or is new to showing. Un-coached amateurs make mistakes that can create dangerous and even lifethreatening situations for themselves and others in the ring. When riders are first learning to show, there is a lot 180AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

to absorb, remember and process all at once, and having your trainer there for you is very reassuring. We all know where our trainer is stationed and learn to tune out the other trainers. I don’t think that trainers should be doing anything that would give the appearance of trying to distract another rider or spook their horse. The reality is,


Amateur Snapshots there is probably not much a trainer can do that would cause an unlevel playing field once the class is in the ring anyway.  Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My daughter, Morgan, is my constant companion and shares my love of Arabians. She’s an instinctive rider and has an excellent understanding of every aspect of the industry, from breeding and showing, to the economics of horse farms and shows. How did you get into Arabians? Back in the early 1990’s, I boarded my last non-Arabian at a stable where there were several Arabians and the next thing I knew, I was hooked! Arabians are like Macadamia nuts; you can’t have just one, and they truly are the most beautiful horses on Earth! It costs the same amount to own another breed—more, sometimes, if you have to chase points every weekend in order to qualify for a national competition—so you might as well own one that’s gorgeous as well as athletic, versatile

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rob Bick

and loving. I also think Arabian horse people are a cut above, and this also attracted me. If you have to spend days or weeks at a show, you want to be around folks you can have a great time with, right? So for me, Arabians are the whole package! Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? C A Solomen, my now-retired purebred hunter gelding. “Solly” came to me at a time when I was almost ready to give up riding because of issues with the non-Arabian I owned at the time. He was so reliable, talented and personable that I ended up showing him for many years. Solomen was always my “battle axe”, the one I could count on to get me through those crazy huge hunter classes of the 1990’s without missing a beat.  He was the perfect first show horse and has earned a life of leisure at my farm, where he gets to play “Uncle Solly” to our little band of mares and foals, eat lots of carrots and go for the occasional bareback ride just to fool around. 

Rachel Pest

and Caralyn Schroter—RBC Show Horses

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show?  I agree that the awards presentation are too long, and with the suggestion that all of the top ten horses coming in to get their ribbons take their victory lap picture and then wait at the end gate for the reserve and champion to be awarded. Once the champion has been announced, the remaining horses can exit.   How have Arabians affected your life? Arabians have affected my life more than I probably even realize. I started riding when I was 8 and started showing the following year, so I can’t imagine my life without them. I am not very talented in traditional sports, so the Arabians gave me my chance to be on a team. One of my favorite parts of showing is watching everyone else from the farm compete.  What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Whether or not it is true, I have to remember to tell myself that, “I got this.” I often second guess myself and let my nerves get the best of me. I remember my first nationals with DA Avant Guardian; Aero and I were Volume 44, No. 4 | 181AA


Amateur Snapshots

beyond nervous. I kept looking for Rob on the rail to hear what he had to say. After a not-so-great ride, I told him that I had trouble hearing him and, I will never forget this, he said “You’ll hear me if I want to be heard.” In a weird way it gives me confidence when I don’t hear him because I’m doing it right! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? Both of my parents are involved in the Arabian horse. Both of them have been my cheerleader, provider, and biggest supporters since I’ve been riding. Without them, I wouldn’t be able to enjoy what I love most—riding.

Name:

Who was the first show horse you ever rode? My first show horse was Primo Talisman. My mom, dad and I went to our first horse show, Region 15, to cheer on friends from the barn. We were walking the aisles looking at all the horses and we saw Primo. He had just won reserve champion in the 3-year-old gelding class. We asked to try him out and as we walked out to the ring, he bucked the whole way. He had just been broke to ride and wasn’t used to being body clipped with a saddle on. My mom signed a check right then and there. Two years later, I showed him at Youth Nationals in a class of 80+ horses and we won two top tens in walk/trot. I still consider it one of the happiest moments of my life.

Cynthia Piotrowski

Farm: Cynimar Farms Trainer Affiliation: Rooker Training

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I think coaching on the rail should be done in a subtle manner because there are other competitors that are trying their best, also. We need to remember to be safe! How have Arabians affected your life? They are my ultimate stress relief from working.  What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To have fun! How did you get into Arabians? My dad purchased an untrained 3-year-old grey mare and gave it to me to train when I was fifteen years old. She was a Half-Arabian,

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Stable

and the rest of the family had Quarter Horses. That was the most intensive three months of my life, running around the arena with no slowdown in sight, and then like flipping a coin, she was beautifully collected. Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? The grey mare my dad purchased for me, Bonnie Briggadoon. She was the best trained horse I ever had, and I did a lot of winning with her.


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Arabian Horse Photographers In Focus

Kelly Campbell by Mary Kirkman

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“This was at Royal Jaafar, and we had just taken shots in the barn. The background was shaded, so these two grey mares provided contrast. They just looked at each other. It is all about the connection of two horses.”—Kelly Campbell

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Kelly Campbell has been a professional equine photographer for six years, a respectable start on a career that is gaining momentum at a dizzying speed. Her biggest challenge, she reflects—apart from recalcitrant horses, inclement weather, and wildly talented competitors—has been her own age. She laughs when she recalls a shoot she went on near her Vacaville, Calif., home. The horse owner, who knew and liked her work, had booked an appointment online, but when Campbell arrived for the early-morning session, she couldn’t get in without a gate code. Finally, she managed to wave down a few people she spotted in the distance. “Are you lost?” one asked her. “No,” she replied. “I’m Kelly, and I’m here to photograph your horses.” “Oh my gosh!” the woman exclaimed in surprise. “There’s a high school on the street over, and I thought you were looking for that!” The quality of her photography rapidly dispels anyone’s reservations, but she still smiles. There is not much she can do about it except turn out good work. She has known that

she would work in the horse industry since she was a child, and has had a passion for photography since her teens; this is where she is meant to be. Campbell was born in Fairfield, Calif., 26 years ago, to a family with no ties to horses. Her father was a contractor and her mother worked in healthcare; she and her older brother, Casey, got into riding when they accompanied friends to a local barn for lessons. She was 5, and the expansive facility, which accommodated nearly 100 horses and hosted shows in three arenas, offered a variety of breeds and disciplines for experience. As they grew up, she and Casey leased horses and showed in local shows, grooming and cleaning stalls to pay for their fun. Quarter Horses, Warmbloods and Thoroughbreds, western and dressage and jumping provided an eclectic background that eventually led them both into a lifetime commitment to horses. While she took up equine photography, Casey became a nationallevel trainer in Miniatures. Campbell’s interest in cameras began when she was a youngster, as she fired off endless

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successions of Polaroids for her parents to develop, but her formal pursuit waited until she was about 16, when high school classes unlocked the world of art photography. She fell in love with the black and white genre, secluding herself in the dark room to manipulate the images. The courses also expanded her knowledge of equipment, as students worked with a variety of cameras, including the 4x5 large format models, which produced stunning

Casey Campbell, Kelly’s brother.

results but were heavy as lead and highly manual. She remembers having to duck under a black sheet to shoot her subjects. “You do one click,” she says, “and then you take the slide out and take another photo. I think learning on those kinds of cameras and working with film really taught me the technical side of how a camera works.” As a counterpoint, digital cameras were introduced around that time, and she was equally captivated. By the time she was ready for college, it was clear where her future lay, and she opted for a double major of photography and business. The next component to fall into place was her focus on the horse industry. She had been studying the photographers whose work attracted her most, such as Stuart Vesty, Gigi Grasso and Glenn Jacobs, dissecting how they treated angles and curves, and translating the techniques to her perspective when she peered through a viewfinder. When her brother Casey became a professional trainer, that sealed the deal; her hobby evolved

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into support of his marketing effort, and his clients liked her work. In 2007, she sent out a flyer announcing her professional debut, and her first booking came from Tina Fisseler, of TF Miniatures, in the Netherlands. “Of course I was ecstatic,” she recalls, “but when I hung up the phone, I think I had a nervous panic attack—it was, ‘Oh my God, what am I doing?’” Fortunately, a trainer she knew named Mike Rosauer also booked a job, and it came first on the calendar. “I shot about 20 of his training horses, and he really taught me that I was the director,” she says. “I learned to communicate what I wanted on the shoot. He let me know that they were there

to set up the horses and have them go where I wanted.” By the time she headed for Europe, she was comfortable with the process, and her career exploded from there. Even though Miniatures were vastly different from the other breeds, they provided the unique experience that most developed her eye. “Many people’s opinion of them is that they’re dwarf horses,” she says, “so the whole thing in my mind was that I didn’t want anyone to see one of my photos of a Miniature horse and think ‘that’s a cute miniature horse.’ I wanted people to see a bold, beautiful horse, so I went for a different perspective. I would lay on the ground and shoot up at them—work so hard to get the best angles for these horses that are three feet tall. I wanted them to look five or six feet tall.” Breed standards, she adds, are moving the Miniatures toward a more Arabian type. As she picked up work, Campbell experimented further. She would shoot the standard conformation and sales shots, and then black and white shots for herself, which she manipulated

“This shot is an example of my intent when I’m photographing Miniatures: I want to make the viewer see the horse, not the size. This stallion had a rock star attitude, and we tapped into it. I shot from a low angle, and kept the background simple, and then used a vignette to darken the edges and further draw the focus on the stallion.” —Kelly Campbell

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on the computer to create extreme effects. “I just wanted something a little different,” she offers. “I liked to have a horse with little to nothing in the background; it just made your eyes go straight to the horse. I like a lot of black backgrounds or white backgrounds, or just a real simple landscape with no fences, no buildings.” At the same time, she drew on her photographic education. In school, her professors and friends had urged her to do wedding photography, and living near the popular wedding destination of Napa Valley, she investigated further. But it didn’t inspire her as horses did. “Photographing horses is a challenge,” she says, “but it’s very exciting, because everything has to come

together and be perfect in that split second. I can capture the moments and the love at a wedding, but I’m not inspired. And I wouldn’t want to hang creative wedding photos in my house like I do with my equine photos. I think I can make art with horses.” Nevertheless, she still keeps a finger on the pulse of the wedding industry to stay abreast of the latest in evocative imagery. When she reached beyond her comfort zone in Miniatures, it was to Arabians. She credits David Cains with giving her the boost she needed to break into the market when he allowed her free run of Stonewall Farms, with its classically beautiful horses, to “play around.” Then he went through her photographs and helped her evaluate her work. “I would see the things that he liked,” she says, “what angles his eyes gravitated to, what little perspectives.”


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In the end, it is Campbell’s style as an equine photographer that is making her name. Yes, she routinely does conformation shots for owners and she takes show pictures, but it is her pushthe-envelope shots that are attracting the most attention. They are images that qualify not only as horse photography, but as art too. A glance through a gallery of Campbell’s work now bears that out: there are standup shots, beautifully posed horse and owner memories, records of ring performances, eye-catching advertising shots, and a strong sampling of what she calls “crazy stuff ”— romantic portraits that play with light, sooth the eye with monochromatic palettes, or focus attention with tightly controlled parameters. As her career grew, Campbell expanded into more breeds, notably adding Friesens, Andalusians and Gypsy Vanners to her resume, their signature long manes and tails lending a quality similar to the exotic flavor of an Arabian’s flared nostrils and wide

eyes. In each breed, she researched their standards, both equine and photographic, and then added her own spin. Often, techniques developed for one breed informed another: turning a Warmblood’s head a certain way offered more refinement, and the swirling mane and out-flung tail of the Arabian inspired the dramatic pose of a Gypsy Vanner stallion. Special lighting and simple backgrounds supported the intricate detail of a horse’s coat, and the structure of its face and eyes. Although she is the creative force behind her work, Campbell is aware how important it is to have a good crew to work with—she remembers the day when she was a part of a team, before she turned pro, when she was working with her brother. “I firmly believe I’m only as good as the people helping,” she says. “Sometimes it’s just not the horse’s day, so I understand what it takes to be a handler or the ‘bear,’ or the gofer who runs around and gets anything everyone else needs.”


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“The Gypsy Vanner shots are an example of what can be done with different lighting techniques. We shot these in a dark arena, using studio lighting, and for the full body shot, we added a smoke machine to create the aura around him.”—Kelly Campbell


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The bottom line is that sometimes her results depend on it. “I think patience is important,” she says, “because if the photographer or the people get frustrated, that can translate to the horse, and the horse can shut down. Like

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people, horses can definitely feed off your emotions and how you’re feeling.” And then, when everything comes together, all the work is worth the effort. “All of the sudden, you get that one great shot, that one great look.”


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Anyone who works with show horses knows that an equine photographer’s job is hard work, and the pressure is always on to hit a home run. But the profession also can be a ticket to high adventure. Campbell can testify to that. This year alone has yielded unforgettable memories. One occurred this past May in the UK, when she went on a shoot at Jayne Howell Arabians in Hertfordshire. In the early morning, while Howell dropped her children at school, Campbell took the family dog and headed out on a walk up a nearby hill to look for good shooting locations. “There are so many trees, I can’t even see the fence line, and it’s just gorgeous and perfect,” she recalls. “And then I get out in the middle of the field—and I hear a lion roaring. A lion roaring. You know how you can just feel so scared that your hair stands up and you get this hot feeling? I really freaked out!” However, no lion emerged from the trees— thankfully, as Campbell really hadn’t planned on ending her life as a lion’s morning meal. When Howell heard the story, she didn’t bat an eye (nor, to her credit, did she burst out laughing). “Oh, yes, there’s a zoo on the other side of the hill,” she told Campbell. And as it turned out, that was

nothing compared to what they could hear when it was time to feed the monkeys. Campbell still shakes her head. “There I was, wondering if she was going to believe me or think I was just a crazy American.” And then there was her recent experience at a breeding operation in Jordan. “They have some of the most gorgeous horses I’ve ever seen,” she says, “and the happiest horses, too.” But with the 2013 situation in the Middle East, no one was unaware that somewhere out in the distance was Syria. “I think it was the first day we were shooting, I was really freaked out,” she continues, “first because I wanted to prove myself and provide them with some special shots, and second because I’d never seen any of the horses, so I didn’t really know what I was working with. Once I saw the horses, I was in love; they were the most amazing horses ever. The shoot was going great—we were photographing liberty horses in an open pasture. And all of the sudden I hear all these gunshots go off.” She stopped shooting and leapt up, waiting for the others to run—only to realize that she was the only one with a terrified look on her face. No one else even flinched. Instead, they all started laughing.

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“Oh, yeah,” they told her. “There’s a shooting range down the hill. You’re fine. Don’t worry.” She shakes her head. “The horses didn’t even spook. They just trotted higher and bolder.”

In 2010, at age 23, Campbell formalized her business as Arare Photography LLC. She now shoots all over North America, in Australia, Europe and the Middle East. Some aspects of her life, such as her rising reputation, have changed, and some have not. Her base is still the “20 beautiful acres, with horses both big and small” she shares with Casey. He is a huge part of her success, she observes. Always has been. Now the challenge is just to stay fresh, to stay on the cutting edge of a very creative and competitive business. But that, she will say, is what it is all about, what got her into the business in the first place. It is all about finding new ways to portray the beauty of the horse.

www.Ararephotography.com

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Amateur Snapshots Profiles continued from 182AA Name:

Tess Piotrowski

Farm: Cynimar Farms Trainer Affiliation: Rooker Training

Stable

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? As far as nationals goes, we need to shorten the length of our classes, period. Whether it is changing the way photos are taken for the winners in the class, or not exiting the ring before the top ten is called, it has to happen! This would help us be able to put more classes in a session, allowing for a few evening sessions off for some fun! How have Arabians affected your life? Arabians have affected my life in so many ways; it’s hard to put it into words. My whole life has pretty much revolved around being with the horses, whether it’s breeding, riding, or showing. The passion and exhilaration I experience every time I enter the show ring is absolutely priceless and irreplaceable, and I wouldn’t trade it for anything else in the world. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To stay relaxed, do my best, and (in some situations) just stay on! How did you get into Arabians? My mother always had horses, so I was pretty much predisposed to it all. When

I was born, I was a little bow-legged, so my parents knew that naturally my place would be on top of a horse. I was already riding by myself when I was 3 years old! Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? CY Nite Obsession in lead line, but the first show horse I seriously competed with at regionals and nationals was MNM Showdown+//.

Robin Porter

Name: Farm: Crescent

Creek Farms, LLC Trainer Affiliation: Colonial Wood Training Center and Rooker Training Center Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think it is fine. It has worked this long and I would not change it. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I think coaching over the rail is fine. At the end of the day, is it really making a difference in the outcome? Probably not so much. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To look up and smile; not an easy task for me! How did you get into Arabians? My parents had Arabian show horses before I was a twinkle in their eyes. 214AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Who was the first show horse you ever rode? I started out riding a Half-Arabian mare named Famirs Dawn. Not a very good horse, but I learned a lot from her.


Amateur Snapshots

Cameron Rohn

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Gordon Potts—The Brass Ring

How have Arabians affected your life?  My Arabian has created a whole new exciting lifestyle and addiction to western reining.   What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? The only thing that matters is my horse and I staying calm and having some fun. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse?  No  How did you get into Arabians? My parents bought an Arabian at a charity auction. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? An English hunter/jumper Quarter Horse named Blackjack.

Melanie Ronen            

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Jim Lowe—Lowe Show Horse Centre

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I think the breakdown of age divisions works well, as far as numbers are concerned. However, it would be exciting to see the top five or so from each division compete for an ‘all ages’ championship.  Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring?  I do not have any concerns regarding coaching over the rail.   How have Arabians affected your life?  In more ways than I could possibly count! Most importantly, spending time with Arabians allows me to take a break from the stresses of life. For a few hours on the weekend or for a few days at a horse show, I can truly step away from the pressures of work, family, and the day-to-day stresses we all encounter. Also, Arabians have brought me many life-long friendships with people who share my passion.   What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring?  To breathe and enjoy the ride

How did you get into Arabians? When I was 11, I finally convinced my parents to buy me a horse. The first one I found was a 3-year-old Half-Arabian mare for $650. It might not have been the wisest purchase my parents ever made, but it is probably one of the things I am most grateful for. I have owned and shown Arabians ever since. Volume 44, No. 4 | 215AA


Amateur Snapshots

Mary Ryan

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Adandy

Farms

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? In order to maintain a level playing field for all amateurs, it is not just the age breakdown that should be considered, but the experience and show record of the amateur exhibitor, as well as the horse. The industry may want to review incorporating provisions based on the show record of the horse and the rider, and consider tiered levels of competition. What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? Improve our scoring system so that classes may be pinned more expeditiously; this may assist us in increasing our spectator attendance. Also, provide plenty of quality work areas for schooling at all times throughout the show and make the show arenas available as much as possible. Time is one of our most precious commodities, especially during a show.   Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Success in the show ring comes from a level of preparedness provided through your training program. Once you enter the show ring, you need to focus on all that you have learned and apply it, to ultimately present you and your horse as a winning team. You need to learn to police yourself

as a rider. Rail coaching, excessive or otherwise, will not make a difference for an unprepared horse and rider. How have Arabians affected your life? Positively! Doing something that you love, the horses themselves, and competing, inspire teamwork, hard work, and dedication. Cliche? Maybe, but so true. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring?  Ride ‘em like you stole ‘em! Have fun—life is a journey so enjoy the ride!

Rich Sadala

Name: Farm: Honeysuckle Farm Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Joe Alberti—Rohara Arabians Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? Since I show halter, I do not think age makes much of a difference than showing under saddle. However, I believe separating the divisions by age decade would seem fair. How have Arabians affected your life? Getting involved with Arabians has certainly enriched my life in many ways: working with the horses has created serenity in my busy life; the foals create a feeling of excitement and anticipation of new things to look forward to; meeting some great people 216AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

who have become life-long friends; and, most importantly, I met Linda, my wife of 25 years. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? Growing up in the Bronx, NY, I had no experiences with horses, other than riding a pony at the Bronx Zoo as a child, and neither did anyone in my family. There was, however, one instance where an uncle asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up—I was 9 at the time. I answered, “I want to have a horse farm.” I never knew why I answered that way, having no inclination or thoughts of horses then. Some cosmic forces must have been at work?


Amateur Snapshots How did you get into Arabians? I took my daughter, Jocelyn, to see the movie, “The Black Stallion” and I was hooked. I fantasized being that young boy with “the Black,” riding along the beach and ocean—that is still on my bucket list. I researched the local Arabian breeders and trainers and eventually purchased a mare and got into breeding.   Who was the first show horse you ever rode? I have never ridden a show horse, but I do show in halter. The first time I ever showed a horse was in the early 80s. She was a weanling filly, SA Dynasty, by Bill and Oma Hodge’s stallion, Overlook Applause. There were 34 entries and we placed 4th. I was so excited since I beat many of the local professional trainers. I remember waiting to go into the ring and my legs didn’t seem to want to  move due to my anxiety, but once in, I felt elated. Nothing has changed since. I still need to get the butterflies in formation before going into the ring.

Cheryl Sepulveda

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Lisa

and Zach Powell—Powell Training Center

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I personally feel the current amateur age divisions are correct. I do believe with the growing number of competitors in select amateur classes, an age split might be in the future. Maybe a 39 & under, and 40 & over. Research into the numbers at the shows, and at nationals should seriously be looked at. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? As far as coaching, I agree that it is nice to have a trainer say a few things as you ride by, but some trainers take it to an extreme and scream at their students, so when you’re riding by it can be very distracting, especially when you’re not with them. I am not sure there will ever be anything that could be done as far as curbing the volume. Maybe us riders should wear earplugs! What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? I never check out the competitors is the warm-up ring; I enter the arena and concentrate on my horse; I always try and position myself where I can be seen to my best advantage. I ride my ride, good or bad and try to learn from every class. At the end of the day, I am thankful to be able to ride and do what I love.

How did you get into Arabians? I first got involved in riding when I was about 7 and my dad bought my sister a horse, so I had to have one, too. We started with Quarter Horses, but wanted  horses with more personality and spirit, so we found what we were looking for and more in Arabians. I started in 4-H, then over the years kept progressing upward. It is my first year finally riding at nationals.

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Amateur Snapshots

Name:

Gregg Shafer

Farm: Shafer Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Siemon Stables and Gene

LaCroix

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I feel that 3 age groups, including JOTR/JTR, is more than adequate.                 What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show?  I believe we have too many classes. It would be beneficial to reduce the number of classes in order to allow for a show to have 2 sessions or 3 shorter sessions per day. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I don’t mind friends helping along the rail, but “amateurs” coaching clients during lessons push the issue. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My wife, daughter, and mom are very involved

Who was the first show horse you ever rode? Back in early 70s, I started with a very beautiful liver chestnut mare named El Blanco Gairanda.

Nancy Shannon

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Lisa

Powell—Powell Training Center

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? The age breakdown at nationals is good. I really love the 55 & over in hunter, as no matter what anyone says, with riding, you do not get better with age. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Coaching from the rail is very helpful if it is done quietly and respectfully. How have Arabians affected your life? The Arabian experience has provided me with a great physical outlet and a great group of friends. The support and camaraderie is super. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Look ahead and sit up!

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Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? Fifty some years ago I showed a palomino Saddlebred mare named JauntyPeggyAnn. Not sure how it happened, but got a blue in saddle seat equitation!


Amateur Snapshots

Steve Smith

Name: Farm: Stonecreek

Ranch Trainer Affiliation: Andy Sellman and Chateau Epona Training Center Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I believe the lower end of the age spectrum has been changed for the betterment of the competitors, but at the upper end, I believe that having it open ended after age 55 is something that might warrant a look. I could see a break happening at 65 or 66 for the competitors. Believe it or not, there is a fitness difference between ages 55 and 65—I speak from experience. I would also like to see it include halter somehow.    Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Don’t have a problem with it. If we as amateurs are attempting to get better at what we do, then I think it can extend beyond a practice venue. How have Arabians affected your life? The wonderful Arabian horse has allowed me to forge relationships and friendships with people I would not have ever met. People like Murray Popplewell, Andy and Angie Sellman, Greg and Nancy Gallún, Teresa and Ramon Madrigal, to name but a few. The most interesting thing is that we are all in this together and while being wealthy certainly has its advantages, good horses are where you find them, and everyone I have met treats each other on the same level, wealthy or not. We are all interested in the advancement of the Arabian horse. There is a certain camaraderie amongst horse lovers. They have also grounded me when I get to believing that I am pretty smart and have this horse thing figured out. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To have fun. Try your best to improve on

your last time in the ring. But realize, ultimately you are at the mercy of 3-5 judges who have their own biases and subjectivities when it comes to their judging. So smile and understand that on any given day, at any given show, the best horse may not win. So refer back to having fun and trying your best to improve. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My daughter, Lacie, has her own training barn. My other daughter, Erin, is a very accomplished amateur showing in halter and performance. Both got involved with Arabians at a very early age and have kept with it into their twenties and thirties. Both rode on college equestrian teams (owing their skills to the lessons learned early in horses and shows from wonderful trainers and hours spent practicing). Arabians have kept our family very close.

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Amateur Snapshots

Name:

Leslie Doran Sommer

Shamrock Farms LLC Trainer Affiliation: Gordon Potts, Joe Resser and Andy Sellman Farm:

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? There are too many classes being added. As I tell my kids, “Just because you want it, does not mean you need it.” Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring?I like all the help I can get. I don’t like the fact that really good amateurs who have no desire to be a trainer, have been forced out because they help on the rail. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Facial expression—it tells the whole story! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My sister, who amazes me with her abilities every day, and my mom, who has halter horses.

Mike Steenhart

Name: Farm: Morning Sun Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Andy Sellman—Argent How have Arabians affected your life? The horses have enabled me to travel to places and meet people whose paths I would never have crossed. It has been a wonderful adventure and I have met some fantastic people and seen some amazing things.  What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Remember to keep showing to the best of my ability and remember that I am leading my favorite horse! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? Yes, my wife Sheena; she rides hunter and western and together, we run a small breeding operation. We condition and show a few halter horses each year and really enjoy watching the babies grow up and become all that they can be. How did you get into Arabians? I bred a grade mare to an Arabian stallion when I was 14 years old. I bought my first 220AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Farms


Amateur Snapshots purebreds in 1975—three mares and a stallion. I loved their beauty, presence and spirit. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? XXX Bravado (Barich de Washoe x Miss Naborr) in western pleasure. My first national top ten halter horse was the gelding MS

Sincerely Bey whom we bred, conditioned and trained at home ourselves. He went on to win multiple regional and national titles in hunter pleasure and side saddle for his new owners. My first national championship was in 2012 with Spitfyre VF in Stallions AOTH.

Mary Sullivan

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Ali

Brady—ABCentre

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I believe the age breakdown for the amateur divisions are generally correct. They may want to consider doing an age breakdown for the amateur select divisions at the national level. These classes have really become popular, especially in the western division. How have Arabians affected your life? The Arabian horse has enhanced the quality of my life. I have shared many wonderful moments with my horses. I have also met some interesting and talented people. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? I have learned to relax and breathe—the horse really does feel everything. Just have fun! How did you get into Arabians? When I was very young, I learned about the Arabian and I have never looked back. At 16, I got my first purebred gelding, a Gdansk son, and he was a real gem. Name:

Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? A big grey gelding named Shiloh’s Banner. He didn’t look like much in his stall, but under saddle he puffed up and really had presence. We nicknamed him the “transformer.” We showed at the local level shows in country English.

Jessie Szymanski

Farm: Paradise Farms Trainer Affiliation: Keith Krichke, Vallejo What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? It takes a lot of time to pin a class at the larger shows. Some ideas to reduce that: limit the amount of time the champion and reserve’s group shot has; pin the class from lineup instead of dismissing the entire class; or have the top ten run down the opposing side of the arena as the first and second have their moment of fame. There are so many

III and Garlands

unavoidable time consuming moments such as throwing shoes, timeouts, tack holds, and getting horses in the gate etc., that make efficiency such a tricky task. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I feel that coaching over the rail is a successful tool for amateurs. I always find the tips that my trainers give me as I pass them on the rail to be helpful. The Volume 44, No. 4 | 221AA


Amateur Snapshots only problem I can think of is when someone gives advice loud enough for the entire arena to hear—that’s distracting. How have Arabians affected your life? Arabians are a big part of my life. They consume the majority of it and I wouldn’t have it any other way. I feel so lucky to be able to own, breed, and show such an exceptional animal. Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My dad, Frank Szymanski, is very involved in owning and breeding Arabians. He loves them just as much as I do and I enjoy sharing my passion for the Arabian breed with him. He is one of this breed’s biggest fans. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? McCoys Dakara, “Sparky.” She was my first horse, a Half-Arabian pinto. I showed that horse as a kid in anything and everything.

Jacque Thompson

Name: Farm: Smoky

Mountain Park Arabians

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? Most amateurs I talk to are fairly happy with the age breakdowns, so I hesitate to state my opinion because it definitely bucks a long established practice in the Arabian horse breed. But hesitation aside, my view is that we have our classes divided into too many categories, making the classes too small and seemingly unimportant. This is especially damaging when it discourages spectator participation; it is spectator participation that encourages new people to want to buy an Arabian horse. What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? I have been very happy with the efficiency and camaraderie at our Arabian horse shows, but have noticed Scottsdale and the Arabian Horse Celebration stand tall among the other shows in these areas, so I would suggest that other shows could improve by emulating those models. How have Arabians affected your life? The Arabian horse all but defines my everyday life and happily so.

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Amateur Snapshots How did you get into Arabians? When I was a teen, I had a generous friend who owned an Arabian gelding named Mac Keff, and who allowed me to exercise him for her. Eventually I leased Mac Keff and showed him in Arabian park horse classes. It was so much fun showing

Mac that I was hooked on Arabians for life! Who was the first show horse you ever rode? My first show horse was a field hunter Thoroughbred mare named J’s Lady whom I boarded with my friend who owned Mac Keff.

Alyson Tobin

Name: Farm: Alstad

Arabian Farms Trainer Affiliation: Katie Showers and John Rannenberg—Rohara Arabians How have Arabians affected your life? I have been involved with Arabian show horses since I was 6 years old. To this day, 45 years later, they are still part of my life. Most of the horses I have shown have been those that I have bred. I am currently showing Very Heavenly, the last horse I bred. I am having such a great time, and have entered a new discipline—dressage. I am very excited to be attending the Sport Horse Nationals, and U.S. Nationals again this year.  What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? My parents have always told me to make sure when I enter the ring, that I have a smile on my face and to make sure that I am having fun! It isthe same advice I still get from my parents to this day. How did you get into Arabians? My grandfather took me for pony rides when I was 5 years old. I then started to take riding lessons when I was 6. My father bought me my first horse, a grey Arabian gelding named FF Abusir Who was the first show horse you ever rode? FF Abusir. He had the best attitude! As a Nurse Practitioner for General Surgery Service at a VA Hospital, showing horses is my way of de-stressing and still gives me so much enjoyment 45 years later!

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Amateur Snapshots

Name:

Trainer Affiliation: Zac

Clare Todd

and Lisa Powell—Powell Training Center

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I was quite pleased when the 55 & over age division was introduced. As someone who didn’t start the sport until age 47, I appreciate being able to compete on a more level playing field. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Coaching over the rail has always helped me! Not only from my trainers and barn mates, but just friendly folks who will tell me if I’m on the wrong lead. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? To be aware of the traffic around me. How did you get into Arabians? I got into Arabians because, to me, they are the classic horse in terms of beauty, intelligence and versatility. There was no question that my first horse would be an Arabian! And my second, third, fourth, and counting! Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? Brilliant Rush.

Elizabeth Tyler

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Tish

Kondas—Showtime Training Center

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I would do the breakdowns differently, not necessarily to make things more fair, but to make the experience more competitive, more exciting for the spectators, and to highlight those amateurs who have achieved a high level of horsemanship and showmanship. The age breakdown should be 2 classes, 18-39 and 40 & over, with the final 10 being brought back to the Pavilion to ride off for champion and Rrserve. It would be exciting to combine the top five from both age divisions for a Grand Champion ATR in addition to a championship for each age group. We need to get the show back in our horse show!   Profiles continue on 244AA 224AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


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Amateur Snapshots Profiles continued from 224AA What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? First, eliminate group photos in the ring altogether. Second, eliminate the exit ring procedure and place the class 1st through 10th with the top ten being allowed to get a standing shot, and then exit. Leave special victory passes for only champion and reserve. Third, take the emphasis off the walk in the country and English classes; it should be a transitional gait. Five or six steps would be sufficient. Our judges can tell if a horse is mannerly, soft and suitable for the job without asking for a half lap of walking. In the same line of thought, I would eliminate the halt, back, stand still and loose rein walk in country. If the back is desired, the call judge can ask for it as the line is walked. Plus, it’s boring to watch. A lack of camaraderie could be attributed to people saying that one of the reasons we don’t have spectators in the stands is because we’re all back at the stalls watching the live feed. The reason we are at the stalls instead of watching in the stands is because there is entirely too much downtime during classes. When the scoring, presentation of awards, photos and

victory passes take longer than the class, that equals bored, uncomfortable spectators. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring?  Nothing needs to be changed. We already have too many rules.   Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My parents are my biggest fans and attend almost every show. When we first started showing in the 80s, my mom, Shirley, took care of entries, details and, of course, my bun. My dad, Walter, hauled the horses and helped with all aspects of their care. He still meets me at the out gate after every class. My husband, Louis, is also quite involved with the Arabian horse. He feeds for me while I’m away at shows!    Who was the first show horse you ever rode? Stemar’s Windsong, a national champion Half-Arabian Amateur English in 1980 something. I was hooked!

Dick Walden & Nan Stockholm Walden

Name: Farm: Rancho

Sonado, Amado, AZ and Rancho Sonado Oeste, Santa Ynez, CA Trainer Affiliation: Courtney Spicer and Ali Brady

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? We are glad that AHA adjusted the age range to correspond with kids going to college, however, we think not having a “non-pro” category hurts our industry. It is also not right that a trainer and a son or daughter of a trainer can take one year out and suddenly “morph” into an amateur. The AHA is killing the biggest sector of the new Arabian business which is the “over 40” man or woman who runs another business full time, and cannot ride 5-7 days a week. To have them compete against lifelong horse trainers and family is not fair and discourages new people coming into our breed. We are also happy that AHA has changed the leasing rules for the youth at youth nationals.   Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? We witnessed a nationally known trainer screaming repeatedly at his client; that should not be tolerated. At regionals and nationals, I have had the 244AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

experience in a class of a trainer leaning over the rail and yelling across the arena, but right into the ear of my horse, so loudly that it spooked my horse who is a trail horse. A trainer saying in a low voice, “Good” or “Collect more,” is ok and acceptable. Maybe we need a steward in the stands to monitor this. Also, I have seen pros and amateurs come


Amateur Snapshots

out of the show ring, and absolutely lose their temper and beat on their horses. We need a steward at the out gate. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? I need to be as true and honest as the horse I am riding. I owe her or him my total honesty to deserve their trust. No gimmicks, no intimidation. I have seen lots of trainers and riders let their horses down. I rarely see a horse act out without a reason. Winning at any cost is defeat. If you have to use harsh methods, drugs or other ways of cheating with your horse, shame on you! And if you have a bad go so what? Cheer on your competitors! We are so lucky to live in a free country where we can enjoy our passion for showing these extraordinary horses.   Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My husband Dick grew up in his family’s cattle feedlot. Lots of ranchers in Ariz. use Arabians because they are so sure-footed and efficient in the desert country. Our daughter, Deb, was a barrel racing champion and one of her best horses was an Arabian mare. Our grandsons now enjoy riding and competing.  

How did you get into Arabians? All my life I read the Walter Farley books, the Marguerite Henry books, etc. I did not come from a horse show family. I lived in big cities a lot of my life. I could not afford a horse nor did I have good options for boarding or leasing. When I finally married and we had some property, I took my husband to Sheila Varian’s Jubilee. As a true horseman/cowboy, he immediately oriented to her method of breeding for athletic, willing horses. We bought our first horse for Dick at our first Varian sale and the rest is history!

Marta Wasiak

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Mikosz

Show Horses

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? By scheduling amateur classes in the morning and afternoon, we can then relax and watch our trainers show open horses with a group of friends, and can later hang around and help in the barn (our anxiety is gone and some of us are super happy campers enjoying the ribbons!). Having to wait for an amateur class till 11 pm does not make any sense. All friends are gone and family members who are still “on duty” are totally exhausted; it is not fun. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? Your show preparation is done at home and coaching from the rail is not the ‘training session’ that will help your performance much anyway. If your trainer has to tell you that you are on the wrong lead, you are not winning the class! However, simple words

such as, “smile, good job, looking pretty,” are totally priceless and when you hear your trainer’s voice giving you encouragement, the tension and anxiety melts away and Volume 44, No. 4 | 245AA


Amateur Snapshots your ride becomes flawless. We need those words, because we are amateurs and ride for pleasure. How have Arabians affected your life? It is my life story. Because of Arabian horses, I am who I am and do what I do. Horses motivated me to study, become a physician, come to the U.S. and ride and breed. Having them around every day; hugging my horses after a long day at work, feeding them and watching them graze, washes away tiredness and gives me energy for a new day. They teach me patience and understanding, give me compassion and empathy, and motivate me to move on despite all difficulties. How did you get into Arabians? I started riding horses at the race track in Warsaw, Poland, when I was a teenager, and preferred to ride Arabians as they had more “personality” then Thoroughbreds and were able

to form a special and unique personal connection with you. I discovered the existence of stud farms and spent my summer vacations there working with mares and babies, soaking knowledge from Director Krzysztalowicz, Tomasz Skotnicki and Jerzy Bialobok. It was absolutely precious! Who was the f irst show horse you ever rode? My first show horse was Edyp (Ecaho x Emancypacja, by Falsyfikat), whom I imported from Poland in 2000; a descendant of the famous E line and a Emigrantka grandson. A challenging horse for me, our best accomplishment was to get 3rd place in novice rider hunter pleasure in Scottsdale and a top ten in AOTH. He has been my best teacher and provided an emotional comfort to me during the challenging years of my residency training. He has permanent retirement at my home and will never be sold—my first horse ever and great friend!

Beth Whelihan

Name: Farm: Whelihan Arabian Farms, LLC Trainer Affiliation: Mike Whelihan Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I guess if you are going for “fair,” things are fine the way they are. Personally, I would prefer to see one amateur class per division; one winner of the Half-Arabian amateur country, one winner of the Arabian English amateur, etc.  That would result in huge classes, lots of cuts, lots of competition and thrilling finals. I’m sure that suggestion would be about as popular as a mashed potato sandwich, but I wasn’t raised in a time where everybody wins, and I survived. What are your suggestions to make the shows run more eff iciently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? The one thing that I think has got to get under control is the pictures in the arena. That takes so long and it is not fair to the remaining horses who are left standing around; to the horses waiting to enter for the next class; to the spectators who are waiting to watch classes. People should receive their award, have a nice picture with their attendant and one ring man, and then move outside to a spot where there could be nice backdrop for people to take their time and have nice 246AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

photos taken. This would make things move faster and everybody could enjoy themselves and the wonderful moment together, outside the arena. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? As with anything, ‘class’ is king. I don’t really know how you make “rules,” nor


Amateur Snapshots do I think we need more rules, but people should be able to monitor themselves as coaches and help their riders where needed without sounding like they are warning the stands of a 4-alarm fire. As an amateur, I would be embarrassed if somebody was screeching over the rail at me. I would hope I was aware enough as a rider to realize what I need to fix. It draws attention to mistakes if the judges can hear trainers screaming at their amateurs. How have Arabians affected your life? Oh, in lots of ways. They have taught me patience, taught me about fate, about love and helped me deal with loss. They are just magic. I am the type of girl who loves deeply in my relationships in life,

and Arabians appreciate that. They are alive in their soul and they make me feel the same way.  On the flip side, if I didn’t have them, I would probably be well heeled, bubbling around the South Pacific somewhere, footloose and fancy free, but I choose them—at least for now I do. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? Maybars JoJo. It was a rogue little pony that I showed at a Tennessee Walking farm. They would have walking shows there, and once a session they would have an open class and allow other horses in. I always won 3rd place, every single time I showed, and my room was decorated in yellow ribbons. It was such a simple, beautiful time—I remember it like it was yesterday.

Paige Whittecar

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Gordon

Potts— The Brass Ring

What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? Take win pictures outside of the show ring. It would help to keep things moving along. How have Arabians affected your life? They have affected my life in such a positive way. When I was younger, they taught me responsibility. Now that I am older, they remind me to be patient. There was a short period of time when we did not have any of our horses at home and there truly was a void not having them around every day. The one and only down side is that retirement is further out—we may have to work forever!   What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Sit back and use your legs! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? My husband, Brian It is a passion we are

lucky to be able to share together. My niece also rides and shows when she can. Who was the first show horse you ever rode? VA Baska Riada

Maddy Winer

Trainer Affiliation:

Name: Farm: Simply

Spots Arabians Joe Alberti and John Rannenberg—Rohara Arabians

Do you feel the age breakdown of the amateur divisions is correct, or would you do the breakdowns differently to make it the most fair for all amateurs? I feel age breakdowns and classes offered should be exactly the same for both

purebreds and Half-Arabians. Why should the 55 & over division only apply if you are showing a purebred? It costs just as much to show a Half-Arabian as it does a purebred.

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Amateur Snapshots What are your suggestions to make the shows run more efficiently and create more time for camaraderie at the show? Show officials should make sure their sound equipment is working properly before the show starts so that barn calls and announcements are easily understood in the barn areas. This would really help our stress level as we prepare for classes. Progressive barn parties are great fun, however, you need an entire evening to allow everyone to participate and relax which promotes camaraderie. Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I always appreciate both my trainer and qualified friends coaching me over the rail. It gives me a comforting sense of security and it always helps in case I have overlooked something that can easily be corrected. I honestly don’t understand or agree with the proposed rule changes stating that amateurs are not allowed to be coached over the rail. What is the harm in this? We need to concentrate on correcting serious problems rather than this non-issue. How have Arabians affected your life? I appreciate all breeds of horses but Arabians have always been the “gold standard” to me! Their extreme sensitivity,

timeless beauty and elegance, incredible versatility and intelligence, and captivating panache, always make me realize how fortunate I am to experience working with them. What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Communicate with your horse so you are both working together; relax, and most of all. don’t forget to breathe!

Laura Witter

Name: Farm: Live Oak Arabians Trainer Affiliation: RBC Show Horses and Stachowski

Farms, Inc.

Coaching over the rail. What should the rules be in order to help you and your competitors be most fair and successful in the show ring? I feel like mild coaching is ok. It only seems to be a problem when the person coaching begins to yell at the person in the ring.   What is the most important thing for you to remember in the show ring? Do the very best I can, remember all that I have worked hard on, and have fun! Is there anyone else in your family who’s involved with the Arabian horse? Both daughters, Jeanne and Allison Contois, just competed in their first Youth Nationals. Stepdaughter, Brooke Marie Jarvis, is also a very accomplished rider. How did you get into Arabians? My sister and I both entered the show ring in the late 70s, early 80s, showing for Live Oak Arabians. 248AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Who was the first show horse you ever rode? Country Sunshine (Galbor x Jezabell). n


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Viewpoints From The Industry “HOW A LITTLE FUZZ GOES A LONG WAY”

a Ry

n

SPEED LIMITS AND HORSESHOES, or,

By : Chr ist ine

When I was a teenager, I lived in a house overlooking a long banked curve in the road. It was a popular

spot for the local speed demons, and car crashes were not uncommon. After one particularly bad stretch of

accidents, the town dropped the speed limit from 45 to 40, then 40 to 35, and finally 35 to 30; all to no avail. They put up signs warning of the dangerous curve,

Without enforcement, does it really matter what the rule says?

and signs warning of speeding fines, but the accidents

continued. My neighbor, Mr. Wilson, who was getting tired of replacing his mailbox, offered to let a police

We have a similar situation with our shoeing regulations.

days and a boatload of tickets later, the word got out

on Saturday morning! This created a lot of discussion

cruiser hide in his barn to catch the offenders. Several that the fuzz was hiding in old man Wilson’s barn.

Mr. Wilson’s mailbox spent the rest of the summer

undisturbed until a snowplow took it out in January. I think he got a PO Box after that.

“Several days and a

boatload of tickets later,

the word got out that the fuzz was hiding in old man wilson’s barn.”

At Region 12 this year, there were seven thrown shoes

about rewriting our shoeing rules. I can’t help but think of the speed limits on my road. Without enforcement,

does it really matter what the rule says? The only shows my horses are measured at are Canadian and U.S.

Nationals, and we show at some major shows, including

two regionals. I remember back, when at regionals, every champion and a random top five were measured. With

the addition of sport horse, I know our stewards have a lot more ground to cover than years past, but if one horse was measured every session, just one, I bet we would see a lot less thrown shoes. How about we try seeing if the rules we have, work, before we change them? n

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Leaders Of The Times: September Calendar Feature

Seraphina ER by Kara Larson

Just one year ago, in September of 2012, Pam Bauerlein and mom Pam Halbrook bought Seraphina ER. Although they were instantly smitten by this mare, how they came to acquire her is anything but ordinary. Pam Bauerlein shares, “Out of the blue, David sent me a video of her. He’d been

up at Keith Krichke’s looking at a couple of horses, and when they brought Seraphina out, he just fell in love with her. He took a video and e-mailed it to me. I looked at it before I went to bed and right then, I just knew.” Pam called her mother in the morning, telling her all about the mare and video. Pam continues, “And the funny thing is, we were not looking to buy another horse. If anything, we were looking to sell one, just like everybody else. But we saw the video and just had to have her.” As for the instigator, David Boggs, he can only reflect on his initial awe and the potential his trained eye recognized in Seraphina. “From the first day I laid eyes on her, Seraphina has held that ‘wow’ factor for me. A world class mare of extreme type, beauty, and balance, Midwest is honored and delighted to have first recommended her to, and now present her for such fine persons as Pam Halbrook and Pam Bauerlein.”

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So, as the story goes, Pam told David yes. However, there was one more hiccup, or shall we say “baby bump,” in buying this mare. “I was just about to sign the contract on her when David called back, sharing that he had just found out the mare was in foal.” In shock,


Pam, who was barely looking to buy one horse, had to decide whether two for the price of one would do. “While considering the deal, David said maybe it was a blessing in disguise, as we wanted the mare so badly, we would have done anything to get her.” In the end, Pam realized that it, in fact, was an absolute blessing. “She gave us a beautiful colt back on Valentine’s Day. Most don’t hope for colts, but with this one, we were beyond thrilled.”  Since purchasing this incredible Seraphina ER and Pam Bauerlein after winning mare, Pam and family have 2012 Arabian Breeder Finals Champion Mare AAOTH. experienced a great deal of joy and success with her. “When asleep, and she stopped dead in her tracks and bought her you think of a quintessential Arabian mare, she hits the right there on the spot. To this day, she says she bought mark—she’s beautiful, kind, has quality and type, and I it so hastily that she didn’t know at the time whether the just love being with her. I mean, you could have a beautiful mare had all four legs or not, or how she would pay for horse and if they are not pleasant to be around, I don’t her, but she simply knew she had to have her. And here we want them. Beauty surely is only skin deep, but she is so are, 54 years later.” pleasant to be around. She’s just a sweet, kind mare who happens to have a great deal of quality as well.” So, from that first video a year ago, to the first time Pam showed Seraphina at Arabian Breeder Finals in Adding to the subject of Seraphina’s undeniable and Scottsdale last year, owning Seraphina has never fell short classic type, Walter Mishek of Misheks Arabians offers his of a blessing. As the pair took home a championship at esteemed opinions on the mare. “Seraphina ER is a mare the show, Seraphina proved that she excels in the show of old world extreme type, conformation and balance. Her ring, as a breeding horse, and finally, as a family treasure. pedigree (Bey Jullyen x Pretty Tricky, by Padrons Psyche) “Honestly, I think the best with Seraphina is yet to adds incredible shape of neck, athletic ability and come—there is so much more to her.”   structure. Seraphina ER is one of the few classic mares that looks as perfect in her stall as in the show ring—she A lifetime spent within and fulfilled by the Arabian horse is no counterfeit. Seraphina ER is the great artist Mary makes for a lifestyle unlike most. “My mom and I eat, Haggard’s painting come to life—a classic.” breathe, and sleep horses. It courses through our veins—we can’t even help ourselves. It’s great to own a really good It might be this “classic” appeal of Seraphina that brings one like Seraphina, and in the end, it’s not about ribbons, Pam Halbrook back to her beginnings with the Arabian, it’s not about glory; it’s about the horses and putting their Bauerlein feels. “This mare reminds my mother of why wellbeing first, always. It’s important for us to remember she got into Arabians in the first place. It reminds her so that there’s always another horse show, but you don’t much of her very first Arabian, creating a very special bond always get another horse of this caliber,” Pam shares. with this mare. She used to show in Thoroughbreds when “None of us knows what tomorrow will bring, what the she was younger and she loved it, but one day she went future holds, but if this mare continues on, I have no doubt with a friend of hers to a farm with both Thoroughbreds she will be national champion at some point in her life, and Arabians. I guess my mom walked past the stall, saw which is an absolute thrill.” n a little grey mare and next to it, a foal, curled up, sound Volume 44, No. 4 | 269AA


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2013 Canadian nationals

Roses In Royal Red by KARA LARSON

Holding its own as an entertaining, competitive, and friendly event held in the “Great White North,” the 2013 Canadian Nationals received remarkable reviews for its success among newcomers and regulars alike. Show manager Gerald McDonald shares, “In the feedback I received from the show, everyone seemed to be really happy this year. There were different trainers and a lot of first time people who really enjoyed themselves and said they would be back, so that was very positive feedback from the exhibitors. We added Patron’s tables alongside the arena this year and that was well received by everyone. Overall, the show was a great success.”

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Part of the success and positivity surrounding the show comes with the environment in which it is held. Chris Culbreth of Culbreth Equine shares his thoughts on Brandon and the Keystone Center where the show is held. “Brandon is a smaller city than Regina was. However, what they lack in size is more than made up for with energy and ardor. Every restaurant in town knows about the show and is eager to welcome visitors to their city.” Culbreth continues, “The facilities at Keystone Center are very nice. The main arena is not very large; however, I showed in some of the largest classes of the show and felt that I had plenty of room to properly exhibit my horses. I was also very impressed with the number of advertising sponsors around the arena. The signage, along with other decorations, made the venue feel worthy of the quality event, and the Patrons lounge had great food and a welcoming atmosphere.” This satisfaction in the show can be emphasized through Canadian resident and longtime Arabian breeder and exhibitor Murray Popplewell. “Canadian Nationals is a great show EH! I am a little biased, but it is truly Canadian in the fact that it includes everyone from juniors and amateurs to the professionals. In the classes as well, as

it ranges from the Arabian park class to sport horse classes, and everyone mixes together. That is what our country is all about—including everyone.” Murray continues, “The city is friendly and the completion is great. Even with the show growing in numbers in the last few years still allows time to visit and mingle. Everyone seems to get along and have a great time.” Building on the feeling that everyone seems to get along at the show, McDonald shares the aspects of Canada that lend itself toward the atmosphere of a family oriented show. “It’s a relaxed atmosphere with a broad range of classes that allows everybody within the family to participate if they wish. Starting in Walk-Trot, and all the way up to the amateur and open classes. One of the new classes we added this year was the adult showmanship from a request that we got back in January, and was very well received. We had 18 horses in the class, and it was a prime example of sharing horses between the junior showman and the adult.” Whether exhibitors were sharing horses or keeping them to themselves, the legitimacy of any horse show lies in the level of competition and quality of horses and exhibitors.

Arabian Stallion Champion SPITFYRE VF (TF Psymreekhe x Red Flame), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Mike Steenhart.

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2013 Canadian Nationals And for Murray, a great example of the depth presented itself in the halter classes. “The halter competition was good and strong. We had to be at our best and struggle for every point. When it was all over, we were happy with our wins and the judges’ opinions. We were just happy to be there!” Murray continues, “It’s always good to go to a national championship show and win, and when you don’t, it is good to be beat by better horses.” As Murray touches on, a national championship is a special award that, for most, will remain a dream, never breaking into the sphere of reality. It is exclusive and extraordinary, and for that reason, Canadian Nationals presents a unique opportunity to be in the running for that pinnacle of all awards. McDonald offers his take on what this award means for the show in the midst of the quality and depth of competition. “I look at it from the point of view that we are one of the four national events that AHA puts on and I think Canadian Nationals is a very important show for our country. I also think a national championship here is a great award to strive for. It’s an award that certainly takes some

Arabian Mare Champion VALORI TRF (DA Valentino x Satin Chall LL), shown by Andrew Sellman for owners Claire and Margaret Larson.

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2013 Canadian National Judges, left to right: John Rannenberg, Mary Trowbridge, Brian Ferguson, Lisa Skalski, Gordon Potts and Mickey Hegg.

Arabian English Pleasure Champion SUMMER TEMPTATION (A Temptation x CL Summer Heat), ridden by Joel Gangi for owners Mark and Deborah Himmel.

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2013 Canadian Nationals effort and some work, especially when you have numerous classes that are very competitive and deep like we did this year.� Jeff Schall of Shada, Inc. also weighs in on pointing out the amazing opportunities Canadian Nationals facilitates. “Shada and their clients continue to be tremendous supporters and believers in the Canadian National show. It remains one of our most anticipated events of the season. The show seems to strike such a special balance between competitiveness and camaraderie. Additionally, the outstanding horsemen and horsewomen that compete and judge each year aid in creating a unique respect that is attached to a Canadian National title. A title, that for those who have achieved it, holds a special place in their hearts!� With a 32-hour drive from Scottsdale, Arizona, Chris Culbreth has one of the largest commutes to the show of all the participants,

Arabian Park Horse Champion RONDE VU (Mamage x Ames Deja Vu), ridden by Matthew Siemon for owners Gregg Shafer and Nancy Shafer.

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Arabian Western Pleasure Champion ENZIA FMA (Enzo x Sue Bees Honey), ridden by J.T. Keller for owners John and Cynthia Moore.

Arabian Western Pleasure Champion ENZIA FMA (Enzo x Sue Bees Honey), ridden by J.T. Keller for owners John and Cynthia Moore.

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2013 Canadian Nationals and yet, he is one of the major advocates of the show. “As always, Canadian Nationals proved to be one of the top events of the Arabian horse community. I have been fortunate to either exhibit or judge at nearly every Canadian Nationals for the past 25 years. This year’s show was one of the best. As usual, the Canadians welcomed us with enthusiasm and community support.” Culbreth continues, “The 2013 event was noticeably larger than previous years and the quality of competition was incredible. In its third year in Brandon, Manitoba, since the move from Regina, I am impressed how each year the Canadian National Show Commission keeps improving and fine tuning their national championships.” So, with the 2013 Canadian Nationals in the record books, McDonald reflects on the success of the show, closing with positivity and hopefulness in the show and its future. “Canadian Nationals is a fun show and we certainly appreciate all the exhibitors coming to the show and making it what it is. We look forward to seeing everyone return next year!” n

Arabian Mounted Native Costume Champion TOMAGE (Matio x Trifirette), ridden by owner Teal Dowling.

Arabian Hunter Pleasure Champion FANFARE WF (Desert Heat VF x WF Fantazzia), ridden by Sally Randle for owners Debra and Mark Helmick.

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The Horses Are Good, But The People Are Great! by Kara Larson

Frances Fischer’s short story called, “There Are Still Good People Out There,” got Frances the most hits she had ever received on her Facebook© page at 1,042 total. Her story includes a passionate breeder, a great horse, and a grand gesture from her encounter with real compassion from the Arabian industry—a story about a few people who care not just for their animals, but for humanity, too. A longtime breeder from Canada, Frances is the type of Arabian breeder who spends most of her time thinking about her horses, caring for them deeply, and dreaming of their progeny winning national awards. Frances’s first Arabian was a Gainey mare that her and her husband, John, matched up to Bey Shah with an auction breeding. “We had $3,200 in the bank, and that breeding cost $3,000. I think I sat there staring at the person like, “Don’t you dare outbid us!” And that’s where we got GH Venture. He ended up producing national top tens and regional winners.”

one. We’re not huge winners, but we were respected in our community as breeders, and I liked that. I thought, that’s not a bad way to finish.”

A TASTE OF VICTORY

In one of the most successful breedings Frances facilitated, that of GH Maryn, came a very unique opportunity for both Frances and Jeff Schall of Shada, Inc. “I had knowledge of her being an excellent small breeder before I met her. There were horses that we had seen on the circuit that, when we did the research, went back to her breeding program. Then, when I met her, it came as no surprise to me the fire that she had for what it is that she does. She loves it, she’s passionate about it, and she’s genuine. I think that shines through in everything that she does, and on some level, that’s why we hit it off so well.”

As they kept in touch, However, in the midst of and with the assistance of building a unique and special Brenda Driediger, he became breeding program, something interested GH Maryn, a got in between Frances and her colt she raised. In talking to passion for breeding—cancer. Frances, she shared her interest With the news of her first cancer in selling him, so Jeff made diagnosis, Frances sold GH it happen with a client of his Venture and a great deal of her that was looking for something breeding aspirations. “We got special. The couple was Ed Frances Fischer and GH Maryn’s 2012 Canadian National Arabian to the point where we weren’t and Sarah Truitt. Ed ended Gelding Trophy and rose garland. keeping any mares to produce up showing the horse for the more foals because it was hard for the family to sell them, very first time under Jeff ’s care in Scottsdale and went junior and I felt that there was really no time to breed that star champion AOTR—winning the yearling colts and beating horse anymore.” the winning two-year-old colts. Impressed with the colt and his future, Jeff shares, “I told Ed I was going to retire him as So, Frances crossed off winning a national halter trophy a handler, joking that he was at the top of his game, and that from her bucket list. “I’d come close to producing one, or I was going to move in now and he would become my horse breeding one, or my stud breeding one; but never won to show. I did end up showing the horse for the remainder

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of the season to a regional championship and then a U.S. national top ten as a yearling sweepstakes colt.” It was in this, Frances was able to revel in obtaining her first National halter win, something for which she was incredibly thankful. “I remember being called out for top ten in this class,” Schall shares, “and this little person who could barely see over the rail, well, actually she couldn’t see because she was jumping to see over the railing, said, “Darn you Jeffrey, you did it!” She was so excited, but in the moment, I had this bit of trepidation of wondering what road Frances was going to take with this win. It ended up that she was gracious and impressed that I had done what I told her I would do—I liked the colt, I followed through, I sold him, I committed to him, and I showed him all the way to the national level and won top ten. She was joyous about a colt she bred getting a national top ten—that was a big deal for her. When you’re a true breeder and have been at it for some time, you realize that it’s not just a given to produce a national quality horse. You realize the road that it takes and the journey that it is, so she was elated by that.” And it’s true—Frances would have been overjoyed if this was the pinnacle her breeding program reached. Frances’s dream of something greater was in the distance of her heart and mind, something Frances’s bucket list had written off years ago. But could this dream of hers be realized with GH Maryn? “In his first year showing as a gelding, Maryn ended up being tied for high point halter purebred of the breed. He and my wife together won their first reserve national championship, I won the open geldings with him, and finally, he went on to win the first professional national championship in his age division as a gelding for my assistant, Austin Miller last year. Maryn turned into this horse that could seemingly do anything and would try amazingly hard for you.” In the midst of this incredible show, Frances finally got her picture taken with a champion horse she bred. “I’ve bred national performance winners, but this was my first national halter champion. I was ecstatic! It was very special for me because I owned his mom and she was my best mare. When we lost her, it felt like the end of my breeding days;

GH Maryn (NYN Hisani x Enjoue)

broodmares like that don’t come along that often.” But in that moment in center ring, Frances admits to being “over the moon happy” with Maryn and in the other successes of the show. “Besides Maryn, a colt I had bred, Vincencio Bey, owned and loved by Ronnalee Harris, went top ten yearling colt, our colt GH Markaine, got top ten in both his classes with Terry Holmes, and GH Marcheline went top ten in the hunter pleasure junior horse class.. I walked on air the whole show—certainly one for the bucket list!” Jeff adds one more detail to the story, sharing that Frances’s husband, John, was at Canada last year to share in Frances’s joy and accomplishments as a breeder. “He’s usually the behind-the-scenes guy, and rightfully so because no one is going to compete with Frances’s spirit and fire, but he was there too, which was really special. After the show, he actually came over and had some really kind words as to what it all had meant to them. We found it additionally gratifying and special that we were able to share in the joy Frances had at Canada last year.”

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A STORYBOOK ENDING

It was decided that Frances would be most deserving to receive the national championship trophy since none of this would have been possible if not for her. After sending it to her, she called Jeff crying and said it was the nicest thing anyone has ever done in the Arabian industry. And then, Jeff couldn’t believe it, when she went on to say that once she passed, it would come back to Shada. This statement stands as a true testament to her complete disbelief and amazement in this gesture of kindness in Maryn’s national championship trophy. Jeff, of course, said that it was for her and her family to enjoy for always, maintaining that the trophy was issued a one-way ticket to Frances and nowhere else. On the other end of the package was Frances, who could hardly process the contents of the parcel that arrived from Shada a few weeks after the show. “I opened it up and could not believe it. Inside was the national trophy and garland for GH Maryn’s win and a card from Jeff and Roxanne and Ed and Sarah Truitt—I was just absolutely

overwhelmed. I just cried. It took me two or three days before I could phone them to say thank you. Because what do you say?” Frances continues, “I was just so overwhelmed with the gesture. I really didn’t even know how to say thank you, so I wrote on my Facebook© page that there’s still good people out there, great people out there, and I guess there still are.” The “good people” in her working title ended up encapsulating not only those wonderful people who were able to generously share this win with GH Maryn’s breeder, but it also seemed to fit the writer herself. Frances truly adores the Arabian horse and for a person nearing the end of her stay on earth, her attitude and perspective remains a bright and lovely one. In a world where the Arabian horse has little influence on the masses, it is clear that for the group of people involved in this wonderful ordeal, inspiration was bred, memories were shared, and lifetimes were made. “We were very conscious in the fact that this horse had come full circle,” shares Jeff. “Credit to her for the breeding,

Frances Fischer

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Roxanne Schall’s Canadian National Reserve Champion Gelding AOTH win with GH Maryn.

credit to the Truitts for their belief in him in the years they owned him, and credit to ourselves, in particular my wife Roxanne, for her continued belief in evolving him to make him the special horse he was last year.”

“THE BIG GATE” AND REFLECTION

Although Frances’s cancer took a five-year hiatus, it reappeared two years ago, prompting her to evaluate her life, her passions, and how she wants to leave this world. “You never evade the end. I know I’m getting the “big gate” with cancer, but these acts of kindness are priceless—this win and their generosity means the world to me. Like my

husband John says, “They sure made an old couple happy.” And really, I’m lucky I’ve been given extra time. Lots of people don’t. Everybody gets a turn and I got an extra one.  I have a lot of friends, I have really good family, and I have made a lot of acquaintances that I didn’t even know were really good friends, so I’ve got nothing to complain about!” As she spoke candidly about her impending future, she’s learned to think only of the now, the joy she has experienced in her (nearly) 70 years of life, and the kindness she has been privy to in the past year. And when asked where the trophy resides in her life, she gushed about how well it suits the mantle in her living room. n

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In Memoriam

Good Vibrationss (Afire Bey V x The Small Town Blues), 2001-2013

A bright and handsome Half-Arabian country, driving, and equitation horse, Good Vibrationss was a gelding that beamed a warm personality and a bold look in the show ring. Cedar Ridge Arabians trainer, Leah Beth Boyd, shares, “’Vibes’ was a part of the Cedar Ridge family for the last 3 years of his life, and in that short time, he had a huge impact on a lot of different people and families.” Vibes had simply gone to Cedar Ridge to get sold, but Leah and John instantly took a liking to him and started to think of a way to utilize him in their program. Initially that came through the Morton family. “The Morton’s had bought a young horse bred through Cedar Ridge, but she needed a little more time to mature before she was ready to take on a full show schedule, so the Morton’s leased Good Vibrationss for their daughter, Laura, to show in Half-Arabian country and driving. Laura and Vibes went on to go top ten in both; it was Laura’s first driving experience. They were thrilled, and during their time with him, forged quite a bond (even after their lease was up, he always got treats from them).” That same year, John showed Vibes in the Half-Arabian Country Driving in Canada and took champion, a notable win because it was the first national championship for horse and driver! Vibes had previously been reserve twice in driving with Silvio Domingues. After seeing how well Vibes meshed with a junior rider, and how versatile he was, Leah and John decided to sell him in the barn to Sierra Crooks and the Calvillo family. “Sierra came up through our lesson program and it was time to make the step to her first show horse. She and Vibes got along very well, winning garlands at class A shows and regionals. At Youth Nationals that year, her first, they made it to the finals in the Half-Arabian country pleasure 14-17, no small feat. This year he touched yet another life in Ryan Pullera. Ryan wants to be a horse trainer and came to Cedar Ridge over the summer to work. He drove Vibes almost daily throughout the spring and summer, and they became quite a team. Vibes was a really cool character, always ‘talking’ to everyone that walked by in the crossties and will be sorely missed by everyone at Cedar Ridge. Judging by the overwhelming response to his death on Facebook©, the sentiment runs deep with many.”

PowderNPaint LOA (Meistermind x Carrera LOA), 1998- 2013

Fifteen years ago, a chestnut colt with too much chrome was born at Live Oak Arabians. Little did they know he would go on to earn national honors every year he was shown, along with becoming Meistermind’s most successful foal, earning 25 national and 53 regional titles in his lifetime. In December 2003, ‘Puff ’ came into owner Ashley Reimer’s life. “I’ll never forget when my mom first saw him, turned to Juli, and reluctantly asked, “That’s not him, is it?” as she stared at his white face. Just a month later, he was shipped to Fox Hollow Farm.” After a few years of successful showing, Ashley went to college and Puff came home. Between 2007 and 2012, Puff and Ashley (and Mom) were a solo team, but that didn’t stop them from earning a national championship, three reserve national championships, and six national top tens in the Arabian hunter pleasure division, both amateur and open. For Ashley, Puff was a once-in-a-lifetime horse. “He was thought to be the epitome of a hunter by many. He was the king of the barn, and our best friend. Puff ’s eyes lit up when he saw the show ring, but he loved being a horse, too. Throughout his life, he enjoyed daily pasture time, followed by evening rides. Puff now resides in greener pastures, but is greatly missed and will never be forgotten. 282AA | A R A BI A N HOR Se T I MeS


In Memoriam

Edith Vincent, 1923-2013

Edith P. Vincent, the mother of Adandy Farms trainer Cathy Vincent, whose accomplishments include: developing certification for school nurses, state-managed student immunizations, early school-based drug- and sex-education programs and “Keen Cat,” a character who teaches elementary school children health, and a member of the Hall of Fame of Delaware Women, has recently passed away at the age of 90. Statewide school health excellence awards were named for her by Nemours Health & Prevention Services, the state education department and a coalition of other groups. The Delaware School Nurses Association also celebrated Vincent, calling her a “school nurse, pioneer, advocate, educator, leader” as she turned 90 last October. Vincent began her long and tireless career in nursing and public service just before World War II. Come wartime, she joined the American Red Cross, served in the Army Nurse Corps as a first lieutenant, saw duty abroad in 1944-45, trained in Wales and helped set up a hospital in England in anticipation of casualties from D-Day. Post-war, she earned school nurse certification, bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Peabody College/Vanderbilt University in Tennessee and was studying at Salisbury (Md.) Teacher’s College when she learned Delmar School District wanted to hire its first school nurse. She got the job. Over 15 years in the job, she also taught high school journalism and elementary school health and served as a multi-sport coach. In 1963-68, she established health education in Prince George’s County, Md., schools. She was recognized by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control as an outstanding school health advocate, among many honors.

Tracy Caruth, 1962-2013

Tracy Wynn Caruth, born November 8th, 1962, in Hialeah, Fla., passed away August 29, 2013, in Lone Oak, Texas. Tracy was a highly accomplished breeder, being awarded breeder of the year several years running. This was her true passion—breeding and showing horses, which she did for over 30 years. She held championships in every division of the show arena from the U.S. to Canada. Her philanthropic spirit has touched countless people and her legacy will live on in the horses she has bred. Tracy was well known for her selfless sharing of time and efforts to help others and earned the title of “Princess of Philanthropy” for her work with the Black Stallion Literacy Program. Any youth program that needed help knew that she would be there anytime. Her efforts for a Dallas Horse Park are well known, but her work with the Dallas Police Mounted Unit will be her legacy. At the news of her passing, the Caruth Arabians Facebook© page was flooded with memories of Tracy and what her passion for the Arabian and friendship meant to those closest to her. One post by Kathie Williams is one of these meaningful shares. “Through the years, we rode with Ross Tarkington—Tracy, Carol Beringer, and me. We all had country horses, but hers was the best—D A Napitov. You could NEVER stand next to Tracy in a pair of Wranglers and get any notice. That girl could wear jeans like nobody’s business! You could have your hair done…work at it for hours, but she always had the best hair and acted like it was nothing. You could really work at finding the cutest outfit, and you thought you were styling, and then Tracy stepped out of her car—always dripping gorgeous.” She goes on to say, “We went to Canada together and she and I made the front page of the newspaper—a stunning picture of her with Napitov. That was the year we broke down in Canada and had a whole fleet of trucks helping us get back home. In “Julie the Dually” and a limping trailer, they would get on the CB radio, and hand us off to the next trucker until we were safely back in Texas. I bought Julie the Dually shortly after that trip. Tracy’s generosity made that happen. She loved competition and travel and was so FULL of life. You knew that if you were with Tracy, you had better give all you had, because that girl could seriously leave you in the dust. I know that somehow she is leaving us all in the dust again. She just needed to move on to a bigger, grander place.” Volume 44, No. 4 | 283AA


In Memoriam

Sir Fames HBV (*Ffamess x Cajun Lady HCF), 2001-2013 Beginning with the story of Dixie and Robert North’s first encounter with their Sir Fames HBV, Dixie shares, “We were visiting Luciano and Vera Curry of Haras Boa Vista. They had shown a half dozen horses, and up the road from the barn came a prancing dark bay yearling colt and my heart started pounding as he approached. They turned him loose and he blew and snorted and put on a thrilling show. I said to Robert, “Oh my, I am in love.” Robert responded, “Thank you, I love you too.” I said, “Well, I love you, but I love this horse, and we need him to cross on the Psyche daughters.” After seeing his dam, and then viewing him again, it was a done deal.”

From this first meeting, a relationship formed between the couple and their stallion and Sir Fames soon became one of the leading U.S. sires of halter and performance foals. Eventually, North Arabians agreed to return the well-known stallion back to his birthplace of Brazil, and he spent his final days at the beautiful farm of Haras JM, breeding some of the best broodmares in Brazil. His show record boasts a Brazilian reserve national championship, a Region 2 reserve championship, a Scottsdale top ten, and three years as a top three Leading Sire of halter horses. He was a nominated sire in the AHA Breeders Sweepstakes, AHBA World Cup Futurity, Scottsdale Signature, Iowa Gold Star Futurity, Silver Sire Futurity, and Minnesota Medallion Stallion. Although Sir Fames had a relatively short time (only 8 years) as a breeding stallion, he has left an important breeding legacy in his progeny for the U.S. Arabian market. His get excelled in the show ring in both halter and performance classes including western, hunt seat, country English, trail, and native costume. His first foal crop of just six foals resulted in four top show horses including two U.S. national top tens, one Scottsdale halter champion, three regional champions, and one performance champion. In total, he sired just under 200 foals, which included numerous U.S. and Canadian National halter and performance champions, regional champions, Las Vegas World Cup champions, and Youth national champions. Some of his notable get include: Famess N Parys WA (Scottsdale Jr. Yearling Champion), Semper Fie (Scottsdale Jr. Champion Stallion and overall Supreme Show Champion), Ever After NA (twice U.S. Reserve National Champion and Las Vegas Champion 3- and 5-yearold Stallion), Montero SF (U.S. National Champion Native Costume and Top Ten Country English), Marco NA (U.S. National Champion Futurity Trail Horse and Youth National Reserve Champion Trail Horse), Rohara Mademoiselle (Canadian National Half-Arabian Futurity Filly Champion), and KA Roundabout Midnite (three-time U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian halter, Regional Western Pleasure Champion and U.S. National Western Pleasure Top Ten), and French Kisses (Youth National Champion and U.S. National Top Ten Halter). There are many more winners, many great producing offspring, and cherished members of families.  Sir Fames HBV had a wonderful disposition, and passed it on to his get. Performance trainers are still looking for Sir Fames HBV bred horses to add to their show strings. His get had good legs, long flat hips, and great shoulders. His foals were also known for their beautiful, big black eyes. In the short time he was back in Brazil, he produced a number of beautiful halter horses that are now being shown in the major Brazilian shows. Sir Fames sons and daughters are also carrying on his legacy; his most famous son Ever After NA (from his second breeding season), is currently a leading halter sire and the chief sire at North Arabians in California. Sir Fames HBV will be missed by many as a sire and friend. He died too young, but even in his short life, he made significant contributions to the Arabian horse. n 284AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Calendar Of Events

Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; phone 612-816-3018 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

SeminarS/CliniCS/SaleS/ Open HOuSe/awardS

October 5-6, 2013, Cal Poly 75th Anniversary Celebration/Reunion, W.K. Kellogg Arabian Horse Center, Pamona, California. Contact Kelly Pina, 909-869-4988. November 9, 2013, Eleanor’s Arabians’ Open Barn and Clinic, Rogers, Minnesota. Contact: Eleanor Hamilton, 763-767-1381. November 13-16, 2013, AHA Convention, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact AHA, 303-696-4500.

RegiOnal CHampiOnSHipS November 16, 2013, Region 12 100-Mile Endurance Ride Championship, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403.

ShOws OctOber October 5-6, 2013, Pacific Rim Arabian Fall Classic, Ema, Washington. Contact: Lanora Callahan, 360-832-6076. October 13, 2013, NC State Fair Horse Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Barbara Woodlief, 919-839-4701. October 19-20, 2013, PMHA Annual Morab Championships, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Sara Ressler, 248-922-0148. October 25-27, 2013, Heritage Arabian Classic II A and B, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216.

NOvember

November 1-3, 2013, Western Carolinas Fall Show, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-305-4023. November 7-10, 2013, NTAHC Shootout, Glen Rose, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279. November 8-10, 2013, American Cup Championship A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. November 15-17, 2013, Music City Arab Show, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. November 27-30, 2013, AHAF 44th Annual Thanksgiving Show, Tampa, Florida. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. December December 5-8, 2013, Saguaro Classic, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. December 6-8, 2013, Gulf Coast Christmas Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

enduranCe/ COmpetitive trail ride

October 5, 2013, Red Rock Rumble 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Gina Hall, 775-849-0839. October 12, 2013, Oak Leaf Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Hamilton, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. October 19-20, 2013, High Desert Classic II and III 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Fort Churchill, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. October 24, 2013, AHA 50- and 100-Mile Open Endurance Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 24, 2013, AHA 25-Mile Open Limited Distance Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 24, 2013, AHA 25-Mile Open Competitive Trail Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233.

October 26, 2013, AHA 50-Mile Open Endurance Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 26, 2013, AHA 25-Mile Open Limited Distance Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 26, 2013, AHA 25-Mile Open Competitive Trail Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 27-28, 2013, AHA 35-Mile Open Competitive Trail Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. October 27-28, 2013, AHA 70-Mile Open 2-Day Competitive Trail Ride, Chandlerville, Illinois. Contact: Carla Jo Bass, 972-617-8233. November 15-16, 2013, Blackwater Boogie 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403. November 16, 2013, Lead, Follow, Or Get Out Of My Way 30-, 50, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Fountain Hills, Arizona. Contact: Lancette Koerner, 480-655-9434.

NatiONals eveNts

October 18-26, 2013, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact AHA: 303-696-4500.

NatiONals eveNts

November 13-17, 2013, Brazilian Nationals. *Go to ‘www.arabianessence.com or www.ecaho.org for international shows and information.

Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates.

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Index Of Advertisers

A

F

ABCentre At Rancho Sonado ..........................................................200A-203A Abel Family, The ................................................................................ 60-64MW Acevedo, Suzanne ....................................................................................... 19AA Aguirre, Kelli .......................................................................100A, 101A, 236AA AHT Marketing............................................................................................23A AHT Subscriptions ............................................... 244A, 250A, 286AA, 292AA AHT, Inc. ....................................................................................................170A Al Saqran Stud ................................................................................... 46-49MW Al Shaqab ......................................40-45MW, 50MW, 51MW, 68MW, 69MW Aljassimya Farm ..............................................................................................7A Alvey Performance Horses ....................................................................... 176AA Ames Reining Horses ........................................................................ 2AA, 3AA Ames, Dick ...............................................................................................82MW Anderson, Jamal & Jennifer ....................................................................... 26AA Anderson, Jessica .........................................................................................111A Arabian Horse Global ...................................................................................22A Arabian Soul Partners, Ltd................................................................... 17A-21A Arabians International.......................................................................... 17A-21A Argent Farms LLC .....................................................................FCA, 26A-63A

Fazenda Floresta ........................................................................ 54MW, 55MW Fleming, Maudi ...........................................................................231AA-234AA Flemings Steakhouse .....................................................................................83A Foster, Dr. Lori ............................................................................................131A Four Moore Ranch ............................................................................... 30A, 31A Frahm, Jeff ................................................................................................86MW Franklin, Diane............................................................................146AA-149AA Hansen, Tom & Leola.............................................................................. 152AA Freeland Farms LLC ...................................................................... 10AA, 11AA Frierson Atkinson.......................................................................... 244A, 286AA

B Barber, Leon & Debra.............................................................................. 252AA Beloveds Farm .................................................................................. 258A, 259A Black, Jeanne ............................................................................................ 142AA Blevins, Jim............................................................................................... 143AA Boggs, David & Terry Anne.......................................... 79MW, 82MW, 83MW Boisvert Farms, LLC ............................................................................ 76A-79A Brookhill Arabians ...................................................................................85MW Brower, Aimee ...................................................................................197A-199A Butler, Kim ............................................................................................... 143AA

C Charles Amato Equine Interests LLC ............................................. 152A, 153A Chestnuthill Arabians ......................................................................274A-IBCA Colonial Wood Training Center .................................................225AA-243AA Cook, Barbie................................................................................................156A Cooper, Colleen Boylan...............................................................168AA-172AA Copeland, Susan ....................................................................................... 253AA Craig, Teresa ............................................................................................. 139AA Crescent Creek Farms ......................................206AA, 207AA, 231AA-235AA Criadero Medrano ............................................................................ 138A, 139A Cynimar Farms......................................................................................... 210AA

D Day, Sharon .................................................................................... 14AA, 15AA Delsan Arabians, LLC ..................................................................... 194A, 195A Dolorosa Arabians .........................................................................................57A Downing, Stephanie ................................................................................. 237AA Dreymbay Farm ....................................................................................... 137AA DST Arabians ...............................................................................................55A

E East Manor Arabians ....................................................................... 192A, 193A Equine Online Mall ......................................................................................82A 290AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

G GallĂşn Farms........................................................................................ 12A, 13A Garlands Ltd .....................................................................................191A-201A Garvis, Leslie...............................................................................................130A Gedeon, Nola ........................................................................................... 138AA Gemini Acres Equine........................................................................... 64A-75A Goodrow, Richard & Justine ....................................................................87MW Grand Arabian Farm ................................................................................74MW Graystone Farm.......................................................................... 202AA, 203AA Gunabalan, Joanne ............................................................................... 32A, 33A

H HA Toskcan Sun LLC .............................................................. 294AA, IBCAA Halbrook Arabians ........................................................ 66MW, 67MW, 91MW Haras La Catalina ...................................................................... 73MW, 90MW Haras Las Palmares .................................... 36-39MW, 52MW, 53MW, 93MW Haras Mayed .............................................................................34-36AA, 1MW Harris, Pam ................................................................................... 134A, 175AA Hat Lady, The ............................................................................... 245A, 287AA Haug, Deb & Eric .......................................................................153AA-157AA Heartland Arabians .................................................................................... 18AA Hegg, Mrs. Mickey........................................................................ 245A, 287AA Hennessey Arabians ......................................................................... 140A, 141A Hicks, Frank & Julie Wall ...........................................................................269A Honeysuckle Farm Arabians, LLC .................................................. 252A, 253A Hruban, Amelia ...........................................................................................266A

I I Ask LLC........................................................................................ 112A, 113A Iversen, Chloe ..............................................................................................133A

J Jackson, Karlton ............................................................................................99A Janecki, Robert ............................................................................................267A Janow Podlaski ................................................................................... 32-35MW JT Keller Performance Horses ....................................................239AA, BCAA

K Keeler, Joan ............................................................................................... 253AA KGBTX Communications .....................................................163A, 166A-168A Kiesner Training ..................................................................................98A-115A King, Jacquelyn ................................................................................. 182A, 183A Knoop Family, The ................................................................................... 211AA Krichke Training Center ......................................................FCAA, 7AA-22AA Krusenstjerna, Jay & Barbara .............................................. 34A, 35A, 49A-51A


L L&B Farms .......................................................................................176A-181A Larson, Claire & Margaret.................................................FCA, 36A-39A, 54A Limitless Arabians................................................................................ 58A, 59A Live Oak Arabians ..................................................................... 140AA, 141AA Lone Tree Farm............................................................................... FCAA, 9AA Lowe Show Horse Center.................................................................204A-211A Lynch, Dan................................................................................................. 21AA

M M.A. Farm LLC ............................................................................ 28AA, 29AA Manfield, Michael & Robin ........................................................256AA-259AA Marhaabah Legacy Group, The ........................................................... 42A, 43A Marino Arabians ..............................................56MW, 57MW, 65MW, 88MW Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. ........................................................... 245A, 287AA Masterpiece Arabian Partners, Inc. ...................................................... 12A, 13A Matthews, Marikate ....................................................................................263A McArthur, Wayne & Donna .................................................................... 158AA McNeely, Walter & Shirley ........................................................ 173AA, 174AA Mendel, Duke & Renae ................................................................................48A Metzger, Laura & Gil .............................................................................. 240AA Michalow Stud ........................................................................... 58MW, 59MW Midwest........................ 9A, 33-36AA, 1-96 MW(37-132AA), 133AA, 134AA Misheks Arabians ....................................................................... 89MW, 94MW Mittenthal, John & Judy ............................................................................ 27AA Monette, Linda & Michael .........................................................................162A Monteleone Partnership, The ................................................................... 254AA Morgan, Bruce..............................................................................................8AA Morning Sun Arabians......................................................................... 40A, 41A Munroe, Kimberly .................................................................................... 212AA Musso, Linda & Vince ..................................................................... 256A, 257A

N Nelson, Cheryl.......................................................................................... 260AA Newman, Jerry .............................................................................................158A

O Oak Haven Arabians .............................................................. 171A-183A, BCA Oak Haven South Arabians LLC .......................................172A-175A, 241AA Oak Ridge Arabians ........ 28-31MW, 58MW, 59MW, 65MW, 72MW, 75MW Owings, Meg ...............................................................................................160A

P P & S Enterprises ......................................................................... 244A, 286AA Padgham, Barri ................................................................................................4A Pay-Jay Arabians ........................................................................... 245A, 287AA Pest, David & Angel ................................................................................ 142AA Phelan, Tricia & Olivia .................................................................... 102A, 103A Polcsan, Kathy & Steve ...............................................................................196A Polo Grill.......................................................................................................85A Porter, Mike & Robin .............................................................................. 235AA Powell Training Center ...............................................................249AA-266AA

Q Quarryhill Farm Arabians............................................................. 244A, 286AA

R R. Kirk Landon Trust .............................................................254A, 255A, 261A R.O. Lervick Arabians ........................................... 23AA-27AA, 244A, 286AA Rae-Dawn Arabians ................................................................................. 2A-5A Ranch O Flynn ......................................................................128A, 129A, 132A Rancho Sonado .................................................................................200A-203A RBC Show Horses ......................................................................136AA-144AA Richardson, JoRae & Charles............................................................... 44A, 45A Rivero International ............................................................................ IFCA, 1A Rohara Arabians ...............................................................................251A-IBCA Rohn, Cameron & Shannon .......................................................................161A

Ross, David Zouch ........................................................................................56A Royal Arabians ..................................................................................... 28A, 29A Royal Jaafar Stud .........................................................................................271A Russka Farms LLC .................................................................................. 238AA

S Sandhu, Dr. Balpal ...................................................................................92MW Sepulveda, Cheryl ..................................................................................... 262AA Seventh Star Arabians .............................................................................. 177AA Rooker Training Stable ...............................................................199AA-213AA Shada, Inc. ............................................................................................ 80A, 81A Shafer Arabians .............................................................................. 30AA, 31AA Shamrock Farms LLC .............................62A, 154A, 155A, 157A, 164A, 165A Shannon, Nancy ....................................................................................... 264AA Shea Stables................................................................................... 245A, 287AA Showtime Training Center ..........................................................167AA-177AA Shuster Arabians ........................................................................ 200AA, 201AA Siemon Stables ................................................................................30AA-32AA Simply Spots Arabians ...........................................................260A, 262A, 270A Sloan, Jeff & Andrea .......................................................................... 32-35MW Smith, Ken & Debbie .................................................................... 24AA, 25AA Smoky Mountain Park Arabians .......................................................... 10A, 11A Southwest Farm Services............................................................... 244A, 286AA Stachowski Farm, Inc. ................................................................293AA-IBCAA Starline Arabians LLC ................................................ 104A-110A, 114A, 115A Stone Ridge Arabians............................................. 9A, 70MW, 71MW, 78MW Stonecreek Ranch ................................................................................. 46A, 47A Strawberry Banks Farm ........................................................................ 14A, 15A Sycamore Farm, LLC ..................................................................................137A Szymanski, Jessie ............................................................................ 16AA, 17AA

T Ted Carson At Butler Farms Training Center ...............................IFCAA, 1AA The Brass Ring..................................................................................151A-169A Thirteen Oaks Arabians ............................................................................. 13AA Ti Amo Ristorante Italiano...........................................................................96A Timberidge Ranch ......................................................................226AA-230AA Tobin, Alyson ..............................................................................................265A Todd, Clare................................................................................. 255AA, 261AA Tyler, Elizabeth .......................................................................... 173AA, 174AA

U Utica Square ..................................................................................................84A

V Van Dyke, Les & Diane ............................................................. 76MW, 77MW Vasconcelos Family, The ............................................................. 80MW, 81MW Vicki Humphrey Training Center .....................................................127A-135A Villa Del Cavallo ..........................................................................................6AA Voyt, Deborah & Scott............................................................................. 208AA

W Weegens, Todd & Glena ..........................................................................84MW Weichmann, Anne, Robert & Rosanne ................................................ 60A, 61A Whelihan Arabian Farms ............................................................145AA-158AA Whispering Pines Estate .................................................................. 238A, 239A Whitaker, Richard & Gail........................................................................ 239AA Whiterock Ranch LLC .............................................................................. 12AA Whittecar, Brian & Paige ............................................................................159A Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc..................................................... 245A, 287AA Wilson Training Center ....................................................................136A-141A

Y Yochum, John & Sheryl...................................................................................5A

Z Zick, Augutmn ......................................................................................... 263AA Zuccarini, John & Sandy ................................. 250AA, 251AA, 265AA, 266AA Volume 44, No. 4 | 291AA


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Stachowski Farm U.S. Nationals Sales Offerings PUREBRED COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE: PA ELUSIVE (Emanor x PA Screen Play) 2002 Grey Arabian Gelding

PUREBRED ENGLISH PLEASURE:

***

RANSOM DGL (Afires Heir x HL Raisa) 2008 Bay Arabian Gelding

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CROSSFIRE LPR (HF Mister Chips x LPR Sable) 2006 Bay Arabian Gelding

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SF MAJOR SHOC (SF Specs Shocwave x SF La Reina) 2007 Bay Arabian Stallion

ARIES MA (Baske Afire x MD Aquarius) 2009 Bay Arabian Gelding

BASKE ALLIENCE (Baske Afire x Miss Allience) 2004 Bay Arabian Gelding

BLACKPATENT AFHEIR (Afires Heir x Blackpatent Pumps) 2010 Black Arabian Mare

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ERA HORACIO (Baske Afire x Pavlova X)*** 2007 Chestnut Arabian Gelding

VJ JULIAN (Allience x Blush Berri V) 2008 Chestnut Arabian Stallion

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MALIBU MISS (Alchemyst x Miss Nobility) 2009 Chestnut Arabian Mare

ANZA DE COGNAC (Anza Padron x KB Aphrodite) 2006 Grey Arabian Gelding

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DANCING HEIRESS (Afires Heir x Dancing Rain X) 2007 Bay Arabian Mare - CALIFORNIA

AFIRE STAR VF (Afire Bey V x Psympatica VF) 2007 Bay Arabian Mare – CALIFORNIA

EMPRESSARIO DF (Maestro DF x Daca La Empress) 2004 Bay Stallion - Park

CROWNED HEIRESS KD (Afires Heir x Casting Crowns DFA) 2009 Bay Arabian Mare – CALIFORNIA

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE: SF STONEWOODS N COOK (SF Specs Shocwave x Doubletree’s Lady Of Intrigue) 2008 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding ***

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE: JB PUMP IT UP (Baske Afire x Captivating Style) 2007 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding SKYWATCHER (Avatar El Ghazi x On My Wings) 2006 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding DOUBLE VISIONN (AFires Vision x T Fantafox) 2006 Chestnut Half-Arabian Gelding

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MOJITO FIRE (Ali Fire x Captivating Style) 2007 Chestnut Half-Arabian Mare

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HUCKS CARRISSIMA (Hucksbar x Lady Carrissima) 2009 Grey Half-Arabian Gelding

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SMALL TOWN SHOCKER (SF Specs Shocwave x The Small Town Blues) 2008 Chestnut Half-Arabian Mare ***

ALI HOT TAMALI (Ali Fire x The Fix) 2007 Chestnut Half-Arabian Mare

CARAMEL CHIPS LOA (HF Mister Chips x Caramar) 2009 Chestnut Half-Arabian Mare

JJ SPECIAL EDITION (Baske Afire x Endless Legacy) 2005 Chestnut Half-Arabian Gelding

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PUREBRED HUNTER PLEASURE: AVATAR BLUES EXPRESS (IXL Noble Express x Pioneer Rhythm) 2008 Bay Arabian Gelding ***

SINFUL (Hucksbar x Mia Carrissima) 2008 Grey Half-Arabian Gelding

WIZE BEYBE (Afire Bey V x Wize Berry) 2008 Bay Arabian Gelding

ASTRO MAN (Hucklebey Berry x Scarlet Haze) *** 2001 Chestnut Half-Arabian Gelding – CALIFORNIA BL SMOOTH CRIMINAL (Sir William Robert x Rumina Afire) 2007Bay Half-Arabian Gelding – CALIFORNIA DC ONE MAN SHOW (Baske Afire x CR Simply Marvelous) 2005 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding – CALIFORNIA

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HALF-ARABIAN HUNTER PLEASURE: HE BE A BADAZZ (JRA Azul x She Be Noble) *** 2010 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding – CALIFORNIA A FIREEKIN FOTUNE+++/ (SP Fortunefivehundred x Bey Fireshah) 2005 Bay Half-Arabian Gelding – CALIFORNIA ***

***CAN BE SEEN AT NATIONALS Mantua, OH • Scottsdale, AZ • San Marcos, CA Jim Stachowski: 330-603-2116 • 330-274-2494

www.stachowski.com Volume 44, No. 4 | 293AA


Toskcan T oskcan Sun

ha

2012 Unanimous U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse 2012 Unanimous Scottsdale Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse Owners: HA Toskcan Sun LLC Michelle Harris and Helen Lacey Reed

Standing at: Stachowski Farm, Inc. Mantua, Ohio • info@stachowski.com Contact: Jim Stachowski • 330-603-2116

www.Stachowski.com


U . S . N AT I O N A L C O N T E N D E R ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE with Jim Stachowski

Baske Afire x Matoska, by Zodiac Matador • Breeders Sweepstakes, AEPA and Scottsdale Signature Stallion


2013 Canadian Nationals Champion Arabian Western Pleasure Open

Competing in Western Pleasure Open with J.T. Keller

Bred and Owned by John and Cynthia Moore | 254-968-7933 | www.fourmooreranch.com Trained by J.T. Keller | 715-928-2813 | www.jtkellertraining.com

Vol44 No4AA - September 2013  
Vol44 No4AA - September 2013  

September AA