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Cover Story

Miss Marwan PA by Mary Kirkman

Last February, HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Khalifa Al Thani, of Al Shahania Stud in Qatar, found his attention drawn to a fancy yearling filly in the show ring at Scottsdale. Her name was Miss Marwan PA. While he has a good eye and an instinct for exceptional quality, the sheikh nevertheless sought out a second opinion before making an offer; he discussed the filly with Michael Byatt, who has trained most of the Al Shahania show string in North America since the farm resumed competition here in 2010. Byatt easily endorsed the youngster, who is by Marwan Al Shaqab, and out of the Versace daughter, Miss Amerika. The Scottsdale judges apparently agreed with the sheikh’s assessment, as Miss Marwan PA handily won her yearling division before going on to finish Scottsdale Reserve Champion Junior Filly. She was welcomed into Al Shahania Stud’s increasingly-celebrated show and breeding program. For Sheikh Mohammed, Miss Marwan PA represents more than just an outstanding presence in the show ring. Her sire, Marwan Al Shaqab, is one of his personal favorites, a horse who not only enjoys international acclaim, but also inspires the highest level of Arabian breeding. “Any owner would be happy to have a horse like Marwan,” notes Al Shahania general manager Alexandra Newman. “We hope that one of our horses will establish that level of influence. We have an admiration for Marwan and for the line.” Michael Byatt, who will show Miss Marwan PA in competition, sees how the filly fits her role. “If you asked 6AA | A R A BI A N HoR SE T I MES

me to guess her pedigree, I’d say, ‘Versace-Marwan,’ and I’d be right,” he says. “She’s got that real exquisite boning and Versace look to her face—the chiseling and the drama that he had in his face has really come through in her. Also, there is a little of a Marwan look in her face. Her neck is so Marwan—extremely vertical, clean, and beautiful through the throat, with a perfect poll. Her shoulder is very well laid back, she is long-legged like Versace was, and she’s super balanced like both of them are.” In June, at the Region 9 Show, three more judges affirmed the filly’s quality, as she was unanimously selected Champion Yearling Filly. Miss Marwan’s next appearance will be at the U.S. Nationals, but at this point, she has more than just a title to earn. She has to live up to the other top mares who have represented Al Shahania since the farm came back to competition. It was just two years ago that Sheikh Mohammed, who is highly regarded in European and Middle Eastern Arabian racing, reintroduced showing into his program with the purchase of Abha Qalams. Presented by Michael Byatt, Abha Qalams was named 2010 U.S. National Champion Junior Mare. “She is such a fabulous mare,” says Byatt, “and it was such a great beginning for Al Shahania.” The sheikh was so pleased with Abha Qalams that he also purchased her dam, the Marwan daughter Abha Mudira, now one of the most valued members of his broodmare band. The following year saw another Al Shahania representative on deck. Already a Spanish National Champion, Abha Raipur was shown by Byatt at Scottsdale in the


Cover Story International Show, where she won the title in the 3-, 4- and 5-Year-Old Mares class and then was selected Scottsdale International Senior Champion Mare. At Tulsa in October, she won the U.S. National Championship for 3-Year-Old Mares. Scottsdale 2011 also saw the show ring debut of Nada Al Shahania, whom Sheikh Mohammed had chosen when she was just a week old at Michael Byatt’s farm. She nailed reserve titles in the Scottsdale International Breeders Classic class for Yearling Fillies and the Junior Mare Championship. In the Junior Championship, she finished ahead of the yearling champion—but second to a flashy 2-year-old named A-Malaysia, shown by Greg Knowles. A-Malaysia would be the fourth on the stud’s list of primetime mares. Purchased after the Scottsdale Show, she was transferred to Byatt and later in the year was chosen U.S. National Top Ten 2-Year-Old Filly. Throughout those months, Al Shahania continued to develop its show string with a careful selection of bloodlines not only for competition, but also for its breeding program. In early 2011, the young stallion Barzan Al Shahania was acquired, which added trainer Greg Gallún to the Stud’s North American team. (Within a year, Gallún would show Barzan to the unanimous title of Gold Supreme Champion Junior Stallion at the Las Vegas World Cup.) In 2012, Al Shahania’s affinity for Marwan Al Shaqab has been reinforced as well, with the July purchase of Marwan CristalRCA. The 6-year-old mare, who is by Marwan and out of the Sshameless daughter Crysstell, is already a Brazilian National Champion and most recently was named Region 2 Champion Mare. She will be presented at the U.S. Nationals by Greg Gallún. And, of course, there is now Miss Marwan PA. “Miss Marwan is brilliant,” Byatt says of his newest partner. “She thinks beautifully; she’s very excited by everything. She’s a very happy horse, she’s dramatic with her tail, and she snorts and blows. She’s a really positive, energetic, happy, thoughtful, interested horse.” Not yet three years into the North American show scene, Al Shahania Stud has come out of the gate with an impressive record—and the farm is already taking aim on 2013. Byatt ticks through a list of candidates for next year’s show ring: ZT Magnajamara, out of the El Shaklan daughter ZT Shak Jamara that he showed to two Egyptian Event Supreme

Championships; ZT Faa’kalba, an 8-year-old mare who will come out in 2013; and Abha Raipur’s filly by Marwan Al Shaqab, also due to debut at Scottsdale in 2013. “It’s such an incredible privilege to get to live with, lead and be a part of the journey of these beautiful horses,” he says. “I’m grateful that generous people like Sheikh Mohammed have purchased them and allow me to work with them. As cheesy as that sounds, that’s the way I feel. It’s such a privilege to spend my days and go to horse shows with horses like this.” “We at Al Shahania Stud enjoy participating at the U.S. Nationals,” says Alexandra Newman. “We really hope to continue showing there in the future, and we thank our U.S. supporters. It has meant a great deal to us to have received so much support, and we hope that with our foal crops in the future, we are able to continue to please the public. “The sheikh has gotten a real taste for the show world,” she continues, “thanks to the kind reception we have had and to working with horsemen such as Michael Byatt and Greg Gallún—they’ve been very good mentors for us as we’ve become more involved in the show ring.” Both Miss Marwan PA and Marwan CristalRCA, as Marwan daughters, represent another consideration for Al Shahania Stud, she notes. Marwan Al Shaqab was bred and is owned by Al Shaqab Stud, which falls under the Qatar Foundation label today, but essentially is owned by HH the Emir of Qatar. So Marwan Al Shaqab and Al Shahania’s two 2012 U.S. National contenders—although they were both bred outside Qatar—all are representatives of their Qatari heritage. For now, the promising Miss Marwan PA has only to gear up for her future. “People ask me all the time, ‘What are we going to do to make these shows better?’” reflects Michael Byatt. “And I just say, ‘Fill up the ring with as many beautiful horses as possible. The competition itself will be so entertaining that people will be drawn to it.’ With horses like Miss Marwan PA in the ring, the Arabian horse competitions and shows will be better. “She’s made so many wonderful life experiences for everybody she’s been around so far,” he adds. “In such a short time on the planet Earth, she’s made so many people happy and better because she was born and they were blessed to have her.”  Volume 43, No. 4 | 7AA


8AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, No. 4 | 9AA


Presenting at the U.S. Nationals in Arabian Yearling Filly Halter

Miss Marwan PA Marwan Al Shaqab x Miss Amerika

Scottsdale Unanimous Yearling Filly Class Winner Scottsdale Reserve Junior Champion Filly unanimous Region Champion Filly

Handled By

Michael Byatt Arabians New Ulm, Texas 713.306.8345 www.MichaelByattArabians.com

10AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


conformation unaltered

Volume 43, No. 4 | 11AA


Presenting at the U.S. Nationals in Arabian Yearling Filly Halter

Badiaa Al Shahania (Marwan Al Shaqab x Majalis)

conformation unaltered

Handled By

Michael Byatt Arabians New Ulm, Texas 713.306.8345 www.MichaelByattArabians.com

12AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, No. 4 | 13AA


Where Pedigrees Matter! Red Neck cutie caNt Buy Me Love FLiRtacious FiRe PF Made you Look sF caRa Mia Hot HeiR PF suRFace to HeiR PF B WitcHed caBRioLet PF HF Luck Bea Lady Miz sHoW Biz dcisioNs dcisioNs PF sHes HigH MaiNteNaNce BLock BusteR PF guiLty PLeasuRes PF Hot PuRsuit PF good tiMe giRL PF HigH aNd teit PF esPioNage PF MaRcHiNg oRdeRs PF Red Hott MaMa

A Noble Cause

H/A

M

6/26/09

A Noble Cause x Sue Ebony

Arabian

M

7/04/03

Afire Bey V x Basks Genie

Arabian

M

3/01/10

Afire Bey V x PF Im Flattered

Arabian

M

3/13/01

Afire Bey V x Bold Love

Arabian

M

8/13/07

Afire Bey V x Spectra PR

Arabian

C

2/13/11

Afires Heir x A Blessing

Arabian

C

2/28/12

Afires Heir x Miz Show Biz

Arabian

M

4/02/04

Baske Afire x Gala De Cognac

Arabian

G

4/13/08

Baske Afire x Miz Margeurita V

Arabian

M

7/11/04

Baske Afire x Play Annies Song

Arabian

M

3/12/06

Baske Afire x MZ Kitty

Arabian

M

3/12/08

Baske Afire x Justice N Liberty

H/A

M

6/08/09

Baske Afire x She’s A High Roller

Arabian

G

5/27/11

Baskghazi x Afires Quintina

Arabian

M

3/13/12

Baskghazi x Barbarys Truelove

Arabian

C

4/13/11

Black Daniels x Harghazi Fire CMF

Arabian

M

6/05/10

Hucks Connection V x Goodie Two Shoes

H/A

G

5/20/10

Majesteit x Made You Look

Arabian

G

2/25/07

Mamage x Empress of Bask

Arabian

C

5/11/10

Mamage x Catt

Arabian

M

3/03/07

Mamage x Ames déjà vu

Afires Heir

Black Daniels

Afire Bey V

Baske Afire

Undulata’s Nutcracker

Visit us on Facebook. Check out the new videos of our sale horses. 14AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Majesteit


The Prestige Farms’ breeding program is well known for producing some of the finest performance horses in the country. From experience, we have learned which great bloodlines cross with our mares. We are proud to ffer talented Arabians and Half-Arabians with proven performance pedigrees full of the who’s who in the indsutry. Smalltown Satrdaynite eternity PF Great and noble PF invincibility PF md bellameSa noble dynaSty PF noble viSion PF cattatonic Shoc PF heat wave PF boom Shoca laca PF liGhtninG Jack PF deuceS wild PF draGon lady PF cracker Jax PF cracklin roSie PF SnickerS PF wyze cracker PF drivin me nutS PF PiStachio PF diva laS veGaz PF tommy bahama PF

MHR Nobility

Mamage

H/A

G

5/17/07

Arabian

M

2/17/11

Mamage x The Small Town Blues MHR Nobility x Harghazi Fire CMF

Arabian

C

3/28/10

MHR Nobility x HF Luck Bea Lady

Arabian

C

6/08/09

MHR Nobility x A Blessing

Arabian

M

4/08/07

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Arabian

C

5/14/09

MHR Nobility x A Blessing

Arabian

M

3/18/10

MHR Nobility x Neveah W

Arabian

G

2/10/10

SF Specs Shocwave x Catt

Arabian

M

5/07/08

SF Specs Shocwave x Afires Quintina

H/A

M

5/16/09

SF Specs Shocwave x Lady Machine

Arabian

G

5/01/09

The Nobelest x Made You Look

H/A

G

2/27/09

The Nobelest x Baby I’m A Star

H/A

M

3/17/09

The Nobelest x A Lady At Heart

H/A

G

5/10/11

Undulata’s Nutcracker x Made You Look

H/A

M

4/15/11

Undulata’s Nutcracker x MWF Elzbieta

H/A

M

2/17/11

Undulata’s Nutcracker x B Witched

H/A

G

6/17/08

Undulata’s Nutcracker x Bint Bokara

H/A

C

4/04/11

Undulata’s Nutcracker x Made You Look

H/A

M

4/02/11

Undulata’s Nutcracker x VTM Pistachia

Arabian

M

5/16/11

Vegaz x Miz Margeurita V

Arabian

C

2/25/10

Vegaz x A Blessing

Vegaz

SF Specs Shocwave

The Nobelest

Baskghazi

Call for sales list and dVd ... better yet, Come see them in person!

Irwin Schimmel • 360-256-9432 • Cell: 503-367-4997 • P.O. Box 814, Hillsboro, Oregon 97123 Volume 43, No. 4 | 15AA


S a n d r o

P i n h a

&

G i l

V a l d e z


Arabians

International by Mary Kirkman


Ask Sandro Pinha and Gil Valdez about their personal histories in the Arabian horse industry, and they shy away from the question. This is about their clients, they say. It’s the horses and the customers that are important. But that’s really no problem; talk to their clients, and you can learn a lot about Pinha and Valdez. A picture emerges of two horsemen whose basic values of hard work, integrity and talent have built an operation that attracts longterm clients. They have fun, the customers say, and they win their fair share—but there is so much more to it than winning. Amazingly, despite an outstanding record in competition—the list of successful Arabians they have presented is plenty long enough to put them at the top of their profession—much of what clients and friends appreciate most about Sandro and Gil resides outside the show ring. The best thing about having a horse at Arabians International, several say, is the trainers’ honesty, followed closely by their communication skills. Then Sandro in particular is cited for his ability to evaluate a horse’s potential, and customers know that Gil is sharp at spotting talent. Gil is also declared absolutely the best at nutrition and overall horse care (“He did all of the conditioning on Magnum Psyche. Enough said there!” David Boggs says), even though he now spends more time training and they both direct the program of care. The integrity issue is one of long standing. “The most important thing is, these guys are honest. That’s all I’ve heard from everybody and that’s been our experience,” says Lucky Lurken, who with his wife, Raegen, has known Pinha and Valdez 2 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

since the trainers’ early days at Midwest. Gil prepared the Lurkens’ horses, and Sandro showed several to national championships. “In any type of a deal you do, I would trust them explicitly,” Lurken says. “I know that they’re not going to do anything that’s not on the up-andup—ever. My respect for both of them is over the rainbow.”

Who They Are At this point, Sandro Pinha and Gil Valdez’s backgrounds have been well publicized in the Arabian community; Sandro grew up in Brazil, Gil in Mexico. Both loved horses, and they met in the mid-1990s at Midwest, where Sandro got his first big break showing the training center’s powerhouse show string when David Boggs was unavailable. In the meantime, Gil had been named manager of the training program there


and had emerged as one of the accomplished conditioners in the Arabian industry. Midwest was a learning experience that both remain grateful for today, but eventually, they were bound for careers on their own. They found them in Scottsdale, where Sandro became known for his work with North Arabians’ International Training Center and Gil headed All Stars Arabians before finally, in March 2010, they opened Arabians International together. Through the years, for an array of clients (many of whom are still with them today), they handled some of the finest horses in the industry, among them S Justadream, Legacy Of Fame, Magnum Chall HVP, Lethyf Falconesse, BHF Dark Angel, Legacys Renoir, Shutup And Dance, and many more. Since they founded Arabians International, that list has grown exponentially, with such

names as El Nabila B, Grand Commandd, El Chall WR, He Be Showy DFA, Cavalli, RD Challs Angel, Freedom PA, and more. Their international marketing contacts and showing commitments are worldwide, including North and South America, Europe, the Middle East and other areas. The result is a full-service operation, complete with an amateur program, that is home to one of the most successful marketing programs in the business today. Their success, clients say, rests on their overall approach. “It’s important to us that our horses have the care and preparation,” notes Bob North. “The show ring is only a percentage of their time.” “In the beginning, I knew that Gil was a good horseman, a very caring horseman,” says Bob Battaglia, who kept halter horses at Midwest and remains a friend. “The horses came first, and that’s why I was very happy that he was taking care of mine; I knew that there would be nothing that would slip under the wire. Since then, I think he’s become not only an accomplished horseman, but also a great showman. I met Sandro in Brazil, and I thought right from the very first that he was extremely talented. Again, the first concern was that he knew his horses and how to take care of them.” According to Gil, their formula is simple. “You learn their personalities and what they need,” he relates. “Every one of the horses are different; they’re not on the same schedule. You learn about them.” He adds that even Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 3


for professional trainers, both he and Sandro spend a lot of time in the barn. Mike Weinstein, a member of the partnership which owned El Nabila B when the stallion was named national champion in 2010, says it is about more than just knowing the horses—although that is a great part of it; a trainer has to know everything about competition too. “The very top guys out there, and there is a handful of those, are successful for a reason,” he says. “They have an idea of the type of horse that will be successful at a particular show and the type of presentation that will be favorable with the judges (if they don’t want a hard show or, say, a mature look, you have to be aware of that). And you have to be very knowledgeable about what it takes to get a horse looking its best. Not everyone can do that. There’s a talent at getting horses where they need to be. “There is the psychological part too,” he continues. “If the horse has had psychological issues, you have to be able to have thoughts on how you can get around that, so that the horse can appear happier and enjoy it more than they have in the past. An older horse can be tough to show because he’s seen everything. I know Sandro puts in a tremendous amount of time because he’s serious about training the horses. He tries to get the horses prepared so that when they hit the ring and have those few brief moments, they look the part. That takes a lot of time and energy, and you need to do the schooling yourself and get to know the horses.” In Weinstein’s case, that knowledge was critical to El Nabila B’s winning the national championship. “He was happy,” the owner says. “Sandro didn’t push him. He brought out the best in him.” 4 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

The horses’ comfort level in the ring is no accident, Valdez observes. Just as the key to conditioning is figuring out what each horse needs, so too is developing a horse’s talent at showing. That is part of what works at Arabians International. “We’re very involved with how the individual horses think and how they act and what makes them happy,” he says. “You have to do what they like, so that when they go into the arena, they are happy to do it and they can enjoy being show horses. It makes our lives easier when they enjoy what they do.”

Beyond The Show Ring Paralleling Pinha and Valdez’s work in the show ring has been their success in marketing. “They have established a training, showing and marketing facility to equal any in the world,” says Judy Schmid, who with her husband, Ron, has known Sandro and Gil since the Midwest days. Sandro showed Legacy Of Fame for them, and Gil showed the stallion’s first Scottsdale champion, Legacys Renoir.


“They truly are Arabians International,” she says. “They have marketed horses that we have owned or bred to South America, Australia, Europe, the Middle East and the U.S.A.” Among them were Guiliano, who went to Australia; Legacys Rosina, sold to the United Arab Emirates; and recently, Gemini VII, purchased by an owner in Saudi Arabia. The Schmids, who have been in Arabians since 1978 and once rode in distance competitions, also send qualified youngsters to Arabians International. “We understand genotype and phenotype, and using a combination of those to improve your mare,” Judy notes. “We don’t take them anything that doesn’t have potential.” “Sandro and Gil make a great team,” offers client Dean Wikel. He and his wife, Terri, have been in Arabians since 1990; in “six or eight” years with Sandro and Arabians International, they have collaborated on such horses as Cavalli, Freedom PA,

Miss Amerika, RD Challs Angel, and Fadila PCF. Sandro arranged the purchase of some of their favorite Arabians, and facilitated the sales of Cavalli and Troubadour PA to the Middle East. “It’s been kind of a natural fit for us,” Wikel says, “because we’re in it to have fun and try to make a little money along the way—breed quality Arabians, prepare, train and market them. And they’ve been instrumental. Sandro has a great following from other countries; he’ll get on a plane and fly 15 or 20 hours to show horses for someone on the other end, and while he’s there, he’ll meet with four or five others who want to do business with him. That’s very important for people in the U.S. He’s getting a network that he is able to work with throughout the whole Arabian world.”

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 5


Bob North, who with his wife, Dixie, remained a client after Pinha left the North facility, agrees. “Sandro has a good relationship with clients in the Middle East,” he says. “He shows there for several people, and he is a Brazilian, so he has a lot of contacts there. And over the past few years, in conjunction with Gil, a lot of clients have been developed in Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia, and places like that who are new players. They have a wide variety of clientele, some of which are recent entries into the Arabian industry.” Another quality at Arabians International that gets high marks is top-flight communication. Sandro and Gil not only return telephone calls; they initiate them. “People want to know what’s going on,” Sandro comments. “Good or bad news, they want to hear—especially bad news. Anybody can call you and tell you how great things are. When things are not so good, that’s when people appreciate being told what’s going on.” 6 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

That’s just part of good business sense, Bob North says. “Sandro is one who I think has done a very good job in business, with no real formal training. It’s just his inherent personality and logical thinking.” Perhaps that relates to the honesty issue; it may be a personal trait, but it is good for business. “The thing I probably like the most is they don’t give you smoke and mirrors,” Dean Wikel says. “Sandro will just tell you either ‘you don’t have a chance so don’t waste your money,’ or he really wants your horse. Sometimes it’s hard for you to swallow, if you were thinking your horse is better than it really is, but he’s being truthful in telling you that your goal is probably not going to be met. “I probably like that almost as much as I like going there—and I really like going there!” he smiles. “When we go up to Arabians International, we’re entertained. There is always something going on, and you feel like you’re their best client. I think every one of their clients would say the same thing. You all feel like you’re more than a client.


“I don’t need to feel important or have anybody make me feel that way,” he adds. “But yet, isn’t it nice that you’re not taken for granted?” “They see the big picture,” says Mike Weinstein, and explains, “They know that if we don’t do well, we won’t be around.” On paper, that sounds a lot more forceful than he meant it, but Weinstein has been in Arabians long enough to have seen many people come and go. His family got into the breed in the 1970s as Aries Arabians, and was known for campaigning, among others, the 1982 U.S. National Champion Mare Kajora (“the most influential mare in the world,” he muses now, since she went on to be the dam of Gazal Al Shaqab and granddam of Marwan Al Shaqab). Today he owns horses in partnership with Jean Edwards, an association that goes back to Aries days, and Arturo Uribe and Christopher Zubiate. Winning is only part of the game, he points out; buying, selling and the social aspect of Arabian horses are all part of the experience. One of the things he appreciates about Arabians International is that Sandro and Gil, who both show for his partnership, not only win in the ring, but are free with their time in less-heralded

ways as well. “They both love to entertain,” he says, “and that’s important. In this business, only one person is going to win a class, so if you don’t make the whole experience fun, people aren’t going to stay interested very long. This year at Scottsdale, we were all at Sandro and Gil’s house; two of my partners did the cooking two nights for all the customers—there were 35 or 40 people there— and it was a great experience. Instead of being in a restaurant, we all spent four or five hours together and got to see some horses and talk and meet people. “That’s what makes the difference,” he continues. “When you don’t win, then it’s about lifestyle, and they do a very good job at that. The show is fun—I enjoy that part of it—but the camaraderie is wonderful. A trainer has to be more than just a trainer; you have to be a friend and hand-holder for these people through good and bad times. You have to keep people involved, and make it a fun experience.”

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 7


In the end, many friends and clients agree, Arabians International has been all about that formula of work, honesty, talent, and personality. Success and respect have followed naturally. “Midwest is proud of both Sandro and Gil, having given them their start in the Arabian horse business in the United States,” says former employer David Boggs. “I think they are two of the hardest working young people in the country today. Their horses look fantastic; the proof is in the pudding. Their success shows that the harder you work, the luckier you get. They’ve been blessed with a great group of horses.” Rohara’s Roxann Hart sees it professionally. “I like the fact that a high profile halter trainer visits Rohara for their top competitive stock,” she says. “They bought two weanlings from me last year and took them both to regional championships. They are people that I love to sell my good horses to because they move them forward. They will campaign them to their best abilities, and carrying the Rohara name, that’s a great source of interest for me as a breeder.” She smiles at a memory from 2003. “And I particularly have to thank Sandro for doing all the finish schooling on Rohara Allure, and then working with me to show her to unanimous national champion amateur mare.” Brazil’s Salim Mattar, of Haras Sahara, appreciates the complete nature of Arabians International and Sandro Pinha, whom he has known best since he got into 8 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

the breed. “He is one of the best Arabian horses handlers today, not just in the U.S. market but in the whole world,” says Mattar. “He has a strong track record of victories in the ring. And he’s very polite—he’s always available to help Arabian horse breeders. He receives all of us, his friends and customers, with great pleasure at his stud in Scottsdale.”   Through the years, Sandro has had the higher profile in the show ring, while Gil has been known more for his quiet talent making everything happen. That is changing, clients say, as Gil’s work in competition has become more recognized. It is not, many say, about ramping up the talent at the operation; it is about a proper distribution of credit. Both trainers deserve it.


treat the horses well. You can work with them. They’re good friends as well as excellent horse people. Their hearts are in their work.”

“Sandro and Gil have formed a great union in Arabians International,” Bob Battaglia says. That he is happy for them is clear in his tone. “I look for them to just keep growing, and do bigger and better things in the future.” “We respect their horsemanship so much,” Judy Schmid nods. “They both can show, and they

“It started out being about the horses and then it evolved into a friendship for me and my wife,” Lucky Lurken says. “I’ll bet I talk to Sandro two or three times a week— about everything, not just about horses. Same with Gil. Business-wise, what they have done is incredible, in my opinion. I think they are good people, and beyond the horses, they’re two of my best friends in the world.” He pauses and then adds, “Sandro and Gil came to our country to work. They’re great people, and they’re great horse people besides; that’s just a plus. They’ve made our country a better place.” n

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 9


Perfection of beauty and quality from every angle ...

Sire of the most coveted show horses in the world

10 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


United States Canadian &Brazilian National Champion Stallion

HVP

Magnum Psyche x Taamara HVP SCID & CA Clear Multi-Program Nominated Sire Proudly owned by Lucky & Raegen Lurken, USA Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 11


Darryl Larson photo

12 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Exotic in any Language

U.S. & Brazilian National Champion Stallion

LEFT TO RIGHT

ROHARA SOPHISTICATE El Nabila B x MFA Choclate Lilly, by Magic Dream Region 3 Champion Yearling Filly Owned by Arabian Park Arabians JULIA ROBERTS El Nabila B x Rohara Psultry, by Padrons Psyche Region 8 Champion Yearling Filly Owned by Nancy Allen Roberts DIYA FORX El Nabila B x Pocahontas K, by Borsalino K Owned by Hennessey Arabians

Kubinec x 213 Elf Layla Walayla B, by Assad Multi-Program Nominated Sire SCID & CA Clear Owned by El Nabilia Initiative, USA Michael Weinstein • 408.307.6436 Standing at Om El Arab International Santa Ynez, California 805.688.6958 • 805.490.6810 Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 13


14 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


The quality epics are made from ...

2012 Scottsdale International Bronze Stallion 2012 Region 3 Reserve Champion Stallion 2011 U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Colt Arbiteur x WN Deja Vu SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by Armir Partners, USA Dan and Suzanne Acevedo, Managers 208-760-0816 • acevedoarabians@hotmail.com Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 15


2012 Region 8 Unanimous Champion

16 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

Stallion


SW

Marwan Al Shaqab x Fantastica HVP SCID & CA Clear

U.S. National 5-Year-Old Stallions

Proudly owned by Eyad Abdullah Mashat Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 17


18 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Gazal Al Shaqab x Veronica GA, by Versace

SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by Arabian Soul Partners Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 19


U.S. National Reserve Champion *Sir Fames HBV x Entaicyng NA

In t e r n a t io n a l Ch a mp io n

Multi-Program Nominated Sires SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by Robert & Dixie North, USA 20655 Sutherland Dam Rd., Ramona, CA 92065 Breeding Manager Mike McNally 760.789.3208 Robert North 619.992.9832 www.northarabians.com Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly 20 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Bernier

*Magnum Chall HVP x Major Love Affair


Bernier

Las Vegas World Cup Supreme Gold Champion Yearling Colt

Beijing BHF x GA Mi Grandlady, by Minotaur+

U.S. National Yearling Colts

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 21


Magnum Chall HVP x Bey Unforgettable by Bey Shah

U.S. National Futurity Colts

2012 Region 7 Champion Stallion 2012 Las Vegas World Cup Champion 3-Yr-Old Stallion

2011 Scottsdale Champion 2-Yr-Old Colt 2011 Scottsdale Signature 2-Yr-Old Champion Colt 2011 Champion Region 7 Champion 2-Yr-Old Colt

SCID & CA Clear Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by Pegasus Arabians Dean & Terri Wikel, Berlin Heights, OH, USA 419.588.3000 • www.PegasusArabians.com 22 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Legacy Of Fame x Precious Legacy, by Legacy Of Fame

Danica VII 2012 Region 7 Reserve Champion Yearling Filly

Sired by Gemini VII:

Darryl

2010 Region 3 champion Stallion 2010 Las Vegas World Cup Res Champion 3-Year-Old Stallion 2010 U.S. National Topt Ten Futurity Colt 2011 Region 7 Reserve Champion Stallion 2012 Region 1 Champion Stallion

ser i o u s I n qu ir ie s a r e we l c o m e fo r d i scr i m ina t ing b uy e r s SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by Eyad Abdullah Mashat Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Ayat Hammad 2012 Region 1 Champion 2-Year-Old Filly 2012 Region 1 Champion Mare ATH Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 23


El Nabila B x Pocohantas K, by Borsalino K Co-Entry of Psynergy Equine & Hennessey Arabians, USA Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly 24 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324


* U.S. National Senior Mares

Darryl Larson photo

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 25


National Champion

Magnum Psyche x Kishaj, by MS Santana

U.S. National Senior Mares Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by Suzanne Acevedo 26 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

U.S. National Reserve Champion Senior Mare 2012 Region 3 Champion Mare


Breeders’ Finals Senior Mares

JM

National Champion Style SRA x Llana Van Ryad Proudly owned by Arabian Soul Parnters

In foal to th e C h am pion m aker W H Ju stice for 2013 Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 27


A rabi ans Soul Partners proudly i ntroduces ...

darryl

SW El Marwan x OFW Heaven Sent

darryl

El Nabila B x Om El Beladeena

Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly bred and owned by Arabian Soul Parnters 28 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

See them at t he Arabi an Breed er s’ World Cup Las Vegas 20 1 3


avalon

darryl

U . S . N atio n a l 3 -Y ea r -Ol d Ma res & Futuri ty Fi lli es

Justify x Lady Zoe Hadidi

2010 Las Vegas World Cup Class Champion Yearling filly 2012 Las Vegas World Cup Class Champion 3-Year-Old filly 2012 Region 1 Champion Mare

Proudly bred and owned by Celestial Arabians Daneisha Brazzle - cell 562-712-8683 celestialarabians@gmail.com www.celestialarabs.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 29


Regal Actor JP x Bey Angel TGS, by Shahllenger

Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by MC Arabians Hector & Jorge Flores


WCF

2012 National Champion

Marwan Al Shaqab x RA Sheiklani Proudly owned by MC Arabians Hector, Jorge & Miguel Flores Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 31


32 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Making his debut at Arabian Breeders Finals, Scottsdale

Stallion Halter Legacy Of Fame x Shaffira Minnesota Breeders Medallion Stallion Scottsdale Futurity Stallion SCID & CA Clear Proudly owned by Rolyn and Judy Schmid, U.S.A 715.558.3263 Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

s e r io u s In q uir ie s a re welcom e for discrim in atin g bu yers

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 33


Sir Fames HBV x Bey Starrlett WLF

Mu lti-C h am pion

bernier

In foal to P olish Nation al C h am pion P ogrom for 2013

Marauderr x Gai Schara, by Bey Shah Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by Arabian Park Arabians

Region 7 reserve Champion 2-Year-Old Filly


Region 3 Champion Yearling Filly El Nabila B x MFA Choclate Lily, by Magic Dream Proudly owned by Arabian Park Arabians

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 35


Gemini VII x SC Psavannah

darryl

Region 7 Reserve Champion Yearling Filly

Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by Dazzo Arabians LLC 36 Arabians International | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


3x National Champion Magnum Chall HVP x NV Gypsy Dancer

Owned by Arabians International On lease to Dazzo Arabians

5x National Champion Showkayce x She Be Noble

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 37


El Chall WR x Psyches Princess, by Padrons Psyche

Region 3 Unanimous Champion Yearling Colt

Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly bred and owned by Willms Arabians, USA JoAnn Wilms • 970.396.1893

seriou s In qu iries are welcom e for discri mi nati ng buyers


Cavalli

Bint Chall CE

Sweepstakes Scottsdale Signature U.S. Futurities and Iowa Gold Star 2013 Auction Colt

Cavalli x Bint Chall Proudly owned by Chuck and Erin Hansen

Volume 43, No. 4 | Arabians International 39


Magnum Forty Four x Sahtarah, by Sahjat

S c o t t s d a l e In t e r n ation al R e s e rv e C hampion 2 -Y r -Old Colt L a s V e g a s Wo rld Cu p To p f iv e 2 -Y r -Old Colt

se r io u s In q u ir ie s a r e we l c o m e f o r d is c r im in a t ing bu yers Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly

480.226.0001 480.226.7357 480.266.3324

Proudly owned by Mulawa Arabian Stud Berrilee, NSW, 2159 Australia Phone: +61 2 9655 1578 Email: info@mulawaarabians.com.au

www.mulawaarabians.com.au


Photography by Emma Maxwell Design by mickĂŠandoliver

Thank you to Sandro Pinha for his great success with Oula Al Jassimya, Champion Filly, Region 2, Santa Barbara and Bronze Champion Filly at the ABWC in Las Vegas.

by Marwan al Shaqab x El Sanadika IA by Sanadik el Shaklan


Your Next WiNNer Is Just A Click Away

Online Horse Auction

November 9-19, 2012

Now

acceptiNg coNsigNmeNts

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your sales rep today !

Karen Fell 612-816-2940 karenf@ahtimes.com

58AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Trainers: Chris and Nicole Hall 480.495.6555 w

w

w .

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k

Owners: Ray and Lynn Price 570.350.0260 L

e

d

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e

A

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Barn Manager: Terry Steckel 570.242.0076 b

i

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m Volume 43, No. 4 | 59AA


ZA MAGNUMOISELLE MTC+/ Magnum Psyche x Affluent Affair H/A Hunter Pleasure AATR Select with Megan Weiler & Open with Nicole Hall 3x National Champion halter mare now wearing irons! Proudly owned by Megan & Carolyn Weiler

GREYHAWK CW+ ML Mostly Padron x Falcon Song BHF Arabian Ladies Sidesaddle Western & Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 with Megan Weiler Arabian Western Pleasure AATR Select with Irene Pashtenko Multi-National Top Ten & Regional Champion 2012 Unanimous East Coast Champion AATR & AATR Select Rider Proudly owned by Megan & Carolyn Weiler

60AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


HALAN CAIRO+/ Bengal Bay x Kamaria H/A Western Pleasure AATR Select with Sheila Curley H/A Western Pleasure Open with Chris Hall 2011 Region 15 & 16 Champion H/A Western Pleasure Open 2012 Region 16 & East Coast Championships Reserve Champion H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR

Janson photo

Proudly owned by Sheila & Jenna Curley

KAPTN BRAVADO Bravado Bey V x Ronette B H/A Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Ray Price National Reserve Champion H/A Country Pleasure Select & National Top Ten Junior Horse Multi-Regional Champion

Proudly owned by Ray or Lynn Price

Volume 43, No. 4 | 61AA


GUINEVERE RL *Khadraj NA x Galoreus RL Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Ray Price Arabian Western Pleasure Open with Chris Hall 2010 U.S. & Canadian National Top Ten JTR & AAOTR 36-54 2012 Unanimous East Coast Champion AATR 2012 Region 15 Reserve Champion AATR and Open Proudly owned by Ray or Lynn Price

ROCK-N-REFLECTION RL Reflection RL x Rockin Pep Hancock H/A Western Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 & Maturity with Ray Price H/A Western Pleasure Junior Horse with Chris Hall 2012 East Coast Unanimous Champion H/A Western Pleasure AATR 2012 East Coast Unanimous Champion H/A Western Pleasure Junior Horse Proudly owned by Ray & Lynn Price

62AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


ROCKETTE RL Reflection RL x Rockin Pep Hancock H/A Hunter Pleasure Futurity with Nicole Hall Region 16 Champion H/A Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse 2012 Region 15 Top Five H/A Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse Proudly owned by Ray & Lynn Price

JASON ELJAMAL RL Jullyen El Jamaal x Gracious RL Hunter Pleasure AATR Select with Megan Weiler Hunter Pleasure Open with Nicole Hall Region 15 Champion Hunter Pleasure AATR Region 16 & East Coast Championships Reserve Champion Hunter Pleasure Open

Proudly owned by Ray or Lynn Price

Volume 43, No. 4 | 63AA


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Volume 43, No. 4 | 91AA


92AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, No. 4 | 93AA


ferrara

Multi-National, Scottsdale & Regional Champion • Multi-Program Nominated Sire • SCID Clear Standing at Strand’s Arabian Stables, 3625 Alice Rd, Toddville, IA 52341 319.393.4816 • mobile 319.360.5997 • info@strandsarabians.com • www.Strandsarabians.com 94AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


ferrara

Sundance Kid V x Pattrice

Proudly owned by Laura Koch & Bert Sanders

Volume 43, No. 4 | 95AA


Faces & Places Va r ia n A r abia n s Su m mer Jubi le e

T

he annual Varian Arabians Summer Jubilee, held at the ranch in Arroyo Grande, Calif., is always a much-anticipated stop for lovers of the Arabian horse. Held August 3-5, 2012, it attracted more than 200 participants for a look at the Varian Collection horses available for purchase, as well as an array of educational seminars, great food, and a concert by three-time Western Music Association Entertainer of the Year, Dave Stamey. This year’s seminars included a new speaker—Christy Egan, of Arabian Horse Global, discussing “The Arabian Horse International Market is on the Internet”—and popular veteran Mike Perez, who offered “Helpful Hints the Varian Way.” The event’s special guest was renowned horseman Eitan BethHalachmy, who demonstrated Cowboy Dressage™, horsemanship based on understanding, patience and partnership with the horse. And finally, there was Varian’s legendary Sunday morning Mare Walk, which one attendee described as like “swimming with dolphins.” Over the weekend, Collection horses were sold to buyers in several states and Canada. The Summer Jubilee appeals both to prospective buyers and to owners and fans serious about improving their horsemanship. Mark your calendars for next year’s event, scheduled for August 2-4, 2013!

➔➔ For latest news and events visit www.ahtimes.com 96AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Success Reflects Effort Vicki HumpHrey Training cenTer Canton, GA 770.740.8432 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 97aa


Bonfire rof

ArAbiAn Country English PlEAsurE ChAmPionshiP AAotr 55 & ovEr with l.A. Flynn ArAbiAn Country English PlEAsurE ChAmPionshiP with viCki humPhrEy

Owned by L.A. Flynn

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 98AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


SF AFTERShOC

ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER CHAMPIONSHIP wITH L.A. FLyNN ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE CHAMPIONSHIP ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING CHAMPIONSHIP wITH VICkI HUMPHREy Owned by L.A. Flynn

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 99AA


miSteR Bigg

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 36-54 CHAMPIONSHIP wITH LORI FOSTER ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE CHAMPIONSHIP wITH JESSICA CLINTON

Sammantha RoSe HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER CHAMPIONSHIP wITH LORI FOSTER

Owned by Lori Foster www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 100AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


HC Boisterous

Available for purchase at Nationals

" d u p S " a k a

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE SELECT AATR CHAMPIONSHIP wITH DEAN STANkOvIC Also look for Dean in Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Select AATR with vSH Cosmopolitan owned by Mary Earle

Owned by Dean Stankovic

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 101AA


J A M u s tA f i r e

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER CHAMPIONSHIP wITH ART BARTLET

Owned by Art Bartlet

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 102AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Brass Betty

ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR MATURITY CHAMPIONSHIP wITH ART BARTLET ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE JUNIOR HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP wITH JESSICA CLINTON Owned by Art Bartlet

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 103AA


Ice

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH SHOW HACK AAOTR CHAMPIONSHIP HALF-ARABIAN LADIES SIDE SADDLE CHAMPIONSHIP HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH SHOW HACK CHAMPIONSHIP WITH LESLIE GARvIS

Owned by Leslie Garvis

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 104AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Khitty hawK

HALF-ARABIAN ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 40 & OVER CHAMPIONSHIP wITH LESLIE GARVIS

Owned by Leslie Garvis

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 105AA


pa f H o l ly w o o d T o i

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE CHAMPIONSHIP wITH JESSICA CLINTON

Owned by Vickie Lau

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 106AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Afire Siren

Available for purchase at Nationals

HALF-ARABIAN ENgLIsH PLEAsuRE JuNIoR HoRsE CHAmPIoNsHIP WItH JEssICA CLINtoN

Owned by Vicki Humphrey

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 107AA


Baske afireBall

HALF-ARABIAN COUNTRY ENGLISH PLEASURE AAOTR 55 & OVER CHAMPIONSHIP wITH L.A. FLYNN

Owned by L.A. Flynn

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 108AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


SA RApid FiRe

HALF-ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING CHAMPIONSHIP WItH JESSICA CLINtON HALF-ARABIAN PLEASURE DRIVING AAOtD CHAMPIONSHIP WItH L.A. FLyNN Owned by L.A. Flynn

Success Reflects Effort Volume 43, No. 4 | 109AA


S u m m e r T e m p TaT i o n

Available for purchase at Nationals

ArAbiAn English PlEAsurE Junior horsE ChAmPionshiP with JEssiCA Clinton Owned by Vicki Humphrey

www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com 110AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


SaleS offeringS

Summer Temptation

RA Sonofapreachrman

FSF Marwans Roshan

A Noble Gesture

SUMMER TEMPTATION (A Temptation x CL Summer Heat) 2007 • She has a great mind, is eager to please and has strong, cadenced, high trotting motion! Can be seen at Nationals. STAARDOM (Baske Afire x All Staar) 2004 • 2011 Unanimous Buckeye Champion JOTR. Big English horse with a long, upright neck, making it effortless to bridle. Tons of presence with a show horse attitude. LV SPRINGLOADED (Maple Hills Hot Spots x Chase the Clouds) 2000 • Wonderful Amateur or Youth horse, does unparalleled equitation work. Staardom

LETS TALK TRASH BF (Mamage x Movie Maker) 2008 • “Lucy” is a promising young Country horse with a proven heritage. She has a good work ethic, is well-balanced, easy to bridle, and has beautiful motion! Undefeated first show season, including Region 14 Champion.

An Encore

RA SONOFAPREACHRMAN (Revival x Afire Love VF) 2005 National Reserve Champion, spectacular son of Revival! Flashy and fun. FSF MARWANS ROSHAN (Marwan Al Shaqab x Enchantingly Shai) 2005 • A stunning combination of quality and motion. Has won in both Country and Hunter.

Lv Springloaded

A NOBLE GESTURE (MHR Nobility x Sultan’s Captive Lady) 2003 • Huge trot, tons of hock and lots of forward, but gentle enough for the greenest rider.

AGF A Major Surprize

AN ENCORE (Aploz+// x WS Fandango) 2002 • Encore is sure to take any Amateur to the winners circle! AGF A MAJOR SURPRIZE (A Major Fire x Ocean View) 2001 National Champion Country horse, ready for an Amateur or Youth rider. EXCELS HIGH FASHION (AE Excel x My All Time High) 2002 National Champion Park Horse offered for sale. Ready for a Youth or Amateur rider. Can be seen at Nationals.

Lets Talk Trash BF

Vicki HumpHrey Training cenTer Canton, GA 770.740.8432 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com

Excels High Fashion

Volume 43, No. 4 | 111aa


the

Reversing

Trend

112AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


T

his month’s panel of obser vers weighing in on the top of how to reverse the dec line of Arabian horse registrations is stellar. All three—Roxann Hart, Bob North and Sheila Varian—breed and show Arabian horses, and Varian has trained as well. Their horses have participated in just about ever y activity open to Arabians, and together, they represent more than 130 years of experience in the breed. Here is what AHT asked: How do we create a better market—bring more people into the Arabian breed, so that there is substantial demand for horses? W hat can AHA do to help make that happen? And here is what they answered.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 113AA


ReveRsing The TRend

Reversing The Trend Roxann HaRt Rohara Arabians Orange Lake, Fla.

to the price of gas. There is also the additional financial burden of nomination fees and costs associated with futurities that the industry places on breeders in order for them to succeed.

roxann Hart acquired her first Arabian in 1959 and began breeding in 1968. Her program, now in its fifth generation, has produced multiple Arabian and HalfArabian national champions, both in in-hand and performance competitions. she has exported horses to 17 countries around the world, including europe, the middle east, Australia and south America, where they have shown successfully to national honors. significant stallions standing at rohara through the years have included ivanhoe Tsultan, bay-el-bey (on lease from Varian Arabians), Justafire DGL, JK Amadeus, Good Thunder, Qr marc, and el nabila b. Hart was awarded UseF’s ellen scripps Davis memorial breeders Cup Award in 2010. When we try to come up with solutions to increase the number of registrations in Arabians, i think the first thing to do is examine the situation for Arabian breeders and horse owners today. breeders. before we even look at demand (who is buying horses and why), we have to see who is breeding Arabians (supply) and why they may or may not be producing foals. obviously, the biggest factor in why fewer Arabians are being bred is the cost involved. if breeders can’t make a profit, few of them will continue in business. basic costs have increased dramatically for today’s breeder. Among other things, the cost of feed has gone up for a variety of reasons, from the market for grain

114AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

i want to make it clear: in my opinion, one of the few exciting venues in our breed today is the array of futurity programs that have been established, and i support them wholeheartedly. They are one way that breeders and exhibitors get to see the results of their efforts. As a past vice chairman of region 12’s spotlight program, i certainly can testify to the value of futurities—the spotlight is one of the show schedule’s most rewarding events. it is a match made in heaven for our regional


ReveRsing The TRend for your employees to sleep and feed rooms—all at $300 show, it has kept the show’s entries up, and it has each, in addition to the stalls for the horses. tremendously encouraged amateur participation. It is part of what keeps Region 12 among the largest in the One reason it is important that we need to make country, and it helps maintain the growth and stature showing easier and more affordable is that we have to of the Arabian horse in our area. Not to mention, it is not only keep the highly competitive—a breeders breeding win there means a lot! horses and attract All that said, we need to he firsT Thing To do is new owners, but also recognize that as they we have to retain the are now, futurities are examine The siTuaTion for owners we have now costly for the breeder. when their current Futurity funding comes rabian breeders and horse horses age out. And mainly from nomination owners Today the clock is ticking, fees and the proceeds because the Arabian of their stallion service show horse population auctions, all of which are –Roxann Hart financed by the stallion in this country is aging. and mare owners. So, I believe that we need to Suggestions. One devote more attention point that nobody has to broadening the base of funding for our futurities with hit on (that I’m aware of ) is that we need to investigate more sponsorships from outside of the horse community. a stronger lobbying effort in Washington, D.C. The old saying, “The squeaky wheel gets the grease” is true. In short, if we want more people to breed Arabians, we We have the American Horse Council (AHC), which have to realize that we can’t keep passing more and more lobbies for the equine industry as a whole, and we need costs on to them when there is no certainty that they to make use of it. In my opinion, we need to look at will produce one of the superstar foals that generates a what other industries are doing to obtain government profit for their business as a whole. support and work with the AHC to see what is possible for horses. Owners/Exhibitors. We also have to take into account what it costs to show an Arabian horse. Because costs According to the AHC’s latest study (2005), the horse have gone up for showing, it is harder for most owners industry’s direct economic impact on the U.S. economy to attend as many shows as they might like. I believe it is is $39 billion, and it supports 1.4 million full-time positive that we see some of our horse shows combining. jobs. If you include “indirect” and “induced” spending, When my husband, Karl, was president of our club in the economic impact rises to $102 billion. We hear Florida, they put on back-to-back shows that were very of subsidies for many segments of the agricultural successful because they were so much more economical. industry—why not horses? Marion County, where Now, we’re finally seeing the double qualifiers where Rohara is located, has been called “the horse capital exhibitors can show in two shows and get a lot of of the world.” I’ve been told that the horse population qualification points for much less money. Because of here (all breeds) has decreased by 50 percent over the either the economics or the lack of horses, past two years. That sounds like an industry that needs I think we will soon be seeing many of the regional help to me, so in my opinion, we should see what can be shows consolidated. legislated in our direction. Tax breaks, perhaps? We are an agricultural entity. Why should we not have writeThe U.S. Nationals is a case in point of where we need offs on the other agricultural products, such as grain, to consider the exhibitor as well. This year we are being that we use? We still export horses on a regular basis; is charged $300 for a tack stall. If you take, say, 20 horses there any sort of financial break that can engender? to Nationals, you need tack stalls, grooming bays, places

“T

a

.’”

Volume 43, No. 4 | 115AA


ReveRsing The TRend Also, we need to recall that the tax changes which were instituted in 1986 drastically changed the landscape for horse breeders, when owners were essentially declassified as passive investors for tax relief. Many of our current tax incentives are set to expire this year, and we need to be proactive. The horse industry is good for the country; with increasing urbanization, we are environmentally important. I think we need to pursue action through the American Horse Council.

BoB North North Arabians Ramona, Calif. Bob and Dixie North have been in Arabians for 35 years and have owned and/or bred some of the breed’s most famous horses. They are most identified with the influential stallion Padrons Psyche, but also have been associated with such luminaries as Canadian National Champion Junior Mare Llamore di Style JM, multi-national champion mare French Psylk, U.S. National Reserve Champion El Chall WR, and many more. Currently, the Norths stand Ever After NA, El Chall WR, Sir Fames HBV and Grand Commandd at their Ramona, Calif., ranch, and own the North Arabians training facility in Scottsdale, Ariz. I believe that some of the problems we have now are the result of leadership errors or are the unintended consequences of decisions made in the past. As I say that, though, I think our situation now demands that everyone be a part of our breed’s recovery, and AHA certainly can play a role. When we are talking about increasing the number of registrations, that means we need a healthier breeding industry, and to do that, we need to understand why it has been diminished. First, we have to consider the costs of breeding and of participating in a show after you’ve bred. In my opinion, we have not done a very good job of coming up with innovative ideas that encourage people to breed by offering some kind of financial incentive. As it is now, there is very little financial incentive to breed—

116AA | A R A BI A N HoR SE T I MES

in fact, there are financial penalties if you breed. If you hope to market at least some of your foals, you’re expected to participate in a number of programs, all of which add to the cost of breeding. AHA’s Breeders Sweepstakes, where you’re not allowed to show your horses as yearlings or 2-year-olds at the U.S. Nationals unless you participate, costs you $400 to enroll a foal. It is hard enough to breed a horse that is going to be of the quality that you want to take to a national-level show, and yet AHA, before you know if you even have a national-qualify foal, requires you to spend a not-

“We

have to coNsider the costs

of BreediNg aNd of participatiNg iN a shoW after you’ve Bred.”

–Bob North


ReveRsing The TRend A show is to qualify for a regional, and now when you go to a regional, you only go there to qualify for “The obvious soluTion is the U.S. Nationals. Also, ThaT we have To esTablish there is no prestige at most of the regionals anymore. local shows ThaT are Sometimes there aren’t exciTing and fun for many horses in the show and the only people in the There are no AHA programs people To parTicipaTe in.” stands are the ones who that I can think of that own the horses, so there is financially encourage you –Bob North no “fun factor.” You have to breed. It is one of the to go to Scottsdale or the reasons that I think breeding World Cup or the U.S. is a second thought for our Nationals to have a crowd, governing body, rather than and the problem is, those shows typically have 10 to 15 a primary issue in how to increase breeding. Why not horses in a class. If you’re just a breeder, what are the something like, if you breed three horses, you get the chances of your breeding one that is going to get into third one registered for free, or that kind of thing? one of those shows? Only a handful of horses in the whole United States make it to those events. When you The only programs that try to address this situation look at it from an average breeder’s standpoint, they are the amateur programs around the country—the have a very small probability of ever getting there. They Scottsdale Signature, Minnesota Medallion, and can take horses to a class A show (if they can find one), so forth. So, some people are trying to work on the but there is nobody there, or to a regional, but that’s problem, but there just aren’t enough of them to have a probably 500 miles away. Again, no one is there and major impact on the total number of horses being bred. it’s not a fun show. So again, there is little motivation If my memory and my information is correct, I think to breed. none of those are AHA-sponsored or recognized shows. It has taken other organizations to do this, and while I The obvious solution is, I think, that we have to support these other organizations and wholeheartedly establish local shows that are exciting and fun for approve of what they’ve done, I also think that we people to participate in. AHA needs to recreate the need for AHA to be more active as well. The issue for local show. That’s one thing that is done in Europe quite breeders is one of lack of motivation, promotion, and successfully. They have class A, B and C shows, and they recognition, and AHA needs to take a leading role in get fairly extensive participation all the way down to creating, sponsoring and promoting programs that will the class B and C shows—which, I might add, also get aid breeders. coverage in the magazines. So people have some place to go, and it is exciting and fun to share with their friends And then there is the whole issue of the shows. The class and fellow breeders. Of course, they have a system that A shows basically have been destroyed by the regional if you win at, say, a class B show, then you cannot show shows. Twenty or 30 years ago, the class A shows were at that level anymore; you have to show at class A. They nearby and you didn’t have to haul your horses all the try to keep the competition at the lower level shows way across the country. They also were exciting and consistent with the level of the show. So, if you don’t fun, and there were a lot of people and horses there. have a superstar or a world-class horse, you still have a When we got into Arabians, Dixie and I didn’t go to chance to participate and get ribbons and maybe even a national-level show for probably five years; we felt win at a local show, because the ones that are going to like we could show our horses ourselves and we were go all the way are not allowed to continue showing at happy to get ribbons—second, third, fourth, very close those shows. to winning. Now, for halter, the only purpose for a class insignificant sum of extra money for the chance to show. Multiply that by several foals, and the outlay adds up fast. The result is, I think, a lot of people feel that the cost versus the benefit of breeding is not warranted.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 117AA


ReveRsing The TRend in my mind, everything points directly to reestablishing Another problem for the breeding industry has been the small, entry-door Arabian shows. We need places that transported semen has virtually destroyed the for people to become enchanted with the Arabian horse, regional stallion market because people largely breed where they don’t feel like they have to have a great deal to “national level” stallions now. Add to that, the of money or be with a trainer. registration system, which allows multiple foals to be registered from one mare, has resulted sometimes in To help that happen, i believe AHA needs to merge an unfair advantage for some owners in the show ring, many of the regional shows and get down to about six because embryo transfers are just too expensive for the regionals across the United states, rather than 18 as we average breeder to do. once again, the average breeder currently have. At present, most of the industry’s show who can’t afford a top-end, expensive show mare and the horses already have a crowded schedule, and because embryo transfer process (multiple times), has to compete there is no time left over to with the horses bred by those support the class A shows, who can. That’s difficult and most of those have died. if sometimes impossible to do. “r emedying the current we reduce the number of breeding is set up now to be “must do” events on the list, something for the people that problemS in the induStry class A shows will blossom, financially can afford to have beginS at the beginner because you could qualify one or two great mares that at a class A show without can be bred to top stallions leVel. We’re trying to having to go to Timbuktu more than once a year. How to do it. enough class A can others compete? And fix thingS from the top, wins then could qualify a when those “average breeders” but So far that haS not horse for nationals. quit breeding, then they can pretty easily drop out of the been SucceSSful.” The wonderful thing about Arabian horse industry. the class A’s, and why we –Sheila Varian should be paying more attention to them, is that Sheila Varian they are much lower-key Varian Arabians than our regional and Arroyo Grande, Calif. national events, and people can see the Arabian for who he really is, which is a gentle, kind horse that can fit in any level of involvement. That is the real entry level for breeder, trainer, marketer and cowgirl sheila Varian most people, and newcomers can readily compete; it is a has been in Arabians for more than 60 years. Her friendly but competitive, fun, non-stressful atmosphere. horses have won national championships in both They can ride in as many divisions as their horse can performance (legendary names such as U.s. national do, unlike at the regional level, where the horses must Champion in english Pleasure Comment and U.s. be more specialized to have a real shot at a title. Class national Champion in Park mikado) and halter (from A shows allow camaraderie to develop, and that is what her earliest halter winner, U.s. national Champion the Arabian horse is all about. if new owners step on up stallion bay Abi to the latest, sheer Audacity V, who to the next level, terrific, but we must give them a place won his age group in this year’s scottsdale Champion to start. international Colts). Varian Arabians is home to the breeding program which produced such influential All of this would open a new market of people who stallions as Desperado V, best known in the western fall in love with the Arabian breed. For those people, a division, and Afire bey V, who followed his sire, regional would not be on their agenda in the beginning, Huckleberry bey, as the leading sire in the but a class A show could come under the heading of english division.

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ReveRsing The TRend end “having a good time.” And as I said, who knows what the future might hold for them? In the meantime, we have new members of the community who love their horses and use them, and who are good advertisements for the breed as a whole.

The point is, remedying the current problems in the industry begins at the beginner level. We’re trying to fix things from the top, but so far that has not been successful. We also have to realize that it’s not going to happen in an afternoon; we have to start from a beginning. We need to let our local clubs participate. They are the ones that can make it happen. I truly believe it all starts with the clubs and the class A or smaller shows—the entry level. And then it can grow from there. n See more on “Reversing The Trend” in the next issue of Arabian Horse Times.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 119AA


rs Arabian Ho e Times’

18th Annual

Beautiful Baby Contest The winner will be announced in an upcoming issue and will receive a two-page editorial feature in Arabian Horse Times magazine.

www.ahtimes.com/baby-contest-voting

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2 0 1 2 U . S . N at i o N a l S

Think Big Dream Bigger

Volume 43, No. 4 | 121AA


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One Magical Moment

StArr LLight - 2011 U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure with Leah Beth Boyd BrASS StAr - 2011 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian English Pleasure with John Golladay

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& Fun Memories

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U. S .

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11-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

A Noble Cause IXL Noble Express+ x Sweet Summer Fire, by Afire Bey V

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Lara Ames Arabian Informal Combination with John Golladay 2012 Canadian National UNaNimoUs Champion arabian English Pleasure aaoTR 40 & over 2012 Canadian National Reserve Champion arabian English Pleasure open

Owned by: CEdAR RIdGE ARAbIAns Bred by: maroon Fire arabians, inc.

w w w. C e d a r - R i d g e . c o m

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Noble CRF Supreme

A Noble Cause x Toi Jabaska+//, by Matoi

Arabian Pleasure Driving AAOTD with Dick Ames Arabian Pleasure Driving Open with John Golladay 2012 Region 10 Champion Arabian Pleasure Driving Open

Owned & Bred by: CeDAr riDGe ArAbiAns

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Noble Bey

CRF

A Noble Cause x Olympia Bey, by Afire Bey V

AEPA Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with John Golladay 2012 Region 10 Champion Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse Owned by: Toni & MichAEl Dolby Bred by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

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Ames Inspiration

A Noble Cause x Justa New Look, by The Chief Justice++/

Arabian Country English Pleasure Futurity with John Golladay AvAilAble For PurchAse Owned & Bred by: CEdAr ridGE ArAbiAns

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13-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

Starr Llight

Reign On x Charm ETA, by *Eter

Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over and Arabian Park Horse AAOTR with Liz Moore 2011 U.S. National Champion Arabian English Pleasure Open 2011 U.S. National Reserve Champion Arabian Park Horse AAOTR Owned by: TOM & Liz MOORE Bred by: De Longpre Arabians

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Toi Sensation

CRF

Matoi x Alpha Phi

AEPA Halcon Half-Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with John Golladay Owned by: Julio & GEnEviEvE CAlvillo SiErrA CrookS Bred by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

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9-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

Toi Slamtastic CRF

Matoi x Fantasy Watch

Half-Arabian English Pleasure Open with John Golladay 2012 Region 10 Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure Open Owned by: JAnicE & LAurA MOrtOn Bred by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

w w w. C e d a r - R i d g e . c o m 132AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


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CRF

U. S .

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Intoxicating

Matoi x Glamorize

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with John Golladay Owned by: JAniCE & LAurA MOrtOn Bred by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

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3-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

Ames Celebration

Matoi x Ames Mirage, by Brass

Arabian English Pleasure Open with Leah Boyd Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 with Kara Larson 2012 UnanimoUs Canadian national Champion English Pleasure aaoTR 18-39 2012 UnanimoUs Canadian national Champion English Pleasure aaTR Owned by: KARA LARsOn Bred by: Cedar Ridge Arabians

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Juke Box Hero

+/

Take Heart x Mi Kaborina, by Mi Kaborr

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Toni Dolby 2012 Canadian National Top Ten Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR and AAOTR 40 & Over Owned by: TOni & MiCHAEl DOlby Bred by: Merry Beth Richter

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Lots Of Fire CRF

DS Major Afire x G Kallora, by El Ghazi

Arabian Country Pleasure Driving Open with John Golladay Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AAOTD with Dick Ames 2012 Scottsdale Champion Arabian Country Pleasure Driving AOTD and Open

AvAilAble FOr PurChASe Owned and Bred by: CeDAr riDGe ArAbiAns

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Mr Ames

CRF

Brass x Toi Jabaska+//, by Matoi

Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Lara Ames 2012 Region 6 Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AOTR Owned and Bred by: CEdAR RidgE ARAbiAns

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4-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

RJ Ames

Brass x Toi Jabaska+//, by Matoi

Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Leah Boyd Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Lara Ames 2012 Canadian National Champion Country English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over 2012 Canadian National Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure Open 2010 U.S. National Champion Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity

AvAilAblE FOR PURChASE Owned and Bred by: CEdAR RidgE ARABiAns

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4-Time Champion & ReseRve national Champion

Toi Supreme

CRF

Matoi x Alpha Phi

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Lara Ames Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with John Golladay 2012 Region 10 Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over

AvAilAblE FOR PuRCHAsE Owned and Bred by: CEdAR RidGE ARAbiAns

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Sales Offerings

A v A i l A b l e

ames inspiration

Brass star

Ames DistinguisheD (a noble Cause x G Kallora) 2008 arabian Bay stallion

Ames heArt throb

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f o r

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toi supreme CRF

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My starina BFV

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bp KlAssique bey

(Fairview Klassique x BP Meditation Bey) 1999 arabian Bay Gelding 8-time national Champion & Reserve in Country, show hack & halter

brAss CommADor CrF

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(Brass x olympia Bey) 2007 arabian Bay Gelding

Ames inspirAtion

great potential in performance.

2012 U.S. Nationals Contender

(Brass x CB shining star+) 2000 arabian Bay Gelding

(a noble Cause x Justa new Look) 2009 arabian Bay stallion

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140AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


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Matoi Afire

RJ Ames

BP Klassique Bey

CRF Hott PAnts+/

Royal Toi CRF

MY stARinA BFV

(Matoi x Saucy Camille) 1999 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding

(Brush Fire V x My Starina) 2008 Half-Arabian Chestnut Mare

2012 national top ten H/A English 13 & Under and UPHA Challenge Cup

Fantastic Junior Horse for amateur!

CW JACkson

(AE Excel x Shetaxa Bay) 2001 Arabian Bay Gelding

2012 national top ten Youth and Amateur Country

ExotiC AngEl AB

(Ames Image x Carnello) 2009 Arabian Bay Mare

lots oF FiRE CRF

(DS Major Afire x G Kallora) 2006 Arabian Chestnut Gelding

scottsdale and Regional Champion 2012 U.S. Nationals Contender

MAtoi AFiRE

(Matoi x Afire Inmy Eyes) 2008 Arabian Bay Gelding

REd Hot CHili stEPPER

(Brush Fire V x My Proud Mary) 2007 Half-Arabian Chestnut Mare

Youth or Amateur Country horse

RJ AMEs

(Brass x Toi Jabaska) 2006 Arabian Bay Gelding

Multi-national Champion 2012 U.S. Nationals Contender

RoYAl toi CRF

(Matoi x Royal Starina) 2009 Half-Arabian Chestnut Gelding

toi sUPREME CRF

(Matoi x Alphi Phi) 2003 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding

Multi-national Champion 2012 U.S. Nationals Contender

For more information, contact: Leah Boyd • cell 515-520-7604 • leah@cedarridgearabians.com Volume 43, no. 4 | 141AA


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It’s hardwork, dedication and the people, that make all this possible! Eric Krichten ............................. farm managEr mike Brennan .................... BrEEding managEr Catherine “Cat” fuller ........ BrEEding assistant Leah Boyd ............................................... trainEr John golladay......................................... trainEr tom moore ............................................. trainEr Kelsey Cook, Jesus Hernadez, abbie styes & richard tirado ...........................sHow grooms teri King................................riding instruCtor diana Loerzel ..........................offiCE managEr deb trebesch ........................... administrativE tony ferguson ......................... grapHiC dEsign Cory Hafemann Bill Heffern ............. maintEnanCE managErs wilfredo “Luis” alcantar, oscar Esparza, Jurio “Julio” ramiraz & Cervando “victor “ retamoza ........maintEnanCE Brian dahm dvm, Brad Hill dvm & paul weitz dvm ............................... vEtErinary Kyle anderson, ted froedermann & Blair rains ............................................. farriErs

And to all a tremendous thanks!

w w w. C e d a r - R i d g e . c o m 142AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


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N oble Iceman (Vaguely Noble x SH Sharloni)

CompeTing in

Reining Horse AAoTR with Amanda golestani

Reining Horse open with Jessica Bein

Owned by AmAndA goLeSTAni

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2 0 1 2

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L ittle Bit Of BOOm

(Boomernicker x Quais Habibi+//)

Competing in

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Half-Arabian trail Horse AAotR with Amanda golestani Half-Arabian trail Horse open with Jessica Bein national Champion trail Horse Owned by AmAndA golestAni

Bein P erfor mance Horses

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SH

Karlotta

(Buenos Partee Dude x Sage Hill Karla) 2007 Half-Arabian Mare

CompeTing in

Half-Arabian Reining Junior Horse with Jessica Bein 2012 Scottsdale Reserve Champion Snaffle Bit Reining 2012 AHASC 3rd place Reining Futurity

AvAilAble

for

PurchAse

Owned by RoSeTHoRn TRuST

Er

P icaboo

(Tolo Bar U Champ x EF Hello Spring) CompeTing in

Half-Arabian Reining Horse AAoTR with Tamara Wald Owned by Ron & TAmARA WALd

Jessica Bein • Lauren Whyte-Thomas • 480-220-6710 • Scottsdale, Arizona 148AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


2 0 1 2

U . S .

N a t i o N a l S

Sale Horses

TsimmER down now

(Black N Style+// x Tsparklen Jewel+//) 2007 Arabian Mare 2012 Scottsdale Champion Trail Junior Horse and 2012 Region 1 Champion Reining Junior Horse Sweepstakes Nominated CompeTiNg iN

Arabian Reining Junior Horse Arabian Trail Horse Futurity 5 & Under Arabian Reining Horse AAoTR

cadillac Khowboy (TA Khalil+ x Tsparklin Jewel+//) 2009 Arabian Colt Sweepstakes Nominated Currently paid up in the Scottsdale Futurity

chics dig iT (Chic Tommy x Quais Habibi+//) 2009 Half-Arabian Gelding Currently paid up in the Scottsdale Futurity

Bein P erfor mance Horses

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Upcoming Features NoVember Vol. 43, No. 6 u.s. NatioNals coVerage— It’s the most important week of the Arabian horse show calendar, and AHT will be in Tulsa to record its highs and lows. If you were there, relive it with us— and if you weren’t, see what you missed!

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December Vol. 43, No. 7 miNNesota breeDers show coVerage—

wiNNer of the beautiful baby coNtest—

This is the show that inspired all the futurities now taking the country by storm. It’s fun, it’s competitive, and we’ll show you why it’s such an icon in the industry.

One of the most popular contests in the industry, AHT’s Beautiful Baby Contest attracts the best of the best. This is where tomorrow’s stars come out!

December is all about the boys—it’s

aht’s stallioN issue.

We’ll bring you the 2012 U.S. and Canadian National Leading Sires and the 2012 U.S. and Canadian National Top Ten Stallions and Colts. Does your mare need a mate? You’ll see the best of the 2012 show ring right here.


Joel & Ashton Kiesner 3418 Miser Station Road Louisville, TN 37777 Barn: 865-984-5245 Joel's Cell: 865-556-0413 Ashton's Cell: 865-556-0412 www.kiesnertraining.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 151AA


Afires Heir x Shes The Ritz RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Region 14 Champion

English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 & AAOTR Maturity with Nicole Lawrence

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Afire Bey V x Ritida 11x NATIONAL CHAMPION

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 18-39 with Nicole Lawrence

Volume 43, No. 4 | 153AA


Afire Bey V x Nabaaska 10x NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Arabian Celebration Champion English Pleasure AATR 40 & Over

English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Lori Lawrence

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Afire Bey V x Ritida RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Region 14 Unanimous Champion 2012 Arabian Celebration Unanimous Champion Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity

Half-Arabian English Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over and AAOTR Maturity with Lori Lawrence Half-Arabian English Pleasure Junior Horse with Joel Kiesner

Volume 43, No. 4 | 155AA


Apollopalooza x Halstead’s Polka Dot 5x NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Buckeye Champion

Half-Arabian Park AAOTR with Lori Lawrence

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Afire Bey V x Ritida NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Region 14 Champion

AEPA Half-Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity with Joel Kiesner

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IXL Noble Express x Rumina Afire

Country English Pleasure Futurity with Joel Kiesner

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Afire Bey V x HL Glitter Ngold 2012 Region 14 Champion 2012 Buckeye Champion

Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 & AAOTR Maturity with Lori Lawrence For Your Consideration

Volume 43, No. 4 | 159AA


Mariachi WA x Watchful 2012 Region 15 Unanimous Champion 2012 Buckeye 1st Place 2012 Buckeye Reserve Champion Viewer’s Choice at the Buckeye

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Junior Horse with Joel Kiesner

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Millennium LOA x Byzance 6x NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Buckeye Unanimous Champion 2012 Arabian Celebration Unanimous Champion

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 36-54 with Kim Shackelford Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Open with Joel Kiesner

Volume 43, No. 4 | 161AA


MHR Nobility x RY Fire Ghazi, by *El Ghazi RESERVE NATIONAL CHAMPION 2012 Scottsdale Unanimous Champion 2012 Region 12 Champion

Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire Region 12 Spotlight Stallion • AEPA Nominate Sire Owned by Hennessey Arabian Partners LLC Manager George Z • 352.857.3384 • www.HennesseyArabians.com Trained by and standing at Kiesner Training barn: 865.984.5245 • cell: 865.556.0413 • www.KiesnerTraining.com 162AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


English Pleasure Open with Joel Kiesner

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VSH Michaelangelo (Majesteit x VT Duette) 2004 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding U.S. National Top Ten Half-Arabian Country Pleasure Junior Horse and multiple regional championships in open, junior horse and country pleasure 55 & Over. He has a great attitude for equitation. Show him open or AOTR. He is a big, handsome horse with 4 whites socks. Heir To Motion (Afires Heir x Nitemotion) 2008 Chestnut Gelding This horse is by 4-time National Champion Afires Heir and out of Nitemotion, a Promotion daughter that has already produced National Champions. This young horse has an awesome neck, striking carriage and English trot on both ends. Just in plates now, and already impressive. If you don't buy him, at least remember his name, because you'll hear it a lot in the future! VSH Michaelangelo

Afires Guns NRoses (Afire Bey V x HL Glitter Ngold) 2007 Bay Gelding This is a young, super sporty show horse. He has the perfect paint job with four whites and is a great thinker. He is a big horse with great motion! As a four-year-old he had multiple regional wins in the junior horse divisions while finishing the year with a top ten in the competitive AAOTR Maturity. He added a Region 14 Championship in the AAOTR this year. He’s just getting started and keeps getting better. PA Millan Always (Always A Jullyen V x Milleah, by Millennium LOA) 2006 Bay Gelding This is a multi-National Champion halter gelding in both the open and amateur divisions who will certainly continue his winning ways. This is a really fun horse who is ready for another job.

Heir To Motion

Admiral Baske (Baske Afire x Admirals Lotus Blossom) 2005 Half-Arabian Chestnut Gelding Admiral is a fun, honest country horse who has had a great career in open and AOTR. He would be a great equitation horse and youth country horse. He has been top ten in open classes and has many regional wins. Rumorr Has It (Afire Bey V x Read My Mind) 2006 Bay Mare Dam is by a Pro-Fire son out of the GG Jabask daughter, MC Jabaskolee. Beautiful, bay, country English pleasure mare. 2011 U.S. National Top Ten CEP Select Rider and Maturity. 2011 Scottsdale Champion CEP Junior Horse and Select Rider. Divvinci (Afire Bey V x Rimone GW) 2007 Half-Arabian Bay Gelding This outstanding youngster is going to take any trainer or amateur to the top in Half-Arabian English Pleasure. Only available because owner is returning to school—this is one you won't want to miss. Champion at this year’s Arabian Celebration.

Afires Guns NRoses

Yearlings: Crackalackin (Undulata’s Nutcracker x VTM Pistachia) 2012 Bay Colt Heirs Maximus (Afires Heir x Miz Margeurita V) 2012 Bay Colt Flowheir (Afires Heir x Ames Tierra, by Matoi) 2012 Bay Filly 2-Year-Olds Afires Heirloom (Afires Heir x GSF Decadenze, by Apollopalooza) 2011 Chestnut Filly Heiristotle (Afires Heir x Joleen WB, by MHR Nobility) 2011 Bay Colt All Heir (Afires Heir x Ames Tierra, by Matoi) 2011 Black Colt Heir About Her (Afires Heir x Harghaza, by El Ghazi) 2011 Bay Mare Heir Dream (Afires Heir x Harghaza, by El Ghazi) 2011 Bay Filly 3-Year-Olds Heirogance PF (Afires Heir x VTM Pistachia) 2010 Bay Gelding Heirborne Express PF (Afires Heir x Miz Margeurita V, by El Ghazi) 2010 Bay Colt KT Heir Born (Afires Heir x Eartha Kitt) 2010 Bay Gelding

PA Millan Always

4-Year-Olds A Spring Heir (Afires Heir x Quali Phi Time) 2009 Half-Arabian Chestnut Filly JK Heiristocracy (Afires Heir x VTM Pistachia) 2009 Bay Colt MI Ghaza (Sir William Robert x Harghaza) 2009 Half-Arabian Bay Filly Broodmares GSF Decadenze (Apollopalooza x Crimsonn Bay) 2004 Bay Mare ~ In foal to Afires Heir for 2013 Ames Tierra (Matoi x Ferachask) 2002 Bay Mare ~ In foal to Afires Heir for 2013 JOEL'S CELL: 865-556-0413 • WWW.KIESNERTRAINING.COM • ASHTON'S CELL: 865-556-0412

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Admiral Baske


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RA Song Of Shahmaan Competing in Futurity Fillies Proudly handled and presented by: JJ Joyner Joyner Arabians 6631 Strahan Road El Paso, Texas 79932 Phone: 915-276-5471

Owned by: Ilana Lipsen West Desert Arabians

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2012 AmAteur SnApShotS

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AmAteur SnApShotS

Continued from page 244A

Sarah Medina

Name: Farm: Eagle Ridge Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Krichke Training Center How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses when I went to work for Lee Bernier and Joyce Bernier Ventruella in 1997, and have been hooked ever since. They were fantastic mentors! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? We own Arabian horses because there is just nothing like them. I am drawn to their personalities and fire. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Don’t be nervous and just go out there and do your thing. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose our new Falcon mare Ladyhawke because she is beautiful, has a big smooth body, great movement and has a wonderful presence. For the sire I would choose Ever After NA because I love the type and refinement that he adds. he sees the shaker bags, it’s on because he knows he Our filly by him this year is the nicest foal we have ever gets to show off for his entrance. At 12 years old he had, and she has the most wonderful disposition. is still honest and that’s what it is all about for me. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When competition, who would you pick, and why? I would choose I missed my mare class at Region 13. Snafu with my my gelding Pseltic Star to show halter any day of the sister’s alarm clock. Keith will never let me forget it week. He has taken us to the winner’s circle many times after I spent hours driving up there for lessons! and he truly loves to show. He is a fantastic friend and I What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian have known him his whole life. Whenever the Krichkes horses? I love spending time with my husband and our pull in to pick him up, he gets excited because he knows awesome daughters. We love to hang out at the pond he gets to go to a show and for me that is the best part. or go to the lake, and the girls love riding our four When he is getting prepped for a class he can hardly wheelers. We are very blessed with a wonderful family! stand still, and he usually prances to the ring. When

John S. Mengle

Name: Farm Name: Yamoyden Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Matt Siemon How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many with no simple answer. Once you know the breed years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I have you just want to have them as part of your life. been an owner, breeder, and rider for the last 27 years. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Again, I have no idea how I was first introduced to the breed. no simple answer, just a lot of thank you’s to all the Probably at the state fair as a kid. After a break of trainers I have shown with. First to Duane Esser and five years from the show ring, it is fun to be working Chuck Siemon, for doing the hard work of getting me this year with Matt Siemon. Matt’s first national started. Then to Gene LaCroix and Joel Kiesner, for all championship was aboard my Chief Justice daughter their amazing insight and help. Finally, the best advice YA Justajabask when Matt was a junior rider. from Matt this year has been to find the two horses I am Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? A great question showing this year. I had great reservations about the Half186AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


AmAteur SnApShotS

Arabian in particular, but Matt was his champion. Now he is my favorite horse ever to ride and is still a baby at only 4. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? The dam would be my Chief Justice daughter who Matt showed to his first national championship in English Pleasure. The sire would be Afire Bey V. Obviously, a golden cross for others and one I just never got around to doing. So, given the mare is well into her 20s, I guess I should get in gear. Hey, Marty Shea, any deals available for such a cross? If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Supreme Decision, the amazing Half-Arabian park horse. He was incredible, and always took great care of his amateur owner. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Riding into a nationals class at Freedom Hall and I forgot my sunglasses were still on. As I passed the section where my barn mates were sitting, I attempted to throw the glasses to them. I missed and beaned a lady close by. With each pass for the rest of the class I got yelled at by the victim. Guess she thought I was aiming for her!

Name:

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I lift, do power yoga, and am an avid cook and traveler.

Dr. Istvan Merchenthaler

Farm: Pannonia Arabians, Inc. Trainer Affiliation: Ricardo Rivero, Steve Dady and Phil Wolfe How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Twenty years ago, my wife bought me a mare from Wayne Newton. Therefore, I have been involved with Arabians for 20 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? They are elegant, beautiful, and noble horses, always ready to please you. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Do not halter train young horses before they come to me. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? PA Gazsi for the sire and PA Ghazalleh for the dam. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Padron. He had all the phenotype characteristics for an excellent Arabian stallion. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I shanked a bit, my mare flipped over. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Medical research, gardening, wine making, and hunting. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Words of wisdom from Mr. Garland to me, “Just don’t fall off and you will be fine.” Volume 43, No. 4 | 187AA


AmAteur SnApShotS

If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would pick my very first horse, VooDoo Wine (Armagnac x FR Bewitched). In 1991 we were named U.S. National Champion. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Probably getting run over.

Name:

Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Arabian horses are the foundation of all breeds of horses. They are majestic, intelligent, and great athletes. There is a special excitement and fun in owning an Arabian horse. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Make sure when you enter the ring that you are having fun! That is also the same advice I still get from my parents to this day.

Bruce Miller M.D.

Trainer Affiliation: Tommy Garland horses with Tommy Garland a year and half ago. After attending several regional and national events with her, I thought it would be fun for me to get involved as well. We found my horse for sale at the Scottsdale Arabian Horse Show event this year and I began learning to ride. Both she (Cupcake) and Mr. Garland have been very patient with me over the last six months as we have become a horse show family. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Words of wisdom from Mr. Garland to me, “Just don’t fall off and you will be fine.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? As I am completely new to horses, I have no idea of a dream horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? In my first show and only the second time on a horse, I was confused with the lope vs. jog, and I thought jog your horse meant the canter so we made two full laps around the ring at the lope and the judge asked several times for the jog. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I’m an orthopedic surgeon who owns a How many years have you been involved with Arabian small farm with cows and horses, and my wife is horses? I have been riding for 6 months. a pulmonary critical care physician. We have two Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? My wife, Dr. small children, Adam and Anna Miller, and they, Lucinda Miller, began showing and riding Arabian too, are getting into showing Arabian horses.

Lucinda Miller

Name: Trainer Affiliation: How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabians when I was 14 by a group of horsemen that used them as physical therapy for disabled children and adults. I have loved them ever since. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I show for several 188AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Tommy Garland reasons. I love to ride. I love to compete, and I want to get better with every ride. It is something my family can do together, and I hope to be watching my children compete next year. Last and certainly not least, we have made some really great friends at the shows.


AmAteur SnApShotS

What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The advice has always boiled down to enjoy myself, be aggressive, and don’t fall off. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I have always admired the Justify and Versace foals. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I covet most of the horses I see at the barn, because I know their personalities and how beautiful they are just out of the stall, so I would have to say Natalie Hunt’s horse, Restitution and Nancy Delisi’s horse, Aria Opus One. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? The most embarrassing moment wasn’t really mine, but my husband’s and he won’t care if I share. He started riding at shows this year. He had been to enough shows with me that I thought he knew a lot more than he did. He entered his western class at a lope and continued to lope every time the jog was called. He rationalized that when people jog, it means they run. He was the least bit embarrassed and had a great time. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian

horses? My answer to the last question is that we have very limited free time, most of which is spent raising young children and bringing them along to shows, crossing my fingers that they will love it as much as I do.

Michele Moss

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Colonial

Wood Training Center How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was first introduced to Arabian horses when I was in high school through the 4-H club in Dallas where I grew up. Bevans Arabians often let our 4-H group come tour their facility. I was struck not only by the beauty of the horses, but their friendliness and personalities. Years later, when I “got back into horses” after finishing college, med school and residency training, I immediately bought an Arabian. That was more than 20 years and several wonderful horses ago. It is so important for us to share our wonderful horses with kids. You never know who will fall in love and become an owner and exhibitor. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love being around Arabians. There is nothing like going down to the barn in the morning and being greeted by those soft nickers and wonderful faces! I enjoy the horse show atmosphere with so many friends—human and equine. It is a wonderful place to escape from my daily work and I have to admit, I love the show clothes! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? ”Keep your hand down!” Volume 43, No. 4 | 189AA


AmAteur SnApShotS

If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Too many to choose from. Breeding the perfect western horse is tricky, it requires the right amount of motion, attitude, and willingness, not to mention beauty. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would still want to show Medal Bey, my first serious show horse. He loved the ring, loved people looking at him, and just knew he deserved to win. When he didn’t get

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Cheryl Nelson

Powell Training Center—Zach and Lisa Powell

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I grew up with a pony, and have always loved horses. After I married, had three children and earned a degree in nursing, I decided that I wanted an academic experience related to horses. In 2002 I enrolled in the Horse Management Program at Michigan State University. This is where I was introduced to the Arabian horse. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Since 2002, I have

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called out first, he could make quite a ruckus. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I was showing my western pleasure horse, Medal Bey, in the bridle for the first time, steering was a serious problem for me. Medal and I were all over the place. My trainer, Josh Quintus, was so embarrassed he knelt on the ground with his head in his hands! He couldn’t bear to watch! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Cooking and gardening.

purchased five Arabian horses from the Spring Sale held at MSU. I rode two of the horses for a short time and sold them to young girls as trail riding/4-H horses. I still own the other three, all of which have been successful Class A show horses. Why do I exhibit? I have met a lot of really nice people in the horse industry, some of which are now like family. I enjoy the camaraderie, the opportunity to continue learning, and the experience of riding and showing smart, talented horses. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Sometimes keeping it simple is the hardest thing to do. Best advice to me from Zach Powell: “Just say whoa.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I don’t know much about pedigrees. I would have to consult someone with that expertise. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Balenciaga is a 4-year-old junior western horse owned by Sandy and John Zuccarini, and shown by Zach Powell. I think he is amazing. Not only is he talented and beautiful to look at, he is very sound-minded. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I learned the hard way that in competition, you “complete the maneuver.” If you are at the walk and decide to circle for better position when the judge asks the horses to halt, it is in your best interest to complete the circle before halting your horse. If you do not, you will be the only one facing the opposite direction—this is not a good thing. Never will that happen on purpose again. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Photography, sailing, cooking, and travel.


AmAteur SnApShotS

Jill K. Nelson

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Midwest

Station I—Austin Boggs and Clanton Performance Horses—Alan Clanton

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? It all began 41 years ago; I was riding before I could ever walk, at least that is the story that I have been told. Both my older sisters rode and thought I needed to ride with them. From that moment on, I was hooked and I rode every chance I got. It didn’t matter if it was my Shetland Pony “Sugar,” a lesson horse at the barn, or one of the old pasture horses. If I was awake, I was riding. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I hear all too often, “Why do you own and show Arabian horses?” I get this more times than not from the other breed owners that I come in contact with. I would have to say that there is a connection with the Arabian horse that you don’t get with other breeds. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice I ever received from my trainer was Vic Fraley from Iowa. I was 16 and riding an amazing young English horse that my parents had just purchased. He told me before my class, “It is yours for the taking. Go enjoy the ride and don’t make more of it than what it is. Just have fun!” I try and remember that before each class that I go into. This is supposed to be fun, and if we wake up one morning and decide it is not fun anymore, then we are obviously doing something terribly wrong. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? This is a tough one because there are so many great show horses today that are producing incredible offspring. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Apollopalooza.

He was the type of horse that just brought all-over chills. I remember watching him at U.S. Nationals. I don’t think that there are enough words to describe it. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Hmm … My most embarrassing moment, well, I have no problem laughing at myself, so I don’t know if there is any one that I could pick out. We all have them, and laughing at yourself makes it just a little easier to swallow. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I own two Quarter Horses whom I team sort on and love it. It’s actually quite addicting. Riding a horse that is bred to be a cutter and sorting off 10 calves in 60 seconds or less—it’s a rush. I also love to snow ski, spend time with my husband and his children, and travel.

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AmAteur SnApShotS

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Michelle Pease-Paulsen

Lowe Show Horse Centre—Jim Lowe and Kimberly VerHage, and Silver Aspen Ranch—LaRae Fletcher Powell

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I originally started riding when I was 7 years old on the trail ride horses at Roach Harbor in the San Juan Islands here in the state of Washington. We would spend the summers there and I looked forward to going so I could ride. Eventually, they stopped the trail rides. I remember asking if I could groom some of the horses in trade to ride one of the ponies once a week. At this time, my father was training for a marathon so he would run and I would ride the pony alongside him which was very memorable. I was hooked and would continue to ask to go riding more and more. After years of nagging and saying things like, “If I had a horse I would not be asking you to take me here or there,” my folks would finally give in. It really was by chance that we purchased

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an Arabian. A friend of my father said there is an Arabian at the barn where I have my horse and he is for sale. We purchased the little bay Arabian gelding and as they say, the rest is history. We bought him when I was 10, so I have been showing for roughly 27 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the beautiful looks and the diversity of the Arabian breed. Where else can you find horses that can compete in reining, endurance and park, just to name a few disciplines. I respect the other breeds, but they do not have the look nor the diversity that our Arabians do. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Wow, this is a hard one! I have learned so much from my trainers. Early on, the best two pieces of advice came from LaRae Fletcher-Powell: “Be a gracious winner and a gracious loser,” and “Never quit riding in your class. Don’t let one bobble ruin a great ride. You do not know if any/all the judges saw you make the mistake.” If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would have to go with my old horse that passed suddenly, Maestro D. Maestro was an amazing driving horse. However, when we owned him, I was still too scared to drive. I have been getting my driving confidence back, so if I could have the chance to show him in driving I would take it in a heartbeat. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I have been fortunate and have not had any embarrassing horse show moments. I have had plenty of incidents at the barn, but very fortunate to have none at shows. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Along with showing Arabians, I compete in the hunter/jumper world. When I am not spending time with my horses, I enjoy decorating my house for all the seasons and love to spend time with my husband, family and girlfriends.


AmAteur SnApShotS

Ashley Reimer

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Westridge How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I have grown up with Arabians, and after being exposed to many breeds, Arabians have always been my passion. When I was 2 years old, I got my first pony and the rest is history! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Arabian horses are unlike any other. They are extremely talented and have incredible personalities. Each Arabian horse has their own personality, and forming a relationship with each horse is more rewarding than the ride. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Practice, practice, practice! Even if you are giving it 100%, someone else is giving more, so give it your best shot every time! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Meistermind and Carrera LOA. I would love a full sibling to my Arabian hunter, PowderNPaint LOA. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I’ve already been lucky enough to own my dream horse, PowderNPaint LOA. He has more heart than any horse I know, and he is truly an amazing horse inside and out of the ring. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? If I could think of one, I wouldn’t want it in a magazine! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? My horses are pretty much my life, but I enjoy traveling too.

Farm—Jenna Ball

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Patricia L. Rich

Name: Farm: Green Acres Ranch, Inc. Trainer Affiliation: Katherine Rich-Elzig Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I get the pleasure of showing my niece’s beautiful horses. Showing Arabians is something I really enjoy and it has been in my blood for nearly four decades! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose? Bask If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Bask—he is legendary! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Having Don Burt, the judge, pick me up and dust me off after my horse stopped at a jump. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Spending time with God and my family, How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many they come first; art, traveling, driving fast, beautiful years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My cars, eating great food, along with better wine! parents, Raymond and Janet Rich, since 1970.

Sam Roen

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Westridge How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My parents introduced me to Arabian horses at the age of 5. I haven’t stopped riding since, and I hope to continue riding into the distant future. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I’ve loved horses since the minute I was introduced to them. I can’t imagine life without them. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Ride. Show your horse. Oh, and always follow your heart. Sorry, inside joke on that last one. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Zoraladdinn and Psyches Envy. Both are at my farm. “Ladd” is one of the most talented, beautiful western horses I’ve ever seen. His babies are just starting to hit the ground and they’re amazing. Psyches Envy has a great track record and is such a good mom. Her WR Soulman, by Khadraj NA, was just Canadian National Champion in the Arabian Western Pleasure 18-39 and Reserve in the Open. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would choose my horse, SF Korbel. He is the 194AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

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most amazing horse I have ever had the pleasure of owning. I wouldn’t trade him for any other. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I’ve had more than a few embarrassing show experiences. It’s hard to choose just one.

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I really like sports—football and basketball. I also like being with my friends both at the barn and outside of it.

Melanie Ronen

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Lowe Show Horse Centre—Jim Lowe How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Nearly 30 years. My first horse was a 3-year-old Half-Arabian mare who taught me to ride. I’ve been riding Arabians ever since. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Spending time with horses is so therapeutic. It’s the only time I can truly block out the other stresses of life. Competing is just a bonus—nothing better than getting to indulge my competitive side in a positive way while having a great time with good friends. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? It’s a list too long to put here. I guess if I had to pick the best—it’s not really advice, but more of a life lesson—Jim taught me that hard work always pays off, and that just when I think I have no more to give, I can dig a little deeper and work a little harder. Most recently, he told me to buy my current horse, which I think was great advice. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Mamage. He is such a great all-around show horse and athlete, he loves to work, and his babies are extraordinary. SA Sophisticated Lady, to that kind of ride—I know I certainly do. as well, because she too, is an amazing show horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in Again, too long of a list. There have been LOTS amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? over the years. Looking back, most of my youth Apollopalooza. I remember watching Carmelle Rooker years were nothing but embarrassing moments! show him to one of his U.S. National Championships, What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of and she looked like she was truly having a great Arabian horses? Skiing, Pilates, and yoga. time riding a very special horse. I think we all aspire

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Larry Schopf

Name: Farm: Twin X Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Keith Krichke and Dan Lynch How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Fairs and horse shows, as well as stable visits during my first horse purchase in 2001. 12 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love their intelligence, personality, versatility and appearance. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose? Audacious PS and Ladi Veronika. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Ladi Veronika in halter—she has the attitude.

Gregg Shafer

Name: Farm: Shafer Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Siemon Stables How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? In 1972 we were boarding our Appaloosa at Chick Needler’s who owned Naharin. He introduced us to the Brysons. We purchased two mares and our first stud, Ibn El Nahar, from them. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I appreciate their willing attitude, natural ability and beauty. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Stay in balance with your horse’s motion. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Allience and Mattaroyale. I like park horses. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Allience in park, and Halali Escapade for English. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Years ago in a Junior English class, a mare slipped and fell. The young stud I was riding took it as a breeding opportunity. He grabbed the bit and took What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of off at a dead run towards the mare. Fortunately, I Arabian horses? I enjoy USPSA practical pistol didn’t have to worry about a live foal guarantee. shooting with my son, fly fishing and hunting. 196AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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Jen Shearer

Name: Farm: Valley View Farms

Trainer Affiliation:

Chrishan Park Arabians—Chris Wilson and Rick Gault Training

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My parents introduced me to Arabian horses. I have been involved in the Arabian horse industry since I was born. My mother and father have always had horse property filled with Arabian horses. The older I became, the bigger the horse property became. By the time I was 10, my parents had purchased a 50-stall horse training facility. This was a dream come true for a little girl obsessed with horses. Although our horse property has decreased in size since becoming an adult, I will always be involved with the Arabian breed. They are truly special creatures, and I feel blessed to have a family that supports this amazing hobby. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own and exhibit Arabian horses not only because they are beautiful, but because they are extremely intelligent. Their intelligence brings an element of challenge for any rider and this is what I enjoy most about the Arabian breed. I am a very competitive person by nature; therefore, I thrive on a good challenge. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice I have ever received from a trainer was from Crystal McNutt. She told me, “Never show a horse at a level you haven’t practiced. Go out there and show what you have today. Know the strengths and

weaknesses of your horse and showcase the strengths. Whatever you do, ride smart and ride to the best of your ability each time. You have to show the judges you are confident in both you and your horse’s abilities.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose to breed a foal by Vegaz and out of Starr Llight. These are two of the most amazing and talented English horses we have in our breed. They are athletes, and the babies I have had the opportunity to witness by these two horses are incredible. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Wow! This is a tough question. There are so many great horses I would love to have the opportunity to exhibit in amateur competition. I would absolutely be delighted to have the opportunity to show Vegaz, but I’m sure there are plenty of members of the Knipe family who are already in line for this opportunity someday. The other horse I would love to show is James Brown. He is one of the most stunning Half-Arabian country horses I’ve ever seen. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My most embarrassing horse show moment was when I was 8 years old. I was showing my purebred hunter horse in Del Mar. It was a brisk California morning and my horse was a little frisky. The judge asked us to hand-gallop and the chaos began. My mare decided this was the perfect opportunity to buck multiple times, and about the third buck I decided it would be best to bail off. I landed in the middle of the arena, and the next thing I knew, my mom and every horse show official was standing by me. I walked out of the arena and my mom insisted I get right back on my horse. Of course, I didn’t want to, but to this day I attest that this is what has made me a better rider. So, mom, even though I was angry at you at the time, I’m glad you made me get back on. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love to read and spend time with my family and friends. I also love to run, although I don’t get to do this as often as I would like or should. However, I am usually somewhere where there are horses. If I have any spare time, the horses are my escape, which generally means I get to spend time with family and friends at the same time. Volume 43, No. 4 | 197AA


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Brooksley Sheehe

Name: Farm Name: Tshampagne Arabians, LLC Trainer Affiliation: Rohara Arabians—John Rannenberg How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to Arabian horses through Karl Hart. I have been involved with Arabian horses for 26 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love the breed, the competition, the people, and the farms. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? When looking to buy a show horse: “Do not try to convince yourself that this is the right horse for you. A judge only has so much time to choose a horse as a winner. If you can not make up your mind that this horse is spectacular, then it is not the one for you.” ~ John Rannenberg If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I already have my next show horse out of my mare, Adonis Amber Rose, by Undulata’s Nutcracker. Look for Nuttin But Hart. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in get into the arena the day before the show started. amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Second John and I were pressed for time, so I went with Editions Debut hands down. Honey was and still is it and went up to the arena. After one lap, the tiny my all-time favorite English pleasure horse, because rip became about a foot long and as I was passing she never failed to bring it when she needed to. Shannon Beethe, she said, “Hey, Brooksley Spears!” What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Probably After that I went straight back to the barn. when I ripped my pants getting on Everlastin Love What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian the last year U.S. Nationals was held in Albuquerque, horses? Mental Health Counseling, Equine Therapy, Dog N. M. The plan was to have a quick ride and to Therapy, and spending time with family, friends, and pets.

Julie Shick

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My brother and I started taking riding lessons at a local 198AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Rooker Training Stable farm in Metamora, Mich. I was 4 years old, so it’s been 42 years, but I did take 18 years in the middle where I didn’t own any horses—busy with school and career. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I was captivated at a young age with their beauty and bold personality. My Quarter Horse friends say, “brainwashed.” Arabians are never boring to ride or show; they keep you thinking. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Relax. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Tryst and JR Claudia. My Apollopalooza mare is looking for a guy that trots high, has a level head, and a sparkling personality. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? For-CeeHaji, the first horse my family owned and the reason


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I fell in love with Arabians. He had quality (top ten three times), versatility, and a fabulous personality. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Sorry, those have all been erased from my memory.

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Skiing and traveling with my husband and two kids, Sophie and Ben.

Gabrielle Sitomer

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Battaglia Farms—Bob Battaglia

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I hit the ground with a passion for Arabian horses. I don’t know where it came from, but I’ve always loved them and wanted to be involved with them. I was formally introduced to the breed around 1986—just about 25 years ago. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own and exhibit Arabian horses because it makes me happy. I love the horses, but I also love the competition and the wonderful people we’ve met along the way.

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What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Go for it! Many riders, including myself, can over-think their ride. I always have fun in the show ring, but sometimes I try to be too perfect and forget to just “go for it!” If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would pick my very first horse, VooDoo Wine (Armagnac x FR Bewitched). In 1991, we were named U.S. National Champion English Pleasure JOTR 13 & Under. He was a great horse with amazing ring presence, a huge heart, and a great personality. I would give anything to ride him again. I’m especially excited to be showing my new horse, Cey Hey (Hey Hallelujah x CP Shiraz) this year, because of all the horses I’ve owned over the years, he reminds me the most of VooDoo Wine. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Maybe Bob can recall something embarrassing. I’ve been blessed to not be too embarrassed at a show or I’ve blocked the experience out of my memory entirely. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I have two amazing kids—Ashlyn (4 yrs.) and Landon (19 mos.) and a wonderful husband, Jason Koy. Right now, other than work and horses, it’s pretty much all about them! We are working on learning to ride a bike right now.

Dean Stankovic

Trainer Affiliation: Vicki Humphrey Training How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Ever since I was a child, I had “horse fever.” It didn’t matter what breed at that time. I remember hanging out at the local fairgrounds and hoping someone would let me ride their horse. I have been involved with Arabian horses for 25 years. My wonderful friends Mark and Suzi Boyle of Aura Arabians got me started with Arabians. I purchased Nyvern’s Pendragon, “Vern,” from them. He was a purebred English horse, and it only took one ride to know that I was

Center—Vicki Humphrey and Jessica Clinton hooked with English. What an amazing rush! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I have met so many wonderful people and have made so many close friends in this industry, hence the main reason I show Arabians. Arabians are beautiful and smart, traits that attracted me to the breed. In addition, I love to compete and why not do it on the most beautiful, intelligent breed of all? What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? I have dreamed of showing with Vicki Humphrey Training Center for so many years, and two years ago, my dream became a reality. Vicki and Jessica’s approach Volume 43, No. 4 | 199AA


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is so positive and makes you want to do your best. This past year I broke my humerus and had to have a metal plate and seven screws put in to repair the bone. I was finally healed and cleared to ride and then my appendix ruptured and I was in the hospital for a week. So between the two incidents, I had not ridden in a little over a year. I went to my first show in Ohio over Labor Day. I was a little apprehensive, but the minute I got on, I knew what to do. On the walkie-talkie all I could hear from Vicki is, “That’s perfect, I would not change anything—perfect, perfect, perfect.” So I guess the best advice I have gotten from Vicki and Jess is to stay positive, smile and enjoy the moment. They both inspire me to be the best rider I can be. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Hucks Connection

V would be my choice of sire and Balquenette V the dam. This combination produced my current country English pleasure gelding, HC Boisterous. “Spud,” as he is known at the barn, is the best show horse I have ever had. He is smart, flashy with his incredible tail carriage, and beautiful all rolled into one. He is always at the top of the ribbons and every time I show him, I have a huge smile on my face. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? When I first met Vicki, “Beyonce” as I call her, she was riding Revelation and a Beyonce song was playing in the background. She stopped on the rail right next to where I was sitting and started talking to me. I was speechless at first as it was like talking to a famous movie star. Watching her ride Revelation gave me goose bumps, and still does. My next horse will be a Half-Arabian English horse and I hope he is just like the amazing Revelation. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I was so proud of my first saddle seat suit that I had a local seamstress make for me. All together it cost me $175, which included the material, and I wore it proudly. Well, I have learned that you get what you pay for. The crotch ripped out of the pants in my qualifying class, so my mother sewed a patch in the hopes that it would hold. It held, but in the win photo, my suit was dark gray and the patch was almost white. It was pretty obvious, but I did win the championship class. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Outside of Arabian horses, I love to cook gourmet meals and garden. This summer I moved into a new home that has a wonderfully large kitchen. In addition, I planted a garden in the back. When friends come to my house, they say it looks like a nursery. That is the best compliment ever! Having so much produce that I did not want to go to waste, I learned how to can. Canning has become an obsession for me. It is so much work, but you reap the rewards all winter long.

Darcy Stewart

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses—Alan Clanton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how So, that makes 36 years owning an Arabian. many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? That would take I received my first horse on my fourth birthday. several pages to explain! In a nutshell, the horses, the She was an Arabian named Angel. I fell in love people, the competition. I just love everything about it. with her, and I have never wanted any other breed. 200AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


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What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Even though we have been friends since we were kids, this is the first year I have shown with Alan. I think he has taught me I can be extremely competitive and still have a lot of fun. I tend to be too critical and serious about competing. He is all business when that gate opens, but the CPH crew is always having some sort of fun—I just love it! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Undulata’s Nutcracker for a sire and Ultra Afire for the dam—they are both amazing. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? HBB, without a doubt. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Probably getting run off with, in a show hack class at Nationals many years ago. When I came out of the ring, my mother asked why I wanted to be excused. She was sure I was winning. Too bad your mom can’t be the judge!

What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Horses take up most of my free time AND money, but I also enjoy running and keeping up with our yard and flower beds.

Nan Stockholm Walden

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rancho

Sonado, Arizona and California—Courtney Spicer

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I have read about and loved Arabian horses all my life, but childhood asthma prevented me from riding much. I began showing Arabians and Half-Arabians in my 50s

and have been showing seriously for about five years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? My husband and I run a large agricultural business that demands a lot of attention and travel. The horses are our passion and our escape. My husband grew up using Quarter Horses in the cattle business in Arizona. He now uses Arabians with our cattle. We are both admirers of the intelligence, affection and athleticism, especially when they are given a job to do like pushing cattle or negotiating trail obstacles. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice I have received is to avoid training gimmicks and develop a horse the way you would train an athlete, based on a good foundation of positive training and physical development. Start with good nutrition and good care of the feet, and select a knowledgeable, kind trainer like Courtney Spicer who does not take shortcuts. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? We bred our sport horse and show hack champion, Kay Pasa V to Entrigue, the beautiful silver stallion that Patience Prince-Carr showed dressage, because both were not only typey, but beautiful movers with kind personalities. Can’t wait to see the foal! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I am blessed to have my black mare Agracie Girl V (Sundance Kid V Volume 43, No. 4 | 201AA


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x Amazing Grace V) who has been both reserve open and national champion AOTR with me up in the trail class in 2010, and top ten open and amateur last year as well. She is my dream horse—intelligent, loyal, gentle and intuitive. A close second would be my ArabianPaint gelding, Stars And Stripes SF (Allionces Knight x Starry Spumoni). He has been on the Rancheros Ride with 1,000 horses, in parades, and also has been trail champion twice at Scottsdale and national top ten trail several times. All our show horses also work cattle and do ranch chores. It is good for their minds. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My first time at Scottsdale my number blew off in the

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windy warm-up arena just as they called the class. I got so flustered once I got it back on, I tried to go in the out-gate as I rushed to make the gate call. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Farming is 24/7 so it does not give us much leisure time. We love nature and love to ride our horses out in the Tucson desert or Santa Barbara countryside. We also love watching our grandsons learn to ride. Both Dick and I are active on a number of boards of non-profits like the American Farmland Trust, The Arizona Nature Conservancy and the Sonoran Institute, all dedicated to sustainable use of our resources.

Jessie Szymanski Farm Paradise Farms

Krichke Training Center—Keith Krichke, Vallejo III—Bob Hart Jr. and Tommy Garland

Trainer Affiliation:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I have been involved with Arabian horses for almost 15 years now. My first horse was a pony; I boarded him at a small Arabian show barn. While spending most of my days riding my pony, I quickly fell in love with Arabians that were all around me. After I outgrew my pony, my dad bought me my first Half-Arabian mare, McCoys Dakara, and the rest is history. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own and show Arabian horses because the sky is the limit with them. They compete in just about every discipline and are the most versatile horse breed. You can show in anything from western to endurance, to over fences with the same horse—that’s amazing! I also love how beautiful Arabians are, like pieces of art. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice all of my trainers consistently give me is to have fun. Sometimes it is so easy to get caught up in nerves, what can go wrong, all of the things we are supposed to remember as amateurs when we are showing, and we forget to have fun. Of course, it’s okay to be nervous and competitive, but it’s also important to have fun while doing it. It is a huge pick-me-up right before a class when my trainers give me the low down of all the tips they have for me followed by, “Remember to have fun!” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose my two favorite horses in this breed today, Eden C and Elandra.* 202AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Eden C, because he is a consistent, correct, and a great producing stallion. He exhibits all of the great qualities I look for in a stallion to breed too: type, quality, disposition, and movement. Elandra*, because of her athleticism, quality, type, and that beautiful face of hers. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? That’s easy, Elandra* PASB, in an amateur mare class. I will never forget when I first saw Elandra. It was in 2007 when she came trotting into the gate of Scottsdale shortly before she was crowned supreme champion mare. No horse has ever captivated me like she did then and left me with goose bumps well


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after a class. She is magnificent with her beautiful white coat; big, black deep eyes; type; athleticism; and quality. Elandra* is the epitome of an Arabian horse. I absolutely love that mare—she is inspiring. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Oh gosh, I have far too many of these. One of my best was at National Show Horse Finals in 2003. I was in the open mare class with my horse Shades of Kentucky. I tripped and fell flat on my face running into the in-gate right as I got into the arena. She acted as if

nothing happened, of course, and dragged me for a few strides. The best part, was the shavings were dyed blue. I was covered head to toe in blue shavings. I looked like a Smurf, and I was mortified. I hope everyone that witnessed this has forgotten all about it. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I like to spend time with family and friends whenever I can. I enjoy going to the lake, spending time in the pool, traveling, shopping, watching movies and taking my Havanese, Griffin, to the park.

Lissa Tehan

Name: Farm Name: Strawberry Banks Farm Trainer Affiliation: Brian Murch Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? After my dad died in 2005, I thought the horses would be a wonderful thing that my mom and I could share together. My parents had such a passion for them. It all started with me thinking I would try to be there for my mom—to support her and keep her company at her horse shows and other horse-related events. After a while, she convinced me to start riding, so I did! My dad rode and loved it so much that I hoped I would enjoy it and be able to ride like him some day. I have a long way to go, but, fortunately, Brian Murch is patient with me and very determined. So, I guess I do it for fun, but mostly to share and be with my mom—and in my heart, my dad. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Use Your Legs! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would pick Ericca. My dad tried so hard and was determined to ride and show her. He loved the amateur English class, and she was incredibly athletic and beautiful. I think How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how it would be fun to follow in his footsteps and show in many years have you been involved with Arabian that class. I would love to win it for him some day! horses? I’ve been riding for six years now, but our What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of family has had Arabian horses since 1976. Arabian horses? My four awesome kids!

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Jacque Thompson Smoky Mountain Park Arabians

Trainer Affiliation: Mike Miller How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many right away. In fact, it was love at first sight. Soon I was years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I saw exercising that horse for its owner and eventually bought my first Arabian when I was a teen and was impressed and showed it in the park horse division. My horse, Mac

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Keff, was only a backyard gelding, but it was a thrill of a lifetime showing him against the big boys and more often than you might think, won the class with him. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? It is because of my love of the Arabian breed which I developed at that time that I breed horses and exhibit them today. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? One of the best pieces of advice I have learned from a trainer is to enjoy the journey. That came from Joel Kiesner who put me on my first English horse since those early days showing Mack Keff. When it comes to advice from my trainer Mike Miller, it is hard for me to single out one thing because he is a man of example more than words. I would say if actions speak louder than words, his best advice would be to just keep going and to work hard to achieve success.

Name: Farm:

If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Selecting the sire and dam of my next show horse is a tough one. We have wonderful mares and three excellent breeding stallions at Smoky Mountain Park Arabians. Baskghazi is producing incredible quality foals like Baskadonis SMP and Baskghazelle SMP, and his foals seem to get better each year. But The Renaissance is also producing well. Last year we had our first foals by him and one of those went on to win reserve in the AEPA class at the Buckeye. Our older stud, PS Afire Chief, has done well by us; a case in point is Chief Inspiration SMP, who was top ten in the country, English pleasure futurity. Most of our mares are by U.S. national champion producers, by top producers of national champions or are national champions or top tens themselves. So, who would I pick to be the sire and dam? One of the coolest long-necked trotty foals we have ever produced is Alympus SMP who was born this year and is by Baskghazi and out of PS Afire Chief ’s full sister PS Alympia. I think I would either pick the Baskghazi x PS Alympia cross again or maybe The Renaissance bred to Baske Afire Revue SMP (Baske Afire x El Ghazi daughter) who is the elegant trotty filly that won reserve in the AEPA class at Buckeye in 2011. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I would have to say Mac Keff simply because he brought me so much that is important in my life.

Alyson Tobin

Alstad Arabian Farms Trainer Affiliation: Rohara Arabians—Katie Showers and Joe Alberti How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I started taking riding lessons when I was 6 years old and my father bought me my first Arabian when I was 7. He was a grey gelding named FF Abusir. I have been blessed with owning and showing many Arabian horses for the past 43 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Arabian horses are the foundation for all breeds of horses. They are majestic, intelligent, and great athletes. There is a special excitement and fun in owning an Arabian horse. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Make sure when you enter the ring that you are having fun! That is also the same advice I still get from my parents to this day. 204AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


AmAteur SnApShotS

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Tamara Tozer-Wald

Farm: Diamond T Farms Bein Performance Horses—Jessica Bein and The Rich Group—Roy Rich

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? In 1977, I was training Quarter Horses and Paints out of Rancho Del Rio in Anaheim. A group of Arabians were brought in and I was surprised (yes, I was told they were dingy and dumb) at their intelligence, kindness and interest in everything. When asked to take one on—Gai Apatche—I said yes, and it’s history from there! Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Horses are my life and I can’t imagine a day without them. Arabians, especially Half-Arabians, are at the top of the list,

Name:

although we do own Quarter Horses and Paints. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? This one’s easy … Stop Talking! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? Gee, sire-wise would be tough. It would be between The Iceman, TA Mozart and Black n Style. Mare-wise, I would love to breed one of them to a Shinning Spark daughter. (I have a granddaughter now!) If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Ah, no hesitation and no doubt … it would be Im Destinees Hobby (still trucking)! She is, undoubtedly, the most honest, hardworking, talented mare I have ever had the honor to know! As a junior, she was national champion reiner and now, many, many times (to many to count here) National and Reserve National Champion Trail! What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I’m sure I have had a few, but even an embarrassing moment in the ring is still a “moment in the ring” and I consider that good! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Starting a new “horsie/doggie” type business— won’t be ready until Scottsdale 2013—sshhhhh!

Mike Van Handel

Jerland Farm Trainer Affiliation: Jeff Schall, Jody Strand and Greg Gallun Farm:

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was introduced to the Arabian horse through a family friend when I was growing up. Lysle Swinkles exposed me to the horses, trainers, and owners. He was wonderful to me, even to the point of taking me to and paying for my riding lessons. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? They are what I own and exhibit because of their versatility and beauty. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Have a good ride, and when things are going well, make sure you get seen. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would want a Khadraj NA

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son out of a Sundance Kid V daughter who goes back to GG Samir. Think of how that thing could lope! If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? It would be amazing to be able to show *Khadraj NA again. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment?

Haven’t really had one—knock on wood! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? Between the horses and the kids, my time is pretty consumed. If I can find some extra time, I like to take my wife out on a date every so often.

Julie Velasco

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses—Alan Clanton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My mother introduced me to Arabians. She got me my first pony, which was a Half-Arabian/Welsh cross. I have been involved with Arabians for the last 35 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I have been involved with other breeds through the years, but my heart lies with the Arabian—they give 100% and love unconditionally. I can also never give enough thanks to the Arabian community as they have introduced me to my most treasured friendships that will no doubt last a lifetime! What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice my trainer has given me is to, “Trust my horse.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? There are too many incredible sires and dams to choose from. have to say my most embarrassing horse show moment I would have to say it depends on the discipline. actually happened this year at the 2012 Iowa Gold Star. Our industry has bred unbelievable stallions and I happened to go out with several horse show friends the mares to accomplish any goals one might have. night before I showed. Let’s say, a good time was had If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur by all, and I had to show first thing the next morning. competition, who would you pick, and why? One horse that During the class, I found myself a little boxed in, and comes to mind that I would have given anything to have my trainer’s wife told me to get out of the pack I was in. shown was a purebred gelding named Infra Red, that I immediately did what she said, but paid no attention Gordon Potts trained and showed for years, as well as his to the rider coming behind me and ended up cutting amateurs. I would say that horse performed 100% with her off. I felt awful. I would definitely say I should all his heart, every time out, and never let a rider down. have been issued a RWI—Riding While Intoxicated! He has long since been gone, but he has always stayed What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian in my mind and I compare English horses to him now. horses? Outside of riding and showing, I do have a passion What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? I would for shopping, reading, and, of course, people-watching.

Richard “Dick” S. Walden

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rancho Sonado, Arizona and California—Courtney Spicer How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years my wife, Nan, convinced me to attend Shelia Varian’s have you been involved with Arabian horses? I had been Summer Jubilee Sale in 2003. We came home with a a Quarter Horse person for more than 50 years until 4-year-old mare which I started riding immediately.

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Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I grew up on a farm with a feedlot and worked on my Dad’s cattle ranches as a teenager. I have had a horse since I was 4 years old. Nan and I use our Arabians on our ranch, and showing is a way to immerse ourselves in a hobby we love. Their intelligence, stamina, endurance, and human friendliness are something we really appreciate. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Take the time to do things right.

If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? We own three horses by some of the best performance stallions in the breed. They are a 4-year-old by Jullyen El Jamaal, a 3-yearold by Jake Jamaal, and a 3-year-old by Maclintock V. All three young horses are looking really good, and I am looking forward to showing them amateur myself soon. I think these three stallions are excellent sires. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? I think we own these horses: Agracie Girl V, National Trail Horse Champion, and Breeze V, who is doing very well in western pleasure, both amateur and open. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? When I swapped leads on Breeze V and was still reserve in a western pleasure class. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I am a 4th generation agriculturist. We are blessed to have a successful pecan farming and processing business. We love to observe the next generations of our family and our employees growing and assuming more responsibility in our farming enterprise. Watching our two grandsons learn to ride is of great pleasure.

Megan Weiler

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Rock Ledge How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? Seven years ago, after riding my aunt and uncle’s Arabians in Wyoming, I laid eyes on my first horse, a beautiful Half-Arabian named Halan Cairo. I couldn’t be more blessed she came into my life, because she started me on an amazing journey. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? Not only are Arabians beautiful, diverse, and talented, they have such brilliant personalities. I’ve never met an Arabian who couldn’t make me smile. Since I’ve been involved with these horses, my confidence has broke through in areas outside the barn. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? I have learned so much from Chris and Nicole throughout the years. I’m honored to have them as friends and my trainers. Out of all the outstanding advice, “trust your horse,” sticks out the most. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I’d love to

Arabians—Chris and Nicole Hall

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breed my mare, ZA Magnumouselle MTC, to Shaddofax. Both of their combined beauty and talent would create an outstanding show horse. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? There are so many legendary horses to choose from. One horse that has stuck in my mind as one who looks like a thrill to show is Second Sight. He was unanimous national champion last year in the Half-Arabian English pleasure open. He had the crowd on the edge of their seats and received a standing ovation.

What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Trying to get my side saddle skirt on in the warm-up. It’s like the couch scene from “Friends” when my mom and I try to get it on. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? I love music. It’s just always been something that keeps me motivated. I love listening to different genres, discovering new bands, discovering old bands, and hearing long lost B sides of my favorite bands. After a day at the barn, my favorite thing to do is put on some “Oasis” and play Ultimate Frisbee with my dog.

Beth Whelihan

Name: Farm: Whelihan Arabian Farms Trainer Affiliation: Mike Whelihan can transfer from the training barn to the show ring. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? I think the best advice I have derived from watching a barn operate for eight years is, “Let your trainer do his job.” There is nothing worse than second-guessing, doubting his plan, or thinking I know what is best. We share ideas, I give my thoughts with certain things, but when it comes to training a horse, I let him do his job. I stay off when I need to be off, and I never doubt what he is doing. That comes with trust, and we have a great deal of trust between us, on a personal level as well as a professional one. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose Pension as the sire and Heir To Love for the dam. I love Pension. Having had the pleasure of being around him for the last eight years here at the farm, I have a real appreciation for what he produces. They are pure thinking, hard working, oily horses that make riding a complete pleasure. They are built to drive from behind, which is the type of horse I prefer. Heir To Love was my favorite How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many mare ever. I lost her in January in a freak accident. We years have you been involved with Arabian horses? My have two babies out of her, and both are awesome. They mother owned a business with a lady who had an are totally different, but by far my favorite two Pension Arabian horse farm. They were breeders and exhibitors; babies I have ever been around. She died carrying a so, I spent every waking moment with them at their third foal, and I have always wondered what that baby farm, doing anything I could to be around the horses. would have been like. That is the baby I would wish for. I have been involved with horses for 33 years, with What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? a little sabbatical when I was having my children. I honestly never really get embarrassed. That Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I own Arabian horses comes from the ability to laugh at yourself. because they are a huge passion of mine. I exhibit them What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian because I enjoy showing and I enjoy seeing how things horses? I have two teenage boys who are both 208AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


AmAteur SnApShotS

very active in football; so, Mike and I spend most Saturday nights at the stadium cheering them on. I also spend a great deal of time fishing during the fall and winter. I love to Steelhead fish on the rivers

Name: Farm:

of the Olympic Peninsula. We have a second home on one of the rivers and that is usually where we go to relax and enjoy some quiet time when we can. I would fish everyday if I could get away with it!

Maddy Winer

Simply Spots Arabians Trainer Affiliation: Rohara Arabians—John Rannenberg and Joe Alberti How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I’ve wanted an Arabian since I read Marguerite Henry’s, “King Of The Wind,” when I was 7 years old. As a teenager, I finally saved up enough money to breed my Quarter Horse mare to an Arabian stallion. I’ve been involved with Arabian horses for the past 35 years. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? I love all breeds of horses; however, to me, an Arabian is the most beautiful and intelligent of breeds. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? Connect with your horse ... and breathe! If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would breed Sweet Shalimar V (Sundance Kid V’s dam) to Rohara Moonstorm for an incredible western horse. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? Wish I had the opportunity to show the great HalfArabian mare Miz American Pie in both halter and performance. She was such an exceptional mare as evidenced by all her national champion foals, and she had a tremendous amount of heart. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? After 35 years of showing horses, it is just about

impossible to pick just one embarrassing moment! What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? My life’s occupation and love is being an entertainer, singer/songwriter. I don’t even consider it work, but rather feel quite fortunate to be able to pursue two things I love—music and Arabian horses!

Janet Wojcik-Plouffe

Name: Trainer Affiliation:

Strawberry Banks Farm—Brian Murch and Blackwell Stables—Michele Betten

How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I have been involved with Arabian horses for over 32 years. My mom’s cousin from New Hampshire had Arabian horses and got us hooked in 1980, and I have been showing ever since. Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? My family owns Arabian horses because we enjoy the beauty and intelligence of the breed and, of course, the people that

are associated with the Arabian horse community. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? “Ride your own ride and pick your spots.” If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would select A Temptation and Princess Of Baske to be the sire and dam of my next show horse. Their beauty and athleticism in the show ring is amazing to watch. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in Volume 43, No. 4 | 209AA


AmAteur SnApShotS

amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? This question is interesting to me, as this past year I have had the opportunity to show a great champion in the western division. My family purchased Awe-Gus Tus this year, and I feel privileged to own and show this wonderful western horse. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? My husband’s “maiden voyage” in a charity class at the Silver Spur Horse Show in Hamburg, N. Y. What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of Arabian horses? When I am not working on our family farm, my husband and I enjoy travelling and going on adventures in various countries.

Whitney Wright

Name: Trainer Affiliation: Clanton Performance Horses—Alan Clanton How were you introduced to Arabian horses, and how many nationals and my pants ripped up the leg right before I had to get on and show. I went through the years have you been involved with Arabian horses? I was whole class with the inseam of my pants gone. introduced to Arabian horses when I first started riding and my parents leased an Arabian mare to What other hobbies/interests do you have outside of show. She was so wonderful and she hooked me Arabian horses? Is there a life outside Arabian on the breed. I’ve been hooked 20 years now. horses? I guess I would say in my time away from Why do you own/exhibit Arabian horses? There isn’t a Arabian horses, I enjoy spending time with my better breed to be involved with. I have had so husband and our Weimaraner, Stormy. n many wonderful experiences with my Arabians that I wouldn’t trade them for anything. What is the best advice your trainer has ever given you? The best advice my trainer has ever given me wouldn’t exactly be so much advice as may be the best encouragement, which is, “Do not worry about the class you just came out of, you can always nail the next one.” I always try and keep that in mind if a ride doesn’t go exactly how I want it, I should not to stress about what’s done, but fix it so I can nail the next one. If you could select the sire and dam of your next show horse, who would you choose and why? I would choose Undulata’s Nutcracker and Starr Llight. I’ve always liked a big-trotting Half-Arabian, and I like the Half-Arabians Undulata’s Nutcracker is producing. Starr Llight is just an incredible English mare. If you could choose any horse, dead or alive, to exhibit in amateur competition, who would you pick, and why? SA Sophisticated Lady. She is an awesome mare and is a blast to watch; so, she would have to be a blast to ride. What is your most embarrassing horse show moment? Definitely would be the first time I showed at

210AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


P resents

2012 U.s. national contenders Josh and Jennifer Quintus  FM  E, Pilot Point, TX  -- colonialwood@gmail.com

www.colonialwood.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 211AA


D IESEL SMOKE 212AA | A r A bi A N Hor se T i mes

CBA


U.S. National

Contender L i m i t e d b R e e d i n g s AvA i L A b L e F o R t h e 2 013 s e A s o n

(Sundance Kid V X C A Majia, by C A Hermoso+++/)

Arabian Western Pleasure Futurity with Josh Quintus 2012 Unanimous Region 9 Champion Western Pleasure Futurity 2012 Reichert Celebration Champion Western Pleasure Futurity Owned by: Timberidge Family llP • Jim and rhonda White • 817-907-1588 Colonial Wood Training CenTer • Josh Quintus • -- Volume 43, No. 4 | 213AA


U.S. National

Contender

R OMBAUER (IXL Aroundofaploz+/ x Rejoice)

Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 18-35 with Alex Holloway Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Alex Holloway Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR with Sheree Holloway 2012 Region 11 Reserve Champion Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR 2012 Region 11 Top Five Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AAOTR 2012 Region 9 Top Five Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AATR and AAOTR Owned by: Sheree and alex hOllOway 214AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


U.S. National

Contender

C aliente Virtuoso (C A Hermoso+++/ x Crystal Blue Persuasion)

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Open with Josh Quintus 2012 Reichert Celebration Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Open 2010 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse 2009 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 40 & Over with Robin Porter 2012 Unanimous U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure JOTR 2012 National Reserve Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure JTR 2012 Region 9 Champion AAOTR/AATR/JOTR/JTR 2010 Unanimous U.S. National Champion AAOTR & Maturity Owned by: RObin PORteR www.CrescentCreekFarms.com Volume 43, no. 4 | 215AA


U.S. National

Contender

F innagan

WR

Sir Fames HBV x Miss Escada

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over with Michele Moss 2012 Region 9 Top Five AAOTR & Select 2012 Region 11 Top Five AAOTR & Select Owned by: Michele MOss 216AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


U.S. National

Contender AvAilAble FOR PuRCHASe

V eniccioo (Versace x Bint Bint Diana) 4-year-old Arabian Gelding

Arabian Western Pleasure Select AATR with Kathy Cranford Region 11 Top Five Arabian Western Pleasure ATR Select Rider

S undance King R

(Sundance Kid V x Shes Bya King) 4-year-old Half-Arabian Gelding

Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure AAOTR Maturity with Kathy Cranford Half-Arabian Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse

Owned by: Kathy CranfOrd russKa farms LLC Volume 43, no. 4 | 217AA


U.S. National

Contender AvAilAble FOR PuRchAse

V ERY VERSACE (Versace x Elegant Dahncer)

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over with Jim Klein 2011 Region 11 Top Five Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 2011 Region 9 Top Five Arabian Western Pleasure Open 2010 and 2009 National Top Ten Arabian Western Pleasure Open Owned by: Jim Klein 218AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


U.S. National

Contender

MC

C OVER GIRL (Couturier x MC Khardia)

Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over with Lynn Andrews Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR maturity with Lynn Andrews 2012 Scottsdale Signature Stallion UnAnimOUS Champion Western Pleasure maturity ATR

M ILLANA L

(Millano x Bullish On Doc)

Half-Arabian Western Pleasure AAOTR 55 & Over with Lynn Andrews 2011 Scottsdale UnAnimOUS Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Open, 40 & Over AOTR/ATR and mares 2011 U.S. national Top Ten Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Open 2011 Region 9 Top Five

Owned by: Lynn Andrews www.windHorseArabians.com Volume 43, no. 4 | 219AA


Available For Purchase

russell crowe++

Md Hollywood

JoHnny Fantastic

WESTERN JUNIE MOON HA

(Starof Fame V+/ x PA Senneca) National Top Ten Jr. Horse and multiple Regional wins.

PA HOLLYWOOD STAR Very Versace

(LBA Lode Star x Hucks Prelude V) Reserve National Champion Futurity and multiple U.S. and Scottsdale Top Tens.

RUSSELL CROWE++

3-YEAR-OLDS

(Versace x Bint Bint Diana) Regional Top Five Western and Champion Halter Gelding.

BOLD HEIRESS HM

(Afires Heir x Pfiness) Country English prospect/ Under Saddle. Bridles tight.

PLAY IT LOUDER

HUNTER

(Turn It Up+ x Merlot CSP) Hunter Pleasure prospect/ Under Saddle.

SAN SOUCI V

TOBY (pending)

(Jullyen El Jamaal x Sweet Klassique V) Multiple Regional Reserve Champion. National Top Ten Western Jr. Horse

ENGLISH AMBROSIA FIRE

(Justafire DGL x Ambiannce) English Pleasure Maturity.

HOLLYWOOD VISION

220AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

(Eqynox x Evening Interlude) Multiple Regional Champion. National and Scottsdale Top Tens.

VENICCIOO

(Versace x Elegant Dahncer) Multiple U.S. and Canadian National Top Tens.

Prego rl

JOHNNY FANTASTIC

(Versace x Pasazz) Multiple National Champions, National and Scottsdale Top Tens.

VERY VERSACE

Pa Hollywood star

(Afire Bey V x Bint Bokara) Reserve National Champion Equitation. Multiple National and Scottsdale Top Ten.

(Valantino x RPA Electric Jam) Unanimous National Champion Gelding. National Champion Equitation and multiple Top Tens in Country.

PREGO RL

Veniccioo

MD HOLLYWOOD

(Afires Vision+/ x Miss Hollywood) Country English Pleasure prospect.

(Tamar Cartier x Miss Hollyhotwire) English Pleasure Prospect/Under Saddle with lots of trot & bridle.

Contact For More Info: JOSH & JENNIFER QUINTUS 8762 FM 455 E Pilot Point, TX 76258 940-686-5141 colonialwood@gmail.com www.colonialwood.com


It Is All About the Journey! In 1968 when Chuck Siemon first began training horses professionally, taking in any breed from Appaloosas to Paso Finos, he and his wife LuAnn would never have envisioned the journey that they were embarking upon. “Over the past 25 years, Chuck and I have been so blessed to be part of watching our son, Matthew, who grew up in this business, become one of the premier trainers and showmen in the Arabian breed." Says Chuck, “What Matt can do to inspire a horse in the ring is amazing to me. God has truly gifted him. Then the added blessing of having our younger son, Luke, join the team in the past decade has just added to our business in every way. Luke breaks all of our young horses. I have never seen anyone who has his gift of being able to break young horses and start them out as quickly and quietly as he does. Though less experienced in the show ring, he too, is making his mark. Someday, through hard work and perseverance, I believe he will become a force to be reckoned with in the show ring. LuAnn and I are indeed blessed to be able to work with both of our sons as we look to the future with anticipation and excitement." " We have a great group of clients who love their horses and love to show them in the amateur divisions. There is no greater thrill then to watch a young horse develop to the best of its potential and then to have their amateur owner be able to enjoy and succeed with their horse in the show ring. No, we would never have envisioned where this journey would lead. The many friends we have made, colleagues we have had the privilege of working with, and great horses are what this journey is all about.”

Matt and Luke Siemon

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

Good luck to everyone at U.S. Nationals!

Volume 43, No. 4 | 221AA


Ronde Vu

Mamage x Ames Deja Vu

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

2012 Canadian National Champion Arabian Park Horse

U.S. NatioNal CoNteNder with Matt SieMoN iN arabiaN Park horSe Owned by Shafer Arabians • Nancy Shafer, Gregg & Lotta Shafer W. Farmington, ohio

222AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


My Allience

rea

Allience x My Diamond Girl

2012 Canadian National Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse 2012 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse AOTR 2011 Canadian & U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse

U.S. NatioNal CoNteNder with Matt SieMoN iN half-arabiaN Park horSe

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

Volume 43, No. 4 | 223AA


Ronde Vu

Mamage x Ames Deja Vu

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

2012 Canadian National Champion Arabian Park Horse AAOTR

U.S. NatioNal CoNteNder with GreGG Shafer iN arabiaN Park horSe aaotr Owned by Shafer Arabians • Nancy Shafer, Gregg & Lotta Shafer W. Farmington, ohio

224AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


My Allience

rea

Allience x My Diamond Girl

2012 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse AOTR

U.S. NatioNal CoNteNder with GreGG Shafer iN half-arabiaN Park horSe aaotr

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

Volume 43, No. 4 | 225AA


u.s. national ContEndErs

Belles Afire

Cl

ArAbiAn Country English PlEAsurE AAotr 55 & ovEr with John MEnglE

Dock Of The Bay Afire Bey V x Baskins-Belle

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

Man Of The Ring x JJ Aaria

Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE aotr 55 & ovEr witH JoHn MEnglE and Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE Junior HorsE witH Matt siEMon Owned by John Mengle Lebanon, Ohio

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u.s. national ContEndErs

Shes A Hotty

Thank you, Prestige Farms, for producing and making available such a wonderful show horse. Thank you, Matt Siemon, and the entire Siemon team, for your awesome training—we have had a great start to our show career.

Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE sElECt aatr and Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE aaotr Maturity witH taMMiE dawson Also, see Tammie in Arabian Country English Pleasure Select AATR on Multi-National Champion Hes The Berries+//, owned by Matt & Sara Siemon Afire Bey V x She's A High Roller

owned by tammie Dawson Columbus, ohio

Hey Bey Be

++//

Thank you, Dallas Joiner, for letting us purchase this beautiful multi-national champion mare. We are having a blast! Owned by Justin & Deborah Baker Dublin, Ohio Hey Hallelujah++// x Scarlets Swirling Ember

Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE aaotr 36-54 witH dEboraH bakEr Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE sElECt aatr witH katiE tuttlE Half-arabian Country PlEasurE driving witH CHuCk siEMon

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

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Oops Ididit Again U.S. NatioN atioNal atio Nal CoN Nal oNteNderS o NteN Nte teNder NderS derS

SF

aEPa Half-arabian saddlE sEat futurity witH Matt siEMon owned by Richard & Justine Goodrow manchester, new Hampshire

Baske Afire x Captivating Style

Crimson Express

HCa

Siemon StableS 9311 lower Valley Pike new Carlisle, ohio 45344 937-849-1487 Chucksiemon@sbcglobal.net

IXL Noble Express x Dream Copy PHF

Half-arabian Country EnglisH PlEasurE oPEn and Half-arabian Country PlEasurE driving witH Matt siEMon owned by David & olivia Kern Holland, new York

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Time For Your CLOSE-UP

What are the similarities between yourself and your horse? We’re both white, and we both love popsicles. (Funky White Boy) What makes you happiest? My family, friends, and horses. I don’t know what I’d do without them. Oh and my pug, Laverne! She is the greatest. What is your motto? “You better check ‘yo’ self, before you wreck ‘yo’ self.” What is your very first memory with the Arabian horse? When I was really young, I’d always be waking up in the middle of the night to watch the foals being born. I’d always try to put first dibs on them! (I still do that one, actually.) I also remember walking down to the barn so I could watch my dad give my mom riding lessons. I started riding when I was really young, but I didn’t start showing until I was 11. My first show was the Triple Crown, which was always held at the Indianapolis Fairgrounds. I have no idea what place I got or even how the class went, but I remember thinking how fun it was, and then noting how itchy the pants were. I eventually learned to embrace the itchy pants. I also remember entering Laverne in the “Dog Show” class. We got a ribbon for participation. 234AA | A r A BI A n HOr Se T I MeS


If you could show one horse from the past, who would you show and why? Apollopalooza! He was such an amazing horse, and he still continues to bless the breed today through his progeny. If you could have one super power, what would it be and why? To teleport. I’m afraid of flying, so it would be nice to get where I need to go instantly without having to get on a plane. What is the most memorable piece of show ring advice you’ve ever received? “... And don’t forget to ride.” It’s so easy for me to enter the show ring all tangled in nerves. Remembering this always helps me focus on the riding rather than the nerves. What would be your ultimate dream job? I have no idea what I want to do when I grow up yet. I’m a junior in high school; so, I’m always getting asked questions like: “Where do you want to go to college?” or “What do you want to study?” The truth is that I have absolutely no idea. There are so many amazing opportunities. It is super exciting, but it’s also overwhelming. One thing I know for certain is that I never want to quit my involvement with the Arabian horse. What do you love most about showing Arabian horses? The community. I love going to the horse shows and seeing all of my best friends who I only get to see a few times a year. We always start talking like we just saw each other yesterday, when, in reality we haven’t seen one another in months. Who has had the biggest influence in your involvement with Arabians? My parents, definitely! I was born and raised in the Arabian horse industry, so if it weren’t for them I probably wouldn’t have gotten such an amazing opportunity to show! What have you learned from riding and showing that has helped you in other areas of your life? Riding has taught me that nothing worth having comes easy. You have to work very hard to accomplish your dreams. Sometimes you might win, but you’ll lose too. That is okay, because in the end it’s not about the ribbon. Special thanks and appreciation to: My mom and dad for giving me such an amazing opportunity and supporting me no matter what! To Leah Beth Boyd, John Golladay, Jesse Clinton and Vicki Humphrey for being awesome, keeping things fun, making sure I check myself before I wreck myself, and being the best trainers I could ever imagine. Also, a special thanks to Mary Wilson for being a great rider and continuing to inspire me everyday.

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Eric Mendrysa: 734-652-8508

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The Evolution Of An

Arabian Training Team

—Rob Bick And Caralyn Schroter by Mary Kirkman Individually, they are both highly-respected trainers in the Arabian breed. Their list of national champions, both horses and amateur riders, is beyond anyone’s reckoning, and there have been other honors as well that have illustrated the upward arc of their reputations. For instance, both have been nominated for APAHA Horsemen’s Awards routinely, and not just in one category; Caralyn Schroter is often up for western or hunter, and Rob Bick has been in the top five for western, English, hunter and halter, and once was in contention for Horseman of the Year. In 2003, Schroter was named APAHA Female Western Trainer of the Year, and last year, Bick won the Arabian Horse Times Readers’ Choice Award as Versatile Trainer of the Year. Yet, no matter how good they are on their own, they are better together. They are among the very few high-level training couples in the business—a partnership successful not only professionally, but personally, sharing a home as well as a barn. Nine times out of 10, you hear not about “Rob” or “Caralyn,” but about “Rob and Caralyn.”

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The easiest summary of the personalities that make up this combination is that Bick is outgoing and gregarious, with a library of stories and an ever-present humor, while Schroter is the quiet one, the typically reserved Canadian. True, say their clients, but only as far as it goes, which isn’t very far. Schroter isn’t the life of the party on first meeting, but give her half a chance to know you, and conversational air time is up for grabs. Friends also mention that, for the record, Schroter has a terrific sense of humor too—it’s just sometimes Bick’s is stage-worthy. Neither is likely to blow his or her own horn; ask how good they are, and they far prefer to show you. When it comes to the professional expertise that has made their career, the wealth is shared, and clients find their variation in teaching styles effective. “They work together on different things, but from two different points of view,” says one. “Their different personalities are always fun when you get lessons from both of them at the same time!”


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Rob Bick celebrates his 30th year as a professional horse trainer in 2012, which also marks the 20th year he and Schroter have been a team. Ask them what is most important to them at this point, however, and it is not the show ring or even the horses and clients (although the clients and horses rank right up there). It is each other.

Rob Bick

Rob Bick grew up in Charlo, Mont., a minute town in the northwestern part of the state. About an hour from Missoula, it is close to the National Bison Range, where Bick worked as a teenager, briefly contemplating a career in wildlife management. Clearly, animals are in his blood, but as it turned out, his future lay with the domesticated variety. Early on, he demonstrated a talent for training; growing up on a dairy farm, he cut his teeth teaching calves to lead. His equine career—although he was far from envisioning it as a career—began when he won a pony at the age of 8. “My mom had bought some tickets to a raffle at a divisional basketball tournament,” he remembers, “and one of the things to win was a Shetland pony. When I got home, I was yelling, ‘Mom, we won!’

And she’s like, ‘You won the game?’ ‘No, we won the pony!’ I trained him to do all kinds of things—he was the brokest pony in Montana.” It was not until Bick accompanied his father to the 1975 Arabian Horse Fair in Reno that the idea of training for more than pleasure began to flicker in his mind. Looking back now, he remembers the Fair’s stallion row, where he got his first look at leading stallions such as Fadjur and Khemosabi. However, it was a human connection that would have the biggest impact on his future: he met horseman Murrell Lacey. Lacey, who stood *Karadjordje, operated Lacey’s Arabian Center in Walnut Creek, Calif., and offered a two-year apprentice horsemanship program. When Bick graduated from high school, he remembered the program; he was eyeing the University of California at Davis, with the ultimate goal of wildlife biology, and thought he might work for Lacey at the same time. He did go to work for Lacey, but things didn’t go quite as planned. “I got hooked on showing and training,” he says simply. “Murrell was the first person I’d been around who did it for a living, and he was amazing with the horses, the way Volume 43, No. 4 | 245AA


the evolution of An ARAbiAn tRAining teAm he could read their mind and how he could teach people how to train. I learned a lot of basic training from him.” A look now at Rob Bick’s life in the 1980s is a walk down memory lane for anyone who was in the Arabian breed at the time. Less than a mile from Lacey’s was Make Believe Farm, home of *Padron, the stallion who would define his generation in halter. Bick saw him before he began knocking down titles. And later, when Lacey loaned him to client Bill Van Der Meer at Saddle Rock Ranch in Sonoma, the young horseman got to know the Russian stallion *SR Nadom. Within a couple of years, the two stallions’ rivalry would headline the 1982 show season, with *Padron emerging the champion. Saddle Rock was also the home of Sonoma Lady, who would go on to be a Canadian National Champion and U.S. National Reserve Champion Mare, as well as the dam of Dakar El Jamaal. “She was unusually beautiful for her day,” he remembers, “one of those who when you see a bunch of babies, you look at her and say, ‘wow.’”

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Bick’s resume over the next several years, both of jobs and the people he worked with, reveals the depth and variety of his increasing experience. His first stop after Lacey’s was with trainer Glen Wilson; while at Nicasio Valley Arabians, Wilson had advised George Dexter to buy partinterest in a 2-year-old named Bey Shah, and he had been the first to show the stallion. He was at Southern Cross, owned by Doobie Brothers drummer John Hartman and his wife, when Bick arrived, and he offered his new assistant the chance to begin showing horses. Bick’s next stop was Nicasio Valley, where he picked up more experience with halter horses. The oldest Bey Shah babies were 3 then, he recalls, and there weren’t many, but the stallion’s name already was acquiring a luster. “There were 150 to 175 mares coming to the farm to be bred to him,” he says. “That was in the days before shipped semen.” Jo West, now Jo Lauter, was farm manager, and many of the horses Bick worked were being readied to show with Mike Neal.


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Then it was on to Palo Verde Arabians, where Dick Adams was the trainer. “He had a horse there named Fame VF, who was a 2- or 3-year-old,” Bick notes. He was there for a year and a half before the desire to strike out on his own grew too strong to ignore. “I was a pretty bad horse trainer at that point,” he admits candidly, “but I was scrambling. In the early 1980s, even a bad horse trainer could make a living, but as things got a

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little slimmer, I got to be ‘have halter, will travel.’” When having his own business didn’t work out, he returned to a succession of jobs, culminating in another shot at being on his own, at Castle Rock Arabians. He had married by then, and his then mother-in-law underwrote the project. “It’s interesting how many people had trail horses they wanted to board,” he observes of the operation which backed up to a state park. “So, it was a little training and a lot of boarding.” Pretty soon he longed for the show ring.


Rob bick And cARAlyn SchRoteR It took leaving Castle Rock to begin working his way back to his original goals. The first step came when he was hired by Santa Cruz, Calif., Arabian breeder Mustafa Sabankaya. Sabankaya had several good horses, but many of his homebred youngsters—by that time 4 and 5 years old—had barely been touched. Even so, in his own words, Bick got lucky with that job. Sabankaya was the manager of the Ariston Syndicate, and he sent an Ariston son to LaCroix Ltd. in Texas, which Ray LaCroix and his father, Dr. Eugene LaCroix, had opened after Lasma was disbanded. That was Bick’s ticket. “I got hooked up with Ray LaCroix,” he says. “He hired me as a halter trainer.” Now known for his skill as a performance trainer, he smiles at his abilities back then; he could train horses to do all sorts of things, but his riding skills were another matter. “I wasn’t a very good rider,” he says frankly. “At Saddle Rock, one of the jobs I had was to condition broodmares, and I would actually put a f lat saddle on them and try to learn to post. But I had never ridden in a saddle, and I could not ride in a f lat saddle. I could

talk somebody into paying me to show a halter horse, but I couldn’t get paid for riding. By the time I went to LaCroix, I was thinking, ‘I’d better get good at this or get out.’” LaCroix Ltd. became not just a job, but an education. “Murrell had been a big inf luence in learning how to start horses and train them, but finishing them was another story,” Bick says. “Ray LaCroix was amazing at that. He could polish on a horse and make it finished, and teach you how to present a horse in the show ring and what was important and how you were going to win. He really helped me with my riding. I’d get my halter horses done and then sneak up to the training barn to learn as much as I could, and I got a whole lot better. He made it where I could make a living in this business, and I owe a lot to him.” LaCroix was important for another reason as well. When Bick left two years later, a young Canadian trainer named Caralyn Schroter was hired to fill his job. That is how they met.

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Caralyn Schroter

Schroter, who is four years younger than her husband, was born and raised in Edmonton, Alberta. There was plenty of horsemanship in her family, she cites an array of relatives who influenced her career. It all started with her father, who purchased her first Arabian, and her cousins, the Jacksons, Schroters and Archers, who remain in the breed today. She spent her early years riding with them, and then, with other cousins that showed hunter/jumpers. Even with that promising beginning, however, she quit horses altogether for awhile to finish school. The hiatus didn’t last long; she returned to work with trainer Pam Zimmerman for three years, and then signed on with horseman Mike Whelihan. There, she often traveled with the show string and learned more about

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not just riding and training, but ring presentation. At the time, Whelihan had horses for Pinnacle Arabians, home of the multi-national champion park stallion Zodiac Matador, and eventually that became Schroter’s next stop. Under Whelihan’s supervision, she was responsible for starting the youngsters, preparing them for show careers. And finally, when it was time for her to spread her wings again, she heard about a job in Texas at LaCroix Ltd. Over the next three years there, she rode and trained horses and worked with amateurs, polishing her skills, until finally, she too was ready for something new. Looking back at her career’s development to that point, Schroter is grateful for her mentors—not so much for the specifics of what they taught her as for how they allowed her to develop her own knowledge. “I think they all added something to my desire to keep doing this,” she


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says. “I wasn’t told I couldn’t do it. When you’re learning to be a horse trainer, you’re constantly questioning yourself—‘can I do this?’ I hoped that if I couldn’t do it, someone would tell me, like, ‘you can’t sing, find another job.’ I never got that; instead, I got encouragement. Pam Zimmerman allowed me to show horses. From Mike Whelihan, I learned how to train a horse better. And from Ray LaCroix, I learned how to train and finish a horse, and what to do in a high pressure situation.

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And working there, I learned that I love high-pressure situations—I get better for them.” LaCroix did something else for her and for Bick, although he wasn’t aware of it. He became the catalyst that set in motion what eventually would be RBC Show Horses. When Schroter let him know she would be moving on, he called Rob Bick to see if he would like to come back. By that time, however, Bick had set up his own operation,


Rob bick And cARAlyn SchRoteR which he called Pacific Park. He had gone back to California’s Bay Area, his first marriage had dissolved, and he didn’t want to return to Texas. In fact, he had a job opening himself—so he rang up the young horsewoman who had done so well in his old job at LaCroix. Caralyn Schroter accepted his job offer. That was in 1992, and two years later, they were a whole lot more than employer/employee. They were a team, and they were married. “When I met Rob, there was an instant connection,” Schroter recalls. “We are so comfortable sharing everything with each other. Rob has an innate ability to make me feel secure and confident, and his unbelievable amount of patience is awe-inspiring. There are so many things that he has taught me.”

With the broad base of knowledge he had acquired, Bick could be the next step on Schroter’s learning curve—but she had important contributions to make as well. As he remembers it, she made him better at what he did. “A lot of trainers end up bouncing around, and I bounced around in a hurry when I was younger,” Bick observes. “I had no stability whatsoever. She’s definitely brought a lot of stability to what I do. But it works both ways; I think we help stabilize each other really well. “She talked me into showing at the national level,” he adds more specifically. “Actually, the truth is that she is a great businessperson, and I’m a terrible businessperson. When we did Pacific Park together, she kind of got us in business.”

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The Team

Over the next few years, the dovetail fit of Bick and Schroter’s horsemanship and personalities became apparent. “Looking back, I think we were raised the same,” Schroter says today, searching for reasons they clicked so well. “We both grew up on dairy farms, etc. We both worked at LaCroix Ltd., so our theories of training horses are very close, although the actual doing gets a little different as we get into the finishing end of a horse sometimes. I think [what is critical is] the amount of trust we have with each other, both personally and professionally, that when we do ask the other person for something, we always get an honest answer. It’s never been a politically correct answer.” By 1996, the synergy of their partnership was attracting attention. In 1993, Bick drove Diamond Bask to the U.S. National Reserve Championship in Pleasure Driving, and two years later, one of his amateurs led PR Padrons Prince to the title of U.S. National Reserve Champion AAOTH, while Schroter saw one of her amateurs ride TF Totally Kool to the U.S. National Championship in English Pleasure AAOTR 40 and Over. BP Meditation Bey was another in their barn at the time, first a U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Filly and then a U.S. and Canadian National Top Ten in Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse. Bick started Mamage and showed the stallion for his first year in the ring, which culminated in a U.S. National Top Ten in English Pleasure Junior Horse. “He was one of my first good English horses,” the trainer remembers. A 4-year-old at the time, Mamage belonged to Marjorie Jacks, who worked for him. There were nationally-known clients as well. Among them was Sheila Varian, for whom Bick rode Autumn Blaze V to a U.S. National Top Ten in English Pleasure Junior Horse and a U.S. National Reserve Championship in Informal Combination, and Santa Fe V to U.S. and Canadian National Reserve Championships in Western Pleasure Junior Horse. Still, when they left for the U.S. Nationals in Louisville in 1996, they had no idea that their world was about to change. That was when Dr. DeCarol Williamson, who with his wife, Jan, was establishing the new Dolorosa Arabians in Rocky Point, N.C., offered them jobs. It was an exciting opportunity; the Williamsons envisioned a

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comprehensive breeding farm and public training stable, staffed with highly-credentialed professional horse people. Tommy Garland would be handling western, and Ted Carson had just been hired for halter. Chip Capo-Bianco was the breeding manager, and Mary Leadley would be running the office. Bick and Schroter sent their staff home with the horses and drove to North Carolina to look at the farm. Within weeks, they had moved east. They would be there for 11 years. To this day, they remain grateful for their time at Dolorosa. “DeCarol and Jan were amazing to work for,” Bick says. “If we hadn’t gone there, we never would have been able to come here.” “I was very tentative when we first moved there,” Schroter admits, “but Rob assured me it would be a good move to work for DeCarol, and he was right. Once we got here and got to know him and his family, it couldn’t have been a better situation. They allowed us to grow—they backed us to grow—and allowed us to be a part of their family.” It was an amazing time, as a spellbinding array of horses were bred and/or trained at Dolorosa. Some passed through Bick and Schroter’s hands and some were with the other trainers, but the list of top horses in the ring with the prefix of “DA,” signifying the North Carolina nursery, was extensive. One of the first that Bick broke was DA Lightning Jack, a Half-Arabian who would go on to win seven national championships and two reserves between 1998 and 2006. (He remains a favorite.) Then there was DA Trinidad, 2002 U.S. National Champion in the English Futurity, and two years later, U.S. National Reserve Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse. Schroter trained DA Josiah to a Canadian National Championship and a U.S. National Reserve in Hunter Pleasure, as well as accounted for CBS Bahznia, U.S. National Champion Half-Arabian Western Pleasure Junior Horse. They had Afire Storrm when she was a young halter horse, showing to the 2004 Canadian National Championship for Mares 3-5, before selling her on for more national titles. And for Dolorosa client Frank Chisholm, they won the 2004 U.S. National Championship in the Western Pleasure Futurity with May Dancer V. And there was another horse, one that they never owned or showed, but who was a favorite and in their care for the


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the evolution of An ARAbiAn tRAining teAm final eight years of her life: U.S. National Champion Park Horse Scarlet Lace. She came to them while they were at Dolorosa and accompanied them when they opened RBC Show Horses. “That was a horse I always wanted to ride,” Bick smiles. “I just had no idea it would be when she was 30 years old and it would be bareback. We got her when she was 25, and she lived to be 33.” In 2006, when Scarlet Lace was 30, Bick and Schroter took her to the U.S. Nationals for the presentation of champions that marked the show’s final year in Louisville, Ky. “She was a unique horse—a freak,” Bick recalls, “so pretty, and so freaky-moving too. When we had her at Louisville, we did a presentation every day in the commercial exhibit area.” One memory, he says, is indelible. “Bazy Tankersley was there petting her, and crying. It was unbelievable. That horse touched everybody.” By the time that Dolorosa disbanded its public training operation in 2007, Bick and Schroter were committed to North Carolina and settled in Smithfield, about half an hour from Raleigh. Many of their customers—including the Chisholms, George and Debbie Attwood, Nan Harley, Debra Hines, Laura and Abby Gay, Teresa Craig, and others—stayed with them. “Probably the biggest motivation was the great clients that Dolorosa had spent so many years finding and building relationships with,” Schroter says of their choice of location. “We wanted to get to an area where we could keep those people, and not only did we keep them, but we kept DeCarol and his family too. They’re still clients of ours. I wouldn’t have put my finger on this state—I didn’t know anything about it—but now that I’m here, the people are so laid-back but are still so forward, and they want to do well.”

RBC Show Horses

Nearly five years into their own farm, which is situated on 14 acres and includes a 50-stall training barn, riding arena, large reining track and other amenities, they have approximately 25 clients on a regular basis, with about 50 to 60 horses. They are known for the broad spectrum of their talent (they can compete nationally in just about every division of the show ring except jumpers and working western horses, due to the extra space and set-up those activities require), and they turn out young horses as well.

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“I would like to think that when you put a horse in training with us, we’re creating value in that horse,” says Bick. “If it’s a young horse that is getting started from scratch, we hope that every month we are adding some value, to the point that that horse is the best he can be. That’s the point—that each individual horse gets to be the best he can be. Whether he gets to be a national champion, who knows, but hopefully he is rising to the occasion at the level he can be.” With young horses in particular, they pay attention to what the horse does best. “We do a lot of different disciplines,” Bick notes, “so when the horses come in, I don’t try to get a preconceived idea of what that horse is going to be. Does it want to be English, is it high-energy, or is it a little slower and more easy going? Does it want to wear its frame high or low? A lot of times, the apple doesn’t fall from the tree. Usually, a horse will do what it’s bred to do, but there are exceptions—that’s why they’re called exceptions. You want to be open-minded and not force it into something it doesn’t want to do for a career, because you just end up with everybody miserable. “Rob and Caralyn listen to the horses,” one longtime client observes, “and we listen to Rob and Caralyn.” Plenty of RBC Show Horses’ contenders have made names for themselves in the ring. One favorite for Schroter was Nan Harley’s CBS Top Dog, who racked up eight national championships and reserves under her direction. Bick rode The Trashman to the Canadian National Reserve Championship in Country English Pleasure, and Jeanne Black’s Finding Fame to the Canadian National Championship in Hunters. With Arezzo NL, Bick nabbed the U.S. National Championship in Western Pleasure Junior Horse, while Schroter, with Annie Oakley V, won the U.S. and Canadian National Championship in Hunter Pleasure Junior Horse. And that is just a selection from the past few years. In the amateur ranks, the list of successful horse and rider combinations goes on forever. CF Jimmy Neutron won the 2011 U.S. National Championship in Half-Arabian English Pleasure Maturity with Katie Burr, who also rode The Trashman to the Scottsdale Championship in Half-Arabian Country English Pleasure AOTR and won last year’s amateur title at Canada as well. At Region 12 in May, PA Valparaiso Kid was the Champion Western Pleasure Junior Horse for Schroter. Over the past few


Rob bick And cARAlyn SchRoteR point, they say, is to create horsemen (or women), not just passengers. For clients who expand their Arabian commitment beyond the show barn, they also offer counsel on breeding and on nutrition for mares and foals, and early training programs that ensure the foals a head start in life. In practice, there is no set rule as to who schools which horse, and on occasion, depending on what a horse or amateur is doing, they may move from one to the other trainer. “Despite the fact that we work together 24/7, we have our different perspectives,” Schroter notes. “Some people really

years, All Dolled Up EA has won title after national title in the amateur divisions— country English pleasure, country pleasure driving and lately side saddle—and a few years ago threw in a Canadian National Championship in Country Pleasure Driving with Bick at the controls. And the list goes on, both in the open and amateur ranks. Horses, obviously, are just part of the picture. The focus, what they are known for, has become their standout amateurs, as may be obvious by the list of champions that represent the barn. However, clients say that their most appreciated talent is not just turning out national-level show horses, but their ability to communicate, to teach, to make it possible for their riders to succeed personally. “We’re good about showing them how to school their own horses,” Schroter nods, “rather than just setting them up there and sending them out.” She and Bick want to see their riders so competent that when they go in the ring, they are capable of showing their horses without coaching from the rail if the situation ever requires it. Or that they can take their horses home now and then if that is what works best for them. The

enjoy my style better than his or his better than mine, and some horses are like that too. There are a lot of times where he’ll do the horse and I’ll do the rider once the rider is on the horse, or I’ll do the horse and he’ll do the rider. So, it’s a huge team situation that quite often happens so that people can have that whole show horse experience.” In general, while Bick is especially good at being able to start a rider ground-up, Schroter is known for her talent

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the evolution of An ARAbiAn tRAining teAm in putting “the finish” on their amateur riders. “I can take an amateur rider that has been at a certain level and move them to the next step,” she acknowledges, but adds, “I’m not very good at the beginning-type rider level.” She pauses. “Okay, that’s not necessarily true, because once I take you and try to mold you, I invest myself 100 percent into the job to get the best out of you and the horse.” She just has to know that an amateur is seriously invested in improving. “She is the best at teaching amateurs that I’ve ever seen,” Bick says bluntly. “Unbelievable. She is a talented horse person, and I’m extremely lucky to have someone that talented to work with every day. The best thing that ever happened to me was her.” He grins. It is not the first or only time that he makes it clear: for him, the sun rises and sets in Caralyn Schroter.

The Dynamic Of A Team

How much of their success as a team rests not just in their ability to work together, but in the added dimension of their personal relationship as well? “A lot, I think,” says Bick. “We do work very well together, but I see it especially in that we’ve been able to have the clientele we have, and have some stability in this business and survive in it, because it’s a tough business to do.” It’s fair to ask if, given the time commitment of running a successful barn and with both of them training horses, their not having children has played a role in the level of their accomplishments. “It’s allowed us to keep going as strong and consistent as we both want to be,” Schroter responds candidly. “We’re both very competitive people, and it has allowed us to stay competitive. “Rob left the decision up to me,” she continues. “I went through a period of where I wanted children, but it didn’t work out that way. Now, in 20/20, that allows us to have a lot of junior riders and nieces and nephews that we can visit without the responsibility of being parents.” That is a much-appreciated situation for many of the barn’s junior exhibitors, who often regard Bick and Schroter as surrogate parents or good-fun older siblings. (“I think I skipped prom one year to spend a week with them,” confides one youth rider. “I stay with

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them at their house, and I’ve gotten to know them, their personalities in and out of the barn. They’re great role models—they’ve taught me a lot of life lessons, not just riding.”) “There’s been a lot of times we’ve had kids that stayed with us three or four days at a time in the summer,” Bick confirms, and describes movie excursions and dinners, jokes and long conversations. “So, we’ve had kids around—just not our own.” It is also fair to ask how much Bick and Schroter think alike. Do they just naturally agree on an approach to life? Bick takes the question, but the answer can’t be nailed down. It is not necessarily that they just naturally agree, he says. It’s more that decisions just seem to happen. “I depend a lot on just what comes to us,” he says. “I don’t know if that’s divine intervention or what, but I feel like somewhere along the way, I’ve had some help. I kind of listen to that, whether it’s my conscience or whatever. I don’t necessarily sit there and think about things, plot them out. I just go through life trying to enjoy it, and have been, I think, very fortunate—kind of blessed in being able to have a job that I like to do, with somebody I like doing it with. That’s just how we are.” What they have now, he says, is the high point of his career so far—not so much one horse or one ride or one job, but the life they have. “I think being able to buy our own farm is the highlight,” he says. “I never thought that we would. I was always so bad with money, I always thought, ‘well, I’ll end up having to work for somebody else on their farm, or rent a farm or whatever.’” Asked for the high point of her career, Schroter sometimes has cited favorite horses, but on ref lection, she too appreciates more than just the individual successes. “We’ve had clients that have been with us for more than 12 years,” she says. “Every relationship that we end up having with a client or their children or family, no matter how long or short—everybody brings something to the table.” Asked to nail down what is most important in her career now, from a purely professional standpoint, she is succinct. “Respect. Success.” Does she have them? She nods. “We’re getting them now.”


Rob bick And cARAlyn SchRoteR So, assuming that one priority is to maintain the level of success they now enjoy, what is left to accomplish? “There are some things that I still want to do,” Bick says. “I think getting a judge’s card is one. And we have some clinics every year; I would love to do more of that, I guess educating other people on some of the things that I’ve learned.” He adds with typical self-deprecation, “I’m getting to the point where I’m starting to feel like I maybe do know a little bit about the horse business.”

Bick, the more circumspect Schroter—but their dreams are remarkably on track.

It turns out that until the past few years, no matter how accomplished he was, he still suffered from that human sensation of not allowing himself enough credit for his knowledge. As he matures, he’s seeing a different side of the coin, and that is that his experience is there to be shared. “I still am trying to learn,” he says, “but I do think I have some things to offer. I would love to be able to help teach, either through doing some judging or some clinics or those kind of things—just be able to voice my opinion and maybe help some other people along the way.”

“My dream for Rob is that he always has humor and happiness around him,” Schroter offers, “and I hope that his reputation as a great horse trainer translates into many more show ring successes. I love Rob Bick.”

There are many years left in their careers and in their lives together. Asked what each wants for the other, their personalities could not be more clear—the extroverted

“I don’t want Caralyn to ever feel like she’s looked back and didn’t do something that she wanted to do,” Bick says, “or that I kept her from doing anything that she wanted to do. I hope she has a fulfilled life; I want her to be able to live her life to the fullest—and I want to go along with her, but I never want to be in the way.” He smiles. “I hope that keeps her around.”

“I got lucky,” Bick reflects. “Really, really lucky.” He reaches for words, but they are hard to find. “I don’t know—she must have got sent to me from somewhere else. When I first met her, I just thought, ‘Well, there’s something about her.’ I saw it with the way she works horses and the things she can do, and then, when we got together—I mean, personally— we just got along right away. The most important part of my life is Caralyn Schroter.” n

Volume 43, No. 4 | 259AA


Flood Show Horses sc don julio western pleasure open with brandon flood owned by: mayree nolan

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My EvEr-BroadEning World as a HorsEWoMan

My My Ever-Broadening Ever-Broadening World World Endurance Endurance Has Has by

Martha Murdock

I have been riding Arabian horses for over 50 years. The Arabian horse has given me an extraordinary life and satisfying career, but on a day in March 2010, the Arabian horse began to take on a new role in my life. Up until that point, my career had been limited to training show horses. Not just Arabians but several breeds, including Hackneys and Saddlebreds. I am versatile within the show world and have enjoyed many divisions of competition. Since 1973, my show life has been lived from October to October, with the few exceptions of when our U.S. Nationals were held during the summer. On that day in March 2010, I was involved in an Arabian breed promotion during the World Equestrian Games Youth Event in the new arena at the Kentucky Horse Park. The Event was created to educate Kentucky youth of all ages about the various disciplines of the games. When I witnessed the audience reaction to endurance rider Brenda Kenley and her white Arabian gelding, Elite Treasure, I too began an education about endurance riding. After seeing the audience react to Brenda and Elite Treasure, I pondered the resonance of her ride. Seeing her ride around in the tack of the discipline lacked the excitement of Grand Prix jumping, the beauty of dressage, and the technical challenges of driving. Why did these people seem to connect with her the way they did? Suddenly it hit me; these parents, children and young adults could relate to Brenda because they could see themselves participating in her sport. While planning for the Alltec FEI World Equestrian Games™ 2010 and our Arabian breed promotion, I remembered what happened with Brenda, and I knew that if we were able to create a horse dream for WEG spectators, it would be that they could imagine becoming competitors—on Arabians—in Endurance. It was imperative that we center our efforts around accomplishing 262AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


EndurancE Has coME To MEan so Many THings.

As As A A Horsewoman Horsewoman

Come Come To To Mean Mean So So Many Many Things Things this goal. Little did I know that soon I would become one of those people. Fast forward to the morning of Endurance at the WEG in October. My friend Mary Trowbridge and I watched with uneducated eyes as a field of Arabians started their 100 mile event. The tears that rolled down our cheeks were created by pride and awe at the sight in front of us. The world was represented, and the breed that we love so much was center stage. I was not prepared for the beauty of that sight or for the passion that watching it would create in me. At that moment, I decided that I was going to participate in the sport of endurance. I have served on the USEF Drugs and Medication Committee for 20 years, and Valerie Kanavy is the representative for endurance. The USEF’s 2011 Annual Meeting was in Lexington, Ky., and during that meeting, Valerie invited me to come to her March endurance ride in Williston, Fla. I accepted the challenge and took one of my training horses to begin the first of many miles. I finished my first 25 mile ride and I was hooked. That gelding and I did four more rides together before I sold him at the end of the summer. In November, following the 2011 show season, I prepared two more horses for the rides in Florida during the

winter months. I completed the miles required for me to be eligible for FEI (Fédération Equestre Inernationale), riding a horse for Valerie Kanavy. Both horses I had taken down to Florida also completed their mileage for FEI competition. Unfortunately, the 2012 Biltmore ride, which was to be my first opportunity to ride FEI together with my horses, was scheduled at the same time I had to be showing horses at Region 12 in Perry, Ga. It was impossible to be two places at one time. Determined to keep logging miles, I scheduled my next ride in Indiana in June. It was at that ride, in a driving rain, that my world changed again. I had a bad fall with my horse and suffered a broken left leg. Let me add that what happened to me is no more typical of endurance riding than having a fall during practice is to main ring riders. Accidents happen; mine happened on an endurance ride, but my regard for safety applies across the board in any horse sport and practically any physical sport you choose. To get back to my endurance ride in March: I was so excited to be there, even with the rain. On check-in, the vet, Jim Baldwin, told me that my horse would have the lowest heart rate of the day—which he did. He was ready Volume 43, No. 4 | 263AA


My EvEr-BroadEning World as a HorsEWoMan I went. Bill stayed with me and rode back out to the road until we could find help. He gave up his ride in order to help me get to safety. In my opinion, that is the hallmark of a true competitor. The need to win is never stronger than the respect for other competitors and the realization that the person in distress can be anyone. The ride management summoned a trailer to pick up our horses and Bill stayed with me until another vehicle came to take me to the hospital. I have a spiral fracture of the left tibia, and as I write this, I am still in a cast. I have no idea what I would have done without Bill Taylor or without my kind horse, who must have known I was hurt because I had to ride with my leg out of the stirrup. He got me to safety without further incident.

to run and show his stuff! We started the ride and his heart rate was steady at speed. All things were going just right, or so I thought. We got deep into the woods, and it was raining hard. Lots of horses were slipping, and we did some steep climbing up and down. And then, at a slight bend with little slope, just as I was thinking how well the horse was doing, the ground gave way and down we went. The horse came up fine, but I could tell immediately that my leg was injured. Another rider, Bill Taylor, heard the sound of trouble and turned around to come back and check on us. He found me trying to stand up. It was obvious that I wasn’t able to walk, so Bill took both horses and helped me get steady. As we were eight miles deep in the woods, we discussed our options, the first being my lying down and waiting for help while he got the horses back. I decided that I didn’t want to be left behind, so a better option was for me to ride. The only problem Bill could see was that with my left leg in pain, how were we going to get me on the horse? Finally we picked a low spot by a young tree, small enough for me to grab. Bill moved my horse and then lifted me up until my right foot crossed the saddle and my hand could grab the tree, so that I could pull, and up 264AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

This injury is the first time in my life that I have missed a day of school or work from a health issue. Oh, I have had a few minor things that kept me from the saddle, but I always managed to work from the ground or hook to the jog cart. Imagine making it all of these years and not even missing a day from the flu! Looking at it that way, I know that I have been very lucky and maybe thought myself a bit super human. Reality has struck, as for the last several weeks, my heavy, full leg cast has slowed me down and kept me using a walker, on crutches or in a chair. (Okay, I admit it, I have been helped onto my most gentle horse a couple of times and taken a few laps around the round pen, but you get the idea.) The week following my accident, with support from many of my riders, I was able to get back to training. I would “stand” in my round pen while the horses all looked at my walker and stood calmly as if they knew I needed them to be cooperative. I started the bit-and-longe marathon each morning for several hours, and a few nights a week, my riders came to start the under saddle hours. Shortly after the accident, my sister flew in from Florida and two weeks after my fall we took off for Virginia to show six horses in two shows. My group did an amazing job and things went just about perfect. It was amusing to find out that it took four people to do what I normally do at a horse show. Two weeks later, with a few crew members missing and a different rider, we were able to achieve the same results at the highly-competitive Region 14 Championships. I owe a tremendous amount of gratitude to Carol Phillips, Megan Rumpke, Nicole


EndurancE Has coME To MEan so Many THings.

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My EvEr-BroadEning World as a HorsEWoMan have a rental car because all of my vehicles are standard transmission (not drivable with a broken left leg). Then there have been golf carts to get me from arena to arena and back to my stalls, and on a smaller scale, the clothes I have had to buy because blue jeans don’t fit well over a full length cast. No doubt about it, when one of our limbs is not firing, we horse trainers find out how much we do in a day and how difficult it is to be sidelined. The Endurance world has responded in force as well. The emails and phone calls have included concern, and even offers to take horses to keep their mileage up while I recover. Our AERC president has kept track of my progress and everyone has been so supportive, even though some of them barely know me.

Larkey, Jason Reed, Denise Pelphrey, Katie Pelphrey, Elizabeth Woodall, Clarke Vesty, and my sister, Merri Krehl. They have gone to extremes to help me accomplish the seemingly impossible task of getting through my season with minimal adjustments. The Horseman’s Distress Fund has also been awesome in helping me with the extra cost this accident has created. You don’t fully understand how fast little expenses add up until it happens to you. For example, I have had to 266AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

In the early days after the accident, when I was feeling down and sorry for myself, I woke up in the middle of the night one night with the thought that it could have been my kindhearted horse instead of me that had the broken limb. If that had been the case, Bill Taylor and I would not have been able to get him out of the woods. I survived just fine. I could be fixed, but when a broken leg is involved, no matter where it happens, it is always uncertain as to whether a horse can recover. If my horse had lost his life, I could not have lived with that. He did not ask to be there and was there only because of my choices. That night I stopped feeling sorry for myself and focused on recovery. While possibly not as profound or defining as my experience with the 2010 WEG, I have learned valuable


EndurancE Has coME To MEan so Many THings. lessons because of my accident. First, I have been reminded that I have incredible friends with amazing talent and compassion for both horses and people. Second, the doctor in the ER, while first examining me, commented on my protective gear. He noticed the pattern of mud, showing him how and where I hit the ground. According to him, without my vest and helmet, my accident could have been fatal. I will forever encourage everyone who rides to wear protective gear. You never know when you get on if it could be your last ride. Our sport, no matter what discipline, needs to stay as safe as possible. Perhaps the most valuable lesson for me personally has come from being forced to sit and watch my horses (six) be handled and ridden by other talented riders. Some of these riders had not ridden these horses before, and they had not shown in many of the divisions in which the horses were entered. I watched as the riders went through show clothes in my trailer to get all the required apparel and find the closest fit. Some they had and some we borrowed, but most of it was mine. The riders showed over obstacles, rode in dressage not knowing where the letters were, and showed in main ring classes of side saddle, hunter pleasure and show hack. I watched and

what I saw gave me a window into my own talent and why at my age I am still doing what I was meant to do, and that is train horses. There has not been one day that I have not loved my life with horses, even with my leg in a cast sitting on the sidelines. Horses give back to you threefold what you give to them, if you have passion in your soul. My horses have performed well and are competitive. The championships have continued to go up in every discipline, and with all six horses. We did not longe them all night or school them by snatching, smacking or spurring. The horses have done their job because they are trained, and above all they look happy doing it. My horses have performed well because they love their job and they learned that from me. As I have said many times, “They are what you are. It’s like looking in a mirror.” A full career as a horse trainer means enduring lots of things. There are good years and bad years, good horses and not so good horses, and yes, here and there an injury. For me it has never been about the falling down. It’s about how you get up and what you do next. My cast comes off in a few more weeks. I can’t wait to get back in the saddle and log more miles. I’m not done yet! n

Volume 43, No. 4 | 267AA


2012 Arabian Breeder Finals—

The Preview

The Arabian Breeder Finals (ABF) returns to WestWorld in Scottsdale, Ariz., October 13-16, 2012, for the second year of what promises to be one of the hottest shows on the fall schedule. With an all-halter schedule and noteworthy prize money, it offers a showcase of Arabian beauty and marketing potential for breeders and purebred Arabian horse enthusiasts. The ABF show schedule is designed especially to encourage fellowship and camaraderie among the exhibitors and spectators. It begins at 3 p.m. daily, with a break each day for Happy Hour that includes live entertainment. This year’s star attractions are singer/ songwriter Rebecca McGown on Friday, October 12, and the popular BeatleShow Tribute! from Las Vegas, that was such a huge hit last year, on Saturday, October 13.

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Prize money and awards are a highlight of the Arabian Breeder Finals, and this year’s event sponsors have signed on generously. Jade Creek Arabians is sponsoring the Senior Mare and Stallion Championships with $10,000 in cash prizes. Hennessey Arabians is sponsoring a High-Point Breeder award, as well as a special award to the breeder of each show champion. Royal Arabians, the show’s Platinum Sponsor, was the winning bidder last year on the Karina Peacemaker painting at $11,500, which will be offered in prize money for this year’s weanling classes. In 2012, Royal Arabians will host each of the cocktail hours. Scottsdale Equine Reproduction Center’s G.R. Longworth V.M.D., the title sponsor for the Weanling Filly class, also will donate


his time, giving a breeding seminar during Happy Hour, Thursday evening, on “Equine Embryo Transfer: Fresh vs. Frozen.” This year, the ABF also has expanded its schedule of classes for the Scottsdale Signature Stallion Futurity program. For the first time, any horse that has been nominated in the SSS Futurity can compete in the SSS Champion 3 and Over Colt, Gelding or Filly ATH classes for prize money. New this year as well will be a very special award presented to the Senior Stallion Champion in honor of the late Don Morse. Morse, who died in December 2011, was a friend and passionate supporter of the Arabian horse community. The Show Chairman for the Arabian Breeder Finals is Jay Allen; Vice Chair is Greg Knowles. Scott Bailey, Sharon Chauncey-Siar, Janice McCrea, Gary McDonald, Rory O’Neill, and Taryl O’Shea make up the Show Commission. The judges will be Michael Beethe of Scottsdale, Ariz.; Michael Byatt of New Ulm, Texas; Aude Espourteille of Butte Falls, Ore.; Joanne Lowe of Warwick, U.K.; Carol Steppe of Danville, Calif.; and Flavio Regis Wanderley of Campe Grande, Brazil. n A complete list of Founding Members, Show Sponsors and the schedule, is available at www. scottsdaleshow.com/shows-events/arabian-breederfinals. Story by Riyan.

Volume 43, No. 4 | 269AA


HL INFACTUATION (1993 – 2012)

by Linda White

the titles of 1997 Canadian and U.S. National Top Ten Mare and 1999 U.S. National Top Ten Mare. In 2004, she added another U.S. National Top Ten, this time in Senior Mares 6 and Over. Her first daughter, Major Love Affair, by DS Major Afire, was foaled in 2000. Major Love Affair’s career took off with 2001 U.S. National Top Ten Arabian Breeders Sweepstakes Yearling Filly honors. In 2002, she added the Scottsdale Championship in Mares AAOTH, and the following year was a U.S. National Top Ten Futurity Filly. She was named 2006 U.S. National Reserve Champion Mare AAOTH in a class of 31 contenders. Major Love Affair went on to become 2007 U.S. National Top Ten and 2008 U.S. National Champion Mare 6 and Over. As HL Infactuation had done, her first daughter passed on her mother’s excellence. Major Love Affair’s 2008 grey Magnum Chall HVP colt, El Chall WR, was 2009 U.S. National Reserve Champion Yearling Colt, and in 2011, U.S. National Reserve Champion Futurity Colt and U.S. National Reserve Champion 3-Year-Old Colt. HL Infactuation’s progeny included nine mares and four stallions. In addition to Major Love Affair, these included her 2002 bay daughter, Major Desire GA, and two 2005 sons, Major Elegance GA and Major Precision. Her last three foals, fillies Mi Gabrielle and RD Alotta Ambition, and colt Mi Regalo Di Angelo, were foaled in 2010.

She was an elegant grey mare with great quality and a beautiful expression, representative of her royal ancestry. HL Infactuation was bred by Paul and Ann Emerson, and foaled at their Horseshoe Lake Arabians in Lake Elmo, Minn., on March 20, 1993. Margit and the late Warren Bentley purchased her from the Emersons on her second birthday, March 20, 1995, and her show career began and ended under their ownership. The 1995 Region 10 Champion Mare title topped her earliest outings as a 2-year-old, foreshadowing what would follow. She was named 1996 Canadian National Reserve Champion Futurity Filly and U.S. National Top Ten Filly. A year later, HL Infactuation won her class and was reserve in the mare championship at Scottsdale, and followed with 270AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Her pedigree was a careful blending of Polish and Crabbet bloodlines, featuring crosses to some of the breed’s most influential halter and performance sires: *Bask, *Aladdinn, Safire, Al-Marah Canadius, Gamaar and El Magato. Her sire was LF Fifth Avenue (Laddinns Fire x Rose Fyre, by Safire). HL Infactuation’s dam was Georddanna (*Aladdinn x TJS Georgie Girl, by Al-Marah Canadius). Many were national champions who in turn sired or produced generations of national champions, as did HL Infactuation herself. In September 2006, HL Infactuation was purchased from the Bentley’s by Robert and Sally Poling, who sold her four months later to Michele Pfeifer’s Shellbird, Inc. She was owned by Shellbird at the time of her death. n


December Issue Featuring

Marwan Al Shaqab

and the

SonS and GrandSonS of Marwan An entire section of the December issue will feature Marwan Al Shaqab and his sons and grandsons. It will be produced as a hardbound book for permanent record of these great horses. The articles and advertising will show the global influence of the great Marwan bloodlines. The complete section will also be printed on special, heavy, premium paper stock to create a visual impact unlike any other. Call now to reserve your advertising space to showcase your Marwan son/grandson and his accomplishments and your breeding program. Here is your chance to be a part of this once–in–a–lifetime historic record. www.ahtimes.com 1-800-248-4637

Volume 43, No. 4 | 271AA


A Leg Up Safe Sleep-Over for Horses by Heather Smith Thomas When traveling with horses, it is important to make sure they stay safe and healthy at the showgrounds. Roberta M. Dwyer D.V.M., M.S., D.A.C.V.P.M., of the Gluck Equine Research Center at the University of Kentucky, says there are several things you can do to ensure safety. Take your own hay, if possible. Bring all of your own hay nets, buckets (and fasteners for hanging them in a stall), and any equipment you expect to use. Before unloading your horse, inspect the stall, including overhead where you might not normally look. “I was in a show barn one night, looking at a 17-hand horse in a stall, and looked up—and right at his eye level were some large fencing nails sticking out of the wall,” says Dwyer. “Someone had been hanging bridles, halters, lead shanks, etc., from those nails. A horse could seriously injure an eye hitting one of those.” Sometimes people staple things in tack stalls, and a metal staple might be halfway out. She recommends taking a tool box when hauling horses, so you will have a hammer and pliers and can do emergency repairs or nail removal. Ideally, the stall will be already clean and bedded. “In show bills, this is generally spelled out, but not always,” says Dwyer. Always check beforehand, with the showgrounds manager or when making arrangements for lodging in an overnight stop, to know whether bedding will be provided, and if so, what kind of bedding it will be. If you have a horse that is sensitive to dust, straw or shavings might not be healthy for that horse. In other instances it may be a case of bring your own bedding. “Find out what the accommodations are, how big the stalls are, and what the bedding will be. Some horses will eat straw,” Dwyer cautions. You may have to go over the stall completely, sweeping it down to remove cobwebs. “Dust and cobwebs can trap pathogens,” she says. “Some people who travel with horses go so far as to bring along their own disinfectant spray, using a small garden sprayer to spray down the walls. 272AA | A R A BI A n HoR SE T I MES

“I’ve seen big rigs come into a showgrounds and offload late at night,” she continues. “I know it’s hard to inspect everything when it’s late, and everyone is tired and wanting to get the horses bedded down and check into a motel and get some sleep,” she says. But if you miss something and a horse is injured, this can be a serious issue. Take flashlights. “If you have to work with your horse in a poorly lighted stall (maybe a small bulb in the ceiling), it might be hard to see a problem,” she says. “If you are depending on their light source and it’s not adequate, it’s handy to have a head lamp like campers use. Then you have both hands free to work with your horse or fix something in the stall.”

“Always check beforehand, with the showgrounds manager or when making arrangements for lodging in an overnight stop, to know whether bedding will be provided, and if so, what kind of bedding it will be.” Inspect flooring for depressions that might trip you or the horse. “Some stall floors are flat—asphalt, concrete, packed clay, sand—while others that have been used a lot may have holes,” she says. “You walk around in the stall and suddenly your foot sinks about three inches where horses have pawed. If your horse puts a foot in a hole this could be a serious issue.” Use your own buckets for feed and water. “Sometimes you can’t choose the accommodation, and it may be temporary stalls with metal panels between your horse and the next,” says Dwyer. “You can’t avoid nose to nose contact, in this situation. “If you are assigned a stall you feel is dangerous, go to the show office and ask for something different,” she says. “If necessary, ask them to come with you so you can show them why you think it’s not suitable—for instance if there are deep holes in the floor and you think your horse might injure a leg.” n


Calendar Of Events

Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; phone 612-816-3018 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

SeminarS/CliniCS/SaleS/ Open HOuSe/awardS

November 14-18, 2012, AHA Convention, Denver, Colorado. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

SHOwS OctOber October 6, 2012, Chile Roast SH One-Day Show A and B, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 6, 2012, Ozark Heartland Arab Classic Fall II One-Day Show, Mt. Vernon, Missouri. Contact: Lenard Davenport, 417-888-0686. October 6-7, 2012, Pacific Rim Arabian Fall Classic, Elma, Washington. Contact: Lanora Callahan, 360-832-6076. October 6-7, 2012, AHANM Chili Roast All-Breed Training Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6832. October 6-7, 2012, Arabian Sport Horse Extravaganza A and B, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. October, 7, 2012, Chile Roast One-Day Show & All-Breed Training Show, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact: Tara Turner, 505-832-6823. October 7, 2012, Ozark Heartland Arab Classic Fall Show I, Mt. Vernon, Missouri. Contact: Lenard Davenport, 417-888-0686. October 19-20, 2012, NC State Fair Horse Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Barbara Woodlief, 919-839-4701. October 20-27, 2012, PMHA Annual Morab Championship, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Sara Ressler, 248-922-0148. October 26-28, 2012, Halloween Spooktacular Classic, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherri Re, 281-513-5745. NOvember November 2-4, 2012, Western Carolinas Fall Show, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-817-0359. November 8-11, 2012, NTAHC Shootout, Glen Rose, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

November 9-11, 2012, American Cup Championship A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. November 17, 2012, Bluegrass Fall Arabian Challenge, Louisville, Kentucky. Contact: Krystina Firth, 859-684-6952. November 17-18, 2012, Music City Arab Show, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. November 21-24, 2012, AHAF 43rd Annual Thanksgiving, Tampa, Florida. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. November 23-25, 2012, AHASFV 41st Annual Thanksgiving Show, Burbank, California. Contact: Sue Todd, 805-646-5703. November 30-December 2, 2012, Gulf Coast Christmas Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherry McGraw, 903-872-7279.

December December 6-9, 2012, Saguaro Classic A and B, Scottsdale, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. December 15, 2012, Holiday Hoorah I OneDay Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Marlene Kriegbaum, 716-628-2640. December 16, 2012, Holiday Hoorah II OneDay Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Marlene Kriegbaum, 716-628-2640. JaNuary January 10-13, 2013, Houston All Arab Sport Horse Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Kayla Roca, 832-971-0991. January 10-13, 2013, Houston All Arabian A and B Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Kayla Roca, 832-971-0991. January 11-13, 2013, SAAHA 42nd Annual Arab Charity Show, Tucson, Arizona. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. January 12, 2013, Show Your Horse All Arabian One-Day Show, Newberry, Florida. Contact: Nannet Read, 352-278-2004. January 22-23, 2013, Central FL Arab Winter Classic, New Smyrna Beach, Florida. Contact: Carlie Evans, 352-215-0710. January 25-17, 2013, Sierra Empire, Pomona, California. Contact: Janie Fix, 520-508-4063.

enduranCe/ COmpetitive trail ride

October 4, 2012, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 55- And 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 5-6, 2012, Alabama Yellowhammer Pioneer 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Heflin, Alabama. Contact: Tamra Schoech, 770-554-1545. October 6, 2012, Red Rock Rumble 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Connie Creech, 775-882-6591.

October 13, 2012, RAHA Rally 30-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Ramona, California. Contact: Margie Insko, 760-789-1977. October 13, 2012, Oak Leaf Run 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Hamilton, Michigan. Contact: Linda Hamrick, 260-602-9660. October 13-14, 2012, RAHA Rally 50-Mile Competitive Trail Ride, Ramona, California. Contact: Margie Insko, 760-789-1977. October 20, 2012, Foothills Of The Cascade 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Molalla, Oregon. Contact: Jannelle Wilde, 541-849-2460. October 20, 2012, High Desert Classic I 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Fort Churchill, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. October 20, 2012, Region 8 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Alamogordo, New Mexico. Contact: Marcelle Himanka, 575-491-6297. October 20, 2012, Sand Hills Stampede 55and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Cheraw/Patrick, South Carolina. Contact: Patricia Lynn Gowen, 803-329-0077. October 21, 2012, High Desert Classic III 50Mile Endurance Ride, Fort Churchill, Nevada. Contact: Suzanne Ford Huff, 775-783-9608. October 26-27, 2012, Spook Run I and II 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Henryville, Indiana. Contact: Lois McAfee, 812-294-1776. October 27, 2012, Region 2 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Inyokern, California. Contact: Jeanine Corzine, 760-371-5830. October 27, 2012, The Haunting 50-Mile Endurance Ride, La Pine, Oregon. Contact: Linda Tribby, 541-475-6199. November 3, 2012, Region 12 50-Mile Endurance Championship, Altamont, Tennessee. Contact: Troy Nelson, 256-614-0277. November 17, 2012, Lead, Follow or Get Out Of My Way 30-, 50-, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Fountain Hills, Arizona. Contact: Lancette Koerner, 480-655-9434. November 30, 2012, Blackwater Boogie 25-, 50-, and 75-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403. December 1, 2012, Blackwater Boogie 25-, and 50-Mile Endurance Ride, Milton, Florida. Contact: Diane Hawthorne, 850-374-1403.

NatiONals eveNts

October 19-27, 2012, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact: AHA, 303-696-4500.

INterNatiONal eveNts

*Go to www.ecaho.org for international shows and information.

Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates. Volume 43, No. 4 | 273AA


R.O. LERVICK ARABIANS Home of Cytosk+++ & Out Of Cyte Halter & Performance Horses For Sale Roger & Linda Lervick Dennis Wigren - Manager/Trainer P.O. Box 699 Stanwood, Washington 98292 360-652-0108 • 800-669-2745 E-mail: cytosk@whidbey.net Web site: www.rolervickarabians.com

Varian Arabians

• Breeder of National Halter Champions • All time leading breeder of English horses • All time leading breeder of Western horses • 70% of the show horses winning today carry Varian blood Arroyo Grande, California (805) 489-5802 | varianarab@aol.com

W W W. VA R I A N A R A B I A N S . C O M

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The Hat Lady has the hats you need and MORE! Western Hats, Derbies, Homburgs and Snapbrims. Custom hats. Top hats, hunt caps and helmets. Hat carriers: single and multiple. Ultimate Show Apparel by Diane Olsen. Frank Principe Silver Bits. AHA Official Championship Jackets.

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Beautiful & Athletic Classic Polish Arabians Available For Sale John & Charlotte Yates, Owners 575-748-4250 office 575-687-3518 ranch P.O. Box 900, Artesia, NM 88211

274AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes

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IrIsh Born & raIsed!

Purebred Arabian Horses Young stock for sale - Reasonably priced Photo: Zygmunt (*Ganges x Zuzanna)

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Volume 43, No. 4 | 275AA


Your Run For The Roses Will Be Hard-Earned! adver dver tise your U.s. National winners inners in

November! You made histor y at the show. Now chronicle your g reat achievement in the ArAbiAn n Horse Times! Call today to reserve your advertising space!

1-800-248-4637 w w w. a h t i m e s . c o m 276AA | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Volume 43, no. 4 | 277AA


You’ll love every issue.

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Stallion Issue • 2012 Futurity Roundup Call today for more information on how to be included. 1-800-248-4637 or 952-492-3213

w w w. a htimes.c om Volume 43, No. 4 | 279AA


Index Of Advertisers

A ABCCA ........................................................................................... 258A, 259A Acevedo Arabians ....................................................14-15ArabInt’l, 26ArabInt’l Adandy Farm.....................................................................................147A-157A AHT Beautiful Baby Contest Voting ...................................................... 120AA AHT Design .............................................................................................. 66AA AHT Online Horse Auction ..................................................................... 58AA AHT Subscriptions ....................................................................... 268A, 278AA AHT U.S. National Coverage ................................266A-267A, 276AA-277AA AHT Upcoming Features ........................................................................ 150AA Al Shahania Stud .................................................................FCAA, 8AA-12AA Aljassimya Farm .................................................................................. 9A, 57AA Allen, Jeffrey................................................................................................150A Alvey Performance Horses ..........................................................................179A Anderson, Jessica ...................................................................................... 160AA Andrews, Lynn ......................................................................................... 219AA Arabian Park Arabians ................................................................ 34-35ArabInt’l Arabian Soul Partners ....................................... 18-19ArabInt’l, 27-28ArabInt’l ArabianHorseGlobal.com .......................................................................... 13AA Arabians International............................. 16AA, 10-40ArabInt’l (26AA-56AA) Argent Farms ........................................... FCA, 20A-24A, 40A-44A, 60A-64A Aria Arabians ..................................................................................... 16-17MW Aria International ................................................................48A, 14-15ArabInt’l Armir Partners ............................................................................ 14-15ArabInt’l

B Baker, Justin & Deborah .......................................................................... 227AA Bartlet, Art ................................................................................. 102AA, 103AA Battaglia Farms ............................................................................... 272A, IBCA Bein Performance Horses ............................................................146AA-149AA Boylan, Anna .....................................................................................173A-175A

C Calvillo, Julio & Genevieve ...................................................................... 131AA Campbell, Barbara .......................................................................................151A Cedar Ridge Arabians, Inc. ........................................... 62MW, 121AA-142AA Celestial Arabians.............................................................................. 29ArabInt’l Chrishan Park ...................................................................................... 12A, 13A Clanton Performance Horses ......................................................143AA-145AA Colonial Wood Training Center .................................................211AA-220AA Congressional Farm.....................................................................................156A Cook, Kim & Scott .....................................................................................247A Cooper, Colleen .................................................................................173A-175A Cornerstone Ranch .................................................................................... 88AA Cotton Performance Horses ........................................................229AA-233AA Crescent Creek Farms .............................................................................. 215AA Crooks, Sierra ........................................................................................... 131AA Curley, Sheila & Jenna ............................................................................... 61AA

Equus Arabians .................................................................................. 4AA, 5AA Eyad Abdullah Mashat ...........................................16-17ArabInt’l, 23ArabInt’l

F Fazenda Floresta .......................................................IFCA-5A, 30MW-33MW Finney, Elaine ....................................................................................253A-255A Fisher, Wendy & Arielle ..............................................................................154A Flood Show Horses .................................................................... 260AA, 261AA Flynn, L.A. .......................................................... 96AA, 97AA, 108AA, 109AA Foster, Lori ............................................................................................... 100AA Franklin, Diane..................................................................................204A-206A Frierson Atkinson.......................................................................... 265A, 275AA

G Gallún Farms, Inc............................................................................... 8AA, 9AA Garlands ............................................................................................181A-189A Garvis, Leslie.............................................................................. 104AA, 105AA Getter, Judy .................................................................................................189A Ginter, Rachel ...............................................................................................39A Glans, Paul ......................................................................................................65 Goodrow, Richard & Justine ....................................................................51MW Green Acres Ranch, Inc ..............................................................................146A Guzzo/Rivero Arabians Worldwide ..................................................... 45A-51A

H HA Toskcan Sun LLC .............................................................. 282AA, IBCAA Haas, Betsy & Steve ....................................................................................180A Hagale Family, The .............................................................................. 12A, 13A Halbrook Arabians ...................................................................................58MW Hansen, Chuck & Erin ..................................................................... 39ArabInt’l Haras Don Piero ......................................................38-39MW, 48MW, 60MW Haras La Catalina ....................................................................................52MW Haras Los Palmares............................................................................ 16-17MW Haras Mayed ...................................................................................... 14-15MW Harris, Pam .................................................................................................179A Haug, Eric & Deborah......................................................................200A-203A Hazlewood Arabians .................................................................................BCAA Hegg, Mrs. Mickey........................................................................ 265A, 275AA Hennessey Arabian Partners LLC ............................................. 162AA, 163AA Holloway, Sheree & Alex ......................................................................... 214AA Hunt, Barbara Lynn ....................................................................................183A

I Iron Horse Farms ............................................................................. 158A, 159A

J Jerland Farms ............................................................................................. BCA Jones, Melissa Campbell..............................................................................151A Joy Horses ................................................................................................63MW Joyner Arabians ........................................................................................ 183AA

D

K

Dawson, Tammie ...................................................................................... 227AA Dazzo Arabians LLC .................................................................. 36-37ArabInt’l Dolby, Toni & Michael .............................................................. 128AA, 135AA Doran, Cheryl .............................................................................................246A Dumont, Francis & Monica .........................................................................3AA

Kern, David & Olivia ............................................................................... 228AA Kiesner Training ..........................................................................151AA-164AA Klein, Jim ................................................................................................. 218AA Knipe, Ken & Susan ....................................................................................249A Koch, Laura .................................................................................... 94AA, 95AA

E

L

El Nabila Initiative...................................................................... 12-13ArabInt’l

Langhlas, Jennifer..........................................................................................79A

280AA | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES


Larson, Claire and Margaret ........................................................................FCA Larson, Kara ............................................................................................. 134AA Lau, Vickie ............................................................................................... 106AA Leavitt Arabians LLC .................................................................................207A Liberty Arabians Ltd....................................................................................2AA Longuini Horse Training .....................................................................IFCA-5A Lowe Show Horse Centre.................................................................190A-198A Lurken, Lucky & Raegen ............................................................ 10-11ArabInt’l Lyons, Merrillee .....................................................................148A, 152A, 153A

M Magnum Arabians 85AA Maher, Sean................................................................................................ 86AA Mala, Alayna ...............................................................................................155A Marie, Jeannie....................................................................................173A-175A Marino Arabians ............................................................. 34-35MW, 54-56MW Maroon Fire Arabians ................................................................... 265A, 275AA Maximuck, Nancy .............................................................................250A-252A MC Arabians .............................................................................. 30-31ArabInt’l McNeely, Shirley & Walter .............................................................. 176A, 177A Mengle, John ............................................................................................ 226AA Messerli, Blake .........................................................................................45MW Michael Byatt Arabians................................................. 14A, 15A, 10AA-12AA Midwest .....IFCA-5A, 9A, 14-23MW (94A-103A), 32-64MW (112A-144A), 145A Miller, Bruce ................................................................................................186A Miller, Lucinda ............................................................................................187A Moore, Tom & Liz ................................................................................... 130AA Morton, Janice & Laura ............................................................. 132AA, 133AA Moss, Michele .......................................................................................... 216AA Mulawa Arabian Stud ....................................................................... 40ArabInt’l Murray, Matt .................................................................................. 72AA, 73AA Mutschelknaus, Darrell & Melissa ................................................................78A Mystic Sands Arabians ............................................................................47MW

N New Vision Farm ....................................................................................... 80AA North Arabians ........................................................................... 20-21ArabInt’l

Rohara Arabians, LLC ....................................................................67AA-93AA Rohl Arabians ...............................................................................................47A Rolyn & Judy Schmid ................................................................. 32-33ArabInt’l Rooker Training Stable ...............................................................165AA-182AA Rosa, Eric ....................................................................................................208A Ross Tarkington Stables ................................................................................39A Russka Farms LLC .................................................................................. 217AA

S Sanders, Bert .................................................................................. 94AA, 95AA Shackelford, Don & Kim ......................................................................... 161AA Shafer Arabians ...........................................................................222AA-225AA Shariff RCA Partnership .................................................................... 36-37MW Shatila Arabians ............................................................................................46A Showtime Training Center ................................................................169A-180A Siemon Stables ............................................................................221AA-228AA Silver Aspen Ranch .....................................................................................198A Silver Stag ...................................................................................................149A Smoky Mountain Park Arabians .......................................................... 16A-19A Southern Oaks Farm ..............................................................170A-172A, 178A Springwater Farms LLC ...................................................................245A-255A Stachowski Farm, Inc. .......................................................33A, 282AA, IBCAA Stankovic, Dean........................................................................................ 101AA Starline Arabians LLC ................................................................152AA-159AA Stone Ridge Arabians....................................................................................11A Strand’s Arabian Stables.........................................................25A, 94AA, 95AA Strawberry Banks Farm ........................................................................ 26A-32A Szymanski, Jessie .........................................................................................188A

T Ted Carson At Butler Farms Training Center ...............................IFCAA-5AA The Hat Lady ............................................................................... 264A, 274AA Timberidge Family LLP ............................................................ 212AA, 213AA Tobin, Alyson ............................................................................................. 87AA Tshampagne Arabians .................................................................... 76AA, 77AA Tyler, Elizabeth ................................................................................ 176A, 177A

V

Oak Ridge Arabians ........ 18-21MW, 44MW, 53MW, 56MW, 59MW, 61MW Om El Arabian International ...................................................... 12-13ArabInt’l

Van Dyke, Les & Diane ...........................................................................46MW Varian Arabians ............................................................................. 264A, 274AA Vasconcelos Family, The ..................................................................... 40-41MW Vicki Humphrey Training Center .................................................97AA-111AA

P

W

Pannonia Arabians ........................................................................................49A Paradise Farms ............................................................................................168A Pastorino, Daniel & Fabiana ...................................................................49MW Pay-Jay Arabians ........................................................................... 264A, 274AA Pegasus Arabians ............................................................................... 22ArabInt’l Perkins, Suzanne & Perry..................................................................... 50A-51A Polcsan, Kathy & Steve ...............................................................................182A Powell Training Center ...............................................................236AA-243AA Prestige Farms LLC ....................................................................... 14AA, 15AA Price Performance Horses .................................................................... 34A-38A Price, Ray or Lynn..........................................................................61AA- 63AA

Weegens, Todd & Glena ..........................................................................50MW Weiler, Megan & Carolyn .......................................................................... 60AA West Desert Arabians .............................................................................. 183AA Westridge Farms ............................................................................ 64AA, 65AA Whelihan Arabian Farms ..................................................................199A-210A Wilkins Livestock Insurers, Inc..................................................... 265A, 275AA Wilms Arabians ................................................................................ 38ArabInt’l Winer, Maddy ............................................................................................ 83AA Wolfe Performance Horses .................................................................. 76A-79A

O

Q Quarry Hill Farm .......................................................................... 265A, 275AA

R R. Kirk Landon Trust LLC ..................................... 70AA-75AA, 82AA, 84AA R.O. Lervick Arabians .................................................................. 264A, 274AA Rae-Dawn Arabians ................................................................................. 6A, 7A Rancho Sonado ................................................................................ 184A, 211A Rash, Ron & Becky .....................................................................................185A Regency Cove Farms .................................................................................BCAA Rock Ledge Arabians ......................................................................59AA-63AA

© Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 43, No. 4, September 2012, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $7.50. Subscription in U.S. $40 per year, $65 two years, $90 three years. Canada $65 one year, $125 two years, $170 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $95 one year, $185 two years, $280 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • Fax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

Volume 43, No. 4 | 281AA


HA

Toskcan Sun

Congratulations to Helen Lacey Reed, a new partner in the family ownership of Toskcan. Helen, a lifetime Arabian horse enthusiast, has herself shown and bred National Champion English horses. Together in our partnership we plan on breeding the next generation of English National Champions.


UnanimoiUs scottsdale champion arabian english pleasUre JUnior horse U. S N at i o N a l CoNteNder iN arabiaN eNgliSh PleaSUre JUNior horSe with Jim StaChowSki

owners: ha toskcan sun llc standing at: stachowski Farm, inc. Mantua, Ohio • 330-274-2494

www.Stachowski.com

baske afire x matoska, by Zodiac matador


ExcEptional

BEauty

inhEritEd

from past

GEnErations

Gloria aPal A palo's dam

Apalo

sa MisHa aPal Glor ia A pal's dam

Justify x Glor ia Apal

S h o w i n g at 2 0 1 2 U. S . n at i o n a l S with greg hazlewood SCI D and CA Clear

Standing and presented by H a z lewo o d a ra b i a n s Greg Hazle wood • Aubre y, Te xas • 602-549-8726 haz earabians@aol.com • www.hazle woodarabians.com O w ned by Re G en c y cov e FA R m S • Jac k & e liz abeth milam

www.regencycovefarms.com/apalo/

S JUSTADReAm+/ Justify's dam

Arabian Horse Times Vol. 43, No. 4AA  

September 2012 AA