Page 1

Volume 43, No. 12 $7.50


JJ ARGEntinA

© Javan

(Faraa Al Shaqab x Diva Girl by Versace) 2012 Filly Bred and owned by Haras Mayed

JJ MEnton

© Gigi Grasso

(Faraa Al Shaqab x JJ Bella Rose by Magnum Psyche) 2012 Colt Bred and owned by Haras Mayed

HARAS MAYED

www.harasmayed.com

AHT-may-faraa-2pp.indd 2

8-04-2013 14:22:14


2:14

Faraa Al Al Shaqab Shaqab Faraa

Š April Visel

(Marwan al Shaqab x gw natorious Star) 2007 Stallion

Standing at Stud with MidweSt training Center

MiDwESt tRAininG CEntER www.midwestarabian.com David Boggs - midwest@sbwireless.net nate white - natemidwest@sbwireless.net

pseterra@qf.org.qa www.AlShaqab.com


Co n s i st e n t Q u al i t y . . .

Baske Afire x RY Fire Ghazi, by El Ghazi U.S. National Top Ten Arabian English Pleasure

Baskghazillionheir SMP (Baskghazi x On Tulsa Time) 2012 Half-Arabian Gelding

Palisade SMP (Baskghazi x SA Pasafire) 2012 Arabian Gelding

Baskghazillionheir SMP (Baskghazi x On Tulsa Time) 2012 Half-Arabian Gelding

2 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


R e l i a b l e R e s u lt s !

ML Afire Dream x Fire Essense, by Pro-Fire U.S. National Top Ten Arabian English Pleasure Arabian Celebration Champion English Pleasure Scottsdale Champion English Pleasure

Amazing Grace SMP (The Renaissance x Pretty Amazing) 2012 Arabian Filly

Ingenue SMP (The Renaissance x Tranquility Bey SCA) 2012 Arabian Filly

Ingenue SMP (The Renaissance x Tranquility Bey SCA) 2012 Arabian Filly

Rod & Jacqueline Thompson • Lenoir City, TN • 865.388.0507 Trainer Mike Miller • Mike@smparabians.com • cell 608.332.0701 Visit us on the web at: www.SmokyMountainParkArabians.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 3


Contents Issue 5 • Volume 43, No. 12 17

Afire Bey V, Dave and Gail Liniger And Tim And Marty Shea … 25 Years Of The Most Successful Arabian Partnership On Record by Christy Egan

2TuTTo

Regency Cove—A Journey From Bulldogs To Arabians by Kara Larson

25tutto

1Cavallo Villa Del Cavallo—Arabian Paradise At Lake Tahoe by Kara Larson

25TuTTo

2013 Arabian Breeders World Cup— International Alliance In The City Of Lights by Kara Larson

114

The English Show Horse

146

The Hunter And Show Hack Horse

170

Gene LaCroix: A Look At A Horseman, Part I by Mary Kirkman

190

Leaders Of The Times: Apalo by Mary Kirkman

192

Representing The Arabian Breed: Mary Mag Wilson by Kara Larson

170

195

The 10th Annual Dubai International Arabian Horse Championship by Fabio Brianzoni

204

A Conversation With Bob Battaglia About The Arabian Celebration Event

6

Comments From The Publisher

206

Calendar Of Events

210

Looking Ahead

211

Index Of Advertisers

Volume 43, No. 12 $7.50

On The COver:

Afire Bey V (Huckleberry Bey x Autumn Fire), owned by Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc.

6 | A r A bi A n Hor se T i mes


Design by: mickĂŠandoliver

Competing at the Egyptian Event in Related Senior Stallions Thank you to Greg Gallun for his presentation here and for his successful debut at the ABWC Las Vegas Stallion Showcase. by Ansata Hejazi ex Aliah Al Nasser by Imperial Mahzeer | Managed by 100 Oaks Ranch, Santa Ynez, U.S. | Owned by Al Nasser Stud, Qatar | In training at Gallun Farms, Santa Ynez, U.S. Leased by Aljassimya Farm, Qatar Contact: info@aljassimyafarm.com | Debra Schliem, debra@100oaksranch.com

Volume 43, No. 12 | 5


Comments

Publisher Lara Ames Operations Manager/Editor Barbara Lee

From The Publisher

Contributing Writers Linda White Mary Kirkman Kara Larson Advertising Account Executive Tony Bergren Walter Mishek Production Manager Jody Thompson Senior Designer Marketing Director Wayne Anderson Print & Web Design Tony Ferguson Leah Matzke Jennifer Peña Michael Knepprath Ben Lundsten Editorial Coordinator Proofreader Charlene Deyle Office Manager Robin Matejcek Sales/Editorial Assistant Accounts Receivable Karen Fell Sales Associate Kristin Hamway Sales/Editorial Assistant Deb Trebesch © Copyright AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Articles or opinions published by the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times are not necessarily the expressed views of the AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times. AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times is not responsible for the accuracy of advertising content or manipulation of images that are provided by the advertiser. ARABIAN HORSE TIMES (ISSN 0279-8125) Volume 43, No. 12, May, 2013, is published monthly by AHT, Inc. dba Arabian Horse Times, 20276 Delaware Avenue, Jordan, Minnesota 55352. Periodical postage paid at Jordan, Minnesota 55352 and at additional entry offices. Single copies in U.S. and Canada $7.50. Subscription in U.S. $40 per year, $65 two years, $90 three years. Canada $65 one year, $125 two years, $170 three years, U.S. funds. Foreign Subscriptions: $95 one year, $185 two years, $280 three years, payable in advance, U.S. funds. Sorry, no refunds on subscription orders. For subscription and change of address, please send old address as printed on last label. Please allow four to six weeks for your first subscription to be shipped. Occasionally ARABIAN HORSE TIMES makes its mailing list available to other organizations. If you prefer not to receive these mailings, please write to ARABIAN HORSE TIMES, Editorial Offices, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352. The publisher is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographic materials. Printed in U.S.A. • POSTMASTER: Please send returns to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; and address changes to Arabian Horse Times, P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816. For subscription information, call 1-855-240-4637 (in the U.S.A.) or 952-492-3213 (for outside of the U.S.A.) Arabian Horse Times • P.O. Box 15816, North Hollywood, CA 91615-5816 • Tel: 952-492-3213 • Fax: 952-492-3228 1-800-AHTIMES • www.ahtimes.com

6 | A R A BI A N HOR SE T I MES

Though the saying has always been, “April showers bring May flowers,” well, in the great state of Minnesota, we would have to say, “April snowflakes bring May flowers!” May is such a wonderful month, as it is the month that I get to specifically honor and say thank you to my mom for all that she does for me. I think that everyone in the horse industry can say that they have support in everything they do, and that person for me, is my mother, Lollie Ames. She is always there to give me a helping hand and encourage me to be the best I can be. Most of all, she is my mom, and she is very proud of me and all I have accomplished, so I am thankful to her. Don’t forget to thank yours! In this issue we are celebrating the accomplishments of the saddle seat and hunter/show hack divisions. Both are very instrumental in our breed and we are also thankful to the breeders, owners and trainers who devote their time and efforts in these areas and make us proud. We are also coming from the Arabian Breeders World Cup, one of the most prestigious Arabian halter horse shows in the world. It was so wonderful to see that people came from all over to see these great horses. The competition was amazing and the horse market was very strong. Better weather and warmth are ahead, I hope you all are able to get out there and spend more time with this wonderful creature we all love, the Arabian horse, and enjoy the beauty and versatility that they provide us.

Lara Ames Lara Ames Publisher


The ValenTino influence ... BeauTiful daughTers

Maraposa SRA

DA Valentino x Ellectra SRA 2008 Mare

DM Valencea

DA Valentino x HED Caramba 2008 Mare

Vallerina SRA

DA Valentino x Van Alyssa 2007 Mare

Donna Molta Bella SRA DA Valentino x RD Fabreanna 2012 Filly

Stone Ridge ARAbiAnS • dan and Maureen grossman • FOR VIDEOS CONTACT: mogrossma@aol.com www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 7


The Power of History, The Result of Dedication . . (QR Marc x Petia)

2 0 1 3 S c o t t S d a l e S u p r e m e c h a m p i o n h a lt e r h o r S e 2 0 1 3 S u p r e m e G o l d c h a m p i o n S ta l l i o n arabian breederS World cup ... laS VeGaS Nothing more to say! This magnificent creature is the most sophisticated and most classic example of a human’s passion and love, and a shining example of Poland’s tempestuous history, knowledge and devotion of generations of breeders. When admiring Pogrom’s beauty, grace and enchanting personality, one has an undeniable feeling of a journey in time and going back to when it all began. From the sands of the Arabian deserts, through the endless fields and palaces of the Polish noblemen’s 18th century estates, to the historical National Stud of Janów Podlaski—the dream has come true! —Izabella Pawelec-Zawadzka The Honorary President of the Polish Arabian Horse Breeders Society 2013 Arabian Horse Breeders Alliance Ambassador Award Recipient

Bred by Stadnina Koni Janów Podlaski, Poland On lease to David & Terry Anne Boggs Jeff & Andrea Sloan

www.MidwestArabian.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 9


English is Our PassiOn THE Leading Breeder of Nationals-winning English Bred Horses

Toi Slamtastic CRF

10 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

Ames Celebration

A Noble Cause


Come Take a ride!

wiTh our

Championship Trainers Accepting Outside HOrses FOr trAining.

Contact Leah Boyd 515-520-7604 or John Golladay 847-668-3538 leah@cedarridgearabians.com • john@cedarridgearabians.com

w w w. C e d a r- r i d g e . C o m Volume 43, no. 12 | 11


Ath l eti c ... reA My Allience Allience x My Diamond Girl

Multi-National Champion Half-Arabian Park Multi-Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Park

ronde Vu Mamage x Ames Deja Vu

Multi-National Champion Arabian Park Unanimous Scottsdale Champion Arabian Park

Š Marielle Watson 2013

lucky Allience Allience x Lucky Atress

Scottsdale First Place Half-Arabian English Pleasure Š Marielle Watson 2013

12 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


V e r s Ati le ... Ability MHR Nobility x Nikita

Multi-Scottsdale Champion Gambler's Choice U.S. and Canadian National Champion Half-Arabian Jumper

Morocco GrAnde AA Apollo Bey x Quintina

U.S. National Sport Horse Champion Carriage Driving Multi-Regional Champion Carriage Pleasure Driving Working, Obstacle and Reinmanship

Mamage x Ames Deja Vu

tAlented ProsPects AVAilAble Nancy Shafer, Gregg and Lotta Shafer 5865 Oak Hill Drive, W. Farmington, OH 44491 E-mail: dauber@apk.net ~ 330.847.0776 For sales information ~ 330.847.2922

Volume 43, No. 12 | 13


Afire Bey V x Kaz Baskteena Owned by Merrilee Lyons SiLVer STAG ArABiAnS LLC

Trained by and standing at

ADANDY FARM Greenwood, Delaware

Cathy Vincent ~ 302.236.6665 cell 302.349.5116 ~ AdandyFarm@aol.com www.AdandyFarm.com

14 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


Volume 43, no. 12 | 15


ABV

Afire Bey V, Dave and Gail Liniger and Tim and Marty Shea … 25 Years Of The Most Successful Arabian Partnership On Record by Christy Egan

How did a man who has been characterized as one of the world’s 50 most powerful people in real estate get involved with Arabian horses? He fell in love. “One of my vice presidents lived in a rural area and we were at his home for a barbecue,” says Dave Liniger, chairman and co-founder of RE/MAX™ International. “He owned an Arabian mare that he rode on the trails and I was fascinated. She was charismatic and all fired up that evening. She put on a great show, just what you’d expect … snorting, tail flipped up over her back. I thought, wouldn’t it be great to own a horse like that? My host gave me a copy of an Arabian magazine and subsequently I discovered the Scottsdale show. His wife and my wife thought that sounded like fun and the four of us went to Arizona in February. He and I golfed. We all went to the Chauncey Sale and I thought, wouldn’t this be great as an escape for me from the real estate business?” It was a match well made. Arabians inspire great passion in their breeders and owners. Dave Liniger was built for the Arabian horse encounter. This is a man who is at some sort of activity or job 24-hours a day. Ask him about his work and he laughs, “… I don’t work. I have a passion for what I do. I’d PAY to have this job!”


The Steps Up

Over the 25 years of their partnership, the combined Liniger/Shea breeding program has resulted in many awards. Nominated for the APAHA Horsemen’s Awards on numerous occasions, the Linigers have won the award twice and the Shea’s once. The partners have been nominated for the Arabian Horse Times Readers’ Choice Awards. Two of the farm-bred horses have been nominated for USEF Horse of the Year: Afires Heir and Adams Fire. These same two horses were nominated to the USEF and Equus Foundation Horse Stars Hall Of Fame. Most recently, Liniger’s and Shea’s were also the winners of the USEF Pegasus Award for 2012 Breeder of the Year. “The 2011 USEF Pegasus Award had special meaning for me because it’s open to all breeds and has only been won by a few other Arabian breeders,” says Dave. “My mentor, Sheila Varian, was one of those most honored breeders. As far as I can tell we are the only winners of this award to have been mentored by a previous winner. It made me feel particularly proud.”

Tim Shea, Sheilla Varian, Don DeLongpré, Marty Shea, Gail Liniger & Dave Liniger.

In February of 1989, Dave and Gail Liniger joined a star-studded group of successful bidders for the first time at the Scottsdale Arabian horse sales. There were 11 auctions in seven days that year and the sale horse “theatres” on Bell Road were the places to obtain some good Arabian horses and some media coverage. Linigers bought three horses at The Legend Sale (Adam’s Arabians) and one at the Karho 1989 Excalibur Classic. They purchased the Barbary daughter Flame Dancer (x Autumn Flair, by *Eter), a Bask Flame mare named Flames Lullaby, Baskazelle, by *Bask+, and Miz Charisma, by GG Jasbask. Dave was quoted in the Arabian trade magazines as saying that he and Gail were “in the process of building a herd of foundation stock,” and that his hopes were “to have a major Arabian breeding farm in the future.” A cynical media person apparently shrugged at the time and remarked that Linigers had the same ambitions as many others before them and then smugly predicted that they would undoubtedly be out of the horse business in a few short years. Dave Liniger has never forgotten the comment and likes to tell the tale, smile and say that he took it as a personal challenge. Twenty-five years later the challenge has been met. It’s almost impossible to match the Maroon Fire Arabians’ and Shea Stables’ success story. Personal challenge aside, Dave Liniger seems to have approached the creation of Maroon Fire Arabians much like he did the development of his company, RE/MAX™ Realty. His mantra could translate to … listen to honest, knowledgeable advisers, build a team that can do the job, gather the right building blocks (or bloodstock) and keep moving forward in a positive direction. He got into the horse business because he was intrigued with the horses. In the late 1980’s he started systematically seeking advisors and gathering information about the Arabian horse. He still has the 200 legal tablets he filled with notes about breeding horses those first few years.

2 Maroon Fire | ARABIAN HORSE TIMES


“I asked people that I met in the horse business who was the best breeder and trainer, and Sheila Varian’s name came up frequently,” Dave says. “I found Sheila at the Scottsdale show, introduced myself, and asked her to talk to me about breeding Arabian horses. She was open, gracious and generous with her advice. Don DeLongpré and Richard Petty also advised me openly and sold me many good horses, as did trainer Gordon Potts. It was Don who told me to pick a stallion that I liked and buy his daughters; understand the stallion’s strengths and what exactly he was capable of as a sire.” For a time, while they were showing nationally, Maroon Fire kept horses in several locations around the United States. It was Sheila Varian who recommended Tim and Marty Shea, trainers Sheila was utilizing in Michigan. Their good business sense, integrity and horsemanship won Dave and Gail’s confidence and they would eventually consolidate all of their bloodstock at Shea Stables in Michigan. “The Shea’s are also marketing wizards,” Dave notes with a smile. “We’ve purchased and sold literally hundreds of horses with them.”

In 1988 it was Sheila who placed a top, young three-yearold colt by Huckleberry Bey out of the *Bask daughter Autumn Fire in training with the Shea’s. Liniger remembers his first encounter with Afire Bey V very well. “By the time I got around to seeing Afire Bey V, I had looked at over 50 Arabian stallions,” Dave says. “I already knew his pedigree quite well. Gail and I had been to Sheila’s on numerous occasions by that point. The Sheas were training mares for us. We were there in the fall. They brought him out and I remember the leaves were just changing. He had been laid up for something minor but it didn’t hinder his ability to show one bit. He shot through the leaves, blowing and dancing. Within seconds I knew he was the horse.” Their stallion procured, Dave and Gail immediately set about buying more broodmares for Afire Bey V, including the national champion Mark IV Coronation. Linigers are the first to admit that they purchased many mares while building their herd and certainly did not keep all of them, but their original choice of mares at the 1989 Scottsdale sales was actually both astute and ideal for Afire Bey V.

Barbary daughters. Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 3


Three of the four mares they bought that February produced national winners and two of them, Flame Dancer and Flames Lullaby became an integral part of the foundation for their future. Six of Flame Dancer’s eight offspring are national winners. Flames Lullaby also produced a solid handful of national winners with Afire Bey V, among them three national champions, including multi-national champion Afires Lullaby+, Afireandbrimstone SCA and 10-time national champion Romeo Afire. The contribution of DeLongpre and Petty was more than simply good conversation and solid breeding advice. It included *Eter (Comet) daughters and an impressive number of Barbary daughters out of *Eter daughters. This was the legacy and foundation of DeLongpre Arabians and it quickly became the backbone of the Liniger/Shea program as well. Today, the heritage of Barbary and *Eter have provided the most successful cross to date for Afire Bey V. Broodmares sired by *Bask and numerous *Bask sons followed suit with the next most successful being The Chief Justice, Cognac, Zodiac Matador, Bask Flame, Promotion and his full brother Pro Fire. Daughters of the *Bask grandson, line-bred Witraz and multi-national champion, MHR Nobility, figured prominently in the Shea and Liniger breeding program as well and later, helped inspire the purchase of his son, IXL Noble Express. *El Paso and his son Pask also provided outstanding females that generously assisted in the creation of Afire Bey V’s national winning success as a sire. There is no question that Afire Bey V with his stellar pedigree and physical quality, was an ideal candidate for stardom as a breeding stallion, but the broodmares provided by Linigers and Sheas certainly made the difference between great and the greatest. And the promotion of Afire Bey V, orchestrated by both Linigers and Sheas was a veritable masterpiece of equine marketing and consistency. “I don’t think there is another horse in the Arabian breed that has been photographed as much as Afire Bey V,” says Marty Shea with a smile. “Dave had us in photo sessions three or

4 Maroon Fire | ARABIAN HoRSE TIMES


four and more times a year … year after year, with different photographers, but especially with Stuart Vesty. We were on the back cover of the Arabian Horse World for twenty years, a deadline and a creative responsibility I worked hard to meet and improve upon every month, year after year. Afire Bey V has been the most visible horse in the Arabian horse industry for two decades. No horse has ever been better supported throughout his entire lifetime. The mares, the marketing and the solid, ethical business decisions … it all worked hand-in-glove to help make and keep Afire Bey V the breed’s leading sire.”

quite expert in understanding the magic necessary to win in the show ring and in matching horse to human, helping with precisely the right selections for buyers.

The support provided on the ground for Afire Bey V through the Shea Stables training and management matches well with the support provided by the Linigers. Marty Shea in particular has played an important role in making breeding decisions for the farm’s program, assisting clients with their personal breeding decisions, handling all of the magazine advertising throughout the past twenty years, and watching the daily panorama of young Afire Bey V horses in training and on the road to greatness, trotting by right below her office window. It has been Marty and Tim that provided many of the strong ideas and standards that enhanced the Maroon Fire and Shea Stables breeding program to its most successful peaks. Through forty-five years of working in the industry, Marty has also become

When Afire Bey V was ten he became the leading Arabian performance sire and then quickly took over as Leading Combination Halter and Performance Sire. For over fifteen years he has led the breed. A few years ago he overtook even *Bask’s record and became the Arabian breed’s leading all-time sire of champions, national champions, national winners and offspring. Afire Bey V was selected by Linigers for more than just his pedigree and beauty.

“I have become quite good at visualizing the end product when I look at the young horses,” Marty laughs. “This is nice because it has given me the ability to present the right young horses to people, whether they are trainers, amateurs or children … making matches that work. It’s taken years but I do it all the time and it’s satisfying to have it work out for the horses and their new owners so much of the time.”

“We were at Scottsdale with Afire Bey V maybe a year after Dave Liniger bought him. Marty and I had been out to dinner and came back to our barn at WestWorld to find the horse was not in his stall,” says Tim. “My groom

Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 5


6 Maroon Fire | ArAbiAn Horse Times


told me that Dave had walked in while we were gone and told him that he was taking the horse out for a walk around the grounds. Well, I wasn’t too worried at the time. Dave took the horse all over the grounds and enjoyed conversing with people here and there about his horse. He could have bought a lot of horses, a lot of different stallions and he chose Afire Bey V.” “It was a good choice for a lot of reasons,” adds Marty. “Certainly his pedigree and conformation were the best but the horse also has a kind disposition and that great Arabian intelligence. That’s important for Dave and for Gail too. She really enjoys interacting with the horses. Afire Bey V always knew when to be fiery and when it was time to be quiet.

Dave took the horse out in Albuquerque during the show too. Maroon Fire jacket, cap and matching cooler on the horse. The horse needed to mind and be a nice guy walking around the grounds and he was for Dave. He always has been.” Afire Bey V was not an overnight sensation, but almost. When it became apparent that Afire Bey V’s daughters would be the backbone of the future Maroon Fire and Shea Stables breeding program, the partners began looking in earnest for another breeding stallion. “We saw a video of IXL Noble Express and then went to see him in Montana,” Dave remembers. “The weather was very bad. Tim rode the horse and we all recognized that

Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 7


A Note From Home

A message sent to Marty Shea a few weeks ago perhaps sums up some of the feelings about Afire Bey V expressed by those in love with Arabian horses in our time. “I have been involved with Arabian horses in one way or another for over 50 years. In that time there have been four horses which have truly captured my imagination: *Witez II, Bay-Abi, Khemosabi and Afire Bey V. I’ve been going through my old Arabian horse magazines starting with the 1990’s and 2000’s. These are certainly the Afire Bey V years and I have torn out every photo and every article. Either you have been very wise in your choices, or he doesn’t have a ‘bad side’. I printed out an extended pedigree to add to the pile. I can see why he is at the top of the heap – he certainly has the bloodlines to be there. I know Afire Bey is now in his senior years. On behalf of all of us Arabian lovers who appreciate the importance he has been to the modern Arabian breed, and who value the strength of his impressive bloodline, I would like to thank you for your care and devotion to him. I hope he has many more years on his earthly pastures.” —Linda Manwiller Stouchsburg, Pennsylvania

8 Maroon Fire | ARABIAN HORSE TIMES

he was powerful, eager, talented and strong in the hind end. Eventually I said that we ought to buy him and so we did. Each of the stallions that we’ve utilized, from Barbary and *Eter to Huckleberry Bey and Afire Bey V brought something important to the breeding program for all of us. HBB and Afire Bey V had that superb break at the pole and they were smart and trainable. IXL Noble Express brought a real depth of talent and beauty and more hip and hock. For Gail and I the Arabian horse must be a family horse as well. That was a wonderful trait that Barbary shared with his daughters and Afire Bey V as well.” “In the beginning Sheila taught me a lot about what it means to be an Arabian horse breeder,” says Dave. “Right after we bought Afire Bey V we went on a quest for Arabian mares for him and I looked at Sheila’s best mares and I thought ‘… these are the mares I want!’ One day we were all visiting the Sheas at the same time and we went out to dinner. I said to her ‘… why don’t we just cut to the chase. I want to buy three of your mares. What do you want for them?’ They were Sheila’s top mares and, though I inferred that I would pay a large sum of money, she told me that, no, she wouldn’t sell them, not for any price. They were her foundation bloodstock and what she taught me that night was that breeders don’t sell their best horses until at the very least there is a proven daughter or son or several to replace them. I’ve never forgotten. That’s what made me take Flame Dancer’s filly off the sales list at the Sheas open house. Every June or July we get out to Michigan to see the new foals. We were there at Shea’s and there was an open house the following day. Flame Dancer had a beautiful filly at side, maybe two or three months old. I saw her on the Friday before the open house and I told Tim to take her off the sales list. I remembered what Sheila said about that kind of quality and decided that the filly wasn’t for sale. Gail named her Foxy Afire and now she’s the dam of our good, young stallion Noble Ffyre. ” “We sell all of our colts as a routine policy but we decided to hold on to Noble Ffyre,” Tim admits. “He’s a wonderful, tall and stretchy colt. He has an artist’s concept of a beautifully arched Arabian neck. He won the AEPA yearling class at the Buckeye two years ago. He was both the youngest and the biggest colt in the class. We started him under saddle this last Christmas and he really is a different breed of cat, the next step up the ladder. We’re going to start by breeding him to the Afire Bey V daughters as well as several of our other mares. We’ll wait until he’s four to bring him to the show. I think he’s our next great show horse.” “Looking back on 25 years of Arabian horses and breeding, I still remember what Sheila told me about the horses,” says Dave. “She said that I would fall in love with the broodmares and even when they were older they would still be beautiful to me. Still so beautiful even at twenty, because the memories they give to us are irreplaceable. Now there is this new colt and he’s young and handsome, and four generations, and 25 years of our breeding. It’s always about tomorrow, isn’t it? Every foal crop is different. Sometimes you break out the champagne and sometimes the beer.” “Marty and I feel as though we have been very fortunate in our lives,” says Tim Shea. “Everything has come together for us. At one time we trained for owners


all over the country. Sheila Varian came along and put horses with us and then the Linigers approached us and we became the breeding and marketing force behind Afire Bey V. He was a good horse with a good pedigree but nobody knew at that point if he was a breeding horse. It was a gamble. To his credit, Afire Bey V’s dam, Autumn Fire (*Bask x Sparklingburgundy) was a great mare. And then, there were the Linigers. Most people get into the horse business and buy a big farm, a big van and some nice horses … but often not great horses. The Linigers did just the opposite. They bought and they bred for great horses.” “Perhaps most importantly, they really listened to the people they asked for advice” says Marty. “They’re always making changes in their herd and always looking for better bloodstock. They apply their solid business principles to the business of horses. Their honesty and integrity are phenomenal. Through good luck and bad luck, they’ve stayed the course.

Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 9


IXL Noble Express

Joel Kiesner and IXL Noble Express. 10 Maroon Fire | ArAbIAN HorsE TImEs


Foaled in 1997, IXL Noble Express is sired by MHR Nobility (*Elimar x Har Nahra, by *Bask) out of RY Fire Ghazi (*El Ghazi x RL Rah Fire, by Le Fire). He was purchased as a four-year-old by Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. as their chosen cross for daughters of Afire Bey V. From the start he had the right pedigree and individual quality for both the Liniger’s and the Shea’s. IXL Noble Express is descended from an outstanding line of national champion performance horses, including his sire, 6-time national champion and reserve park horse, MHR Nobility; his dam’s sire, Reserve U.S. National Champion English Pleasure, *El Ghazi, and his maternal granddam, 3-time National Champion Informal Combination and English Pleasure, RL Rah Fire. IXL Noble Express made his first show ring appearance in 2004 at the Ohio Buckeye Show and, like his sire before him, came home as the Buckeye Champion Park Horse. In 2004 and 2005 he was Top Ten Park at the U.S. Nationals and then became the 2006 U.S. National Champion Park Horse. When he returned to show in halter competition, his correctness and outstanding quality made the multi-dimensional horse an instant favorite with horsemen, breeders and judges. IXL Noble Express quickly became the 2007 Ohio Buckeye Champion Halter Stallion, and then a Top Ten Halter Stallion (third) at the 2007 U.S. National Championships.

Top: Keith Krichke and IXL Noble Express. Above: Joel Kiesner and IXL Noble Express.

The first foal crop of IXL Noble Express arrived in 2003 and among them were his first national winners: A Noble Cause (x Sweet Summer Fire, by Afire Bey V), A Noble Pass (x SA Passing Fancy, by DW Zask), Expressamo (x Mystic Bey V, by Huckleberry Bey++), Global Express (x Ohernastraum), and Queen of Soul (x Koralina). The debut for IXL Noble Express offspring at the National level came in 2006 when A Noble Pass took top ten honors in the U.S. National English pleasure futurity. A Noble Pass went on to be named 2008 Canadian National Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse and was the U.S. National Champion Show Hack in 2010 and 2012. Leading national winning offspring of IXL Noble Express are A Noble Cause (x Sweet Summer Fire by, Afire Bey V) with 12 national awards (5 national championships and 6 reserves) in pleasure driving and English pleasure; Expressamo (x Mystic Bey V, by Huckleberry Bey++) with 17 national awards, (8 national championships and 1 reserve) in park, English pleasure, pleasure driving and informal combination, and Brave And Noble (x Sweet Bravada V, by Bravado Bey V) with 16 national awards (1 national championship and 2 reserves) in country English, show hack and costume. Fifty percent of the purebred national winners sired by IXL Noble Express are out of Afire Bey V daughters. As of April, 2013 IXL Noble Express is the sire of 324 registered Arabian and Half-Arabian offspring. Thus far, 126 IXL Noble Express offspring are champions. Among them are 58 national winners that have taken 208 top ten awards, 33 national championships and 22 reserve national championships. Over 87 percent of his purebred national winners won their awards in an English division. Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 11


Afire Bey V

12 Maroon Fire | ArABiAn Horse Times


Bred by Varian Arabians and owned by Maroon Fire Arabians for 25 of his 28 years, Afire Bey V (Huckleberry Bey x Autumn Fire, by *Bask+) came to public notice as a 4-year-old when he won the Region 13 English Pleasure Junior Horse Championship in 1989 with trainer Tim Shea. He was also the Ohio Buckeye English Pleasure Champion during his show ring career. By 1992 he had switched from English pleasure to park and was a 1992 U.S. National Top Ten Park Horse, but it is as a sire that he has made a lasting contribution to the Arabian breed. In 1995, ten years after his birth, Afire Bey V’s first offspring launched onto the national scene and made their first serious impression at the U.S. National Championships. Afire Lullaby (x Flames Lullaby, by Bask Flame) was national champion pleasure driving and Can Can Dancer (x Canadette, by Al-Marah Canadius) was national champion English pleasure junior horse. Both were just 4-year-olds. At the beginning of 2013, there are 1,311 registered offspring sired by Afire Bey V. Afire Bey V’s most successful purebred offspring are Whiskey Glow+// and Casablanca Afire+//, the former with 78 national awards (15 national championships and 11 reserves) and the latter

with 75 national awards (14 national championships and 10 reserves). In addition to these two, MWF Benedykt has 47 national awards (11 national championships and 7 reserves) and Spirit Afire has 36 national awards (10 national championships and 5 reserves). Among his most successful Half-Arabian offspring are Americanbeautie with 44 national awards (14 national championships and 5 reserves), Got The Blues with 31 national awards (4 national championships and 6 reserves), Adams Fire with 28 national awards (12 national championships and 2 reserves) and SA Rapid Fire with 26 national awards (5 national championships and 5 reserves). Each year at the U.S., Canadian, Youth and Sport Horse National Championships, new Afire Bey V superstars make their mark and become legends in their time. At the end of 2012, adding together his purebred and Half-Arabian credentials, Afire Bey V has sired 702 champions (Class A champions and reserves, regional and national winners), among them 348 national winners. These national winners have accumulated 2,288 national awards. His total national winning offspring include 120 national champion horses and 56 reserve national champion horses that between them have accumulated 332 national

Bay-Abi Bay El Bey Naganka Huckleberry Bey++ Raffon Taffona Waneta

Errabi Angyl Bad Afas Najada Gazon Vadraff Bagdad Rhadna

Afire Bey V • Ahr*342854 • Bay 1985 Witraz Bask Balalajka Autumn Fire Fadjur Sparklingburgundy Taza

Ofir Makata Amurath-Sahib Iwonka III Fadheilan Bint Sahara Ghazamar Treyf

Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 13


The Next Step Dave Liniger has co-written a number of books about RE/MAX™ International and his successful life as an entrepreneur, but his latest book, The Next Step, released on Amazon, April 26th is a remarkable memoir. It tells the story of his extraordinary recovery from a horrific staph infection along his spine that left him paralyzed from the neck down and in excruciating pain. His inspiration for recovery was his wife Gail and his devoted, supportive children, as well as his personal mantra, “Just 10 steps.” He believed if he could walk just 10 steps, he could walk 20. If he could walk 20, he could walk a mile. After months in a coma, three critical surgeries and six grueling months in the hospital, Dave was able to return home. Now he’s back at RE/MAX™ International and getting stronger every day. My Next Step is no doubt on track to being a best seller. It pre-sold 11,000 copies before its worldwide release. It’s inspirational, filled with hope and meaning and offers more than a little insight into the man who created one of the most successful real estate companies in the world and provided the support and determination behind the Arabian breed’s most successful stallion.

14 Maroon Fire | ARABIAN HoRSE TIMES

championships and 244 reserve national championships. The national awards have been taken in Halter, English Pleasure, Informal Combination, Country English Pleasure, Country Pleasure Driving, Pleasure Driving, Native Costume, Hunter Pleasure, Ladies Side Saddle, Show Hack, Competitive Trail and Dressage. There are few English divisions in the Arabian and HalfArabian rosters where the Afire Bey V offspring have not made their mark at the top. To understand the true impact of Afire Bey V on the purebred Arabian saddle seat horse of our time, a look at the past decade of the U.S. National Championships is helpful. Consider the four top, purebred English classes: English Pleasure, Country English Pleasure, English Pleasure Junior Horse and Country English Pleasure Junior Horse. Afire Bey V offspring have been national champion or reserve national champion 33 times in these classes over the last decade. The U.S. National English Pleasure Champion has been sired by Afire Bey V in seven out of the ten classes. The U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Junior Horse has been sired by Afire Bey V five out of the ten times. Some years these classes have been virtually overrun by Afire Bey V offspring. In 2009 Afire Bey V get were champion and reserve in both the English pleasure and the country English pleasure championships. In 2007, out of the eight national and reserve national champions honored in these four classes, only one horse was not sired by Afire Bey V. Perhaps most importantly for a stallion who is the obvious progenitor of a new sire line in the Arabian breed, at the 2012 U.S. National Championships all but one of the eight national and reserve national champions in these four classes was sired by either Afire Bey V or one of his sons. As of this date, Afire Bey V is the Leading All-Time Arabian Sire of Champions, National Winners and offspring in the breed. ■


Volume 43, No. 12 | Maroon Fire 15


Maroon Fire Arabians Dave and Gail Liniger Castle Rock, Colorado

Shea Stables

Tim and Marty Shea St. Clair, Michigan • 810.329.6392 E-mail: SheaStable@aol.com

www.AfireBeyV.com


Arabians of the Southeast Will be featured in the July Issue of

This feature will include: • Highlights of the Region 12 Championship Show • Exclusive Farm Profiles Also, this special section will be included in the July issue of AHT and will be sent out as a digital flip book. • Special ad package available $895 per page includes 1 E-blast (a $300 value) designed especially for your farm.

800-248-4637

www.AHTimes.com

Tony Bergren - 231-286-6085 • Wayne Anderson - 952-492-4543 • Walter Mishek - 507-837-9127

Volume 43, No. 12 | 33


C O N T I N U I N G

T H E

L E G A C Y

Bill & Shirley Reilich with Joel & Ashton Kiesner salute

SHEA STABLES & MAROON FIRE ARABIANS On 25 Years of breeding Exceptional English Pleasure Horses. 34 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


4X CONSECUTIVE UNANIMOUS U.S. NATIONAL CHAMPION ENGLISH

S I R E

O F

N AT I O N A L

HEIRS NOBLE LOVE U.S. National Champion English Pleasure Futurity Proudly owned by Karlton Jackson

C H A M P I O N S

BEL HEIR LR U.S. National Champion AEPA Arabian Saddle Seat Futurity Proudly owned by The Blankenship Family

Proudly owned by Bill & Shirley Reilich AEPA Nominated Sire Breeders Sweepstakes Nominated Sire

Minnesota Medallion Stallion SCID Clear

STANDING AT KIESNER TRAINING • 865.984.5245 • WWW.AFIRESHEIR.COM


AT Y O U T H , C A N A D A & U . S . N AT I O N A L S

* Congratulations to Jessica Barker, current owner of Guns Afire, and Karen Sparks, current owner of Afires Guns Nroses, in their additions to the career total trophey counts! Additional compliments to Rose Taylor for her participation in the careers of Adams Fire & Nabaskin Afire. 36 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


ferrara photos

Immeasurable thanks to Maroon Fire Arabians & Shea Stables for the opportunity to own this incredible group of horses bred and/or marketed by your programs. Their collective overall careers will go unsurpassed and have given us thrills beyond words. We look forward to the excitement that lies ahead.

Proud to be the leading owner of today’s English Pleasure Horses as listed by the Arabian Horse Times

Carey, Lori & Nicole Lawrence www.starlinearabians.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 37


38 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


Volume 43, No. 12 | 39


full siblings by Afire Bey V ROL

Fire Lily

Multi-National Champion (Afire Bey V x Singularcylection)

Lets Dance

ROL

(Afire Bey V x Singularcylection) 2008 Mare AVAilABle For PurchASe

Trained by r.o. lervick Arabians owned by John and Judy Mittenthal Sammamish, Washington

40 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


Pure Asset

ROL

(Afire Bey V x Singularcylection) 2009 Stallion

FuLL SiBLingS AVAiLABLe FOR PuRchASe

Congratulations to ROL Divine Style

(Afire Bey V x iXL Miss Firefly) u.S. national Reserve champion Scottsdale champion

R . O. L e rv i c k A r a b i a n s Roger & Linda Lervick, owners • Dennis Wigren, trainer Stanwood, Washington • 800-669-2745 • cell 360-202-5934 • cytosk@whidbey.net www.ROLervickArabians.com

Volume 43, no. 12 | 41


Ames Mirage

Brass x Afire Inmy Eyes

42 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

A Noble Cause

IXL Noble Express x Sweet Summer Fire

Afire Inmy Eyes

Afire Bey V x Angyl Eyes


Arabians Congratulations to Shea Stables and Maroon Fire have on 25 years of success! Year in and year out, you plar y provided the Arabian horse community with exem ch many examples of an outstanding breeding program, whi programs. have been able to pass on in their own breeding e Inmy All of us at Cedar Ridge are so proud to have Afir as our Eyes as our foundation mare and A Noble Cause ding head stallion. Both these horses represent the bree s. We program of Shea Stables and Maroon Fire Arabian with are thankful to have the opportunity to be involved such magnificent horses.

We wish you continued success and again, thank that you have done.

you, for all

—Dick, Lollie, and Lara Ames

Volume 43, No. 12 | 43


NatioNal ChampioN award wiNNiNg StallioN & Sire

(afire Bey V x S S magnolia)

Proudly owned by: Freedom ranch LLc Jennifer Patterson Glenbrook, nevada 44 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

Minnesota Breeders Hall of Fame Stallion Minnesota Breeders High Point Sire Nominated Sire: AHA Breeders Sweepstakes • MN Medallion Stallion Scottsdale Signature Stallion • National Show Horse Iowa Gold Star Stallion • Silver Sire Breeders • SCID & CA Clear


Siring National Champions in Halter and Performance Producing National Champions in Halter and Performance

NAtiONAL ChAMPiON

ReSeRVe NAtiONAL ChAMPiON

Major Love Affair (DS Major Afire x hL infactuation+)

ReSeRVe NAtiONAL ChAMPiON Major Bella VA (DS Major Afire x LLC Joyful)

Lots Of Fire CRF (DS Major Afire x G Kallora)

For breeding information, contact: Mike Neal & Katie Beck Delavan, Wisconsin

el Chall WR (Magnum Chall hVP x Major Love Affair, by DS Major Afire)

NAtiONAL ChAMPiON

Reveille W (DS Major Afire x Psyches Princess)

NAtiONAL ChAMPiON

Ames Jasmine (DS Major Afire x G Kallora)

Visionetta PCF (PCF Vision x Majoretta, by DS Major Afire)

Tel: 262-728-1168 Fax: 262-728-2678 mikenealarabiancenter@hotmail.com Volume 43, no. 12 | 45


Get-Er-Done

vibrato G

Gibson Gitar (Gitar MF x Ghazis Flaminstar) Region 12 Reserve Champion English Pleasure Junior horse

Scarlet O butler

Owned by: Melissa Campbell-Jones and barbara Campbell

(Gitar MF x AF Ellenai)

AvAilAblE FOR PURChASE

(Gitar MF x Starlite Flite) 2012 U.S. National Champion Country Pleasure Driving 2012 Youth National Champion Country Pleasure Driving JTD 2011 U.S. National Reserve Champion Country English Pleasure Junior Owned by: Jeffrey Allen

Owned by: Cathy vincent and Merrilee lyons

She be A Rockstar (Gitar MF x Callaway’s Epiphany) Region 12 Champion h/A Mare Saddle/Pleasure Type 3 & Over

Pretentious CA (Gitar MF x Precocious AF)

independence G (Gitar MF x Starlite Flite) Owned by: The Gantt Family

Owned by: Wendy Fisher AvAilAblE FOR PURChASE

Owned by: Joseph Mangone

ADANDY FARM Greenwood, Delaware

Cathy Vincent ~ 302.236.6665 cell 302.349.5116 ~ AdandyFarm@aol.com www.AdandyFarm.com

AF Eddievanhalen (Gitar MF x Young and hot) Owned by: Alayna Mala AvAilAblE FOR PURChASE

46 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


The Get of

Get It Right

2013 Special Breeding Incentives Available nominated sire: AEPA Enrolled Sire Western Carolinas Futurity AHA Breeders Sweepstakes

Volume 43, no. 12 | 47


B red to Move You. Maybelline

CA

English Hunt Show Hack Western ...

Noble Way x Abeline

Proximus

CA

Afire Bey V x DA Triffire

2012 U.S. national half-arabian hunter Pleasure Futurity with tom theisen

2012 Canadian national reserve Champion arabian Country english Pleasure Junior horse with tom theisen

THrEE-yEar-OldS UndEr SaddlE availablE fOr PUrcHaSE Savannah Ca (noble Way x Savirene B) h/a Black Filly Brittany Ca (noble Way x Magatos Way) PB Bay Filly Chardonnay Ca (Proximus Ca x Md tanqueray) PB Bay Filly ChanCellor Ca (Proximus Ca x enchanted Glory Ca) PB Chestnut Gelding CadenCe Ca (afire Bey v x Glorious Melody) PB Bay Gelding Md KhaMi (*Khadraj na x anas Star Fire) PB Bay Filly ta MaKhenzie (navajo Moun x ta Markhessa) PB Bay Gelding

Conway Arabians

18080 Cty 2 • Chatfield, MN 55923 507-867-2981 • 507-202-4440 • 507-867-0060 barn lori@conwayarabians.com or Tom Theisen at 404-304-9955 tommytheisen@yahoo.com

www.conwayarabians.com 48 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


T u T T o

A r A b i

S p e c i A l

Apalo

Justify x Glor ia Apal

e d i T i o n

Lighting The Way! www.regencycovefarms.com/apalo/


A Journey

from

Bulldogs

to

ArABiAns

by Kara Larson As the owners of 5-year-old stallion Apalo, Jack and Elizabeth Milam have an interesting beginning to their Arabian story. Just a few years ago, the Arabian horse was well out of the picture; however, the pair was involved in breeding and showing a different species—bulldogs. Elizabeth was born into the sport of dog shows and Jack has been involved with show bulldogs for about 15 years. Besides breeding for the show ring, Elizabeth is also a judge of both Bulldogs and French Bulldogs, judging all over Europe and Central and South America, in addition to the U.S., Canada, and Mexico. Bulldogs and Arabians—definitely an interesting combination; and yet, Elizabeth finds similarities between the two that only someone close to both would

Elizabeth and Jack Milam with Apalo. 2 | Tu T To A r A b i /AHT

be cognizant. “Bulldogs are a very type-oriented breed. The head is the crowning glory, but there has to be equal strength in the body with balance being a key word. Arabians are similar in that regard. Bulldogs are very misunderstood by those who don’t own them—much like Arabians, who are also often mislabeled. The loyalty and devotion of fanciers of both are of a similar intensity level.” It was through their prized bulldogs that Elizabeth and Jack were introduced to the Arabian horse. “While at the French Bulldog National in Atlanta, our friend Perry Payson asked us to attend an Open House at Belvedere Farm,” says Elizabeth. “I would bug him about his Arabians every time I stood next to him in the dog show ring, so he knew we had some interest.” An interest in horses had always been present for Jack and Elizabeth, but it wasn’t until they were introduced to Arabians that it all came together. “I was a typical horse-obsessed kid for as long as I can remember. I always admired the Arabian breed, but I really knew little about them. Jack had Quarter Horses on and off his whole life. We attended Quarter Horse and Morgan Nationals in Oklahoma City, but for us, they were both just missing something.” Elizabeth continues, “it finally clicked when we were standing at the rail at Belvedere watching Tara Carpio and Sara Beth Womble showing off their show and sale string. I literally had tears in my eyes watching these beautiful horses. We realized that this is what we wanted to see at w w w . AHTimes . com


those horse shows. Two weeks later Jack announced that he purchased a beautiful Arabian gelding as our ‘starter horse.’” Jumping quickly from casual admirers to owners of one of the top stallions in the market makes for a whirlwind situation, but according to Elizabeth, it is hardly a surprise. “I would expect nothing else from Jack! We started off with the gelding then purchased a straight Egyptian mare and a yearling filly. Apalo came right after Scottsdale last year. He has been a wonderful horse to own—a very sweet temperament and fun to be around. He has a great win record, and so far appears to be meeting and possibly even exceeding his expectations as a sire. We have expanded our group of mares, which feature a variety of pedigrees in the hopes that we find the right niche with Apalo.” With the increase in horse numbers came the need for a different kind of expansion. “Regency Cove” is named after the cove at Lake of the Ozarks where the Milam’s lake house sits, and after expanding their existing ranch just south of Oklahoma City from one huge pasture to nine smaller pastures and a beautiful seven-stall barn, they also added the Scottsdale facility in March. Focusing again on Regency Cove’s main attraction— Apalo—trainer Greg Hazlewood offers his opinion on balance and type in conjunction with the stallion’s potential in the U.S. and internationally. “I think Apalo is going to be able to produce for many countries, but specifically in the U.S. for the European market. What he brings to the table in terms of type and balance will make him a horse that is appealing to the European and even Middle East market. Breeding-wise, we’re very pleased with the fact that he’s consistently producing short backs, very pretty eyes, ears, and faces on his babies.” Beyond owning and breeding a great stallion, the Milams have discovered a passion and new lifestyle within the Arabian breed. “We have met some really incredible people w w w . ahtimes . com

Apalo (Justify x Gloria Apal).

while also doing some serious rearranging of our social and dog show calendar. We are learning so much everyday about the breed and the horses we own. Our afternoons and evenings after work are spent almost exclusively with the horses, also spending a good deal of our spare time looking up pedigrees and Internet videos. We have a lot of learning to do and we really want to make sure we do right by the breed.” The Milams avid interest and enthusiasm for the Arabian horse is endearing and inspiring for all, and for Greg Hazlewood, he is very pleased with their attention to detail and desire to learn. “They are very willing and extremely gracious in doing what needs to be done in regard to what’s best for Apalo. They are brand new to the business, but they came in with so much enthusiasm and they have maintained it. I am blessed to have them as clients that have been beyond willing to bring Apalo to where he is today and I’m confident they will take him where he needs to be in the future.” n tu t to a r a b i /aht | 3


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Takes Flight and Emerges as a Leading sire of Champions!

www.facebook.com/VitorioStallion

8 | TuT To A r Abi /AHT

(DA VAlentino x Sol nAtique, by SolStice)

w w w . AHTimes . com


Vitorio CelebrAtes his ChAmpion dAuGhters AGAin!

AJ Manayer Vitorio TO x Anna Marie BHF

2013 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Gold supreme ChAmpion YeArlinG FillY 2013 sCottsdAle GrAnd ChAmpion Junior FillY 2013 unAnimous ChAmpion ArAbiAn ClAssiC YeArlinG FillY oF JAnuArY 1 - April 15 2012 ArAbiAn breeder FinAls Gold ChAmpion WeAnlinG FillY Owned by: HRH SHeikH AmmAR bin HumAid Al nuAmi • AjmAn Stud

Chantilly Lace

ORA

Formerly Bella Vitorio ORA

2013 reserve ChAmpion AhbA 1-YeAr-old FuturitY FillY 2013 reserve ChAmpion sCottsdAle siGnAture stAllion AuCtion YeArlinG FillY 2012 ArAbiAn breeder FinAls top Five WeAnlinG FillY

Vitorio TO x Raherra

Oa k R i d g e a R a b ia n s www.VitorioTO.com • www.OakRidgeArabians.com www.MidwestArabian.com w w w . ahtimes . com

tut to a r abi /aht | 9


Sandro Pinha Gil Valdez Pam Donnelly Tom Oben

480.226.0001 (cell) 480.226.7357 (cell) 480.414.8194 (cell) +32 479 95 44 67

Sandro@sandropinha.com AllStarsArabians@aol.com Sandro@sandropinha.com Obentom@hotmail.com

Located at 28432 N 44th Street, Cave Creek, Arizona 85331 www.ArabiansInternational.com

10 | Tu tto A r a b i /AHT

w w w . ahtimes . com


PreParation, Presentation and marketing of the world’s most beautiful horses for the most renowned owners and breeders. Join us!

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Tu t to A r a b i /AHT | 11


Plan

n o w t o at t e n d t h e

2nd

annual

e s r o H n a i b a Ar t n e v E n o i t a r Celt eIbs More Than Just A Horse Show! I

Please join us! September 18-21, 2013 Freedom Hall - louisville, Kentucky

"It was a thrill to be able to show in Freedom Hall again. A great idea – the Arabian horse business is in need of a Celebration."

— Sandro Pinha

Become a sponsor today! Several levels of sponsorships available: Benefactor Premium & Platinum show sponsor Gold & Silver corporate sponsor Visit our website for details

Arabian Celebration Benefits ...

www.homeoftheinnocents.org Louisville, KY

Premium BookS are online! For more information on events:

PH: 480-585-0739 • info@arabiancelebration.com w w w. a r a b i a n c e l e b r at i o n . c o m 12 | Tu T To A r A b i /AHT

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World Cup Gold Champion l e G a C y F u t u r i t y y e a r l i n G F i l ly

USA Altima Shown by AdAm RickARt thAnk you to RicARdo RiveRo, And doyle & kAte deRtell.

Rahere x RA Khansuela, by *Khadraj NA

U n i g lo b e S e l e c t A r a b i a n s John Blincoe, 602.770.3958 • E-mail: USArabians@aol.com • Scottsdale, Arizona

w w w . ahtimes . com

tut to a r abi /aht | 13


Dedicated to the Arabian Horse for over 40 years.

A leader in monthly Arabian publications International Show Coverage • Features

subscribe online TodAy! Magazine + Free Digital edition + Free 2014 Wall Calendar

www.AHTimes.com 1-855-240-4637

In PrInt • OnlIne • In tOuCH

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tu t to a r a b i /aht | 15


Egyptian EvEnt Show CovEragE

in August

Advertise in AUGUST and include your ads in Arabian Horse Times and Tutto Arabi ... All for one low price! A Great opportunity to showcase your Egyptian Event wins in the AHT show coverage feature.

&a collaboration!

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Tony Bergren - 231-286-6085 • Wayne Anderson - 952-492-4543 • Walter Mishek - 507-837-9127 16 | TuT To A r Abi /AHT

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Arabian Paradise At Lake Tahoe by Kara Larson Comfortably nestled at the base of the Sierra Nevada Mountains and surrounded by sprawling western grassland and evergreen trees, the “Home of the Horse� exists as a sanctuary of peace and relaxation. Presenting the chance to immerse oneself in the luxurious privacy of a mountain-view home with spacious and accommodating areas for friends, both human and equine, Villa Del Cavallo also enjoys the benefits of all that Lake Tahoe has to offer: skiing, golf, restaurants, boating, fishing and more—venues that people from all over the world come to experience. The laidback lifestyle of this property is embodied by an afternoon spent on the veranda sipping a beverage and watching horses graze on the unfenced natural grass pastures next to the home. A four seasons resort on its own, Villa Del Cavallo is available for purchase by the discerning horse lover. now offered for sale

www.villadelcavallo.com

call: 1-775-400-7443

~

email: agent@villadelcavallo.com


SPACIOUS SYMMETRY Encompassing a total of 9,193 square ft. enclosed living space, Villa Del Cavallo opens on the focal point of the property— the main residence. Just behind this large space and entirely accessible under covered walkways, the property also branches out into two appartmentos, an exercise room and indoor spa, a wine vault with temperature controls, a cigar/tasting room with ventilation, secure storage, a maintenance shop, two vehicle garages, and, of course, 8 stable/paddocks with a separate shower and tack room. Entering the 4,000 square ft. main residence, the design calls on one to appreciate the beyond-the-ordinary aesthetic. The eye is drawn to the cruciform arched ceiling coming together from four directions to cover the entry vestibule. Looking through the curtains, the large atrium invites all to journey closer toward the soothing sound of the central stone fountain capped with a fourteen foot square skylight and two large Rumford fireplaces on either sidewall.

The coffered ceilings have large stone beams supported by Tuscan columns, allocating support uniformly in all four directions. Five bedrooms, consisting of four identical Guest Suites and one Master Suite all have a private bath and fireplace. Every room has individually controlled heating (hydronic–warm stone floors) and cooling (moisturized quiet forced air) as well as a fireplace for heating the old fashioned way. All of the rooms open to both the outside veranda and the inside atrium, so there are many venues perfect for entertaining.

2 Villa Del Cavallo | ArAbiAn Horse Times

Two kitchens, the first a large commercial type, is organized for serving larger groups, while the second is a smaller galley kitchen in the den, best for serving on the veranda. This large, furnished wrap-around veranda facilitates outdoor living for any occasion and time of year since the climate is incredibly mild, even in the winter. The main house also contains a large library conference room with mahogany built-in shelving and large capacity lateral file drawers. Curl up in front of the period fireplace with a good book or use the matched desks at the other end of the room for home office chores. Further enhancing the resort-like feel of Villa Del Cavallo, privacy and interior noise reduction were maximized by the owners. Every room opens to the outside so guests can come and go as they please without disturbing others. Extreme soundproofing measures were employed, including double wall construction between rooms, gasketed doors and in utilizing wall materials of various densities through the attic to the roof. Even the walls themselves are set upon elastomeric rubber to isolate them from the rest of structure to minimize “broadcasting” in the home. In the end, the design and construction achieve complete privacy in all the rooms and also provide multiple venues for shared experiences for family and friends. Moving behind the main house, the East and West appartmentos are each around 900 square feet and located at either end of the Barcesa. The first is for guests in the Porticato entertainment wing. The Porticato is perfect for al fresco dining and entertaining with facilities inside and outside for preparation and serving. The second appartmento is ideal for an Estate or Equestrian Manager.


“The Porticato is perfect for al fresco dining and entertaining with facilities inside and outside for preparation and serving.”

TIMELESS INSPIRATION The owners have called the property, “an experiment in adapting aesthetic shapes, proportions, and organizing space for practical uses.” To call a total living space an “experiment” is quite something in itself, yet, the source of this idea takes the intrigue one step further. The inspiration for the home was provided by the 16th century self-taught builder Andrea Palladio, an architectural virtuoso whose own inspiration goes back even further. Palladio was influenced by Vitruvius, the Roman builder-writer of pre-Christian Rome. The Palladian style adheres to Classical Roman principles in the legendary villas he designed in 16th century Italy. Now known as one of the most influential architects in Western architecture, Palladio’s designs have been translated through time in iconic works such as Thomas Jefferson’s beloved Monticello. Today, Palladio’s architectural genius has transformed a pristine plot of Nevada real estate into a modern interpretation of western living. The owners of Villa Del Cavallo, as greatly inspired by Palladio’s designs as Jefferson was nearly 250 years ago, began their pursuit of realizing a strong vision for the home as they visited almost all of the Palladian Villas in Northern Italy. They hoped to build something classically precise and aesthetically profound, and the next step was adapting the design to the American West. The owners’ greatest consideration fell on making the inside division of space work with its external logic. A symmetrical counterbalance from outside to inside was crucial in marrying the modern and ancient designs. In the end, the elements of sight lines and balance create the magic of the villa, so it was a puzzle of adapting the antiquity of the design into a functional modern space.

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“Spending time with horses has never been easier or more enjoyable, and the horses appreciate the roomy stalls, large pastures, and comfortable climate that comes along with this extraordinary property.�

EQUINE UTOPIA The paradise of Villa Del Cavallo goes beyond sipping a morning coffee on the veranda or curling up with a good book on the porticato; the soul of the villa exists in the grass pastures, the all-stone stalls, and the warm muzzles of beloved horses awaiting their evening carrots. Spending time with horses has never been easier or more enjoyable, and the horses appreciate the roomy stalls, large pastures, and comfortable climate that comes along with this extraordinary property. An interactive experience for all, the stables are accessible in a few steps under the covered walkway and, additionally, the stall doors have arched windows that allow for the horses to see the world while you are able to see them. Within the barn, the stalls are a roomy 12' x 12' and each has a wind-protected paddock that opens to a fenced utility road for feeding and cleaning from the rear of the stall—in other words, there is a front and rear door for each stall. The stalls have rusticated stone wainscoting, a vertical plank, raised grain upper walls, and a smooth bright steel roof with a 12" x 12" wooden main beam. The front doors slide open and the rear double doors swing on rustic handmade hinges. All features are made entirely of composite stone, so there is no cribbing and everything is easily cleaned. Even the heated water trough is enclosed in stone, which simply lifts off for easy cleaning.

4 Villa Del Cavallo | ArAbiAn Horse Times


“Living with Arabians just steps away from the house also gives the opportunity to connect with them in a very personal and rare way. ” Each of the paddocks turn into fenced runs that can go into the 60’ round ring. And behind this is an open flat area that can accommodate a 100' x 200' arena. There are about 12 acres in fenced pastures and there is equestrian easement that runs for several miles around neighboring properties.

The stalls, barn, pastures, and riding rings of Villa Del Cavallo offer the Arabian horse a unique and peaceful haven perfectly suited for the magnificence of our beloved breed. In the beautiful and unique artistry of the property, a barn full of Arabian horses is the ideal complement to the charm and beauty of the villa while giving horses a naturally simple and full life. Living with Arabians just steps away from the house also gives the opportunity to connect with them in a very personal and rare way. After all, this is a horse we simply can’t live without, so enjoying them in new and exciting ways— trail rides, daily visits, grazing next to the house—would be an entirely inspired experience for both horse and owner.

“There are 12 acres of fenced pastures and there is equestrian easement that runs for several miles around neighboring properties.” Volume 43, No. 12 | Villa Del Cavallo 5


AN UNBRIDLED CHARM A ten-year project, the building of the home concluded in 2008—a worthwhile timeframe as the product came together as a seamless blend of artistic vision through ages of brilliant minds. Villa Del Cavallo offers a lifestyle and a charm that is truly one-of-a-kind. As a Palladian Ranch House, the single story home flows effortlessly from room to room in a spread-out arrangement echoing with the ambiance of past times. The owners placed great emphasis on the natural comfort of the space while also incorporating numerous interesting shapes and sightlines to liven up the home. The home is constructed entirely with 6” steel box-beam construction topped with an all glass-fiber reinforced concrete tile roof that will undoubtedly withstand anything Mother Nature wills to throw its way. Durability, beauty, comfort, and an informal elegance, the home possesses a certain simplicity of lifestyle unique in the western United States. Constructed with a high degree of symmetry indicative of the Palladian inspiration, a patina of age encourages one to breathe in the fresh mountain air, put their worries behind them, and relax in the simplicity of life in the West while being in the heart of so many four season resort activities.

“Durability, beauty, comfort, and an informal elegance, the home possesses a certain simplicity of lifestyle unique in the western United States.” 6 Villa Del Cavallo | ArAbiAn Horse Times


For Those who Love to Live...

Unlimited activities minutes away from your personal four seasons resort.

World-Class Skiing

Fine Dining

Golfing

Boundary-Free Natural Wilderness

Fly-Fishing

Shopping

Diving

Gaming

Hot Air Ballooning

YOUR PERSONAL FOUR SEASONS RESORT For the prospective buyer, Villa Del Cavallo offers the rare opportunity to live in an exquisite piece of architectural history. Enjoying the interminable comfort of a life within an all-stone home adorned with horses and panoramic mountain views, your own personal “four seasons resort” promises an imaginative and down-to-earth life with the finest modern amenities. Within 30 minutes of 5-star restaurants, worldrenowned skiing, a wide range of golf courses, shopping, and more, the excitement of living at Villa Del Cavallo goes well beyond the breathtaking views. The rich grandeur of every detail in the home enhances the lifestyle, but you’ll discover that the true magic exists in the beauty of gazing upon the mountains from the back of your horse. The Panorama of Villa Del Cavallo

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“The rich grandeur of every detail in the home enhances the lifestyle, but you’ll discover that the true magic exists in the beauty of gazing upon the mountains from the back of your horse.”

now offered for sale

www.villadelcavallo.com

call: 1-775-400-7443

~

email: agent@villadelcavallo.com


2013 Ar abian Breeders World Cup

InternatIonal allIance In the cIty of lIghts by K a r a L a r s o n

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S

Opening Night Gala at XS Nightclub at the Encore Resort.

erving as the ostensible connecting point between International and U.S. owners, breeders, trainers, and horses, the Arabian Breeders World Cup is an event growing in size, quality, and significance in the Arabian horse show calendar. In its seventh year, the event was held at the South Point Equestrian Events Center in Las Vegas, Nev. from April 18th-21st, once again proving that it can cater to all corners of the ideal horse Arabian show experience. Beyond the breathtaking horses adorning the coliseum-seating arena, the accommodating, all-inclusive, and entertainment-focused style of Las Vegas encases the show with ease and panache.

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The show opened with amateur classes on Thursday, which featured many breeders and owners showing their own horses, making for an especially momentous beginning. Thursday evening also included the annual Opening Night Gala at XS Night Club at the Encore, an aptly named host resort, given the venue is the only nightclub to be chosen a second time by the organizing committee. A chance to catch up with friends and enjoy the Las Vegas nightlife, the Gala showcased what the city has to offer this Arabian crowd in this perfect opening celebration.

CHanGes and iMproVeMenTs

The Arabian Horse Breeders Alliance is an organization open to change, trying new things, and finding ways to better showcase our Arabian horse. The changes made to this year’s World Cup were alterations to the arena; in the design of the ring, the layout of the VIP area, and the procedure on championship Sunday. Scott Benjamin, an integral

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member of the World Cup show committee, was happy with the outcome of such changes. “We took a lot of risk in terms of modifying the show, and there were some skeptics who thought the ring looked smaller and weren’t sure about the VIP area. And, of course, in Sunday’s championships, for the first time ever in North America, there was the opportunity for horses to win from anywhere in the championship lineup on Sunday,” Scott shares. “In the end, all of those things turned out to be extremely positive. Everyone loved being closer to the horses and the VIP area, and those who thought the ring was too small realized that it was the perfect size—just big enough to make the horses look fantastic without disturbing the handlers.” Taryl O’Shea, Co-Manager of the show, agrees that the changes made at this year’s show only enhanced the magic and allure of the entire event. “The World Cup show is always a fun show with the excitement of Vegas, the incredible horses, and the international sponsors that you don’t see at any of the other shows,

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Trainer’s THouGHTs on THe World Cup David Boggs:

David Boggs and Pogrom.

“The quality was so spectacular; it’s a great event—extremely exciting and exhilarating. I think it’s one of the best shows the breed has to offer. The competition was at an all time high— there were a lot of high-powered stallions from all over the world and more international attendants than I’ve seen in a long time. Without question, the highlight of the show was the Supreme Gold Champion Stallion *Pogrom. The stallion class was really the best in the breed, so it was extremely exciting and a great win. Obviously, the venue at Las Vegas is very exciting and lots of fun, and I think the show is doing great things for the halter industry. People really like the atmosphere that the show brings and many walked away already looking forward to next year.”

Andrew Sellman:

Andrew Sellman and Om El Soraya.

“The Las Vegas World Cup show is one of our favorites! The atmosphere at the show remains very positive due in large part to all the hard work and good energy from the show commission. The quality of horses at this year’s show was as strong as ever! Great owners and breeders from all over the world consider the show important enough to bring their finest animals to compete, which makes for very stiff competition, and in turn, creates some great worldwide business being done between Arabian horse enthusiasts. The highlight of the show for me was the championship Sunday; I was thrilled to be competing with some of the best Arabians in the world!”

Sandro Pinha:

“I think the show continues to be a wonderful venue to showcase Arabian horses in the U.S. Once again, well done; my hat is off to the whole show committee. The quality of horses competing this year was absolutely amazing and second to none—truly a world-class horse show! My personal highlight of the show was the 5-year-old Stallion El Chall. It was absolutely the most exciting presentation I have ever had with a horse up to this point in my life.” Sandro Pinha and Mystica Antasia.

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World Cup

but we also changed the look of the venue this year.” Taryl continues, “we offered a very dramatic look with the horses entering though a stage-like entrance into a little smaller viewing area, allowing spectators that closer look at the horses. As a show committee, we continually work on making the show better and more exciting for the horse people. This year, I think we accomplished that.”

QualiTY oVer QuanTiTY

The World Cup is not a show that relies on high horse numbers or mass amounts of classes; instead, it reigns in its ability to focus on the value and merit these incredible horses have to offer the diverse crowd. Through the uncovering of talent in the deep classes offered this year, something unique occurred. It ended up that every one of the champions this year at Vegas were all former Scottsdale champions. In response to this, Scott Benjamin believes it reflects the connection building between Vegas and Scottsdale. “Some would

Ricardo Rivero

Michael Byatt and WH Justice.

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Izabella Zawadzka and George Z.

Al Rasheem Pool Party. Rodolfo Guzzo and Natalia Nieves.

Wayne Newton

say that Vegas has become more Scottsdale in style, but I think it’s the other way around. I think the Scottsdale show has become more Vegas in style and internationally focused. Those kinds of horses are now influencing and changing the way the halter horses are bred, shown, and received in North America. And we’re really proud to facilitate that international standard.” Everyone present at the World Cup seems to concur that the quality of horses overall was better than ever. Scott Benjamin reflects on the most impressive aspect of the show in his eyes—the stallions. “The senior stallions were astounding. There were six or seven amazing stallions in the championship on Sunday, and that’s never been something we’ve had in Vegas. Now, we’ve always had great mares, yearling fillies, and super nice colts, but we’ve never had the quality of stallions that we had this year. It shows me that people now are bringing their horses out to showcase them at shows like Scottsdale and Vegas, regardless of whether or not they win.”

Michael Byatt and WH Justice.

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inTernaTional appeal

One of the most impactful aspects of the Breeders World Cup is the international relationships and connections that it inspires and facilitates. In the judging panel alone, the international mix of the show is made apparent. This year’s judging panel included Eduardo Moreira Caio of Brazil, Sylvie Eberhardt of Germany, Jaroslav Lacina from the Czech Republic, Lewis McKim from Canada, Allan Preston from Australia, and Cory Soltau of the United States. Further indication of the global influence of the Arabian is seen in the flags lining the ceiling of the coliseum, in the diverse and passionate crowd of owners, breeders, and spectators, and of course, in the horses that fill the arena.

Pogrom

A real indication of the international presence at the show came in Pawel Kozikowski’s presentation of Poland’s invincible hero, *Pogrom, bred and owned by Janów Podlaski State Stud in Poland, but currently Greg Gallún and Al Rasheem.

2013 Judges

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oWners and Breeders Aude Espourteille, Longtime breeder and avid Arabian enthusiast

Aude Espourteille

“I loved the show! It was incredible to see breeders from all over the world arriving to see the Arabian World Breeders Show! The quality of horses was excellent and included a wide variety of pedigrees. The highlight of show for me was seeing Izabella Z receiving her award. There were tears from every eye in the audience! I love her dedication to the Arabian horse!”

Olivia Strauch, Manager of Excalibur EA, the champion 2-year-old and Silver Supreme Champion Young Stallion “It was a delight to see so many amazing horses class after class. I was especially impressed with the junior colts as it is not common to see so many good ones in one show. And it was a big honor to have the opportunity to see some of the most coveted horses in the world (Najdah al Zobair, WH Justice, *Pogrom) together in the same ring, which also made this edition a very special flavor.” Olivia Strauch, Princess Laetitia d'Arenberg and Excalibur EA.

Murray Popplewell, Rae-Dawn Arabians, one of the top five breeding farms at this year’s show “In my opinion, this is the best show on our circuit. The show is very classy with the Las Vegas venue, and still, it offers extreme quality in every class. The best horse show is the one you win or get beat by better horses. Personally, our highlight of the 2013 show was RD Dynamo finishing as a bronze winner in the Junior Stallions, and also seeing our two Bey Ambition fillies do so well. We ended up selling one of them, one finishing by winning the legacy class and the other finishing third in the same class. It’s always nice after selling, that the new owners have a big win.”

Murray Popplewell

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on lease to David and Terry Anne Boggs and Jeff and Andrea Sloan. Pawel, in his impressive win in the Supreme Champion Senior Stallion class, shares his feelings on the unique event. “The show was great—it was a great adventure for me. I met many interesting people and made a lot of new friendships. Besides this, the quality of the horses was very good. I was surprised, because not just some, but all the horses looked amazing; their condition and preparation was on the highest and most impressive level.” Beyond being amazed by the show’s turnout and level of quality, Pawel experienced a win that he will certainly never forget—a win that further emphasized the incredible quality of the four-year-old Polish stallion. “For me, the highlight of the show was definitely showing *Pogrom. I have known this horse since the beginning, so winning with him was one of the greatest moments in my life. I can only hope that I’ll be able to do it again in the future. And I would of

course like to thank David Boggs and the Midwest team for the opportunity and great show.” Scott Benjamin and the rest of the show committee are aware of the international weight the show is beginning to carry and the growth that it is inspiring for the Arabian horse. Further commenting on the international collaboration that Vegas has enlisted, he believes the impact of the event is changing our show industry for the better. “The international collaboration has rejuvenated and changed the way other shows do things. In Vegas, we’ve learned a lot from the international trendsetters and we’ve tried to take what’s most productive from around the world and incorporate it into the event. In Vegas, you can sit closely with both newcomers and royalty, all mingling together and loving this horse—all boundaries overcome. It’s not just economic boundaries that are broken down, it’s political and religious boundaries

Pawel Kozikowski, Pogrom and David Boggs.

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Murray and Shirley Popplwell, Hank DeShazer, George Z, AHBA Ambassador Award honoree Izabella Zawadzka, Carol Steppe, Bob North, Janene Boggs, Scott Bailey and Jay Constanti.

too. There are Muslims and Christians and atheists and Europeans and South Americans and Middle Easterners and Australians all sitting together, enjoying this horse at the same time in a place that is conducive to such.” Scott continues, “Vegas is a magical place full of acceptance, but that’s part of what makes everyone so comfortable there, because there’s no preconceived idea of who you should be or how you should proceed. It’s been a great place to bring the world together and feel like you have access to everybody.”

More THan a Horse sHoW

The premise of the show is built upon the concise, yet comprehensive schedule of classes with several exciting presentations of our breed’s finest intermittently featured throughout the class sessions. This facilitates a different kind of show that is focused on showing great horses along with setting aside proper recognition for presentations like the International Stallion Showcase,

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which was held on both Saturday and Sunday evening and featured nine stallions all bred outside of North America. For this presentation, individual showings of the stallions were followed by audience members joining the horses and handlers inside the arena in a rare opportunity to interact with legendary stallions on a personal level. Additionally, on Sunday, the Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Dr. Nasr Marei, a longtime breeder, international judge, and well-known aficionado for the Arabian horse. His farm, Albadeia Stud, which is nestled at the base of the Great Pyramids of Giza, goes back as far as seven decades and ten generations into a family legacy built around the Arabian horse. The next presentation was the Handler of Excellence Award presented to Ricardo Rivero of Guzzo/Rivero Arabians Worldwide for the second time. The new, Dams of Distinction Tribute, was presented to two incredibly worthy mares;

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World Cup

the first being National Champion and producer of international champions, Felisha BHF, owned by Robert and Dixie North, who was on site and looking spectacular. Also honored was 19-year-old Bint Bey Shah—a mare that has produced again and again for the Bob Boggs family as the leading living broodmare in the world with 23 sons and daughters in seven different countries and second-generation offspring in some 30 countries. The Ambassador Award was awarded to Izabella Zawadzka, a woman recognized as the “First Lady” of Polish Arabian breeding, an international judge, and the Vice President of the World Arab Horse Organizations— clearly a shining example of an ambassador of the Arabian horse. And lastly, the coveted Arabian Breeders Cup was awarded to Om El Arab for an incredible third time for having the most success with multiple horses accredited to a single breeder in the World Cup competition. For 2013, the top five breeders included Stonewall Farm, Oak Ridge Arabians, Rae-Dawn Arabians, North Arabians, and Western Cross Ranch. These awards and their recipients represent the honor that a life dedicated to the Arabian horse can inspire for a lifetime.

Chris and Sonya Bickford presenting Ricardo Rivero with the Handler of Excellence award.

aT THe end oF THe daY For Scott Benjamin, the World Cup is a step in a fresh and innovative direction for the Arabian horse industry, and yet, the mark it hopes to leave traces directly back to the source of our passion—the Arabian horse. “In the end, I want Vegas to be known for bringing the world together in one place where we all celebrate the horse at the very highest level and exchange ideas. It’s a fair playing field where the best horses win based on their merit. People can bring the best horses from around the world, and they’re confident others will do the same. I really want the legacy of Vegas to be in the celebration of the horse, the people, and the leaders that have made the Arabian horse what it is today. I hope it inspires us all to love and appreciate and promote the Arabian horse on a fundamental level.”

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Janene and Austin Boggs.

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AHba liFeTiMe aCHieVeMenT aWard Winner nasr Marei What makes the Arabian Breeders World Cup an important show for the Arabian horse? The World Cup is providing a great opportunity to breeders from Europe, the Middle East, Australia, and South America to come together with their horses and compete. I believe it is the only, or at least the most important International Bob North, Scott Bailey, AHBA Lifetime Achievement Award honoree Dr. Nasr Marei, show in the USA next to Scottsdale Carol Steppe, Hank Deshazer and Jay Constanti. where horses from all countries compete together. We have the World Championships in Paris, and now, AHBA has offered an equally important show across the Atlantic. By adopting slightly modified show rules of conduct and a judging system used in Europe and the Middle East, I think that the organizers of the World Cup show have bridged the gap between the old and new worlds as far as showing and judging methods are concerned. It is important to start developing a universal system to conduct shows and evaluate them on a basis of Standard Platform(s). One more thing I feel when coming to this show, whether as a spectator like this last April, or as a judge, as I was in the first show of 2007, is that this is a very friendly and inviting show. The organizing committees over the years have managed to add a relaxed, pleasant, and friendly atmosphere. What did it mean to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award? It meant a great deal to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award—I was thrilled when I first received the news. As I mentioned in my acceptance speech, “any honor or recognition that comes from one’s peers is always deeply moving and humbling.” Being appreciated by people that know about breeding Arabian horses, or by a distinguished organization like AHBA, is very rewarding. They can appreciate how much sacrifice, effort, time, and dedication were involved. They are the best ones to tell you if you have done a good job throughout the years. If they do, one should consider this as an honor to what was achieved until this point and also an incentive to do more. It is a great merit that will always be cherished. In the international scope of the Arabian industry, what benefits does the Breeders World Cup offer? Basically, the show does a good job getting breeders from all over the world together, bringing horses that were bred in different countries with different visions and philosophies in one place, standardizing show conduct rules and judging systems, and finally, it is always educational to young and/or new breeders to attend serious shows like this, especially when there are some seminars and round table discussions as was the case in this show of 2013. 

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1. 1. Gold Supreme Champion Senior Stallion and 4 Years Stallion winner POGROM (QR Marc x Petla), shown by Pawel Kozikowski for owner Janow Podlaski State Stud, POL.

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2. Silver Supreme Champion Senior Stallion and 12 & Older Stallion winner WH JUSTICE (Magnum Psyche x Vona SherRenea), shown by Michael Byatt for owners Kerjean Family, FRA. 3. Bronze Supreme Champion Senior Stallion and 5 Years Stallion 2nd place BAAHIR EL MARWAN (Marwan Al Shaqab x HB Bessolea), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner The Baahir Group, USA.

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1. Gold Supreme Champion Senior Mare and 6-8 Years Mare winner NAJDAH AL ZOBAIR (Marwan Al Shaqab x JFN Bint Ludhan), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Sheikh Abdullah Bin Mohammed Al Thani, UAE. 2. Silver Supreme Champion Senior Mare and 4 Years Mare winner GAZALA HBV (Gazal Al Shaqab x Tiaraa Rose), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Arabian Soul Partners Ltd, VEN. 3. Bronze Supreme Champion Senior Mare and 6-8 Years Mare 2nd place FALCONS LOVE NOTE BHF (Falcon BHF x BHF Shahs Luvsong), shown by Keith Krichke for owner Robert & Dixie North Family Trust, USA.

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1. 1. Gold Supreme Champion Junior Stallion and Junior Stallion of 2010 winner OM EL SANADEED (Om El Shahmaan x Om El Jinaah), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud, QAT. 2. Silver Supreme Champion Junior Stallion and Junior Colt of 2011 (A) winner EXCALIBUR EA (Shanghai EA x Essence Of Marwan EA), shown by Ted Carson for owner Haras Las Rasas, URY.

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3. Bronze Supreme Champion Junior Stallion and Junior Stallion of 2010 2nd place RD DYNAMO (Bey Ambition x TF Falconsimprint), shown by Claudio Machado for owners Murray and Shirley Popplewell, CAN.

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1. Gold Supreme Champion Junior Mare and Junior Filly of 2011 (B) winner BADIAA AL SHAHANIA (Marwan Al Shaqab x Majalis), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud, QAT. 2. Silver Supreme Champion Junior Mare and Junior Mare of 2010 2nd place MYSTICA ANTASIA (WH Justice x LL Albufera), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Awaad Mubarak, KWT. 3. Bronze Supreme Champion Junior Mare and Junior Filly of 2011 (B) 2nd place OM EL SORAYA (Om El Bellissimo x Om El Sariyana), shown by Andrew Sellman for owner Aljassimya Farm, USA.

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1. 1. Gold Supreme Champion Yearling Colt, Junior Colt of 2012 (C) winner and Legacy Yearling Colt 2nd place PRUSSIA MI (ABHA Qatar x Parada), shown by Michael Byatt for owner HRH Prince Abdullah Bin Fahad Al Saud, KSA. 2. Silver Supreme Champion Yearling Colt and Junior Colt of 2012 (C) 2nd place A JERICHO (A Jakarta x Destiny VF), shown by Pawel Kozikowski for owner Norma-Jean Abel, CAN.

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3. Bronze Supreme Champion Yearling Colt and Junior Colt of 2012 (B) winner TITAN AS (El Nabila B x Om El Beladeena), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Arabian Soul Partners Ltd, VEN.

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1. Gold Supreme Champion Yearling Filly and Junior Filly of 2012 (E) 2nd place AJ MANAYER (Vitorio TO x Anna Marie BHF), shown by Pawel Kozikowski for owner Ajman Stud, UAE. 2. Silver Supreme Champion Yearling Filly and Junior Filly of 2012 (E) winner MERA ALSAYED (RHR Marcedes x Bonne Chance TBA), shown by Sandro Pinha for owner Al Sayed Stud, KSA. 3. Bronze Supreme Champion Yearling Filly and Junior Filly of 2012 (C) winner RHR CASHMERE (OFW Magic Wan x Nostalggia), shown by Michael Byatt for owner Al Shahania Stud, QAT.

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1. 1. Gold Champion Stallion/ Colt ATH and Stallion 3 & 4 Year-Old ATH 2nd place AL SHAHEED NA (Ever After NA x JA Psilk N Lace), shown by Kenny McDonald for owner Al Shaheed Stud, USA. 2. Silver Champion Stallion/Colt ATH and 1 & 2 Year-Old Colt ATH winner BRAVO SWF ( Jagger SWF x Focus Starlet), shown by Michael Bills for owner Stonewall Farm Arabians LLC, USA. 3. Bronze Champion Stallion/ Colt ATH and Stallion 3 & 4 Year-Old ATH winner VICTORIOUS LD (DA Valentino x Queen Adiamonds), shown by Austin Garrett for owners Les and Diane Van Dyke, USA.

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1.

1. Gold Champion Mare/Filly ATH and 5 Years & Older Mare ATH winner WC CIAO BELLA (Xceptshahn x JE Ali Selene), shown by Michael Bills for owner Holly Woods Dillin, USA. 2. Silver Champion Mare/Filly ATH and 1 & 2 Year-Old Filly ATH winner VICTORIA WP (PCF Vision x Psyches Psecret), shown by A.J. Marino for owner Arturo Ortega Olive, MEX. 2.

3. Bronze Champion Mare/Filly ATH and 1 & 2 Year-Old Filly ATH 2nd place CLARISSA FF (CraveFF x Caro Lynn DPA), shown by Kenny McDonald for owner Matt Sheard, USA.

3.

44 | TuT To A r Abi /AHT

w w w . AHTimes . com


World Cup

Freestyle Liberty Champion ONE LAST ROMANCE (El Nabila B x GR Tara Lee), shown by Gil Valdez for owner Romance Arabians, USA.

AHBA Futurity 2 Year Colt Champion IDENTITY PA (Magnum Chall HVP x Miss Amerika), shown by Dean Wikel, owner of owner Pegasus Arabians, USA.

AHBA Futurity 2 Year Filly Champion BELLA LUNA PA (Masquerade PA x Fadila PCF), shown by Michael Bills for owner Pegasus Arabians, USA.

w w w . ahtimes . com

tut to a r abi /aht | 45


AHBA Futurity 1 Year Colt Champion A JERICHO (A Jakarta x Destiny VF), shown by Jocelyn Hazlewood for owner Norma-JeanAbel, CAN.

AHBA Futurity 1 Year Filly Champion ALTIMA USA (Rahere x RA Khansuela), shown by Adam Rickert for owner John Blincoe, USA.

AHBA Legacy Yearling Colt Champion OCTAVIUS NA (Ever After NA x Psylk Obsession), shown by owner Michael Bills, USA.

46 | tut to a r abi /aht

w w w . ahtimes . com


World Cup

AHBA Legacy Yearling Filly Champion RD CAPELLA (Bey Ambition x Madiera El Marwan), shown by Abdul Aziz Al Tamimi for owners Murray and Shirley Popplewell, CAN. â–

w w w . ahtimes . com

tut to a r abi /aht | 47


Scottsdale Champion! A-Jericho A -Jakar t a x D es tiny VF

2013 ScottSdale champion Signature Yearling colt

tel :

602-509-8228 or 541-865-9302

w w w. d e o r fa r m S a r a b i a n S . co m 48 | TuT To A r Abi /AHT

w w w . AHTimes . com


Las Vegas Champion!

2013 ABWC Silver Supreme ChAmpion YeArling Colt with Pawel Kozikowski

2013 ABWC gold ChAmpion FuturitY YeArling Colt with Jocelyn Hazlewood

Owned by THe Abel FAmily • l AcOmbe, AlberTA, cAnAdA TrAined by: TArA bOreseK


U.S. Nationals Contender Y e a r l i n g C o lt s w i t h D av i D B o g g s

A-Jericho a-Jakar t a x D es tiny vF

owneD BY the aBel FamilY • laComBe, alBerta, CanaDa traineD BY: tara Boresek tel:

602-509-8228 or 541-865-9302

w w w. d e o r fa r m s a r a b i a n s . co m


Volume 43, No. 12 | 101


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Volume 43, No. 12 | 107


A Great Show Horse ... A Great Sire ... A Great Loss ...

1997 - 2013

At Live Oak, Mister Chips was a special horse that encompassed all that we strive for in our breed. Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, his love leaves a memory no one can steal. His memory will live with us forever thru his incredible offspring both in the show ring and breeding barns throughout the breed. Death may end his life–but his greatness will live forever thru his amazing get. Thank you to all of you who loved Mister Chips as we did.

—Laura and Phil Witter

108 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


HF Mister Chips sired many multi-regional and national Champions in Performance and Halter. some of his 2012 national Champions— Poker Face bMJ, Diamond Chips LOa and CP Hurricane—are but a few of his national award winning get.

poker FaCe BmJ

DiamonD Chips Loa

Cp hurriCane

Live Oak arabians Laura and Phil C. Witter 6300 Jefferson Highway • Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 tel: 225-928-7213 • fax 225-923-1984 • e-mail: liveoakarabians@gmail.com

www.liveoakarabians.com

Volume 43, no. 12 | 109


A

Eden C

(ENZO X SILKEN SABLE)

plus So Fancee AF AUDACIOUS PS X HC OLIMPIA

Campbell Arabians

26677 PASSERDYKE CT., EDEN MD 21822 MELISSA.A.JONES@COMCAST.NET 443.614.1222 110 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

B


equals ... cee me!!

Fantacee EDENĂ• S

EDEN C X SO FANCEE AF

Owned, bred and adored by Melissa Campbell-Jones

www.campbellarabians.com

Volume 43, No. 12 | 111


Naughty Nile Bey

(IMPERIAL BAASEEL X ZHIVAGOÕ S NAUGHTY LADY) WESTERN PLEASURE JR. HORSE

Areion el Armando

(ARMANDO EL ARYES X SO FANCEE AF)

Inquires Welcome 443-614-1222 Naughty Karakter

(EDEN C X ZHIVAGOÕ S NAUGHTY LADY)

Campbell Arabians 112 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

26677 PASSERDYKE CT., EDEN MD 21822 MELISSA.A.JONES@COMCAST.NET 443.614.1222


Gibson Gitar GITAR MF X GHAZIS FLAMINSTAR

Region 12 Reserve Champion English Pleasure Jr. Horse with Cathy Vincent

Region 12 Reserve Champion English Pleasure AATR with Alayna Mala

www.campbellarabians.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 113


The English

Show Horse

The Arabian English horse is … charismatic, bright, powerful, eye-catching, and inspiring. As the focal point of one of the most exciting classes our Arabian has to offer, arenas boom with cheers for encore laps at the end of an already exhausting class. And that’s just from the stands. From their backs, the best riders make an effortless picture, even when a storm is brewing on their fingertips. But isn’t that part of the charm? Turn the pages to learn more about the wind-up toy of our beloved breed—the Arabian English horse.

Julie Daniel

Daniel Training CenTer Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My mom owned Arabian horses very early on, so my love of the breed was destiny. She patiently taught me to ride when I was six and I vividly remember crying for days because I couldn’t get our gelding to canter. It seems so funny now and makes for a good family story! How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? When I was young, we showed our horses in several disciplines. They were jacks of all trades, expert at none. My first horse, Mister Heritage, was a park horse that we also showed in western classes! By today’s standards, that is unthinkable and even hard to imagine, thank goodness! Our English horses are now bred and trained to be the best they can be in that individual field. What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? Revelation JF. He is one of the most cadenced horses I have ever had the pleasure of watching. He looks like a blast to ride and makes it look so effortless. It is obvious that he enjoys it as well -I honestly don’t think I have ever seen him tip an ear! Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today.

114 | ARABIAn HORSE TIMES

Julie Daniel

Countess Vanessa. Just thinking of her takes my breath away; one of the all-time greats of our industry. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? Take your time. Consult with a professional who is well-respected and trustworthy. Don’t buy a horse solely based upon its show record, and keep in mind that the rider needs to fit the horse and vise-a-versa.


Brandon Flood

Flood Show horSeS Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 15 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My parents, Bill and Darcy Flood, introduced me to Arabians when I was a child. How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? The English divisions have evolved in a number of ways over the years, some developments have been positive, others not so much. First off, the horses we are breeding today are far superior in their athleticism. They are stronger, sturdier, and have more natural ability than ever before, all positives. Part of that natural ability is how high these horses can trot, which I also believe is a positive. However, our obsession with these horses trotting has led to some negatives in my opinion. Because our horses are trotting so much better, stronger, higher, it seems to have become the single focus of the saddle seat divisions. We need to have pretty, well rounded animals exhibited in the saddle seat divisions as well, not just trotting machines. And in the past couple of years, this seems to be occurring. The English horses that I see coming up through the junior horse classes and into the open not only trot, but are well rounded, beautiful Arabians. So even though I think there was a rough patch, the saddle seat division as a whole, is on its way to bigger and better things.

Brandon Flood

Katie Garland GarlandS ltd.

Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 15 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My dad; he has trained Arabian horses for 30 years, and I have been

On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? To me there is no average length of time to start and finish any horse. As much as I would like to say 6 months for every horse, it’s simply not true. It can take 6 months or it can take 3 years, you never know. And really, time is not the important factor. Knowing you have a horse that knows its job and is willing to perform when it hits the in-gate is. What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? Afires Heir, no doubt. He performs so effortlessly, and has such a quiet nature to him. Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. Bask. Not only did he completely change the saddle seat division, he revolutionized the entire breed, and it’s a fact that he is still impacting all divisions today through his bloodlines.

Katie Garland

Volume 43, No. 12 | 115


riding since I was five years old. He has influenced me and helped me out a lot in this business. Without him, I wouldn’t have had the opportunities I have had in my life and I am so fortunate to have grown up in this business. On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? It takes about 6-8 months depending on the horse. Some horses are more mature and stronger than others, so they don’t take as long as a horse that is a little slow to mature and develop. There really isn’t a time limit that you can put on it because every horse is different and they each have their unique things that make them special. What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? One I would love to have in my barn is Adams Fire. The presence he has when he goes into the ring is unbelievable and so special. When he comes in that arena you can’t help but look at him, your eyes naturally go to him and you find yourself watching him most of the time. When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? It has to be form to function. They also need to have good bloodlines to do it. They need to be round through their hip, shoulders, and up through their poll because you are asking them to collect and be very round. The rounder their parts, the easier it will be for them to do that. If they have very square and sharp points, it will be a lot harder for them. Also, they need to have round fluid motion when they are trotting around. When you first look at the horse, he may not be a huge trotting horse, but once you get him under saddle and in the bridle he will be better than a horse that trots big loose but doesn’t have roundness. Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? Yes, it is proven, but you can have success with horses that might not be bred to do it. Unfortunately our gene pool is getting smaller and smaller by breeding to the same horses all the time. We need to look at different stallions sometimes that might not be your typical English horse for possibly a new outcross.

Chase Harvill

Chase harvill Training CenTre Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? I am honored to say that Linda Fontana was one of the first people to

116 | ARAbIAn HORSE TIMES

Chase Harvill

introduce me to our wonderful breed when she was a professional. Linda actually gave me one of my very first riding lessons; I now get to give her riding lessons! Linda has her beautiful Half-Arabian gelding Sheer Razz Ma Tazz in training with me. When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? There are many factors and conformation points I look for in a young prospect. The number one thing I look for is overall balance. If a horse doesn’t have a body that is naturally balanced, it will be very difficult for them to do their job under saddle. Long backs, short hips, lack of muscle depth, etc., are all things that take away from a horse’s athleticism and balance. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I understand both sides of the argument on the maturity. I understand why people want the 4-year-olds in the class for sales and promotion purposes, and I see why other people want to protect the horse and save them for five and six. The issue that makes the least amount of sense to me is that the age rule is per division. I believe the best way to make everyone happy is for the class to be eligible for the 4- to 6-year-old horse; the owner would only be allowed to compete with that horse for two of the three years. With a three year spread, a horse trainer doesn’t have to put as much pressure on the 4-yearold horse because if he or she isn’t quite ready, you still have two more years to possibly compete.


What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? The number one thing people need to think about when purchasing an English horse is suitability of horse to rider. Just because a horse is super cool with tons of show and motion, doesn’t mean than your 7- year-old daughter can ride it. Be smart and honest about your ability and skill level and I promise you will have more fun! Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? Bloodlines are an interesting tool to give a hint as to how a horse is conformed and how they will train. When I initially look at a horse to buy, pedigree is secondary to, is his job done with happiness and ease? As I get more interested in purchasing said horse, I look to his breeding to help me predict the future and training with that horse.

could last forever and impact their training operations and breeding plans, it was a limited survey. Of those 25,759 members, 74 of 232 responded, and of those, 41 voted to keep the ages 5- and 6-year-olds, and 33 voted for a 4and 5-year-old class. That means, of the 25,759 members, 8 people decided the fate of this class. My daughters did not get a survey, although I have four 4-year-olds for Lea to ride this year. My client, Dean Stankovick, did not get a survey; he rode in the Maturity last year. I can add 35 votes in favor of the 4- and 5-yearold class just out of my own barn, from riders who rode or intend to ride in the Maturity in the next two years and did not receive a survey (some were on the AHA list, but the email went to Spam).

Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 40 years

In most judicial systems there is a quorum needed to pass a vote of this long-term importance. According to Roberts Rules, the requirement for a quorum is “protection against totally unrepresentative action in the name of the body by an unduly small number of persons.” I think the decision made, based on the numbers previously stated, constitute an unduly small number of persons.

Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? Dick Keller of Keller Electric Arabians, and owners of National Champion stallion, Hajababa.

I have been breeding horses for 20 years. My daughters have won over 40 national championships as youth riders and 18 of those have been on 4-year-old horses. As a

Vicki Humphrey

Vicki HumpHrey Training cenTer

What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? MHR Nobility. I would have loved to ride AND breed him. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I have been distressed by the negative and personal comments in our social media regarding the changes in the age division of the English Maturity classes. I think we have a great many friends in this business and I hope we can all agree to disagree without either side name-calling and feeling personally offended. I hope that I personally can call many of you “friend” and at the same time strongly disagree with your decision and the process with which the decision was made. I understand that the survey questionnaire regarding the age of horses was sent to 232 recorded owners and trainers that participated in the English and Country Maturity from 2008-2012. With a membership of 25,759, that includes not only riders and trainers, but breeders, stallion owners, future riders, mothers of riders, and trainers of future riders, all who deserve input for a decision that

Vicki Humphrey

Volume 43, No. 12 | 117


breeder in a market where prices of horses are low, adding a year of training to attract a sale is unaffordable. I have had two sales pending this decision and both sales fell through when the decision was announced. I feel this decision negatively impacts the breeding barns trying to stay in business and supply the horses we need to compete, and restricts and limits options for riders. I think showing junior horses against open horses is contrary to the reason we have a junior horse division separate from the open in the first place. I think the decision to keep the Maturity as a 5- and 6-Year-Old Maturity was done with an unrepresentative survey from a small number of people. I think our shrinking market needs to embrace all the opportunities possibly available to owners and riders and let each individual person make the decision that is right for them and their horse. I think that horses that are trained for the maturity FIRST, as 4-year-olds, rather than for the junior horse class, are trained quieter and with less stress than if they were going to be shown by trainers. If they are forced to show junior horse at 4, that will add stress to the horses. If they are not shown at all at 4, then they are forced to choose or share at 5, between the maturity and the junior horse. That limits our choices once again. Our amateurs are our business! We need to give them every opportunity to enjoy their horses! Lastly, the opportunity to show is not a requirement to show. Those riders who feel that their horses are not ready at 4, do not have to show. But we have not limited their decision, merely given them the opportunity to make their own. Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. FF Summerstorm. I showed her when she was owned by Aramor Acres. She was then expertly ridden by Gene LaCriox for the rest of her show ring career, owned by Betty Zekan. She is still, to this day, the epitome of the perfect English pleasure horse. Quality, presence, cadence, extreme motion, balance and a great attitude. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? Call me!

118 | ARABIAn HORSE TIMES

Joel Kiesner

Joel Kiesner

Kiesner Training Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 40 years When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? It comes down to a couple things. Most important is their overall body style. They have to be built in a box, not a rectangle—short back, hocks low to the ground, and a tall neck with long, sloping pasterns. You’re not going to have a tall-set neck without a laidback shoulder; those two things pretty much go hand in hand. And if your hocks are low-set, you will almost always have a good hip. For a young horse, when you turn them loose, they should look like an English horse—they should pick their head up and look around and be happy and lift their knees. I try not to imagine very much; I try to just judge what I have in front of me. If you are imagining things, you might be wrong.   On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? On average, we start them in the fall after nationals when they’re three, and usually, the soonest they will make it into the arena is a show in September or maybe October. One in ten will make it to a show as a three-year-old, but most of them are mentally or physically not ready to show. Then you’re usually looking at showing in their 4-year-old year, so it depends on how many months you put in the horse.


Finished is also a really subjective word. Just because they’re shown does not mean they’re finished. I don’t think a horse is truly finished until they’re five, but you can sure get them shown before that. I’ve had some horses that were their very best at four and I’ve had horses that were their very best at ten. If you’re the owner or trainer of that horse, you have an obligation to do what’s best for the horse. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing as English horse? It’s easy to buy—harder to sell, so make sure you get the right one. The other advice I have is that when you buy something, you will almost always want to sell it another time. People don’t always realize that, and of course, you can’t foresee the future, but something may come up, so buy something that not only you covet, but that someone else will covet as well. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I think it’s interesting that you’re asking this question because we just had a big survey on it that included everybody that has shown in the class since its inception. The survey showed that most people thought it should be for 5- and 6-year-olds, not the 4- and 5-yearolds. So those are the people who are actually competing in the class and those were their thoughts. I think that sometimes, we don’t necessarily need to listen to the loudest voices, but you have to respond to what the majority wants and you have to look after the breed that we love. And I am happy to follow what the majority of the people wanted and happen to agree with them. Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? I think they are extremely important. You can have a horse that looks good in front of you, but almost always, their pedigree is going to show up somewhere or sometime, and for the good or the bad. If it’s bad, it’s when you least want it to be there. But it always shows up. When evaluating a young horse, I look at his traits, but then a lot of the different bloodlines mature differently, so you need to pay attention to his pedigree. He may look like this now, but you should know that this particular bloodline thickens up as they get older, or maybe you know that you don’t like to train a certain bloodline—it might not be your style of horse, so it’s also personal preference. Ultimately, the pedigree will show up, so regardless of what you see in front of you, it’s good to know—it’s the insurance policy. You can have a really pretty horse in front of you and you think this is going to be great horse that will break out and train well and looks like it will be a good show

horse, but the next step is the pedigree. If it has a pedigree that backs it up, something like a dam line that were good show horses and they worked well; and a sire that was a good thinker, then you go, okay, I’m willing to take a risk on it. Especially when you’re speculating on a young horse, pedigree is important and very telling.

Lori Lawrence Starline arabianS

How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? It is easy to see that we demand a much more athletic English horse than we used to. They show with added impulsion, are more “up to the bridle” and their motion is much more extreme. The bar has been raised over the years, time and time again, and the breeders have done an incredible job in producing saddle seat horses that continue to exceed the new expectations.

Lori Lawrence

On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? Some are ready as 3-year-olds, with only one year of training. Other individuals can take two to three years before they are physically and mentally capable of entering the ring.

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There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I think the class should be open to 4-, 5- and 6-year-olds and let the owner pick two of those years to show. As I stated above, all horses mature differently, and some will be ready at 4 to show. This should be left to the owner’s and trainer’s discretion. I also think once you win, you should be ineligible to compete in subsequent years. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? I think it is important that your trainer believe in the horse’s capabilities and trainability. I personally would never buy a horse without consulting my trainer. Joel is very specific in the qualities and bloodlines that he looks for in the horses he likes to train. Buying from a knowledgeable breeder with a track record for producing high quality English horses can also be an important factor in increasing your success rate. But that doesn’t mean that you can’t find a rare gem in someone’s backyard! Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? Absolutely, not only for physical ability, but just as important is their trainability; that is why we are so true to the Afire line.

How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? I think we have evolved our horses into the best trained show horses we’ve ever shown. I just would like to keep our horses true to their division and keep our focus on quality and soundness of gait, as well as the correct completion of ALL gaits called for. Let’s keep it looking like a pleasure to ride. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I like the idea of allowing our young horses the time to develop into the most steadfast amateur mounts as possible. Five and six seems like when they turn the corner and have the confidence to pack an amateur around without making baby mistakes. I’m looking for clean rides out of my amateurs and their horses that only comes with maturity. Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. Orans Adagio … kicking dirt over my head and ten rows up as I stood on a stool peeking over the top rail at Louisville in wild eyed wonderment at what I was seeing! That horse will forever have an impact on what a show horse can do. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? Do your research; use Data Source to compare pedigrees, show records, success of siblings, etc. Don’t hesitate to pay for a professional opinion from someone with the experience and knowledge to help minimize the risk.

Mike Miller

smoky mountAin PArk ArAbiAns LLC

Justin McManus

Justin McManus Cortese ArAbiAns

Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 20 some years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My mom, MaryAnn, and her Half-Arabian/Half-Morgan mare Djingo. Mike Miller

120 | ArABIAn HOrSE TIMES


Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 33 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? I was introduced to the Arabian breed first by my neighbor, Bob Amundson. However, I owe my devotion to and knowledge of the breed to Rosalind Haswell, who was my 4-H leader and Sunday school teacher, and an Arabian breeder. She bred 6 - 8 foals per year and showed on the breed circuit, producing some nice horses. She selflessly shared her horses, time and knowledge with me and numerous other kids, making sure we had the basics and could safely handle the horses. She instilled a lifelong devotion to the breed in countless young people. How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? Saddle Seat has evolved from somewhat up-headed horses being presented in English tack to an extremely specialized division with a specific look, specific bloodlines, training methods, shoeing and highly refined presentation. When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? When looking at prospects, I want to see a horse that is naturally high-headed, with a clean throatlatch and good hinge. It needs to have a well laid-back shoulder, strong coupling and depth to the hindquarters. The hocks should be set low with a good degree of angulation. When viewed in motion, they should take a strong step behind and have a loose way of going in front. On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? We can get them broke and working in pretty short order, and into the ring in 8 to 10 months. To get them to where they are strong, dependable and working near their potential (what I would consider finished) can often take 2 years. What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? DA Trinidad. He was so balanced and athletic, but still a beautiful Arabian.

Gordon Potts The Brass ring

Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 37 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? There were several introductions: My riding teacher had ridden Arabians, and friends of my parent’s were close with Jarrell and Judy McCracken of Bentwood Farms. I had also seen them through magazines, both the Times and the World.

Gordon Potts

When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? I look at the shape of their neck and whether they want to have their head up, determining if it’s something that’s going to be easy for them. The other thing I look for is whether a horse will drop its hind end when it trots off. A horse that will pick its shoulders up and carry itself and wants to go uphill— that’s what you’re looking for in an English horse. On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? I would say probably 8 to 12 months, especially in a double bridle; obviously, for the futurity horse, it’s quicker. Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. I think there are a bunch of them. Quite honestly, I’m not so sure our horses weren’t better quality 20 years ago. I think we have improved shoeing—we have allowed our horses to have a much more comfortable shoe, we don’t have to tear it down to fit the foot, and we can pad them as they need it. So, I think they’re much more comfortable. But I think that if we’d had those rules 20 years ago, that would have helped those horses because there were some phenomenal horses 20 and 30 years ago. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing as English horse? I think that you need to find someone that you like, trust, and you have a good rapport with to help you make that selection. English is a division that, and actually all our divisions are this way, is not a do-it-yourself division. Find someone you feel good about and someone who has a good track record and enlist their help.

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Mitch Sperte

Sperte Show horSeS Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? I was born and raised in Colorado and was primarily showing Saddlebreds. Our neighbor, Marilyn “Vonnie” Wilde, was an Arabian breeder, and she invited me to accompany her to a Lasma seminar. I was mesmerized watching Gene LaCroix present his athletic Arabians and his demonstration of achieving collection that ultimately produced tremendous impulsion and elevated motion. I can honestly say, had it not been for Bask’s ability to consistently produce beautiful, athletic and ambitious show horses, I wouldn’t have refocused my career to become an Arabian trainer.

Gregg Shafer

Gregg Shafer Shafer arabianS

Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My mom and Chick Needler.

When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? Most accomplished and knowledgeable horsemen will recite important conformation requirements. When evaluating a young prospect, I think it is also important to assess their ability to demonstrate a show horse attitude. Are they confident and do they have a high opinion of themselves? Do they appear to effortlessly achieve vertical carriage with the desire to propel themselves forward?

How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? The horses have more collection and elevation. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? I’m in full agreement with the 5- and 6-year-old age for the maturities and would like to see the futurities be for 4 year olds. Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. FF Summer Storm Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? Absolutely, every bloodline has specific traits. Even if you’re not thinking of further breeding, you want to make sure there are not any traits that you’re not willing to deal with.

Mitch Sperte

On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? Hopefully the young prospect arrives for training and has been properly imprinted, yet has benefitted from living 122 | ArABIAN HOrSE TIMES


primarily in pasture and with their peer group to develop socializing and survival skills. If indeed this is the case, the young horse should progress from start to finish in a full-bridle in roughly 18 months, assuming there are no significant setbacks. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? There are certainly legitimate arguments on both sides of this issue, however, I believe we need to give our trainers more credit. Most have the horse’s best interest in mind and they have the ability to assess the horse’s physical and mental capacity, regardless of age. This is a decision that should be between the owner and their trainer and not an area that needs to be legislated.

What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing as English horse? You can look at conformation and be sure that these horses are built to do the job. They should tend to step off and put their bodies in a position as they would if you were riding them as an English horse. Definitely vet the horse, take x-rays, make sure there aren’t any OCD lesions or joint disease. It’s very important that you utilize your veterinarian as well as you utilize your horse trainer.

Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? Yes. There are certainly exceptions, however, the good and bad traits of certain bloodlines are often predicable.

Cathy Vincent

AdAndy FArm

Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: A little over 35 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? Donald Booth introduced us to the breed; he sold us our first Arabian.   When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? Definitely a low set of hocks, a strong hindquarter, a very well placed, laid-back shoulder, and a high placed neck. It doesn’t have to be four yards long, it just has to be high, and the horse needs to be relaxed in his shoulder and loose in his movement. A lot of these babies kick and gallop, but the really great young ones trot. Look for them to prefer the trot to the buck and kick.   On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? One year; I can’t do it in 90 days. These 3-year-olds that we’re starting, we start them and then we turn them out, and then bring them back—it takes a whole year to put one together from start to finish. In what they’re expected to do at this point in the show industry is unbelievable, and we want to do what’s right by the horse.

Cathy Vincent

Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? They are horrendously important. With the great Huckleberry Bey comes the great Afire Bey V comes the great Hucklebey Berry. Comparing that with the *Bask blood of the older years—these sires have been unbelievable in the breeding shed, setting up necks and getting hind ends. These horses have been dominant sires in this breed and we stand several sons of Afire Bey V here and we’re very proud of it. They, too, have all been very successful in producing English-style horses. Another attribute of these horses is that they seem to work with every trainer— they’re very adaptable and trainable.

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Dennis Wigren

r.O. lervick arabians Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 35 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My parents had a small breeding farm as I was growing up that bred one or two mares a year and I loved the involvement with the Arabian horses. On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? We start them at 2 coming 3, to teach them to long line and find their balance, to get light and balanced in their carriage. As soon as they get past that point, we duplicate that process under saddle in the round pen. This entire process takes approximately 6-8 weeks on average. If the horse is strong and mentally ready, we will move to the big arena and we find that by the beginning of their 4-year-old year, they are ready to show. Some Mike Wheliham

Mike Whelihan

Whelihan arabian Farms Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 50 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? My father, through Dr. Kale. How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? Saddle seat has not evolved over time, however, saddle training and proper care for the Arabian and Half-Arabian has come a long way for the saddle seat horse. When looking at young prospects, what should you look for conformation-wise, when picking a horse out that has not been started? The traits of a good English horse are a high, natural head and tail carriage, short backs, flat bone stricter, flat muscles and deep cut tendons.

Dennis Wigren

What is one horse that you are not affiliated with that you wish you could have bred, owned, or shown? Bask.

horses excel faster and can be shown as a 3-year-old, and some aren’t mentally there till they are five. So, it can take between 15-16 months. If we have done our jobs, than that horse should be ready for an amateur to show as well.

Name one horse that showed 20+ years ago, that you think would still make an impact on the show ring today. Zodiac Matador.

There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-yearolds, what are your thoughts on this? Having them

124 | ArABIAn HorSE TIMES


be eligible at 5 or 6 makes it so you don’t have to push them as hard as a 4-year-old so that they can become developed by the time they are 5 or 6, which would be better for the horse. If you wait till it’s 6, it will have passed its junior horse years and can take some of the load off of showing. What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? Do your homework, and look at bloodlines of the horses that are competing and winning, that excel in the English division. When buying a new horse, check its show record to see how well that horse has competed, and if it’s a young horse that has not shown, make sure it has the conformation, breeding and the willingness to be an English horse. Are bloodlines important when selecting an English horse and if so, how and why? YES … one of the most important things to me is the bloodlines. When selecting a young horse, I look to see if it has the breeding to perform in the English division and will it be true to the English division, because some bloodlines do not perform well and it would take an act of god to make them into an English horse. So, pedigrees are very important in selecting an English horse.

Phil C. Witter

Live Oak arabians, inc. Number of years involved in the Arabian breed: 41 years Who introduced you to the Arabian breed? I was first introduced to the Arabian horse by Tom McNair and “the” Jack Dyer, and Herb Duncan families. How has Saddle Seat evolved over the years? Saddle Seat’s evolution is one from pleasure to performance orientation. This mirrors the breeds’ move from “The Versatile Arabian” to a performance specific Arabian solely relegated to one division.

Phil C. Witter

What advice would you give a new buyer when purchasing an English horse? Buy a horse you really like that fits our purpose, from both a conformation and performance perspective, with great athletic ability, and a compliant willing athletic attitude. When I say, “fits your purpose” that includes but is not limited to the ability of the rider, and the chosen division. Some horses prefer “little people” and others are not so picky. Try numerous horses, look for what a judge might see as a “fault.” I was once shown a beautiful halter horse from a raised center viewing stand – it was a telling experience. When standing above eye level of the horse, every fault was magnified – it surprised me, and I learned a valuable lesson. ■

On average, how long does it take to get your saddle seat horse from start to finish into the show ring? We start young horses slowly, but they are usually under saddle or in the buggy by three and a half years old. There have been debates on the Maturity Saddle Seat classes and only being eligible for 5- and 6-year-olds, what are your thoughts on this? It is my belief Arabian horses mature slower than other breeds and can exhibit growth and maturity into their seventh and eighth year.

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2012 National

English Pleasure Leaders Includes: U.S., Canadian and Youth Nationals English Champions and Reserves. AEPA Saddle Seat Futurity, English Pleasure, Country English, and Park Horse classes

Arabian & Half-Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

1. Ronde Vu..............................3 championships 2. Apollos Cary Grant..............2 championships CP Shenanigan.....................2 championships CSP American Idol..............2 championships Hello Moto..........................2 championships Nutcracker Sweet PF............2 championships ROL Firecracker..................2 championships

Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

Ronde Vu

1. Ronde Vu..............................3 championships 2. CP Shenanigan.....................2 championships CSP American Idol..............2 championships ROL Firecracker..................2 championships 3. A Noble Cause.....................1 championship, 1 reserve Ames Celebration.................1 championship, 1 reserve FSF Loaded Gun.................1 championship, 1 reserve GSF Ambienze....................1 championship, 1 reserve High Philutin.......................1 championship, 1 reserve MBF Burning Springs..........1 championship, 1 reserve MM Sabe.............................1 championship, 1 reserve RJ Ames...............................1 championship, 1 reserve Sir Magni Feke.....................1 championship, 1 reserve Starr Llight...........................1 championship, 1 reserve

Half-Arabian Leading Horses by number of wins

Apollos Cary Grant

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1. Apollos Cary Grant..............2 championship wins Hello Moto..........................2 championship wins Nutcracker Sweet PF............2 championship wins 2. Brass Glamor Shot...............1 championship, 1 reserve Danse All Night...................1 championship, 1 reserve Diamond Chips LOA..........1 championship, 1 reserve Eves Fire...............................1 championship, 1 reserve 3. Carry On LOA.....................2 reserves Toi Slamtastic CRF..............2 reserves


Arabian Overall Leading Sires by number of winning get .......

by number of wins

1. Baske Afire .................20 2. Afire Bey V ................14 3. A Temptation.............. 4 IXL Noble Express ..... 4 4. Allience ....................... 3 Mamage...................... 3 Matoi .......................... 3 SF Specs Shocwave .... 3 5. AA Apollo Bey ........... 2 Afires Heir.................. 2 Apollopalooza............. 2 Bellagio PR ................ 2 Brass ........................... 2 HF Mister Chips ........ 2 Millennium LOA ....... 2

1. Baske Afire ...................23 2. Afire Bey V ...................16 3. IXL Noble Express ....... 5 Mamage........................ 5 Matoi ............................ 5 4. A Temptation ............... 4 Brass ............................. 4 5. Allience ......................... 3 Apollopalooza .............. 3 HF Mister Chips.......... 3 Millennium LOA ......... 3 SF Specs Shocwave ...... 3

Arabian Leading Sires by number of Arabian winning get

by number of Arabian wins

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

1. Baske Afire ...................13 2. Afire Bey V ...................10 3. IXL Noble Express ....... 5 4. Mamage ........................ 4 5. A Temptation ............... 3 Apollopalooza .............. 3 Mamage........................ 2

Baske Afire .................11 Afire Bey V ................ 9 IXL Noble Express ..... 4 A Temptation.............. 3 Afires Heir .................. 2 Apollopalooza............. 2 Bellagio PR ................ 2 SF Specs Shocwave .... 2

by number of Half-Arabian winning get 1. Baske Afire .................. 2. Afire Bey V ................. 3. AA Apollo Bey ............ AE Excel ..................... Allience ....................... HF Mister Chips ......... Matoi ........................... Millennium LOA ........

Hello Moto

Nutcracker Sweet PF

9 5 2 2 2 2 2 2

by number of Half-Arabian wins 1. Baske Afire ................ 10 2. Afire Bey V ................. 6 3. AA Apollo Bey ........... 3 HF Mister Chips ........ 3 Matoi .......................... 3 Millennium LOA ....... 3 Baske Afire Volume 43, No. 12 | 127


Overall Leading Open Trainers by number of horses.........

by number of wins

1. Jim Stachowski ...... 7 2. Joel Kiesner ............ 6 3. Matthew Siemon ... 3 4. Joel Gangi .............. 2 John Golladay ........ 2 Jason Krohn ........... 2

1. 2. 3. 4.

Jim Stachowski ........... Joel Kiesner ................ Matthew Siemon........ Joel Gangi .................. John Golladay ............ Jason Krohn ............... Gordon Potts .............

Overall Leading Owners by number of horses 7 6 4 2 2 2 2

Arabian Leading Open Trainers by number of horses.........

by number of wins

1. Joel Kiesner ............ 3 Jim Stachowski ...... 3

1. Joel Kiesner ................ 3 Jim Stachowski .......... 3 2. Gordon Potts.............. 2 Matthew Siemon ......... 2

Half-Arabian Leading Open Trainers by number of horses.........

by number of wins

1. Jim Stachowski ...... 5 2. Joel Kiesner ............ 3 3. Matthew Siemon ... 2

1. Jim Stachowski ........... 5 2. Joel Kiesner ................ 3 3. Matthew Siemon........ 2

1. Starline Arabians LLC ................... 6 2. Boisvert Farms LLC ...................... 3 3. 6D Ranch Ltd................................. 2 Elvin Berkheimer ........................... 2 Burline LLC ................................... 2 Cedar Ridge Arabians .................... 2 Kimberly Jarvis ............................... 2 Oak Haven South Arabians LLC .. 2 Pine Ridge Arabians ........................ 2 Nancy Shafer and Gregg Shafer ...... 2 Whispers Acres, Inc......................... 2

Arabian Leading Owners by number of horses

1. Starline Arabians LLC .................. 2. Cedar Ridge Arabians.................... Kimberly Jarvis .............................. Pine Ridge Arabians ......................

3 2 2 2

Half-Arabian Leading Owners by number of horses

1. Starline Arabians LLC .................. 2. 6D Ranch Ltd................................ Boisvert Farms LLC ...................... Burrline LLC ................................

3 2 2 2

Jim Stachowski

Joel Kiesner 128 | ARABIAN HORSE TIMES

Nicole, Carey, Lori and Kyle Lawrence of Starline Arabians


Overall Leading Breeders by number of horses

1. Cedar Ridge Arabians................ 7 2. Live Oak Arabians, Inc. ............. 5 Marty Shea ................................ 5 3. Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc......... 4 R O Lervick Arabians ............... 4 4. Boisvert Farms LLC .................. 3 Nick and Juliet Carden .............. 3 5. Ashleigh Ferran ......................... 2 CA State Polytechnic Univ. ....... 2 Chris Wilson ............................. 2 Laura and Michael Medved ...... 2 Marie Jones ............................... 2

Arabian Leading Breeders

by number of horses

Lollie and Dick Ames of Cedar Ridge Arabians Leading Owners & Breeders

1. Cedar Ridge Arabians................ 4 Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc. ....... 4 R O Lervick Arabians ............... 4 2. Nick and Juliet Carden .............. 3 3. CA State Polytechnic Univ. ....... 2 Chris Wilson ............................. 2 Laura and Michael Medved ...... 2 Marty Shea ................................ 2

Half-Arabian Leading Breeders by number of horses

1. Live Oak Arabians, Inc. ............. 4 2. Boisvert Farms LLC .................. 3 Cedar Ridge Arabians ............... 3 Marty Shea ................................ 3 Live Oak Arabians, Inc.

Dave & Gail Liniger, Maroon Fire Arabians, Inc and Tim & Marty Shea, Shea Stables

Roger and Linda Lervick of R O Lervick Arabians Volume 43, No. 12 | 129


Region 12

36 Champions and ReseRves

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"Generations of Horsemen servinG Generations of Clients".

VHTC

Vicki Humphrey Training Center • Canton, Georgia Vicki Humphrey, Jessica Clinton & Gabe DeSoto 770.740.8432 ~ VHTC@VickiHumphrey.com www.VickiHumphreyTrainingCenter.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 131


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Tommy Garland 804.598.3657 Tommy@tommygarland.com

Katie Garland 804.339.2337 kt.garland1@gmail.com

915 Dorset Road, Powhatan, VA 23139 • 804.598.3657 • www.TommyGarland.com

We have been successfully training horses for generations. Sure, we love a saddle with silver, but our dedication to great horsemanship doesn’t stop in the western pleasure arena. From hunter jumper to hunter pleasure to saddle seat, we offer the complete package. Join in a “winning conversation” with us. We understand “English” just fine. In fact, we love it!

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Flood Show Horses

BomBardier express V Brandon Flood

Brandon Flood - Trainer - 480-585-4131 w w w. F l o o d s h o w h o r s e s . c o m

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Brandon Flood Accepting

r i s i n g ta l e n t i n t h e E n g l i s h di v i s io n .

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Brandon Flood - Trainer - 480-585-4131 w w w. F l o o d s h o w h o r s e s . c o m

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Volume 43, No. 12 | 139


Helping people to achieve their goals for over 3 decades.

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THe TRowBRidge Ten Ten core beliefs guide the performance of all of the people that make up Trowbridges, Ltd. our values explain the essence of who we are, and are the spirit that drives our work performance. They form the foundation for the way we conduct our business, make decisions, and treat the horses and the people that are our livelihood. 1. eTHiCS. we are committed to conducting all of our business in a fair and ethical manner for all involved, from buyer to seller, from owner to rider, and make all of our decisions, at all times, based upon what is in the best interest of the horse that has been entrusted into our care. 2. FuLL diSCLoSuRe. we will always share all information that is applicable to any given horse or situation to any and all of the appropriate parties. “our integrity is your guarantee” is the first business motto that i worked at, in 1977 at Sir william Farm, and it guides all of our business actions to this day. 3. THe PuRSuiT oF exCeLLenCe. we are dedicated to the pursuit of excellence in all facets of our business, and are always looking for ways to improve our service in order to share it with our clients and horses. 4. HaRd woRk and PeRSeveRanCe. all success is derived from being willing to work hard and stick with it. we plan to be here for many years to come, and are committed to working hard and sticking with it, for our clients’ interests as well as our own. 5. PRoMoTing THe FuTuRe. we are dedicated to promoting the careers of the young horsemen and women who are an integral part of our business in every way possible. 6. CuSToMeR FiRST. if it’s not right for our customers, it’s not right for us. 7. vaLue FoR youR doLLaR. we understand that this is a recreational hobby for many of our clients, and we are committed to providing as much entertainment, education, and enjoyment as we possibly can in return for your patronage. 8. THe FuTuRe oF THe aRaBian HoRSe. we are committed to promoting the arabian horse in every way possible. we also are constantly looking forward for new ways that the arabian horse can evolve their skills to benefit people in the future. 9. SaFeTy FiRST. all of our practices are governed by our wish to keep the horses and the people that they depend upon safe at all times, and in teaching horsemanship where safety of horse and people is paramount. 10. CoMMuniTy give BaCk. we consider it our duty and a privilege to give back our time and effort to both our arabian horse community and our neighborhood community, because we recognize that the health and best interests of our communities reflect and promote our own.

Pat & Mary Trowbridge • Matt Conway 236 Henry Sanford Rd, Bridgewater, CT 06752 860.354.8926 Volume 43, No. 12 | 141


Tradition of Champions

Too Brassi

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Past, Present and Future

reserve naTional ChaMpion sheer razz Ma Tazz

leviTaTion TM

good glory nnW

naTional ChaMpion prodigy afire

soul sisTer Ch

naTional ChaMpion danse all nighT

naTional ChaMpion Tl MagiC pranCer

Cara Mia Mein loa

lJr Wild Bill

Chase harvill Training CenTre 27109 South Creek Drive, Magnolia, Texas 77354 Chase Harvill and Jessica Belt, Trainers 281-252-6228 • chtrncntr@aol.com • www.chaseharvill.com Mandy & Chase Harvill Volume 43, no. 12 | 143


National Champions Since 1987 One of the most versatile professionals in the equine industry

Rattner Bloodstock, llc Powered by Martha Martha Murdock • Dan Rattner P.O. Box 5803 • Paris, KY 40362 • 859.987.1998 Martha@marthamurdockstables.com Liz Crawley Photography 2013©

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THE HUNTER and SHOW HACK HORSE Theoretically, the Arabian and Half-Arabian hunter pleasure class was derived from the concept of galloping across fields and over fences in pursuit of fox and hounds. In reality, nothing could be further from the truth. While Arabian horses are definitely known for galloping great distances, they have never been the popular choice as field hunters. The real impetus for the birth of the Arabian hunter pleasure horse was the fact that, in the not so distant past, Arabian horse shows were mostly black or white, a horse was either an English horse or a western horse, and there was not much in between. As it turned out, Arabians were not so black or white. A great many of them were, figuratively speaking, grey! With the large number of show horses fulfilling neither the exaggerated western frame nor the break-above-level English pleasure requirements, there became a need for a division that would act as a catch-all for the rest. It was crowned the hunter pleasure division. Granted, that’s a little basic, but let’s face it, hunter pleasure horses are not derived from the open hunter world—they are a result of a black or white Arabian horse show world. The show hack horse shared a little bit of the same history. The class originated in Canada where it was based on the English show or park hack class, and it became another alternative for horses that could not cut it in the English or country divisions. While it was not a dressage class, dressage attire was required and in the early days, horses were stripped at the end of the class. The show hack class was always meant to be a fancy class, however, Arabian show hack horses relate as closely to show and park hack horses in England as do our hunter pleasure horses to hunter/jumpers. While both divisions are usually coupled in the phrase: hunter/show hack, they share little in common—not the type of horse, its carriage, character of gait, or demeanor. The divisions do, however, share the requirements of finesse and perfection, and the people who share a passion for them have strong opinions about what it takes to stand out and be great.

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SHARON BLENDINGER What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? First and foremost, I look for quality. It has to be a pretty horse with a balanced build and a big body. I like a nicely set neck, maybe a little bit forward, but coming out of the withers at a good spot and not too long. On a show hack horse, the neck can be set farther back and a little higher, as long as it’s flexible. A lot of hunter horses can do both if they’re flexible. The show hack horse must be able to collect and extend its frame. I also want in all of them a quiet mouth and a nice tail, not too high and not crooked. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? I think hunters are actually being bred to be hunters. They’re not just rejects from the English pleasure world. They’re athletic and they’re pretty. I think the training has gotten better over the past 10 years, especially in collecting a horse and teaching it to move correctly. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? The open show hunter has a flatter frame and is more ground covering. The Arabian hunter goes more collected, lifts up in the withers and carries its hips up underneath itself with a lot of impulsion. I don’t feel as though the open hunter has impulsion, and that might make the biggest difference. Impulsion creates the roundness. When you’re going across the field on an open hunter, you want the speed over ground and endurance, and if you’re going over fences, you certainly don’t want something that’s balled up and round. They serve two totally different purposes. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? They have to have some kind of ‘wow’ factor, whether it’s how beautiful they are or the way they move. In an amateur horse, I like to see the rider wellsuited to the horse. I don’t like to see a small rider on a super big horse, and I don’t like to see a tall rider on a little horse. Most good horses can be an open and an amateur horse, as long as for amateurs the horse is suitable—and it still has ‘wow’! A deal breaker for me would be a bad

attitude. It’s the one thing you can’t train out of a horse. I don’t like a badly conformed horse. A horse with a straight shoulder, a low-set neck and a horrible hip is not something that’s going to win. On a show hack horse, I like the higher-set neck and a little more motion, and I really like a horse that can change their frame. Not all horses can do that. It’s not just about trotting slower and faster. It means to actually collect and extend the horse’s frame. One of the best horses ever was MacGregor, a multi-national champion English horse. He could go out there and do the coolest collected trot and then just extend. That’s what I like. A deal breaker for Show Hack would be a horse that’s too hot. You have three walks, and it’s a long class, so it takes kind of a mellow horse that can do all that, keep it together and let you train it. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? It’s all about ring position and being a smart rider. If you have a great horse and you don’t put it out there for the judges to see it, you’re not going to win. There are too many horses and everyone is dressed the same. As my riders become more experienced, our focus is on ring position. I always tell them to go in, make their square and stay there, ten feet off the rail. And be smooth. Take your time on your transitions.

ROB BICK What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? Show hack has gotten very similar to country horses, but I think you need a lot of trainability in the show hack horse, and a horse that can go from one gear to another. It’s basically a class of transitions, so you need a patient, trainable horse that allows you to collect them together and handles the collection. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? They’ve gotten to where higher, rounder-moving horses in show hack are more competitive. Ten, fifteen years ago, you didn’t see very many show hack horses with high, round motion. Now that’s all you see. There still aren’t many horses that can actually do the gears―that actually collect their body and their stride. Many of them just go slower and Volume 43, No. 12 | 147


faster. I like a horse to actually collect and gather, shorten their body and their frame for the collected gaits, and lengthen their body, frame and stride for the extended gaits. The size in hunters is one of the biggest changes I’ve noticed. Hunters are so big, particularly the Half-Arabians, but purebreds as well. If you don’t have a 16+ hand horse, you’re small out there. The hunters are the biggest horses out there. I think the horses are beautiful. I think there’s a lot more quality. When the hunter division started, it was kind of a drop-out class for a western horse that couldn’t cut it or an English horse that couldn’t trot enough. But that is not the case anymore. The horses are specialized for that division and there’s a lot of quality there. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? We have a different breed standard and a different type horse. We breed for round necks and round motion, so you’re not going to get that flat-kneed, flat-necked hunter. A lot of people think our Arabian horses are over-collected or over-bridled because of their frame, but our horses naturally have those round frames. For a horse with a less rounded frame to try to carry itself like an Arabian, it would be overcollected. You hear a lot about this - it’s a big topic right now. The open hunter is a totally different type of horse. An Arabian can round its neck really easily because they’re bred that way. I think we need to be careful about comparing our horses and cutting them down when our horses have no more torque on their bodies than Thoroughbreds going flat. I like the pretty hunters that are fancy. A lot of people think they’re too trotty with too much knee action - too round. The only definition of a hunter pleasure trot is a ground covering trot. If you cover as much ground with round motion as a horse with flat motion, I don’t think the horse should be penalized. Concerning the drape in the reins, some horses like to be held onto and others don’t. I think it’s an individual thing, and I don’t like it when the rules start telling you how to train your horse. We are putting together a horse to go out and show off our presentation, and if you don’t like our presentation, that’s fine, but don’t tell us how to come about our presentation. I don’t think those kinds of rules are helpful. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? I think you need a good set of hocks on a hunter pleasure horse so it can push up from behind. Good balanced motion, loose shoulders, a flexible neck—overall quality. You want to start with a horse that has enough quality that when it is finished, it can win. There’s no point

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in training and training and training a horse, and then not having the quality to win. There’s nothing you can do about that. And they need to be levelheaded. I don’t like having a horse that I have to spend more time lunging than riding. Show hack horses have to be a little more patient. We use the show hack class to school our country horses to make them more patient. Because they have to do more transitions and gears, you’re telling that country horse that they can’t anticipate as much. It really teaches the older horses that have gotten ring smart that they need to listen to their riders a little better. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I think of it as making a pretty transition and finding another gear. At each gear, that horse has to find a comfortable balance and that he can maintain. You don’t want to wear yourself and your horse out. It’s a long class that can max out every part of your horse. You need to know how much to collect for your collected gaits and still maintain balance. It’s not about maxing him out like a park horse. It’s about having that horse perform nice transitions and being able to balance within each gear that he’s asked to do.

LORI CONWAY What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? I want a hunter pleasure horse that will fit into a horizontal frame. They should be attractive, full bodied, balanced and smooth moving. The horse should have long, forward sweeping motion at the trot and an uphill, ground covering canter and gallop. The walk should be relaxed and flat footed. I don’t like hoppy or quick-footed horses. The attitude should be positive and have the appearance that going over a fence and landing safely on the other side might be a possibility. The show hack horse is more vertical in their carriage than a hunter, and the attitude must be one of total cooperation between the horse and rider. When performed correctly, watching the transition between gaits is a beautiful thing and requires an athletic, willing horse.


What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? The classes have become more consistent in frame and movement, and the sheer number of top quality horses has increased substantially. The Half-Arabian division has a more diverse type of movement and frame because of the different crosses, but the quality and beauty of the horses is off the charts wonderful! What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? Show hack is a great class for the country and English pleasure horses, particularly if they are bored or are in need of a more challenging training regime. Show hack is physically and mentally more taxing for the horse and rider, because of all the collections, extensions and immediate obedience required. I’ve had country and English horses that move and ride different when they have a dressage saddle on, and they seem to like the extra attention that they receive getting braided and bowed up. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? The open show hunter and the people judging those classes have a different class criteria and a vastly different ‘vision’ of what they want to see. It is not impossible for a horse to be successful on both circuits, and I know of several good horses that are, but it does take a horse that is able to change its frame and be happy long and lower for the open/sport horse classes, and more connected and driving for the ‘main ring’ judges. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? Attitude, willingness and trainability are the most important, because without them, it doesn’t matter what a horse looks like physically. Side profile is important to me if I’m selecting a horse to buy. I like full bodied, smooth, balanced horses with eye appeal. They must have a long, gliding stride, good neck, long hip and good tail carriage. As a judge, I have three deal breakers for sure. 1. A dead tail. 2. An over-shod or heavy-footed horse (easy for the lay person to see if you notice the horse cantering or galloping, and the foot flips up before landing or the toe, at the trot, labors on the ground before being swung forward or up). 3. A behind the vertical, not connected, drape-reined horse. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? In order to “go for it” in any class, you have to be prepared and confident. You need to pay attention to the details. Turn-out of both the horse and rider, the performance and quality of each and every gait,

and the attitude of not only your horse, but you as a rider are important. Your “aura” is conveyed not only to your horse, but to the judge and the others competing against you. You need to know your strengths and weaknesses and do not go beyond what you and your horse are capable of doing. As a judge, the horse that stays on a straight and consistent path is easier to focus on and evaluate, and therefore has a greater chance of rising to the top of the class. Finally, you need a bit of luck. Many people confuse “going for it” as having more speed than the rest of the class, or they are fearful that they will be missed. They get too close to the judge or ringmaster. If either of these scenarios go wrong and evoke the “cringe factor” in the judge, you have lost whatever finesse you had, so you better have luck on your side.

TOMMY GARLAND What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? A hunter pleasure horse has to be very pretty, outstanding, have a very nice shape to its neck and be round in its motion. If it’s a flatter moving horse with a straighter neck, or if it’s not pretty, you’re fighting an uphill battle right from the start. That’s the difference between being average and a national champion. And big! The hunter horses are huge anymore! I want the same qualities in an amateur and junior rider mount. All those things matter plus they have to be very mannerly. If the horse is not pretty and round through his back or if it drags out behind and doesn’t use its hind end well, I don’t want him. Show hack horses have to perform the gaits in a very true, relaxed manner. The collected canter should be quiet, not hopping along, and the extensions a true extension of their frame. They need to be soft in the bridle and responsive. They have to have roundness up through the poll. If a horse is straightnecked and doesn’t have much poll, I don’t like it. The ones that are round thru the poll are the ones who have better quality. What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? It seems like the good show hack horses are country horses that have the ability to do the different gaits. They are going forward,

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trotting big up in the bridle - a notch short of the English divisions. Show hack versus country? Just a different outfit. The type that wins the country is the type that wins the show hack, just with different clothes. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? When I went to the judge’s school 10 years ago, they used the type of hunter that jumps fences as the model for the hunter pleasure class, and when I went back two years ago, they were saying the same thing. This is nothing like the judges are pinning. The rules need to match what the judges are looking for. They’re still telling you to pin the hunter horse that can go to the fence and jump it, nose out and flat. The way the hunter horses in the ring move - trotting big and deep in the bridle - if you’d tried to take one to the fence, it would be very interesting to see what they’d do!

I have a rule that has served me well. I find the horses that can really extend the walk, have the ability to hand gallop (costume gait), and maneuver through tight turns or a long straight away at speed without getting too “high” on life. My best show hack horse was one I picked for that reason. She was undefeated and became unanimous U.S. national champion. That rule stuck with me and so far has held true. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? I think the changes are the same in all divisions across the board. We have more talent in our trainers and more quality in our horses. The trend to specialize has increased the level of competition. What happened to the versatile Arabian? We left him behind more than a decade ago.

What I find in all the divisions is the mentality that if a little bit’s good, a little more is better. And then a little more and a little more until we go past what we need. It’s starting to be a detriment. Most of the hunter horses look very nice, but they’re not what the judge’s school tells you. The flat moving horses are going to sport horse. In our area, the sport horse division is big and carrying the shows. All the people that would be in the hunter pleasure classes on the flatter horses can compete without the need of a trainer. Our main ring classes have gotten smaller and the sport horses are growing.

What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? The difference for me would be in their work ethic. Show hack horses have to like to work both from a training standpoint as well as in the show ring. Show hack is hard work for both horse and rider. A lot of talented horses would be driven crazy by the intensity of being in this division, just as there are riders who do not have the focus to excel in it. It is a lot like caviar - you either love it or you hate it.

How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? We look like a merry-go-round, all riding around the center. We hope the judge can see us - 20 brown horses all with riders dressed in the same dark coats. We all look the same. You’d better have a horse that’s going to make you stand out from the others in the ring - very pretty through its face, shapely through its neck, great in its motion. You also need a horse that can handle traffic because it’s like bumper cars, and those ladies in a hunter class are competitive riders!

Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? Arabian horses have more animation. They are, as a breed, not relaxed. The Arabian breed characteristics of a long arched neck and high tail carriage distort the image of a field hunter. Let’s be honest here. Can you ride across the fields in wedge pads carrying twenty plus ounces of shoe? The analogy that I use is that there are disciplines which are understood around the world and then there are breed divisions. Comparing breed specific western pleasure to reining is like comparing our hunter pleasure to jumping or show hack to dressage. The dress of horse and rider are similar but little else.

MARTHA MURDOCK What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? Hunter pleasure horses in today’s arena must have type and extreme beauty, much like our current day western horses. Show hacks are a bit different.

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Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? Beauty for both divisions. There is no point showing a horse in our show ring today that is not extremely beautiful, because even the best mover is going to be left out of the ribbons if they are not beautiful. Deal breakers would be a common head and hind legs that are too long.


PALMETTO ARABIANS What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? We’re looking for a lot of the same qualities in our hunter pleasure horses that we do in our western horses; horses that have substance and are athletic. We’re always trying to breed a pretty horse, and often they’re pretty enough to go in the halter ring before we start them under saddle. We don’t breed a horse with a preconceived notion. We never know how they’re going to turn out for sure, but we’re trying to breed pretty first of all, and good conformation, along with good attitudes and trainability. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? Obviously the movement. The gaits are getting more animated with more motion. They’re not flat kneed as they used to be. To be a hunter, you have to have a good rolling gait and a higher-set neck. The horse has to have frame. You have a lot of horses that in years past would have been country English horses. They’re getting more specialized in their jobs, whether it’s English or western or hunter. The bar seems to be raised more and more and more. Through it, we haven’t changed breeding decisions. Our lines actually lend themselves to what is winning now. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? An Arabian horse is extremely different than the open show hunter. The Arabian is such a beautiful horse, and the main ring hunter pleasure is the most natural division for them. When I went to high school, I played every sport, and I was pretty decent at all of them. If I was in high school now, I’d have to pick a sport and work on that. That’s the way breeding has gone. You don’t hear anymore of someone that has shown and won in western and hunter pleasure. We’re breeding horses that fit these disciplines really well. It’s just like anything else. In high school they’re concentrating on specific sports now, and it’s the same in the show ring. What we’re asking our horses to do is what they’re suited to do. A lot of the horses that used to show in hunter pleasure have now moved to sport horse. We’re making a place for the different types of horses. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal

breakers? You can’t go in the show ring today with a horse that’s not pretty and high quality. An unattractive horse is not going to make it. You have to be able to look at a horse and say, ‘Wow! That’s a really nice horse!’ We breed 15 to 20 babies a year and put them all under saddle to see which ones are worth the investment of our time and money. Our goal for them is to be able to show at the national level, so we keep our standards for quality very high. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I still have a difficult time in the hunter pleasure class. It’s so competitive in the hunter division and the classes are so big. There are twenty-plus in all the hunter classes, so it’s hard to sit there and judge the whole class. I can pick the top three. In most of the hunter classes, I concentrate on whether my horses have a good go and let the judges tell me who they like.

MICHELLE PEASE-PAULSEN What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? I look for a show hack horse that is pretty, has good quality, and can perform at the extended and collected gaits - really excel in those two areas. Manners are very important. Show hack is a class where you are being judged both ways at 10 different gaits, so it’s important to have a horse that has the manners to hold up through that lengthy class. And because of the length, I also look for one that has more of an engine. Since it’s a marathon work out for the riders, too, I want a horse that has enough forward impulsion so that by the second way of the ring, I don’t feel like I’m out of gas. I once showed a horse without a lot of gas, and by the second way I was like, are you kidding? What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? I have to admit, that before I started showing in show hack, it was a class that we got up and left from. I’ve competed in everything except side saddle, dressage and working cow, and now show hack is my favorite class. For example, at Region 7, Prince LOA didn’t go, so I showed my park mare in show hack, and I had a blast! I’ve only been showing in it for 3 years, and now I realize what an intricate class it is and Volume 43, No. 12 | 151


how rewarding it can be. That’s what I love about it - it is such a precision class.

hack horse. I also don’t like a horse that’s too hot. I think it has to have the mind to get through that long class.

What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? In show hack, we need to be basically perfect, while in country, if you have an all-star amazing horse, you won’t get knocked off a card for a minor bobble. In show hack there is absolutely no wiggle room. At every gait, you’re being judged with equal intensity. I also feel that since it’s such a long class, you really have to be a team with your horse.

How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I always ride on the inside. I never want anyone between me and the judge. I can show Prince off in those collected gaits. I have that mental attitude that nobody can do this gait like I can. Prince very much feeds off my emotions— going back to being a team - so when I’m thinking that we’re the best, I can really highlight my horse. It’s about understanding what your horse’s strengths are so you can demonstrate them.

With the collection and extension, I’m constantly pushing my horse forward. I’m pushing him together to collect. I’m pushing him together to extend and constantly driving his hind end forward. Not that you don’t have to in other classes, but I know in my park classes, when I come down to the walk, I can release my horse’s head and let us relax. I could never do that in my show hack classes. There is no break in the show hack class until you’re in line and the judges’ cards are turned in, and no class is ever the same. The gaits can be called in any order. That’s the hard thing - we actually had to teach Prince to go from the trot to the canter, because normally with English and country horses, you never want them to trot into the canter. In show hack, any transition can happen. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? Eight years ago, I started jumping. I stick with large ponies and small horses jumping 3- 3/6, mostly on warmbloods. It’s an open barn and people in there have the stereotypical idea that Arabian horses are hot. Arabians naturally have more action. With the open hunters, they really want those that swing with their shoulders, point their toes, carry a lower frame with more connection to the bit. That comes from the days of fox hunting where a horse needs to go with a more natural head carriage across the field, carrying its head low so it can see the jumps. We’re not asking our ‘main ring’ hunters to go across country or over jumps. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? Regardless of whether it’s English or show hack, I don’t want a horse that’s dumpy in the bridle and on its front end. I want a horse that’s very balanced. If there’s one that can walk, trot, or canter very well, but doesn’t have the balance to collect and extend, I wouldn’t want it for a show

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CARALYN SCHROTER What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? I look for a high neck-set with clean underline that is nice and clean under the throat, and a pretty face with wide eyes and nice, tight, well-shaped ears. Good front feet, too. To me, a hunter pleasure horse is a little like a country horse in their attitude, their presence, and the amount that they want to show off, like the *Muscat horses used to look when you turned them out powerhouses with strength of body. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? Hunter pleasure has changed to where people worry so much about where the reins are - are they soft? Do they drape? The higherheaded horse is now a stuck look to me. There’s no neck accentuation. It’s not a comfortable look and has gone a little bit country-fied. I enjoy the feel of my hunters when they’re supple and willing. It’s important to me that the hunter pleasure horse bends all its joints - knees, fetlocks, and hocks. It makes it fun and comfortable to ride. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? I’ve not gone to watch an open hunter on the flat class, but to me the Arabian hunter is the prettiest horse. They’d better look different! They’re not a Thoroughbred. That’s a different breed. When you attend convention, they’re making decisions


based on, ‘Why don’t we do it like the Quarter Horse? Why don’t we do it like the open horse?’ We are not those guys. We don’t have to do that. I don’t see the Friesian folks trying to make their horses look like something else or the Saddlebred people. They like their breeds. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? Hunter pleasure horses must have balance, fluidity, and stride. Deal breakers would be poor motion and bad balance and a horse with a neck that, no matter where it is, it’s just not right for the animal. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I think by being steady and fluid. This year it was fun to show at U.S. Nationals in the Ford Truck Arena because the classes weren’t that big. I actually did what I do in English classes and, instead of running around the middle like every other hunter horse, I rode a diamond. During eighty percent of the class, I was by myself and nobody was near me. The judges could see me all by myself for a quarter of the pass from one diamond point to another diamond point.

NANCY SHAFER What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? We have primarily English and park horses, and sport horses. I do not show main ring hunter pleasure horses, so I am by no means an authority on them or show hack horses, but I do have opinions. If I had a hunter pleasure horse or a show hack horse, I’d want an attractive horse that has size and presence, a good mind, and fluid motion. I would want a horse that exhibits confidence in the ring. I wouldn’t want such different things in a sport horse. An over fences hunter has to be pretty and have wonderful form. Size helps to some degree, and it must be very cadenced and very trainable. They have to have a good mind. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? Some horses are being

put in hunter pleasure that shouldn’t be there. It’s not an English horse. It’s not a western horse, so they put them in hunter pleasure. Well, maybe it’s not that either. Maybe it’s just not a show horse. What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? I think that the show hack horses, the good ones, are so evident. They are brilliant in what they do and well trained. They’re so responsive to leg and they move so effortlessly from gait to gait. It all comes back to having athletic horses. People don’t understand how athletic they have to be. Show hack is true discipline for the trainer, the rider and the horse. It has to be really good-minded. It has to be a flawless performance. You can’t miss a lead in show hack. You can’t cross canter. It is a class that demands more perfection than any other - other than dressage. They should also be fluid. They need to be a really good moving horse. They have to be athletic, doing all the gaits. They have to have endurance. Show hack for main ring - I think we’ve done a pretty darned good job of getting that the way it should be. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? I think the main ring hunters tend to be over-bridled. They don’t go forward. The sport horse hunters are slowly looking like real hunters in the real hunter world. They’re going in that direction. The only thing the main ring hunter and the sport horse hunter have in common is the word ‘hunter.’ I think it’s a good class because there are a lot of Arabians that would do better in hunter pleasure than English disciplines, but I do think they should strive to go like a real hunter. I don’t think that’s a big stretch for them to be trained like a hunter. An Arabian does have a different way of going than a warmblood or a Thoroughbred, and I think there has to be consideration for that. I don’t mind that they have a little more knee action than the open hunter does, because that’s how the Arabian horse goes, but they need not to be behind vertical. If these horses had to take a fence they wouldn’t even see it. They wouldn’t even see it if it was a foot high! They shoe them up like they’re going in an English class. They don’t have real contact with the bit. They’re not under themselves and going forward at all. That’s just my opinion. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal

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breakers? I think they have to have a very quiet mouth. They have to stay in frame - maintain their frame. If you have a real hunter judge, I think frame is a very important aspect. It should be important with everything. In some of the English classes, frame is something to put around the picture! A deal breaker for me: you simply cannot have a fussy mouth. You can get away with it in park. You can get away with it in English and even a little bit in country English, but in hunter pleasure, you have to have a very quiet mouth. If you have a fussy mouth, it just channels itself through the entire body of the horse. In hunters particularly, it’s so distracting.

DONNA WAGGONER What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? Beauty, balance, a willingness to perform. The hunter pleasure horse should be able to do the job easily without having to work at it too hard. I like a horse that has motion, but not like an English horse. Everything is so specialized, now, that a horse needs more motion to be competitive.

- more devoted to transitions. A show hack horse is a country horse that can do the transitions and do them well, and whose extensions are lengthening opposed to going up and down. Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? Our horses are built differently than a Quarter Horse or warmblood. They’re built with a higher frame. We as trainers have created a look that we like more that is not flat or long or low. Our horses tend to pick up their shoulders more. The style has changed to show off what we breed for. Obviously our main ring horses aren’t going to be able to go out and jump. I don’t agree with a rolled-over English horse being a hunter. A hunter needs to be relaxed and beautiful with rhythm and cadence and should be ridden with some contact. The full drape is too extreme to me. I think we need to embrace the hunter style as it suits our horses’ conformation without going to the extremes, as long as the horse is happy doing its job. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? Rhythm and balance they have to have. A horse must be relaxed and easy, doing its job in a happy fashion no ears back, tail swishing. I don’t care how beautiful they are or talented, if they are unhappy or stressed out, it’s just not for me. A show hack horse must be a more English pleasure style horse. I like them upright and able to do their transitions easily and quietly.

Show hack is such a cool class. The horses need to be more upright in their frame. Rhythm, cadence and balance are very important to me in a show hack horse. It makes their job easier.

Deal breakers: unhappy, stressed out, tail wringing, ears back; if they’re not happy doing their job. It has to look pleasurable to me for both hunter pleasure and show hack horses.

What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? We’re asking our horses to be more bridled and in a tighter frame than in years past. They definitely have to be bigger, and they’re more specialized.

How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I teach my riders to be smart in the arena. I teach them how to work the arena and look at their placement. I want them to know how to get their horses ready to go down the rail and show it off the best they can. It can be difficult in the large hunter pleasure classes because everyone is going around the center ring. At one large show, I had an inexperienced rider in a big class. The announcer asked everyone to go to the rail and she did. She found her spot on the rail. She did the right thing. Then she was covered up. A rider needs to look at the arena, and if there’s a bunch of people bunched in the center, ride deep and ride smart. Space yourself and make it pretty every time that spot opens for you.

What are the differences between a show hack and a country English pleasure horse? Or are there any? We created a country class for horses that were too fancy for hunter but not fancy enough for English. We made those divisions very specific. The park horse we allow to be extreme and have some mistakes. A show hack and country horse are to me the same category and need the same equipment as far as their conformation for both of those jobs. You’re asking one to do a little bit more

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MARIAH WILSON What do you look for in a hunter pleasure horse and show hack horse? The main things I look for are substance, trainability, and a lot of type. They need to look like Arabians, not like the classic open hunters. I like them round with lots of substance in their body and a bigger hind-end so they can really move out. I want more motion than we’ve had in past years. I’m looking for horses that have a little more knee and can move out with power while still controlled and looking pleasant with a quiet attitude. In a show hack horse, I want a shorter back. I want a higher degree of intensity, but they have to be especially trainable because of the length of the class. I do want to see more motion. They’re verging on country horses these days. They have to be dramatic, but still have the manners and work like they’re comfortable in their transitions, collections and extensions. The horse should be capable of changing their frame and form during that 15 minute class and it should be easy for them - it’s a long class. What changes have you seen over the past ten years in the hunter and show hack horses? The most predominate change in the hunter ring is that you’re seeing higher-set necks and bigger bodied horses. The Half-Arabians are gigantic. You see more action. The main ring hunters look nothing like a horse that could actually jump something. I have conflict with this because the rules are antiquated and describe a true, flat-kneed hunter, yet that’s not what’s winning. Most look like country horses that are dropped down with a lot of artificiality as opposed to true, classic hunters. There is a lot of heavy shoeing and droppingdown necks on horses that haven’t made it in the country ring. Positive changes are that we see a lot more horses in snaffles, which is correct. You are seeing a better use of impulsion and better neck-sets. The Arabian looks much better carrying itself higher and rounder. Show hack has gone from a class judged on fluidity and the change in gaits to one with a lot more drama and animation like in the English pleasure division. Action is being rewarded over quality of gaits with more forgiveness for mistakes over horses that really have self-carriage.

Our Arabian hunter pleasure horses look nothing like open show or field hunters. What are your thoughts on this? It’s a matter of taste, really. If you’re looking for a true open show hunter that’s going to be going over a fence, then you go to sport horse. Thank goodness our breed is so diverse that we can give a proper division to horses who are flatter movers with straighter necks. The main ring has turned into a very breed-specific division. It’s no longer a horse that we’re looking to take out on a fox hunt. It’s a very showy, fancy, extreme version of a horse that looks like a pleasure to ride for long distances. That’s what we’re training for because that’s what wins. You might have to pick which division you prefer, because they’re not the same horse - the sport horse and the hunter pleasure horse - anymore. Are there ‘must haves’ for you in a hunter pleasure or show hack horse and other traits that you would consider deal breakers? My number one thing is that a hunter horse, above all, must have a good attitude, like they are genuinely a pleasure to ride and not something that you have to work hard to make look that way. They also must have substance and quality. They need to look like Arabians. I want to see everything round with lots of drive from behind. For my amateurs and junior riders, it’s all the same, except even more emphasis on the attitude. The horses have to be interpreters as to what the riders want and you need a horse that is patient enough to make up for some of the amateurs’ misconceptions of what the horse is supposed to be doing. I want to have a horse that is trainable and can show that whole package without compromising quality. In show hack, I prefer a shorter back and more hock with a little more presence and drive than a hunter pleasure horse. I like a little hotter look because they need that kind of presence and stamina in the show hack ring. It is a grueling class and the horse must be able to show the actual changes in frame. It is a lot harder than going faster and slower. How do you take a horse into the show ring whose performance is based on perfect execution and manners and go for it to win? I tell my hunter riders to show your horse when they’re at their best and don’t expect your horse to be at their best all the time. Use the other riders in your class as cover when you need to and when you feel like you’re great, get your horse out there and show it. I like to use the rail much more in show hack because you’ll actually get seen more on the rail. You’ll be able to show off your extensions better if you give yourself the space on the rail.

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2012 NATIONAL HUNTER/HACK LEADERS

ENGLISH CHAMPIONS AND RESERVES Includes: u.s., canadIan and Youth natIonals hunter champIons and reserves. hunter pleasure, show hack, and hunter hack classes

Prince LOA

OVERALL ARABIAN & HALF ARABIAN LEADING HORSES by number of wins 1.Prince Prince LOA LOA 1. 2. C Hondo 2. C Hondo Shes Got Got Alotta Alotta Shes 3. EC Cause To Celebrate Celebrate 3. EC Cause To Malieka Malieka MM Sabe Sabe MM Nepyr Nepyr 4. C Sir Madre Madre 4. C Sir CP Hurricane Hurricane CP High Sea High Sea Journey X X Journey Kijan El Jamaal V V Kijan El Jamaal Mimosa LOA LOA Mimosa PA Lucchese Always PA Lucchese Always 156 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

championships,11 reserve reserve 22 championships, 1 championship, 2 reserves 1 championship, 2 reserves championship,22 reserves reserves 11 championship, 2 championships 2 championships championships 22 championships 2 championships 2 championships championships 22 championships 1 championship,11 reserve reserve 1 championship, championship,11 reserve reserve 11 championship, 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve championship,11 reserve reserve 11 championship, 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve championship,11 reserve reserve 11 championship, 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve


ARABIAN LEADING HORSES by number of wins 1. C Hondo 2. Malieka MM Sabe Nepyr 3. C Sir Madre CP Hurricane Journey X Kijan El Jamaal V PA Lucchese Always

1 championship, 2 reserves 2 championships 2 championships 2 championships 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve C Hondo

HALF-ARABIAN LEADING HORSES by number of wins 1. Prince LOA 2. Shes Got Alotta 3. EC Cause To Celebrate 4. High Sea Mimosa LOA 5. Knightts Jewel Outrageous

2 championship wins, 1 reserve 1 championship win, 2 reserves 2 championship wins 1 championship, 1 reserve 1 championship, 1 reserve 2 reserves 2 reserves

OVERALL LEADING SIRES by number of winning get 1. Afire Bey V Allionce Versace 2. Knight Invader 3. AA Apollo Bey Allusion AOF Always A Jullyen V Desperado V Enzo Heir To Glory Hucklebey Berry Mamage Matoi Sundance Kid V

4 4 4 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

by number of wins 1. Allionce 2. Afire Bey V Enzo Knight Invader Versace 3. Always A Jullyen V Desperado V 5. AA Apollo Bey Allusion AOF Heir To Glory Hucklebey Berry Mamage Matoi Sundance Kid V

6 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

Volume 43, No. 12 | 157


LEADING SIRES

by number of Arabian winning get 1. Afire Bey V 2. Allionce Versace 3. Always A Jullyen V Desperado V Enzo

4 3 3 2 2 2

by number of Half-Arabian winning get 1. Knight Invader 2. Allusion AOF Heir To Glory Mamage

3 2 2 2

Afire Bey V

Allionce

Knight Invader

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OVERALL LEADING OPEN TRAINERS

HALF-ARABIAN LEADING TRAINERS

1. Wendy Potts 2. Kim Christy Cheryl Fletcher Caralyn Schroter Tom Theisen

1. Tom Theisen

by number of horses

4 2 2 2 2

by number of horses

2

ARABIAN LEADING TRAINERS by number of horses

1. Wendy Potts 2. Caralyn Schroter

3 2

Tom Theisen

Wendy Potts

Volume 43, No. 12 | 159


OVERALL LEADING OWNERS by number of horses 1. Jennifer and Hannah Bell Conway Arabians, Inc. Ricci Desiderio North By Northwest LLC 2. Remington Monroe Equine LLC Russell Family Trust

3 3 3 3 2 2

Hannah Bell

ARABIAN LEADING OWNERS by number of horses 1. Remington Monroe Equine LLC

Remington Monroe Equine LLC

Ricci Desiderio

HALF-ARABIAN LEADING OWNERS by number of horses 1. Conway Arabians, Inc. Ricci Desiderio North By Northwest LLC

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2 2 2

North By Northwest LLC

2


OVERALL LEADING BREEDERS by number of horses

1. Conway Arabians, Inc. Live Oak Arabians, Inc. 3. John Brown Calif. State Polytechnic Univ. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm Empress Arabians Dean and Sheryl Lacey Susanne Mackrell Pegasus Arabians

3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

ARABIAN LEADING BREEDERS by number of horses 1. Calif. State Polytechnic Univ. J. Frank and Sara Chisholm

Peter and Lori Conway, of Conway Arabians, Inc. Leading Owners & Breeders

2 2

HALF-ARABIAN LEADING BREEDERS by number of horses 1. Conway Arabians, Inc. 2. Dean and Sheryl Lacey Live Oak Arabians, Inc. Susanne Mackrell

3 2 2 2

Calif. State Polytechnic Univ.

Live Oak Arabians, Inc.

Frank and Sara Chisholm of Palmetto Arabians Volume 43, No. 12 | 161


2012 Leading Breeder of Hunter/Show Hack National Winners* 2012 Leading Breeder of Futurity Program Champions* * Listed by the Arabian Horse Times

Frank & Sara Chisholm 4506 Langston Road Timmonsville, SC 29161

SF

Sundance Kid V x Kharrea PGA

Sir Fames HBV x Veronica GA

*Jullyen El Jamaal x Amazing Grace V

Desperado V x Sweet Shalimar V

www.PalmettoArabians.com • Contact breeding manager Melissa Bradshaw at 843.346.5874 • palmettoarabians@aol.com 162 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


PA Laredo (Possesion PGA x Lily Dancer V, by Sundance Kid V) 2009 Bay Gelding This is a young and talented colt just starting his performance career. A pedigree of western pleasure royalty, this colt is by a Khadraj NA son and out of a Sundance Kid V daughter. Use him in your breeding program or get ready to win a ton under saddle.

PA Laredo

PA Valparaiso Kid (Sundance Kid V x Verginia, by Versace) 2008 Bay Gelding 2012 Region 12 Champion Western Pleasure Jr. Horse and 2011 U.S. National Top Ten Western Pleasure Futurity winner. This horse has a ton of quality and type. Very fancy and gets noticed even in the most crowded show rings.

PA Valparaiso Kid

EVG Gentry (*Pershahn El Jamaal x Gisele, by Padrons Psyche) 2005 Bay Stallion EVG Gentry is true to his pedigree, dripping with quality. A big winner in the halter ring, Gentry is broke to ride and is beautiful under saddle. His impressive size, type and charisma make him impossible to ignore and has awarded him great honors in the show ring. His foals are on the ground and we are thrilled with them. Currently in training with Mike and Peri Wilson, he is for the serious breeder or showman. F Pinnacle F (EVG Gentry x Pinga, by Gazal Al Shaqab) 2011 Bay Filly This dynamo earned a Region 12 Top Ten Yearling Filly award in 2012. Her mother was just named World Champion Senior Mare at the Salon du Cheval. She has a pedigree that is a montage of Egyptian, Brazilian and Polish blood. Show her or breed her―she will do great things. The sky is the limit. PA Maverick Kid (Sundance Kid V x Magdalena V, by Sanadik El Shaklan) 2010 Bay Colt Full brother to National champions May Dancer V & Melody V! He is a 2013 Western Pleasure Futurity prospect for sure. Tall, leggy and beautiful, this colt is a breeding and performance stallion of the future. Breeders Sweepstakes and Region 12 Spotlight Futurity Nominated. PA Jonas (Always A Jullyen V x Gai Jullyette, by Jullyen El Jamaal) 2010 Bay Gelding Tall and leggy, this gelding is going to bridle well with his clean throatlatch and long neck. He is a good mover with great hocks. Standing almost 15.1H as a 3-year-old, he has size and presence. He is a Region 12 Spotlight Futurity entry.

EVG Gentry

Acappella V (Simeon Shai x Amazing Grace V, by Huckleberry Bey) 1998 Black Mare This mare is a great opportunity to get your breeding program started. Buy her in foal to Sundance Kid V for a guaranteed black foal. She is a great mom with wonderful babies and is an easy keeper. Acappella is broke to ride and is professionally halter trained. She is a pleasure to have in the barn. PA Avatar Kid (Sundance Kid V x Acappella V, by Simeon Shai) 2010 Homozygous Black Gelding This solid black Western prospect is a quick learner and has a great attitude. 90 days under saddle. For those of you who love black horses, he has the quality you want. He’ll no doubt be noticed in the show ring.

Acappella V

PA Tara Always (Always A Jullyen V x PA Taylor Made, by Picazso) 2010 Bay Mare This young mare will be a great addition to any show or breeding program. She has big wins in halter at Regions 12 & 15, in the competitive Region 12 Spotlight division. Now under saddle. PA Magellan (Audacious PS x May Dancer V, by Sundance Kid V) 2010 Grey Stallion Out of U.S. National Champion, May Dancer V, this guy is displaying the characteristics of a great Western horse. He has a kind attitude and is willing to please. Professionally halter trained, he earned a top ten in the Spotlight Yearling Colts. Quality through and through. PA Alejandro Kid (Sundance Kid V x PA Agracie Girl, by DA John Wayne) 2010 Black Gelding Get your 2013 Western Futurity prospect now! Upright, classic Sundance Kid V neck with front socks for chrome, make this guy exactly what his sire is famous for. Solena MJB (Sundance Kid V x Splash N Glow Milley (APHA)) 2010 Bay Tobiano Filly Sired by the maker of western pleasure champions, Sundance Kid V, this loud and flashy Half-Arabian mare will not be missed in the ring. Broke to ride and ready to be finished.

PA Tara Always PA Magellan

PA Jasmine (Pyro Thyme SA x Gai Jullyette, by Jullyen El Jamaal) 2009 Bay Filly Beautiful neck and sexy body. Shapely ears and large eyes. No white markings. Jasmine is sired by National Champion Pyro Thyme SA. She is entered in the Region 12 Spotlight program. Her dam is out of famous U.S. National Champion, Gaishea. Successful in amateur halter this year. PA Perdita (EVG Gentry x Paris To Rome, by Justafire DGL) 2009 Bay Mare A finished halter mare that is broke to ride. She’ll be a great addition to anyone’s broodmare band, and is a full sister to champion halter mare, PA Pasha. In training at Wilson Training Center. For sales information contact Melissa Bradshaw at 843.346.5874 Volume 43, No. 12 | 163


Rob Bick & Caralyn Schroter Travis Andrews as Farm Manager/Assistant Trainer 2379 Creechs Mill Road, Smithfield, North Carolina 27577 tel: 919.202.8384 • fax: 919.202.8385 • info@rbcshowhorses.com

www.RBCShowHorses.com 164 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


“One of the things I love about riding horses is that all the money in the world can’t make you a great rider. You can buy yourself the absolute best horses, and if you don’t put the time and effort into it, it’s just not going to happen. Most great horse trainers didn’t grow up riding great horses. I tell amateurs all the time if they don’t have the best horse in the class, then they need to out-ride everybody!” -Wendy Griffith Potts

Overall Open Hunter Trainer Trainer of Hunter Arabians

Trainers: Wendy Griffith Potts & Stephanie Sage Mansfield, TX Satallite Facility: Trainer: Barbara Armstrong Jade Creek Arabians, Santa Ynez, CA freewillfarmllc.com freewillfarm@gmail.com PH: 805-443-5645 Volume 43, No. 12 | 165


166 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


Volume 43, No. 12 | 167


Congratulations Hannah & Malieka+// 2012 Unanimous Youth National Champion: PB Hunter JOTR 13 and under 2012 Youth National Champion: PB Hunter JTR 13 and under 2013 Scottsdale Champion: PB Hunter JOTR and JTR 13 and under

2012 USEF Hunter Horse of the Year: Arabian Jr. Exhibitor - Grand National Champion

Arabian Horse Association’s #2 Purebred Hunter Horse for 2012 Hannah Feldman, Rider of Honor Champion

Nominated for AHT Reader’s Choice: PUREBRED HUNTER OF THE YEAR 2013

The Feldman family has been blessed to have these two beautiful girls in our lives. We wish them continued success.

www.arabian-training.com

168 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


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Volume 43, No. 12 | 169


170 | ArAbiAn A r A bi A nHorse Hor seTimes T i mes


Gene L aCroix:

A Look At A Horseman, Part 1 by Mary Kirkman

W

hen Gene LaCroix was honored with the APAHA Lifetime Achievement

Award last February in Scottsdale, everyone in the room—a wall-to-wall jam

that included most of the Arabian breed’s top professionals—rose to applaud him.

Over the years, LaCroix’s influence on the industry has been undeniable; from 1965

through the mid-1980s, he struck new ground and found success in nearly every major

aspect of Arabian horses. At one point, plenty of people wanted to ride on his coattails to whatever next goal he set, while at another, they blamed him for the downturn

in the late 1980s, saying that too much growth had come too fast, setting the stage

for the fall after the 1986 tax reforms. Time and distance have provided perspective, however, and it is worth noting that through it all, there was one thing no one ever

said, and that was that he was not a horseman. A horseman? Absolutely, everyone who knows him agrees. One of the best—the best for many. That was what grounded his

role in the breed. By the time that room rose in tribute, the acclaim was genuine. Gene LaCroix’s story is inextricably interwoven with that of his family’s Lasma

Arabian Stud, and he played a major role in its success. For sure, he was not alone; his father, Dr. Eugene E. LaCroix, was the inspiration in its breeding program, and his brother, Raymond, was one of its most formidable trainers and showmen. Even his sister Kathy, in the early years, was one of its headliners. But in the more than two decades of its influence, it was Gene who came to be its leader.

As with any story, there are the facts in black and white—and there are the more colorful memories and thoughts of the person who lived it.

Volume A PR 43, ILNo. 20 09 12 | 171


Gene LaCroix

in The BeGinninG When Gene LaCroix was born in the late 1940s, the Arabian horse industry in north America was just beginning to explode into the general population. The breed had been here in numbers since the late 19th century, and the decades preceding World War ii had seen some of its most historic breeders. However, there were not enough of them in any one area to generate much more than a piece of the action in all-breed competitions. After the war, that all changed, as a thriving community of owners congregated in southern California, where the first all-Arabian show was held in 1945. That is the world in which a young doctor named eugene e. LaCroix and his wife, mary Jean, started their family. it all began with a friendship between a couple of seattle physicians, LaCroix and Howard Kale, which developed through Arabian horses. it is fair to say that if Dr. Kale had not played matchmaker for his pal, the story of Gene LaCroix—and Kathy and ray, and probably Lasma, for that matter—would never have been written. but Kale thought well of both his friend and a private duty nurse he knew, and he introduced them. The next year the

two were married, and on December 30, 1947, their first child, Gene Jr., was born. A year later, Kathy arrived, and in 1955, raymond joined the family, all of them delivered by Dr. Kale. Years later, the LaCroixes and the Kales would run powerhouse Arabian facilities side-by-side on bell road in scottsdale, nearly next door to Paradise Park, the charming (if weather-challenged) show capital of the breed. but in the early days, as young families back in Washington, they were more likely to spend weekends prospecting for horses together. Gene recalls the trips, crammed into cars and pulling two-horse trailers that “may not even have been covered,” always on the lookout for a promising Arabian. “my father had a vision of what he thought these horses should be,” he recalls. “That was athletic and able to do various disciplines, but with obvious Arabian type. He had already identified with the horses in the Adolf schreyer paintings; he said, ‘That vision came from someplace; we have to recreate it.’” He did his best to see

Left: The youngest “Bedouin,” Gene LaCroix. Above: Kathy and Gene LaCroix at an early show.

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Gene LaCroix

what his father saw, to understand what went into making a good horse. Although they were breeding beautiful Arabians, he observes, they didn’t really begin to achieve their goal until they acquired *Bask—and a lot happened in the meantime. For one thing, everyone moved to Scottsdale in the mid-1950s, and for another, he made a splash in the show ring at an early age. “My sister and I could ride bareback and stuff, but Dad wanted us to take formal lessons,” he says. “So we did, and Kathy excelled much quicker—she won a big class at Scottsdale. I wasn’t getting ribbons, and I guess I was a little jealous (I was happy for her, but feeling sorry for myself). She really set the goal for me to figure out how to get better. I think Dad saw that, and he helped me out by making sure I had the opportunity to show a great horse in the Pacific Slope Championship.”

Rabab and Gene LaCroix, winning the 1958 Pacific Slope Championship in Three-Gaited English Pleasure.

That was 1958. The horse was Dr. LaCroix’s stallion Rabab, purchased from the Kellogg Ranch in 1944. Gene was 11 years old, and he rode Rabab to the show’s Three-Gaited Park Championship, which not only boosted his confidence, but taught him that he really liked winning. The following year, Dr. LaCroix hired Jerry Smola, a third-year student at Kellogg (now called Cal Poly Pomona), to train the family’s horses and polish the children’s riding skills. “I could hardly wait to get out of school and into the barn to work with Jerry,” LaCroix remembers. Smola is largely credited with giving him his start as a trainer. “He taught me that horses instinctively moved into pressure, and you could teach them to move away from pressure— basic stuff like that—that I still believe today. It’s the foundation of my training philosophy.”

Gene LaCroix with Silhoulette, Lot 1 of the Lasma Sale I, who sold for $56,000 in 1971.

That is how things stood when what Gladys Brown Edwards called “the Polish Renaissance” began in 1961.

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Gene LaCroix

The MaGiC of PoLand There had been no Arabian horses imported to the United states from Poland since 1938, but as a few candidates were acquired in england and some arrived here, American breeders became aware of the country’s potential as a source of bloodstock. Two, in particular, came to scottsdale in 1962, and Dr. LaCroix knew a turning point when he saw one. “We were super impressed with *muzulmanin and with sheila’s mare, *bachantka,” LaCroix says. “They just looked different. my dad had always tried to share information about pedigrees and what his beliefs were, and you could visualize the schreyer paintings when you saw *muzulmanin. i’m sure he and *bachantka were off the track, because all of them had been on the track, so when they hit that ring, they had a special presence.” That was enough to have Dr. LaCroix and Dr. Kale making travel plans, and they included Howie and Gene in the venture. The group stopped in england for a few days, where Dr. Kale purchased *silver Drift, and then headed on to Poland. To put the trip in historical context, it was just 17 years after the end of World War ii and Poland still reflected the effects of the war. only the year before, the berlin Wall had been erected, and the LaCroix/Kale visit took place around the time of the Cuban missile Crisis—so the dangers of the Cold War were very real. LaCroix recalls the trip vividly. “it was a big deal to get out of school,” he says. “The whole trip to Poland was exciting, but that was abstract, like, ‘We’re going behind the iron Curtain.’ At 14, you know, it probably sounded scarier to me than it really was, but there was the little intimidation thing about doing it.” They flew into Warsaw on Poland’s Lot Airlines, whose planes in those days were little more than buckets of bolts. And that was just the beginning; once there, they were surrounded by soldiers. “it was all military, guys in boots carrying guns, all that,” LaCroix says. “i’m sure

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even my dad was intimidated, and we were all just hoping the paperwork was set and we didn’t end up in jail for doing something wrong.” The next day, they were driven to Janów Podlaski state stud. “The only cars you saw on the road were government cars, and you didn’t see many of those,” he recalls, and adds that it was like going back in time. “it was cold and damp and cloudy, and the roads were lined on both sides with horses and wagons and people.” At Janów, they met Director Andrzej Krzysztalowicz. “i learned to really like him in later years,” he smiles, “but then, he was a scary old guy and very gruff, and didn’t speak a word of english. but he showed us the horses.” The story has been told and retold: one of the horses presented was just six weeks off the track—a highspirited bay stallion named *bask. “When we saw *bask, so full of himself, bouncing up and down with his hind legs way under him, and then jumping straight in the air with his neck up, and his beautiful eyes …” He pauses. “That was it.” (LaCroix chuckles that he also hit a personal milestone that day; the stud farm’s dinner included the obligatory vodka toasts and the Polish horsemen asked his father if he could join in on one, so his first “adult” drink celebrated their discovery of *bask.) Time would prove that it had been a landmark trip: among the horses imported were *bask, Dr. Kale’s *silver Drift, and an ethereal grey stallion that Dr. LaCroix acquired for Anne mcCormick named *naborr. For a teenager, however, life returned to normal when they got home. LaCroix went back to Phoenix’s Country Day school, worked on his riding with Jerry smola, and tried to learn more about training. He did not know that he was just two years away from becoming the youngest handler ever to win the U.s. national Championship in stallion Halter.


Gene LaCroix

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The Show rinG before he ever got to show *bask, however, Gene LaCroix had his eye on winning a national championship with the homebred Hajji baba, a son of rabab. At scottsdale in February, he and Hajji baba were selected for a two-horse work-off with the well-known saddlebred trainer bob Whitney. The 15-year-old kid didn’t win, but he knew it said a lot for his ability that he had been included, and he was gung-ho for october. it was not to be, though; in the arena at Lasma that summer, Hajji baba colicked and died with his head in Gene’s lap. Looking back now, LaCroix recalls candidly that as a child, he loved the “horse show thing” and had an eye for a horse, but whether or not he cared, personally, as much about the individual horses as he does now—maybe not. That came with time. The loss of Hajji baba, however, shook the whole family; years later, when Lasma’s in-house equine surgery was built, the memory of the lovely bay park horse was its foundation. in 1964, the legend began. *bask entered the show ring, handily winning the title of Champion stallion at scottsdale, and then trotted into the U.s. nationals ring in Dallas with 16-year-old Gene LaCroix on the lead. When they left, he was wearing the tri-color.

in 1966 came *Gdynia, who had come from Poland in utero in the 1962 importation, and who would become a standout broodmare as the dam of the stallions Cognac and Gdansk. “she was the first english pleasure horse i started training from scratch and showed after Jerry left,” LaCroix says. “she was a super-sweet mare who later went on to be a national champion in western.” The following year saw *muzulmanin in the winner’s circle, with LaCroix up for owner Charles Doner. “He was a beautiful horse, slightly horizontal to be an english horse back then, but very fluid,” the trainer recalls. “it wasn’t all about motion then. it was a lot about manners and duty and performance, and unfortunately, through no fault of his, he wasn’t the soundest horse, which made it difficult. but he was a wonderful horse to work with.” in 1968 came *Wirginia. “Probably one of the most gifted *naborr daughters in english,” he says. “Very upright, good shoulder, real good rear end. A delight to train and show.” And that was only part of the story; he would feature prominently in other disciplines as well. in those days,

That was just the start. Jerry smola went back to school in 1965, and Gene, who then became the farm’s principal trainer, was on the frontline to show not only its halter horses, but performance contenders as well. And his record over the next few years was nothing short of amazing: in english pleasure, he owned the national championship for the next four years. First came Lasma star, in 1965. smola had trained her, but it was Gene who fathomed the secret to winning. “i had figured out that the english pleasure class could be won by the horse that had the fastest, most balanced trot,” he says, “and the hand gallop was faster, and manners were probably more important back then than they are now. she couldn’t break three-quarter level, but she could trot uphill if she had to, and i had her trained impeccably to do a slow canter and a fast gallop.”

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Jerry Smola, winning for Lasma in the early 1960s.


Gene LaCroix

a national champion was not allowed to show again for another title in the division it had won, so there was a revolving door of stellar horses lengthening his list of credits. LaCroix made his name in the business so quickly and with such force that it is fair to ask how a teenager handled all the acclaim without becoming insufferable. “We didn’t win everything always,” he points out. “Mom and Dad were there, but Dad was always focused on everybody getting better and working harder, and getting the horses trained and shown and doing the best we could. And being good sports and staying within the rules. Of course, Mom was very much that way. Anybody’s individual effort was really more of a family effort, in all honesty. I might have been the one riding or holding the lead, but it was a whole effort to get us there. There was just always work to be done—and there were enough humbling experiences that brought you down to reality if you were getting a little high-headed.”

on Le Bask—but only after a tough ride against his sister, who claimed reserve aboard Fire Flame. “I’m not sure it shouldn’t have gone the other way,” he says frankly. Their competition remained, but as his career blossomed and she targeted the more mainstream course of college and marriage, she became her brother’s best catch rider. LaCroix’s significance in the Arabian industry, for all its foundation in training and showing, also came to encompass sales, syndications, registries and more, and as the 1970s opened, that was just beginning. On his to-do list at that point was a horse auction.

Also, no one was the king at home. With seven years between them, Raymond was too young to compete with his brother in the early days, but to this day, there are those who knew the family back then and observe that Kathy was the most elegant rider of the bunch. Even Gene nods with understanding. He remembers the 1970 U.S. National Championship in English Pleasure, which he won Top: Gene LaCroix on *Prowizja, 1968 U.S. National Champion in Park and broodmare extraordinaire: dam of U.S. National Champions in Park Ibn Prowizja (1976) and Cometgo (1978); U.S. National Champion in Formal Driving and Reserve in Park, Promotion; and champion sire Pro-Fire. Bottom: Bask Melody, 1976 U.S. National Champion Mare, with Gene LaCroix, and Ray LaCroix with Hask, 1973 U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallion and 1976 U.S. National Champion in English Pleasure. Volume A PR 43, ILNo. 20 09 12 | 177


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Those show-sToppinG Lasma saLes one absolute in the LaCroix household was that everyone attend college, and Gene did, training Arabians on the side. but after three years, he knew where his focus was, and it was his decision to leave school that indirectly precipitated the farm’s innovative horse sales. When he persuaded his parents to let him take a break, he said, “‘i’ll make you a deal. if you let me manage Lasma, in one year we’ll have our first profit year. if we don’t, i promise you that i will go back to school.’” Although not happy about it, they agreed, and he had to make good on his word. “i started thinking, ‘okay, how am i going to make this happen?’” he says. “And the thought came to me that we had to do an auction—but we had to dress it up.” He had attended the 1969 World’s Championship saddlebred show and been very impressed with trainer Tom moore (“he became my hero”), so he followed saddlebred magazines and noticed that there would be a dispersal of Knolland Farms horses at the American royal in Kansas City that november. so he was in the audience, and what he saw changed how things were done in Arabians. it was all there: a runway, the colored shavings, maybe even a band.

After the Lasma Sale III: Dr. LaCroix and Mike Nichols, who served as announcer, celebrate their success. 178 | ArAbiAn A r A bi A nHorse Hor seTimes T i mes

“so, i said, ‘This is the way we’re going to present our horses,’ because by this time our horses were trotting well,” he says. “‘We’ll pitch the tent, we’ll have a runway and colored shavings, we’ll have a band, and it will be a great way of selling horses.’ so, February 1971 we had our first sale and a profit year, and i didn’t go back to school.” in 1974, they added more bells and whistles and their gross doubled. Three years later, the only thing they feared was rain, so the Lasma sale Center was built (“the only time Dad went into debt”). broadway and film producer/director mike nichols, who had grown to love Arabians and become a good friend of Dr. LaCroix’s, was the announcer, and they gave away a Cadillac to the lucky bidder who put the gross over $1 million. That year, they offered two sales, the Lasma sale iii, which attracted $1,910,500, and the first *bask Classic, which raked in $822,900. That was a new offering, he notes, a sale set up just for clients with *bask-bred horses (up until then, the sale horses had been Lasma’s). “That was really for people to promote their farms and breeding programs,” he says, “and of course, it promoted us and *bask too.”

At the 1977 Lasma Sale III, Kathy LaCroix leads *Bask across the stage while Mike Nichols provides commentary.


Gene LaCroix

In 1979, they introduced the concept of an opening entertainment act. By that time, they were beginning to attract a celebrity clientele, one of whom was Al Jardine of the Beach Boys. As part of a horse deal, Jardine agreed that the Beach Boys would open the Lasma Sale IV. There was no preceding announcement; the audience simply sat down, the curtain opened, and one of the country’s top musical acts was on stage. It worked so well that a blowout opening became tradition—and miraculously, one in which the name of the featured stars never leaked out ahead of time. In the first half of the 1980s, Bob Hope and Sammy Davis were among those on stage—precursors of 1985’s legendary offering of The Pointer Sisters, whose “I’m So Excited” had the crowd dancing in the aisles and so fired up that Lot 1 sold for $1.5 million.

“I’m So Excited” might have described the Arabian horse industry at that point. By that time, Raymond LaCroix headed the Lasma training program, assisted by a roster of young trainers who would go on to astounding success in the breed. Dr. LaCroix ran the breeding program, Mary Jean LaCroix the equine surgery, and business people were in the office. There were four Lasma locations around the country, and the farm offered a stallion list that resembled a telephone directory. Gene LaCroix was at the top of his game on so many fronts that any real consideration might have whispered, “No one person can keep this up.” Or maybe it was, “This is too good to be true.” Next month: Showing, syndication, more innovation—and, in the end, finding a balance.

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U.S. nationaL ChampionS Shown By Gene L aCroix in haLter, enGLiSh pLeaSUre a nd park U.S. National Champion Stallions 1964 1976 1979 1989

*bask *el Paso *Aladdinn exceladdinn

U.S. National Reserve Champion Stallions 1970 1975 1980

*Gwalior *buszmen bey shah

U.S. National Champion Mares 1969 1970 1973 1976 1977

Fame Dancing Flame Fire music bask melody *Wizja

U.S. National Reserve Champion Mares 1972 1981

basquelle Alove-note

U.S. National English Pleasure Champions

1965 1966 1967 1968 1970 1972 1974 1975 1980 1993

Lasma star *Gdynia *muzulmanin *Wirginia Le bask basquina Fire music Afire FF summer storm Hucklebey berry

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U.S. National English Pleasure Reserve Champions

1973 1976 1978 1988 1989

basquelle mi Toska mark iV escapade FF spring sonnet *el Ghazi

U.S. National Park Champions 1968 1970 1973 1975 1976 1978 1979 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1996

1.

*Prowizja *el mudir The Judge mieczych ibn Prowizja Cometego Ambra eW natal miss Cognac scarlet Lace orans Adagio Zodiac matador orans Adagio Zodiac matador mHr nobility mHr nobility mHr nobility

1. *Wirginia, 1968 U.S.

2.

3.

Champoin English Pleasure

2. Ambra, 1979 U.S.

Champoin Park.

3. *FF Summer Storm, 1980 U.S. Champoin English Pleasure

4. Hucklebey Berry, 1993 U.S. Champoin English Pleasure

Facing Page: Orans Adagio, 1984 and 1986 U.S. National Champion Park

4.


Gene LaCroix

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Tom Moore

There are three men in my life that have had a great impact on me. They are my father, Dick Ames, and Gene LaCroix. Gene is the greatest horseman I have ever known—I cannot thank him enough for all that he has taught me. I am honored to say that he has been my mentor and good friend for over 28 years. I wish Gene and Erin all the best, in the years to come.

— Tom Moore

CEO Associated Mechanical Contractors, Inc.

Mike Whelihan

As a student in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, while reading the Arabian Horse Times magazine in the high school library, I came upon an article about Lasma Arabians featuring Gene LaCroix in Scottsdale, Ariz. Of course, it was 40 below at home and in Scottsdale, it showed Gene riding a magnificent Arabian in the warm sunshine. How I dreamt of someday being an Arabian horse trainer like Gene. The next time I saw Gene was at the Canadian Nationals in a warm-up ring training an Arabian to do things I only dreamed might be possible— but he was doing it. From that day on I began to ask Gene questions and attended many of his seminars. I asked him questions on training, showing and marketing—everything about the Arabian horse. His answers were always concise and thought-provoking. Gene had a huge influence on my training and career. Later on I joined Gene at Lasma and furthered my training. He trained through sound, old-school horsemanship principles, but added his special God-given talents to these methods. During the Lasma years, many great trainers learned their trade from Gene and are now some of the most acclaimed horsemen and trainers in many breeds today. You gave us a path to success. Thank you, Gene, for all you have done for me.

— Mike Whelihan 182 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

Mike Whelihan and Zodiac Matador winning 1984 Canadian National Champion Park Horse.


Gene LaCroix

Mitch Sperte

With Dr. LaCroix’s Lifetime Achievement Award, a heritage became immortal. Armed with his father’s drive, Gene utilized his unmatched talent, creativity and vision to catapult the Arabian horse into the National and International spotlight. In sports, great coaches are renowned for their coaching tree, whereby the coaches who have apprenticed under their guidance have gone on to success of their own. In our community, no horseman’s tree is more significant than Gene’s. The LaCroix family’s fingerprints remain a significant influence, and Gene’s contributions are unparalleled. I’m so proud to be a part of a fraternity of horsemen who have been mentored by Gene and I’m honored to be able to call him a friend.

— Mitch Sperte

bred. *Eukaliptus was there as well, on lease from Poland and several of Lasma’s other great *Bask sons such as Wisdom, Promotion and Bak. Gene demanded excellence from everyone, but no one worked harder than he did. I was managing the breeding program, as that was my passion—not training. To be able to spend dawn to dark and beyond, working with mares like Bask Melody, Gwendalyn, Silhouette, Ambra, Fame, Dancing Flame, *Wizja, *Busola—it was heaven on earth. We bred over 450 mares per season those first years before the move to Lasma East and it was the greatest open-air university on earth.

Cindy Reich

Working for Lasma Arabians in the early 1980’s was an education that could never be replicated. *Aladdinn had just been named U.S. National Champion Stallion, had been syndicated for 8.5 million dollars, and his first breeding season in the U.S. was at hand. In addition to Lasma’s own elite broodmare band, all of the best mares in the country were arriving daily to be

The knowledge Gene possessed he also shared, and I was like a sponge on those occasions when we could walk the pastures and talk about the mares and current foals. I can remember calling up to the house on occasion when a particularly exciting foal was born, and Gene would arrive—even after all of the horses he had seen—as excited as a kid on Christmas. I will be ever grateful to Gene and the LaCroix family for the experience gained and wisdom imparted.

— Cindy Reich Volume 43, No. 12 | 183


Gene LaCroix

Katie Garland

I’d heard people talk about Gene LaCroix but I had never met him until the summer of 2012. We asked Gene to come and see if we were on the right track with my English Futurity horse, ROL Divine Style, for U.S. Nationals. At first I was nervous to talk to him, it’s like, he is the god of English training. But I found him so down to earth and very soft spoken—nothing ever gets him wound up. My dad says we balance each other out because sometimes I can get really nervous and high strung, and Gene is always very quiet and relaxed sending that vibe to me. When asked to help us at Nationals, my dad laughed as he said, “Here Gene, you can help her, she will listen to you.” I look to Gene as my second dad in horse training. Anytime I need help, he is a call a way. Having success in the show ring and knowing that he is proud of me makes me want to continue to do my best.

I am honored to have Gene LaCroix in my life and look forward to making a lot more memories with him. Thanks for being there for me, Gene.

— Katie Garland

Greg Farrell

Mulawa Arabians was in its infancy when my parents and sister, Jane, and I met the LaCroix family in 1975. We were immediately impressed by the Lasma program and by the warmth and genuine interest of Dr. LaCroix, Mary Jean, Ray and Gene, in wanting to understand our goals and vision. From that trip, we purchased our foundation stallion, the Bask son, Ambition, who had an inestimable influence on my life and our breeding program; as did the Nabor daughter, Dwina, who four generations later, through her great granddaughter Parada, produced the 2013 Las Vegas World Cup Champion Junior Colt Prussia MI, sold by Mulawa to Al Mohamadia Stud. I spent my university holidays for a number of years with the LaCroix family, learning as much as I could during the Scottsdale sales, and their generosity was remarkable. Gene LaCroix is a man I have always admired for his extraordinary talent as a horseman, his drive and determination in establishing the Arabian as an industry, and for a willingness to take at times what seemed to be enormous risks in backing his judgement. The breed owes a great deal of gratitude to this true entrepreneurial spirit.

— Greg Farrell, Mulawa Arabian Stud 184 | ArAbiAn Horse Times

Ambition


Gene LaCroix

Mike Kevil

In 1977 I started working for Lasma Arabians. They hired me even though I had never shown a horse before. My first day, they asked me what my program was. I told them, “First I saddle the horse, and then I get on the horse.” They said, “You’re kidding, that’s it? You get on the first day?” I said, “Yeah, I’ll show ya’.” We took a colt to the round pen and 15 minutes later I was done. They said they might not get on a colt for 2 or 3 weeks. They told me about their program and I thought it was a lot of wasted time, until I saw the results. I never dreamed a horse could ride and feel the way Gene’s horses could. I have worked for and with some of the best horsemen in the world and I have yet to see anyone with the timing and feel that Gene LaCroix has. I still use those methods. He is blessed with being both smart and talented. His methods work for every breed and discipline. He’s been both a good friend and teacher. I can’t thank him enough for the time and the help he gave me.

— Mike Kevil

paramount. His creativity in designing programs and venues that would excite people and promote them to show and breed was consistent in every venture. He created a stage for Arabian horses that is as special as they are. Our horses are different from the rest and therefore offer an experience that is bigger, more exciting, and more emotional than any other breed. Gene built a stage worthy for the world to see them on and people did. My livelihood for over twenty years in advertising and promotion is based on Arabian horse lovers’ excitement and passion for their horses and he paved the way for that. If I have learned something that he may even have forgotten, I am better for it. Brandon Bessey Photo

Jenn Trickey

I feel everyone in the industry has a job today because of Gene. His tenacity and pure dedication to the Arabian horse has influenced everything from the way we look at conformation, to training techniques, to presentation to marketing. More personally, I feel so fortunate to have worked with Gene on several projects and promotions over the years, and horseman first, Gene’s ability to envision three steps forward from the norm was

Of course, praising Gene LaCroix would not be complete without saluting his family who supported and encouraged the entire “magic factory” of Lasma, and anyone who knows Erin and how hard she works, can understand how Gene is still able to contribute the way he does. Look around a horse show today … from our stall curtains to center ring activities, from big money futurity ride-offs to spectacular party presentations … all of it was influenced in some way, by Gene.

— Jenn Trickey Advertising & Equine Promotion Specialist Owner of Equine Communications & Partner in ArabianHorseGlobal. Volume 43, No. 12 | 185


Gene LaCroix

Joel Kiesner

Gene LaCroix ... a great horseman.

Pablo Picasso ... a great artist. Michael Jordan ... a great athlete. When someone is so good at something that their work inspires others for decades to strive to emulate ... genius. Frederic Remington, famous American sculptor and painter, wanted on his gravestone ... “He knew the horse.” There are few people in the world that understand that kind of dedication to understanding the horse. Gene LaCroix is one of them and he knows the horse. Congratulations, Gene.

— Joel and Ashton Kiesner

Gregg Shafer and Nancy Shafer

Volumes could be written about Gene LaCroix and you wouldn’t even scratch the surface of this complex man. What he has taught me about horses is amazing and it is such an honor to learn from the best. There are great trainers, there are great horsemen, and then there is Gene, who is truly in a class by himself. His knowledge is encyclopedic and his “ feel” is unparalleled. Within less than a stride, he can change your ordinary ride into a great ride. Demanding, yes, but never demeaning.

Gene is a wonderful friend and outstanding mentor who has helped me succeed, in and out of the show ring. No one deserves the Lifetime Achievement Award more! It was long overdue.

— Gregg Shafer

He’s simply the best, in so many ways.

— Nancy Shafer

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Gregg Shafer and Multi-National Champion REA My Allience (Allience x My Diamond Girl ASB), 2013 Scottsdale Champion Half-Arabian Park Horse.


Gene LaCroix

The Ames Family Dear Gene,

We cannot thank you enough, for what you have provided our family in the Arabian horse industry. For 40 plus years, we have admired what you and your family have achieved—you set the bar very high for everyone else to follow. We have enjoyed our time with you be it our horses in training, or having you assist us over the years on various different projects. It is more than a business association, it is a friendship that has provided us with some very good times and laughs. We have the utmost respect and admiration for all that you have done. Thank you for the memories and we look forward to more! Love, Dick, Lollie, and Lara

Leah Boyd and John Golladay Dear Gene,

Thank you so much for coming to Cedar Ridge and spending time working horses with us. We both have always been inspired by your showmanship, innovative training, and your vision for the Arabian breed. The insight we gained from your knowledge during your visit is continually helping us to hone our skills. Hearing some of your personal stories about the evolution of our industry inspires us to set our goals high. Our sincerest thanks, John and Leah

Volume 43, No. 12 | 187


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Volume 43, No. 12 | 189


Leaders Of The Times: May Calendar Feature

Apalo

by Mary Kirkman

Apalo ( Justify x Gloria Apal) 190 | ArAbiAn Horse TiMes


His pedigree, in a word, is ‘beauty,’” says Apalo’s trainer, Greg Hazlewood. The stallion’s sire, Justify, represents the mega-influence of Magnum Psyche and the most decorated halter mare in American show history, S Justadream—an intriguing blend of top halter talent from both, along with Justadream’s athletically-oriented sire line of Justafire DGL and Afire Bey V. All of that notwithstanding, however, it may be Apalo’s female heritage that offers the most potential in his career at stud. Apalo’s dam is the lovely Gloria Apal, 2011 Scottsdale Champion Apalo ( Justify x Gloria Apal), 2012 U.S. National Reserve Champion International Breeders Classic Mare 4-5 Year Old Stallion, with Greg Hazlewood. 6 and Over and Reserve Champion Senior Mare. A daughter of the highly-regarded Padrons World Cup Silver Supreme Championship, full owners. Psyche son Psytadel, she also recalls the extreme type Now, Elizabeth says, they are calling on their expertise in of SA Misha Apal, World Champion Filly at the Salon the dog world, where they are noted breeders of English du Cheval and All Nations Cup Champion Mare. bulldogs and she is an American Kennel Club and “What I like about that is, both of those mares are international show judge, to get up to speed in Arabian absolutely gorgeous,” says Hazlewood, “and as mother and breeding. “The concept of breeding and livestock isn’t new grandmother, they are close up in the pedigree.” to me,” she notes, “although it’s a different creature.” It all makes Apalo a source of substantial type, he In the meantime, Apalo has been burnishing his show explains. “He’s putting on a really beautiful face, large eyes, credentials. At U.S. Nationals last October, showing shortening the head and back, and overall improving their with Hazlewood, he was named U.S. National Reserve balance. In addition, he is one of the best-natured and Champion Stallion 4-5 Years Old, and he is now standing great-minded horses to be around.” his third season at stud. The stallion is a memorable entry into Arabians for In this formative year, the Milams are exploring all the owners Elizabeth and Jack Milam, whose chance visit to bloodlines that appear to work well with their young a Belvedere Farm open house (they were taking a break stallion, but as Elizabeth hears reports from mare owners from a dog show) has been well-publicized. They hadn’t with new Apalo foals, she maintains perspective. “I’m sure counted on becoming entranced with a 4-year-old coppera lot of stallion owners hear, ‘It’s the best I’ve ever seen,’” chestnut stallion, and neither expected to buy a young she says. “But I also know that with puppies, they all look gelding, but in the space of months, their Regency Cove perfect, so I’m waiting to see the foals as they grow up.” Farms was born. As excited railbirds at Scottsdale, they Based on his first foal crop, though, she admits to being watched when Apalo, their favorite from the open house, hopeful. “We’ve seen several really, really beautiful babies.” won his preliminary and then was the judges’ selection as International Arabian International Breeders Classic Greg Hazlewood, surveying the newly-minted yearlings, is Champion Senior Stallion. happy with what he sees—and he cites another benefit for breeders. “I think he is going to breed horses that will be That was February 2012. Not long after, they became very marketable worldwide.” n partners in the stallion and then, following his AHBA

Volume 43, No. 12 | 191


Representing The Arabian Breed:

mary mag Wilson by Kara Larson

P

ossessing a true talent and passion for the Arabian horse is a rare commodity in today’s decreasingly horse-centered society; however, these qualities have certainly found a home in mary mag Wilson. You will often see the Arizona 17-year-old showing at various shows around the country or grooming for stachowski Farms as well as others, all the while wearing a smile and enjoying herself with the Arabian horse. Although mary has been riding nearly her whole life, the trainer who introduced her to saddle seat was John rannenberg just six years ago. John takes credit for the introduction, but as for mary mag’s natural abilities as a rider, he directs the praise toward her inherent feel and talent on a horse. rannenberg shares his first meeting with mary mag. “We were at region 12 and i really didn’t know her, but she approached me by herself and told me she would be competing in the walk-trot hunt seat equitation. she went on to ask if i would head for her in the class. And i was thinking, ‘all right, this kid’s got some guts.’ And so i did. And from that point on, mary mag has impressed me as a young rider who really has a burning passion for riding. When i met her, she was a dressage and hunt seat rider, and i think starting that way, you develop a very strong leg and seat— she had the ability to really stick to a horse. That year we took her to Youth nationals and she was national champion walk-trot dressage. After the class, i took her up to the judges to say thank you and they were very impressed with her ability to present a horse at such a young age. i can’t take that credit—she was already well started when i got her, but i did introduce her to saddle seat riding. it was evident right away that she was going to be able to do

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that well, and she has beautifully. it’s been fun to watch the progression.” A saddle seat natural from the start, mary mag tried out for the inaugural Young rider Team hoping for the best possible outcome—to make the team—a dream that was realized. As the only Arabian breed competitor, mary mag is riding with other saddle seat riders on this Young rider Team in international competition. The purpose of Young riders is to groom the riders to better understand and eventually try out for the World Cup. Young rider Team coach barbe smith, owner of Cascade stable of new orleans, La. and coach of the 2010 World Cup Team speaks highly of mary mag’s horsemanship, adaptability, and character. “As the only Arabian rider on the team, i think mary mag is a great representative of the breed— she’s a fabulous kid and a fabulous rider. Coming from riding Arabians made her stand out mainly because she was unfamiliar with all the other kids, but because of her fantastic personality, she was able to get to know them all really well and show how great a rider and friend she is,” says barbe. in the competitions of the season for the team, barbe shares the success of their first year competing and where mary mag fits into the mix. “We had practice in new orleans in march, and then both teams won gold at William Woods invitational in April. There will be another invitational in new orleans in June. mary mag was the alternate on the Young riders Team that competed in march at William Woods, and now, she’s going to be riding on the team for this event. even before, as an alternate, which can be a tough position to be in, her personality was great—she was helpful to the other riders, and i am just continually impressed with what a good kid she is.”


Mary Mag Wilson

One-On-One with Mary Mag: what inspired you to try out for the young rider team? ever since i started riding saddle seat equitation, it was an immediate dream of mine to try out for the United states World Cup Team. The opportunity to apply for the inaugural UsA Young rider Team came about when i received an e-mail invitation. i realized that it would give me the opportunity to prepare for the trials of the World Cup team. The experience of representing the United states and competing as a team against other countries, such as south Africa and Canada was exciting. what horses or people have helped you most in making you the rider you are today? Without the support of ellen beard, Jonathan ramsay, and John rannenberg, i would not be the rider or person i am today. They have given me the opportunity to learn horsemanship not only by placing me on a plethora of horses, but in the way they coach and ride themselves. i have to thank them for always believing in me and pushing me to my fullest ability. As well as all the horses, for teaching me something every time i place my feet in the irons. Also my mom, without her support i would not have had the proper tools and guidance from these trainers to become the rider i am today. what has the process of applying for and joining the team been like? The process for applying for the team included a five minute video showing the rider execute three gaits at both directions and pattern work. The application also included three letters of recommendation and your accomplishments inside the show arena. Joining the team has been such an amazing experience and i am so fortunate to be a part of it. it has been great being able to meet riders from other breeds and all coming together and competing as a team with the same passion and ultimate goal. what has been the highlight of the experience for you? Winning the gold medal for both 3- and 5-Gaited in march but also, learning under the guidance of two incredible coaches: mandy martin and barbe smith.

Their guidance and coaching have taught me things i never knew i was capable of doing in my riding before. Another highlight is the opportunity to compete in new orleans this June. what have you taken away from the experience overall? being a part of the inaugural Young riders Team has been a once-in-a-lifetime experience that i am so thankful for. i have garnered such great friendships and memories, but most importantly, it has been a reminder of my passion for saddle seat equitation. â–

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Reprinted with the kind permission of

from April 2013 issue

DIAHC THE 10th ANNIVERSARY 21sh-23rd March 2013

DUBAI INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP z

by Fabio Brianzoni photos by Wiesław Pawłowski for filcoart.com & ArabianFlashlights.com

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appy Birthday, because this year from 21st to 23rd March the World Trade Center of DUBAI celebrated the 10th edition of this memorable show under the patronage of HH Sheikh Hamdan bin Rashid Al Maktoum - Deputy Ruler of Dubai. This venue is not only an important International world famous Show, but also represents a very important “show case” for artists, horse food suppliers, tack and riding accessories, etc. This year there was also a horse auction organized by Emirates Bloodstock. Our congratulations go to the Staff in the persons of Mr.Ziad Abdullah www.tuttoarabi.com


SHOWS AND EVENTS

DUBAI INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP Galadari, Mr. Qusai Obaidalla and Mrs.Jennifer Malton who is always very kind whilst struggling through paperwork and solving all sorts of problems. Mrs Christianne Chazel and Dominik Briot were also present to assist the Organizers and contribute to success of the event. The auction was a good idea and a great success for the local breeders. “Dubai Arabian Stud” brought along 69 horses and Al Shaqran Stud, Al Jazeera Arabian Stud, Al Shamokh Stud, Al Dhaffra Stud, Alfawares Stables and many other private individuals followed and took part. There is always a large number of registrations in venues organized in Arab Countries. The hospitality is always very welcoming, the locations beautifully elegant. 242 Arabian Horses took part in this show, but the actual total number of competitors in the Dubai International Arabian Horse Championship reached 371 with Racing, Ridden Classes and Endurance included.

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The timetable was cleverly arranged by the Organizers who made a great effort to finish all categories perfectly on time. The categories took place in the afternoons which was an excellent decision. This way, breeders and owners who had travelled from all over the world were able to visit the beautiful and futuristic city of Dubai and all it has to offer! Now, a few words about the Show. First of all the TOP FIVE regulation was applied. Eight judges were on the panel: Mrs. Joanne Lowe, Mrs. Anna Stojanowska, Mrs. Ann Norden, Mrs. Elisabeth Chat, Mr. Scott Benjami, Mr. Jerzy Bialobok, Mr. Konrad Detailleur and Mr. Willy Poth. Ring Master for the first time was Mr. Hassan Valsan. Away from his music, he entered the life of the show in close contact with the judges, handlers and horses. “Good Luck” to him! Early in the afternoon the first filly of category 1A for yearling fillies entered the show ring. The winner of this


SHOWS AND EVENTS

category was “BASMA AL MOHAMADIA” (Savio X Ballerina Bva) owned by HH Prince Abdullah bin Fahad (KSA). Second place was taken by “AJ BAHYA” (Marajj X Princess of Justice) owned by Ajman Stud (UAE). Section B of the yearling fillies category was won by “NAJDIYA AL ZOBAIR” (Eden C X Najdah Al zobair), bred and owned by Sheikh Sultan Mohamed Abdulla M. A.Althani (UAE). AJMANIAH OS” (Ajman Moniscione X Ab Nastrapsy) bred in Austria by Gestut Osterhof and owned by Ajman Stud (UAE), followed in second place. The winner of the two year old fillies category section A was won by “INSPIRED NAJLA” (Ajman Moniscione X Natalia) owned by HH Sheikh Amna Bint Abdul Aziz bin Humaid Al Nuaimi (UAE). Second place was taken by “EVANGELEEN IA” (Ever After Na X Love Shak ia) owned by Mr. Abdullah Al Subaie and Sons (KSA). Section B of the two year old fillies category was won by “AJ ASYAD” (Marwan Al Shaqab) bred and owned by Ajman Stud (UAE). Second came “GHANADIR AL ZOBAIR” (Mca Magnum Gold X Thoraya Al Zobair) owned by Sheikh Ahmed Abdulla Mohammed Althani. The three year old fillies category followed, with 19 horses competing. First place in this busy category was assigned to AJ SIYADAH” ( Vervaldee X Sweet Caroline LL) owned by Ajman Stud (UAE). Second place was taken by “ UL SID PARMA” (El Sid X Ca Kupona) owned by HRH

Prince Saud bin Sultan bin Saud Alsaud (KSA). The 4/6 year old mares category was a show case where we were able to admire top quality international horses. Two points alone separated the 7 mares. The winner was “ F. M. GLORIA” (Wh Justice X Psity Of Angels) owned by Sheikh Abdulla bin Mohammed Ali Althani (UAE). Second place was assigned to “FT SHAELLA” (Shael Dream Desert X Soul Pretty Tgs) owned by Dubai Arabian Horse Stud. The 7/9 year old mares category was taken by “EMANDORIA” (Gazal Al Shaqab X Emanda) purchased from the Polish Stud by Ajman Stud (UAE). Second place for HCE MAGDONNA” (Ab Magnum X Sha Bint Padron) owned by HE Sheikh Abdullah bin Mohammed Ali Al Thani. The 6th and last female category was won by “ EMIRA” (Laheeb X Embra), with six 20s - another beautiful mare purchased from Michalow and owned by Ajman Stud (UAE). Second place was taken by “LUMIAR BINT BALZAC” (Lumiar Balzac X Supereme Foccus) owned by Dubai Arabian Horse Stud (UAE). It should be noted that because of limited space, only the first two horses to qualify have been named although the first five actually entered the final Championship. All the relative names can be found on http://www.diahc.ae . The second day of the Show (22nd March) was the time to judge the male participants starting with Section A and colts Volume 43, No. 12 | 197

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born in 2012. The winner was “NASHIMI AL HAWAJER” (Marajj X Maniba Bint Ibn Narav) bred and owned by Dr. Ghanem Mohamed Obaid Alhajri (UAE). Second place was taken by “BARAKAH AL ZOBAIR” (Marwan Al Shaqab X Thoraya Al Zobair) bred and owned by Sheikh Abdullah bin Mohammed Ali Al Thani (UAE). Section B of the yearling colts category was won by “BAD’E AL HAWAJER” (Marajj X Valentyna F) with 91,13 points, making the day for his owner Mr. Abdullah Al Subaie and Sons. Second place was assigned to “BS RAEED” (Debowiec X jj Mona Lisa), bred and owned by Al Bustan Stables (UAE). In the 2 year old colts category, 5 horses competed over 1.5 points. The winner, with 92,63 points, was “ASCOT DD” (Glorius Apal x Lady Nina DD) owned by HRH Prince Abdulaziz bin Ahmed bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (KSA). Second place, with 92,38 points, for “DESIGN FOR LIFE” (Designed X Lianna) bred in England by the Rhiannon Jones & Stuart Bros. and owned by Abdullah Al Subaie and Sons. The following category with a great score of 93,63 points was taken by “EKS ALIHANDRO” (Marwan Al Shaqab X Ofw Psylhouette) owned by HRH Prince didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didaAbdulaziz bindidascalie Ahmeddidascalie bin Abdulaziz Al Sauddidascalie (KSA), scalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didafollowed didascalie by “S.M.A.MAGIC ONE”didascalie (Psytadel X Majidah scalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie Bint Pacha) owned by Sheikh Abdullah bin Mohammed didascalie didascalie didascalie

Ali Althani (Uae), in second place. Finally the stallions categories – the highlight of the Show. 19 stallions entered the ring for the 4/6 years old category. The winner was “REVOLUTION” (Padrons Psyche X Queen Victoria Ga) owned by Abdullah Al Subaie and Sons (KSA), just half a point ahead of “FAKHR AL KHALEDIAH” (Marquis Cahr X Barah Al Khalediah), bred and owned by HRH Prince Khaled bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz (KSA). The last category of this exciting day was for stallions 10 years and older. The winner was “MA SHADOW EL SHER” (El Sher-Mann X Calyenna El Jamaal). This beautiful stallion is one of the breeding jewels of Dubai ArabianHorse Stud (also his owner). Second place was assigned to “BS PAPARAZZI” (Kar Papageno X Sivka) owned by Abdul Mohsen bin Abdul-Malik Al Al-Sheikh. This brought an end to the second day of work for the team of judges. Meanwhile, the Endurance and Ridden Categories (also divided into males and females) had taken place in the morning. Now the most difficult part: the final Championship. It is always hard to decide who is to receive the GOLD, SILVER didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didaor BRONZE medals, didascalie but the didascalie decision didascalie of assigning this scalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascaliejob didascalie didascalie didascalie didajudgesdidascalie leaves no doubts didascalie and balances difficult to eight scalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie didascalie the decisions made.didascalie didascalie didascalie

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DUBAI INTERNATIONAL ARABIAN HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP

YEARLING FILLIES: Gold “NAJDIYA AL ZOBAIR” Silver “AJMANIAH OS” Bronze “BASMA AL MOHAMADIA” YEARLING COLTS: Gold “BAD’E AL HAWAJER” Silver “NASHMI AL HAWAJER” by Simone Leo z photosAL byZOBAIR” Gigi Grasso Bronze “BARAKAH FILLIES: Gold Medal “AJ ASYAD” Silver ”AJ SIYADAH” Bronze “INSPIRED NAJLA” esto finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo COLTS:finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testoALIHANDRO” finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo Gold “EKS finto testo fintoDD” testo finto testo finto testo finto testo Silver “ASCOT finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo Bronze “S.M.A.MAGIC ONE” finto testo. q MARES: Gold “EMANDORIA” Silver “FM GLORIAA” Bronze “FT SHAELLA”

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The Stallions Championship is always the most exciting part of the event. The Judges, on the 10th Anniversary of this great show, nominated Champion Stallion: “BAANDEROS”. Silver “REVOLUTION” Bronze “IM BAYARD CATHARE” Thus we reached the end of the tenth edition of an amazing show that attracts breeders and owners from all over the world. As always, Tutto Arabi was there to capture the beautiful images and the results for our affectionate readers and to spread the word about this important international event. Special thanks to the Organizers for their exquisite hospitality and to all the public present on this occasion. Don’t miss the next (eleventh) edition of DIAHC. q esto finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo finto testo. q

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At this time last year, those of us who were planning the

inaugural Arabian Horse Celebration were just hoping that it would live up to its potential. Fast forward to now, and the goal is to build on the tremendous momentum of 2012.

horses and visitors. We found that people wanted to support an event that was fun and educational, served a good cause, and offered prize money (half of all entry fees was paid back to successful competitors). And I think the caliber of competition for a first-time show impressed everyone; many of our titlists went on to national honors. Based on all of that, it is not surprising that the feedback we’re getting now is that this year, the show’s numbers will increase. Of course, we want it to be better than ever. Because our priority is to respond to what our exhibitors ask for, we are adding select rider classes and 3-year-old futurities in all performance disciplines. The rest of the lineup will be retained, with the exception of the liberty event.

For those who came to Freedom Hall last year, the Celebration was even more than we expected. More than 300 horses and 20,000 spectators showed up, and the enthusiasm was infectious. Horses came from all over this country and Canada, and we welcomed many international

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ArAbiAn Horse CelebrAtion 2013 We also are changing our seminar schedule. The demvonstration/education part of the Celebration got great reviews in 2012, but in 2013 will be moved to Thursday and Friday mornings to better accommodate everyone. Educational seminars will be held during the lunch breaks. And our program of tours and activities for youth groups will be continued; again, these entrylevel introductions to horses are available by appointment Wednesday through Friday, and on Saturday at set times with no appointment necessary. One of the most popular aspects of the Celebration in 2012 was our Stallion Row, and what an incredible success that was! Eighteen sires were on view at daily presentations, complete with cocktail parties, and on either Friday or Saturday night in Freedom Hall. Our stallion owners told us that they saw an increased interest in breeding, and many sold breedings. Speaking of cocktail parties, expect our Churchill Downs opening gala again. It was exciting and fun, and great for our charity—which brings me to one of this year’s great feel-good stories. Our charity in 2013 is a Louisville favorite: Home of the Innocents, a 130-year-old

organization which offers short- and long-term care for abused, abandoned and neglected youth. The Home also works with medically fragile children, and provides support for autistic youngsters. Who can’t get behind helping children find better lives? We are proud to earmark some of our profits for that cause. Finally, back by popular demand will be our shopping expo. It was 50 vendors strong in 2012, and early indicators are that it will be even bigger this year. So, preparations for the 2013 Celebration are underway. If you are interested in joining us, September 18-21, we welcome your participation as exhibitors, benefactors, sponsors or spectators. And don’t forget, if you want to reserve one of Freedom Hall’s skyboxes—unmatched in any other venue—please call as soon as possible, because we expect to sell out in 2013. Please check out our website, www.arabianhorsecelebration. com, for the various ways you can be a part of the Arabian Horse Celebration Event. Give us a call, and make plans to enjoy the hottest new show on the calendar. n

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Calendar Of Events Items for the calendar are run FREE of charge on a space-available basis. Calendar listings are subject to change; please confirm dates and locale before making your plans or reservations. MAIL notices to Arabian Horse Times, Attention: Charlene Deyle, P.O. Box 69, Jordan, MN 55352; phone 612-816-3018 or e-mail: charlened@ahtimes.com. *Due to the intrinsic nature of these shows, Arabian Horse Times cannot be held accountable for their validity.

Regional championships May 29-June 2, 2013, Region 9 Championship, Fort Worth, Texas. Contact: Melanni Hershberger, 480-443-3372. May 29-31, 2013, Region 11 Dressage, Hunter/ Jumper & Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. May 30-June 2, 2013, Region 1 Championship, Del Mar, California. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. June 6-8, 2013, Region 8 Championship, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. June 8-9, 2013, Region 6 Offsite Sport Horse Championship, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. June 13-16, 2013, Region 10 Championship, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Mary Tronson, 763-755-1698. June 14-16, 2013, Region 13 Dressage/Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Edinburgh, Indiana. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 18-22, 2013, Region 4 Championship, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. June 19, 2013, 1st Annual Pacific Coast Breeders Cup ATH Yearling Classes, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: Aude Espourteille, deorfarms1@aol.com June 20-23, 2013, June 13 Championship, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 21-23, 2013, Region 2 Championship, Santa Barbara, California. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. June 22, 2013, Region 10 Working Western Off-Site Championship, Cannon Falls, Minnesota. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. June 27-30, 2013, Region 14 Championship, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. June 28-30, 2013, Region 6 Championship, Rapid City, South Dakota. Contact: Becky McAllister, 406-861-4929. 206 | ARABIAN HORSE TIMES

June 29-30, 2013, Region 3 Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Kelly Wilson, 530-383-4935. June 29-30, 2013, Region 4 Sport Horse Offsite Championship, Sherwood, Oregon. Contact: Nancy Goertzen, 559-625-2631. July 4-7, 2013, Region 15 Championship, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Martin Kleiner, 717-507-5474. July 4-7, 2013, Region 11 Championship, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. July 5-14, 2013, Region 5 Championship, Monroe, Washington. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. July 9-13, 2013, Region 3 Championship, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. July 10-13, 2013, Region 16 Championship, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. July 12-14, 2013, Western Canadian Breeders Championship, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. Contact: Cheryl Sproule, 306-752-4240. July 17-20, 2013, Region 18 Championship, London, Ontario, Canada. Contact: Dan Cross, 519-657-6133. July 23-27, 2013, Region 17 Championship, Langley, British Columbia, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. August 2-4, 2013, East Coast Championship, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Pamela McDermott, 770-728-4383.

Shows MAy May 23-26, 2013, Buckeye Sweepstakes, Columbus, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. May 24-26, 2013, SCHAA Arabian Show, Temecula, California. Contact: Nancy Harvey, 626-355-9101. May 24-26, 2013, IEAHC Memorial Day Classic A and B Show, Spokane, Washington. Contact: Lois Rice, 509-291-3413. May 24-26, 2013, Spindletop Spring Arab A and B Show, Katy, Texas. Contact: Sherri Re, 281-513-5745. May 24-26, 2013, The Badger Classic, Jefferson, Wisconsin. Contact: Pamela Scoggins, 217-369-7753. May 24-26, 2013, AHC of CT Horse Show, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Beth Barnes, 860-302-2061.

May 25-26, 2013, Road Runner Sport Horse Show I, Tucson, AZ. Contact: Rosemary Panuco, 520-797-6921. May 25-26, 2013, Iowa Memorial Weekend A and B Show, Des Moines, Iowa. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. May 29-30, 2013, Region 1 Pre-Show, Del Mar, California. Contact: Jean Beck, 559-642-2072. May 30, 2013, MSU Showcase One Day Show, East Lansing, Michigan. Contact: Sally Epps, 920-992-3293. May 31-June 2, 2013, Showtime 2013, East Lansing, Michigan. Contact: Sally Epps, 920-992-3293. June June 1-2, 2013, Arabian and Sport Horse Celebration, Auburn, Washington. Contact: Kaye Phaneuf, 503-651-3037. June 1-2, 2013, Illinois/Arab, Inc. All Arabian Show, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. June 1-2, 2013, Virginia Arabian Sport Horse Show, Doswell, Virginia. Contact: Coleman Smith, 757-876-0989. June 1-2, 2013, NC PAHA Arabian Show A and B, Hughesville, Pennsylvania. Contact: Patricia McQuiston, 570-924-4836. June 5, 2013, AHA Region 8 Lead In Show, Denver, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. June 6-9, 2013, WA Midsummer Classic A and B Show, Monroe, Washington. Contact: Betty Engleman, 360-425-7798. June 7, 2013, Aurora 4/5 Qualifier A and B Show, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. June 7-8, 2013, Aurora Region 6 Qualifier, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. June 7-9, 2013, Gold Coast Arabian Show, Watsonville, California. Contact: Nancy Goertzen, 559-625-2631. June 7-9, 2013, Eastern Classic, Hamburg, New York. Contact: Lindsey Hager, 716-481-4907. June 7-9, 2013, Aurora Arabian Summer Show, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Contact: Marion Enders, 403-227-0538. June 8, 2013, NCAHA Summer Sport Horse One Day Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. June 8-9, 2013, Medallion I A and II B Show, Wilmington, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. June 9, 2013, NCAHA Summer Dressage One Day Show, Raleigh, North Carolina. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216.


Calendar Of Events

June 12, 2013, Region 10 Pre-Show, St. Paul, Minnesota. Contact: Mary Tronson, 763-755-1698. June 13-16, 2013, Hoosier Horse Classic, Edinburgh, Indiana. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 13-16, 2013, Blue Ridge Arab Classic I A and B, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marie Taylor, 804-314-5216. June 14-15, 2013, Region 12 Youth Jamboree, Clemson, South Carolina. Contact: Nancy Baker, 828-305-4023. June 14-16, 2013, NJ HAHA Classic A and B Show, Allentown, New Jersey. Contact: Joan Mitch, 610-914-7008. June 15-16, 2013, Island Classics Arabian Horse Show, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Contact: Wendy Don, 250-722-0162. June 15-17, 2013, Region 4 Pre-Show, Nampa, Idaho. Contact: Patricia Ann Hough, 253-847-8842. June 19, 2013, Region 13 Pre-Show A and B, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. June 19-20, 2013, Region 2 Pre-Show, Santa Barbara, California. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. June 20-23, 2013, The North Central Working Western Horse Celebration, Cannon Falls, Minnesota. Contact: Sandra Woerle, 715-939-0562. June 22-23, 2013, Region 10 Sport Horse & Dressage Offsite Championship, Waukesha, Wisconsin. Contact: Candy Ziebell, 262-363-3640. June 26, 2013, Region 14 Silverama, Lexington, Kentucky. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. June 27-28, 2013, Pacific Coast Arabian Sport Horse Classic, Elk Grove, California. Contact: Annette Wells, 530-344-1706. June 27-29, 2013, AHANE 59th Arabian Horse Show, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Lurline Combs, 603-627-8645. June 28-30, 2013, Arabians In Motion Sport Horse Classic, Sherwood, Oregon. Contact: Nancy Goertzen, 559-625-2631.

June 28-30, 2013, Pennsylvania Arab Junior Amateur Games, Centre Hall, Pennsylvania. Contact: Patricia McQuiston, 570-924-4836. July July 3, 2013, Region 11 Pre-Show A and B, Springfield, Illinois. Contact: Gary Paine, 641-466-3320. July 3, 2013, Markel Firecracker Classic, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Marilyn Norton, 715-514-5478. July 7-9, 2013, Region 3 Last Chance Qualifying Show, Reno, Nevada. Contact: Sharon Richards, 916-645-2288. July 10, 2013, Region 16 Hunter Jumper Qualifier, West Springfield, Massachusetts. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. July 13-14, 2013, Road Runner Sport Horse Show II, Tucson, AZ. Contact: Rosemary Panuco, 520-797-6921. July 13-14, 2013, OVAHA Summer Sizzler I and II, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. July 27-28, 2013, Pas De Deux Arabian Sport Horse A and B Show, Sherwood, Oregon. Contact: Kaye Phaneuf, 503-651-3037. August August 1, 2013, Eastern Arab Horse Show, Lexington, Virginia. Contact: Pamela McDermott, 770-728-4383. August 2-4, 2013, Daffodil Summer Show, Payallup, Washington. Contact: Linsey O’Donnell, 253-988-4265. August 2-4, 2013, WAHA August Show, Jefferson, Wisconsin. Contact: Jan Lerud, 715-488-2834. August 9-11, 2013, Georgia AHA Summer Classic, Conyers, Georgia. Contact: Jean Buddin, 228-826-1486. August 18, 2013, ASAAD Summer Fun One Day Show, Valparaiso, Indiana. Contact: Jennifer Dresdow, 260-444-2066. August 23-25, 2013, New York State Fair, Syracuse, New York. Contact: Tari Weston, 315-695-1332.

August 23-september 2, 2013, Oregon State Fair, Salem, Oregon. Contact: Roxanne Hood, 831-637-8510. August 30-september 1, 2013, Reichert Arabian Celebration, Fort Worth, Texas. Contact: Nancy Harvey, 626-355-9101. August 30-september 1, 2013, WMAHA Fall Classic, Mason, Michigan. Contact: Jean Hedger, 937-434-6114. August 30-september 1, 2013, Silver Spur All Arabian, Hamburg, New York. Contact: Lindsey Hager, 716-481-4907. August 31, 2013, One Day Show @ Latigo, Elbert, Colorado. Contact: Jo Anne Read, 303-648-3261. August 31-september 1, 2013, OHAHA Fall Show B, Springfield, Ohio. Contact: Donna Auber, 330-274-2039. August 31-september 2, 2013, Iowa Fall Classic, Des Moines, Iowa. Contact: Laurie Persson, 920-568-9073.

NAtionAls EvEnts July 20-27, 2013, Youth Nationals, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Contact AHA: 303-696-4500. August 12-17, 2013, Canadian Nationals, Brandon, Manitoba, Canada. Contact AHA: 303-696-4500. september 18-22, 2013, Sport Horse Nationals, Lexington, Virginia. Contact AHA: 303-696-4500. october 18-26, 2013, U.S. Nationals, Tulsa, Oklahoma. Contact AHA: 303-696-4500.

IntERnAtionAls EvEnts

*Go to www.ecaho.org for international Shows and information.

Visit www.ahtimes.com for a calendar view of these dates.

www.ahtimes.com Volume 43, No. 12 | 207


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Volume 43, No. 12 | 209


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w w w. a htimes.c om 210 | ArAbiAn Horse Times


Index Of Advertisers

A ABCCA.......................................................................................................188 Abel Family, The ...........................................................48Tutto (98), 99, 100 Adandy Farm ..........................................................................................46, 47 AHT Arabians Of The Southeast ................................................................33 AHT Egyptian Event Show Coverage........................................ 16Tutto (66) AHT Favorite Products ..............................................................................203 AHT Inc. ....................................................................................................194 AHT Subscriptions....................................................................... 14Tutto (64) Al Shaqab Stud ......................................................................................IFC, 1 Aljassimya Farm..............................................................................................5 Arabian Horse Celebration Event ..............................................12Tutto (62) Arabians International ......................................................10-11Tutto (60, 61) B Beloveds Farm .......................................................................... 50, 1Tutto (51) C Campbell Arabians ..............................................................................110-113 Caruth Arabians .........................................................................................189 Cedar Ridge Arabians, Inc........................................................ 10, 11, 42, 43 Chase Harvill Training Centre..........................................................142, 143 Conway Arabians ..........................................................................................48 Cortese Arabians.........................................................................................133 D Daniel Training Center ......................................................................134, 135 Deor Farms Arabians.....................................................48Tutto (98), 99, 100 Desert Heritage Subscriptions ...................................................................105 E Estancia Las Rosas Arabes....................................................... 212, IBC, BC F Feldman Family, The..................................................................................168 Flood Show Horses.............................................................................136, 137 Freedom Ranch LLC .............................................................................44, 45 Freewill Farm ..............................................................................................165 Frierson Atkinson .......................................................................................208 G Garlands ......................................................................................................132 H Hat Lady, The.............................................................................................209 Hegg, Mrs. Mickey ....................................................................................209 I Il Paradiso Arabian Stud ....................................................................102, 103 K Kiesner Training ........................................................................ 34, 35, 38, 39 L Live Oak Arabians ..............................................................................108, 109 Lowe Show Horse Centre ..................................................................166, 167

M Maroon Fire Arabians ..................................................................FC, 32, 209 Midwest ........................................................... IFC, 1, 7-9, 8-9Tutto (58, 59) Mike Neal Training Center ...................................................................44, 45 Mittenthal, John & Judy...............................................................................40 O Oak Ridge Arabians ............................................................ 8-9Tutto (58, 59) P P & S Enterprises, Inc. ...............................................................................208 Palmetto Arabians ..............................................................................162, 163 Pay-Jay Arabians .........................................................................................209 R.O. Lervick Arabians .................................................................. 40, 41, 208 Rae-Dawn Arabians ............................................................ 6-7Tutto (56, 57) Rattner Bloodstock, LLC ..................................................................144, 145 RBC Show Horses, LLC ...........................................................................164 Regency Cove Farms ...................................................................................49 Reilich, Bill & Shirley ............................................................................34, 35 S Schneiders Saddlery .................................................................................... 169 Shafer Arabians .......................................................................................12, 13 Shea Stables ...................................................................................FC, 32, 209 Show Season................................................................................................107 Silver Stag Arabians................................................................................14, 15 Smoky Mountain Park Arabians LLC ......................................................2, 3 Southwest Farm Services............................................................................208 Starline Arabians.....................................................................................36, 37 Stone Ridge Arabians .....................................................................................7 T TA Mozart Futurity ....................................................................15Tutto (65) Ted Carson At Butler Farms Training Center................... 4-5Tutto (54, 55) The Brass Ring, Inc. ...........................................................................138, 139 Trowbridge’s Ltd. ................................................................................140, 141 Tutto Arabi ..........................................................................................104, 106 U Uniglobe Select Arabians ............................................................13Tutto (63) V Verhage Farms.....................................................................................166, 167 Verona 2013.................................................................................................101 Vicki Humphrey Training Center .....................................................130, 131 Villa Del Cavallo................................................................ 1-8Cavallo (67-74) W Wilkins Livestock Insurers ........................................................................209

Volume 43, No. 12 | 211


His incredible future is the result of a legendary past.

Shanghai EA x Essence of Marwan EA

2013 ArAbiAn breeders World Cup Junior ChAmpion Colt of 2011 silver supreme ChAmpion Junior stAllion 2013 sCottsdAle ChAmpion internAtionAl ArAbiAn breeders tWo-YeAr-old Colt 2012 u.s. nAtionAl ChAmpion YeArling Colt Thank you, Ted Carson, for your dedication and hard work with Excalibur EA! Princess Laetitia d'Arenberg Florida, Uruguay

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Arabian Horse Times Vol. 43, No. 12  

May 2013

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